WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer molecular genetics

  1. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention

  2. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  3. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  4. Endometrial cancer : from a molecular genetic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Smid-Koopman (Ellen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe first observations indicative of a role of genetic factors in carcinogenesis were made as early as 1912, when Rous demonstrated that a filterable agent (i.e. virus) could induce cancer in chicken (Rous 1965). In 1914, Boveri postulated a "genetic" theory on carcinogenesis by

  5. Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer: Genetics and Molecular Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ceu; Camargo, M C; Leite, Marina; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Rabkin, Charles S; Machado, José C

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most incident and the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for this disease. Gastric cancer is the final outcome of a cascade of events that takes decades to occur and results from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes are crucial for tumor cells to expedite and sustain the array of pathways involved in the cancer development, such as cell cycle, DNA repair, metabolism, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune surveillance. Comprehensive molecular analyses of gastric cancer have disclosed the complex heterogeneity of this disease. In particular, these analyses have confirmed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer is a distinct entity. The identification of gastric cancer subtypes characterized by recognizable molecular profiles may pave the way for a more personalized clinical management and to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for screening, prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of gastric cancer progression.

  6. Implication of Gastric Cancer Molecular Genetic Markers in Surgical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsova, Marina V; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Tanas, Alexander S; Bykov, Igor I; Zaletaev, Dmitry V; Rudenko, Viktoria V; Glukhov, Alexander I; Kchorobrich, Tatiana V; Li, Yi; Tarasov, Vadim V; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated aberrant methylation of genes CDH1, RASSF1A, MLH1, N33, DAPK, expression of genes hTERT, MMP7, MMP9, BIRC5 (survivin), PTGS2, and activity of telomerase of 106 gastric tumor samples obtained intra-operatively and 53 gastric tumor samples from the same group of patients obtained endoscopically before surgery. Biopsy specimens obtained from 50 patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis were used as a control group. Together with tissue samples obtained from different sites remote to tumors, a total of 727 samples have been studied. The selected parameters comprise a system of molecular markers that can be used in both diagnostics of gastric cancer and in dynamic monitoring of patients after surgery. Special attention was paid to the use of molecular markers for the diagnostics of malignant process in the material obtained endoscopically since the efficacy of morphological diagnostics in biopsies is compromised by intratumoral heterogeneity, which may prevent reliable identification of tumor cells in the sampling. Our data indicated that certain molecular genetic events provided more sensitive yet specific markers of the tumor. We demonstrated that molecular profiles detected in preoperative biopsies were confirmed by the material obtained intra-operatively. The use of endoscopic material facilitates gastric tumors pre-operative diagnostics, improving early detection of gastric cancer and potential effective treatment strategies.

  7. Genetic Alterations in the Molecular Subtypes of Bladder Cancer: Illustration in the Cancer Genome Atlas Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Ochoa, Andrea; McConkey, David J; Aine, Mattias; Höglund, Mattias; Kim, William Y; Real, Francisco X; Kiltie, Anne E; Milsom, Ian; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-09-01

    Recent whole genome mRNA expression profiling studies revealed that bladder cancers can be grouped into molecular subtypes, some of which share clinical properties and gene expression patterns with the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer and the molecular subtypes found in other solid tumors. The molecular subtypes in other solid tumors are enriched with specific mutations and copy number aberrations that are thought to underlie their distinct progression patterns, and biological and clinical properties. The availability of comprehensive genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other large projects made it possible to correlate the presence of DNA alterations with tumor molecular subtype membership. Our overall goal was to determine whether specific DNA mutations and/or copy number variations are enriched in specific molecular subtypes. We used the complete TCGA RNA-seq dataset and three different published classifiers developed by our groups to assign TCGA's bladder cancers to molecular subtypes, and examined the prevalence of the most common DNA alterations within them. We interpreted the results against the background of what was known from the published literature about the prevalence of these alterations in nonmuscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers. The results confirmed that alterations involving RB1 and NFE2L2 were enriched in basal cancers, whereas alterations involving FGFR3 and KDM6A were enriched in luminal tumors. The results further reinforce the conclusion that the molecular subtypes of bladder cancer are distinct disease entities with specific genetic alterations. Our observation showed that some of subtype-enriched mutations and copy number aberrations are clinically actionable, which has direct implications for the clinical management of patients with bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  9. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.R.; Krontiris, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the authors review new findings concerning the molecular genetics of malignant melanoma in the context of other information obtained from clinical, epidemiologic, and cytogenetic studies in this malignancy. These new molecular approaches promise to provide a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of melanoma, thereby suggesting new methods for its treatment and prevention

  10. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Vital Oncogenes and a New Molecular Genetic Paradigm for Cancer Initiation Progression and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been declared repeatedly that cancer is a result of molecular genetic abnormalities. However, there has been no working model describing the specific functional consequences of the deranged genomic processes that result in the initiation and propagation of the cancer process during carcinogenesis. We no longer need to question whether or not cancer arises as a result of a molecular genetic defect within the cancer cell. The legitimate questions are: how and why? This article reviews the preeminent data on cancer molecular genetics and subsequently proposes that the sentinel event in cancer initiation is the aberrant production of fused transcription activators with new molecular properties within normal tissue stem cells. This results in the production of vital oncogenes with dysfunctional gene activation transcription properties, which leads to dysfunctional gene regulation, the aberrant activation of transduction pathways, chromosomal breakage, activation of driver oncogenes, reactivation of stem cell transduction pathways and the activation of genes that result in the hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, a novel holistic molecular genetic model of cancer initiation and progression is presented along with a new paradigm for the approach to personalized targeted cancer therapy, clinical monitoring and cancer diagnosis. PMID:27649156

  11. Molecular and genetic epidemiology of cancer in low- and medium-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and molecular factors can play an important role in an individual's cancer susceptibility and response to carcinogen exposure. Cancer susceptibility and response to carcinogen exposure can be either through inheritance of high penetrance but rare germline mutations that constitute heritable cancer syndromes, or it can be inherited as common genetic variations or polymorphisms that are associated with low to moderate risk for development of cancer. These polymorphisms can interact with environmental exposures and can influence an individual's cancer risk through multiple pathways, including affecting the rate of metabolism of carcinogens or the immune response to these toxins. Thus, these genetic polymorphisms can account for some of the geographical differences seen in cancer prevalence between different populations. This review explores the role of molecular epidemiology in the field of cancer prevention and control in low- and medium-income countries. Using data from Human Genome Project and HapMap Project, genome-wide association studies have been able to identify multiple susceptibility loci for different cancers. The field of genetic and molecular epidemiology has been further revolutionized by the discovery of newer, faster, and more efficient DNA-sequencing technologies including next-generation sequencing. The new DNA-sequencing technologies can play an important role in planning and implementation of cancer prevention and screening strategies. More research is needed in this area, especially in investigating new biomarkers and measuring gene-environment interactions. Copyright © 2014 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  13. Fanconi anaemia: genetics, molecular biology, and cancer – implications for clinical management in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Chandler, K; Tischkowitz, M; Meyer, S

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities, cross-linker hypersensitivity and extreme cancer predisposition. With better understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of the disease, and improved clinical management, FA has been transformed from a life-limiting paediatric disease to an uncommon chronic condition that needs lifelong multidisciplinary management, and a paradigm condition for the understanding of the gene-environment interaction in the aetiology of congenital anomalies, haematopoiesis and cancer development. Here we review genetic, molecular and clinical aspects of FA, and discuss current controversies and future prospects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Update on Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Morphological, Molecular, and Genetic Features of the Most Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Ragazzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is the most aggressive form of thyroid cancer. It shows a wide spectrum of morphological presentations and the diagnosis could be challenging due to its high degree of dedifferentiation. Molecular and genetic features of ATC are widely heterogeneous as well and many efforts have been made to find a common profile in order to clarify its cancerogenetic process. A comprehensive review of the current literature is here performed, focusing on histopathological and genetic features.

  15. The Genetics and Molecular Alterations of Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, R.F. de

    2015-01-01

    The prospect that pancreatic cancer will be the second most common cause of cancer death by 2030 is worrisome. Considering that the approximate 6% overall 5-year survival has not merely changed in the past decades illustrates the need to revert the bleak prognosis. Centralization of surgery

  16. Molecular Genetics Techniques to Develop New Treatments for Brain Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Jacob; Fathallan-Shaykh, Hassan

    2006-09-22

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to devise novel molecular gene therapies for malignant brain tumors, (2) advance our understanding of the immune system in the central nervous system; and (3) apply genomics to find molecular probes to diagnose brain tumors, predict prognosis, biological behavior and their response to treatment.

  17. Molecular genetic approach for screening of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Ravnik-Glavač

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goal of knowledge concerning human diseases is to transfer as much as possible useful information into clinical applications. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the most common autosomal dominant inherited predisposition for colorectal cancer, accounting for 1–2% of all bowel cancer. The only way to diagnose HNPCC is by a family history consistent with the disease defined by International Collaborative Group on HNPCC (Amsterdam criteria I and II. The main molecular cause of HNPCC is a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair (MMR genes. Since HNPCC mutations have been detected also in families that did not fulfil the Amsterdam criteria, molecular genetic characteristics of HNPCC cancers have been proposed as valuable first step in HNPCC identification. Microsatellite instability is present in about 90% of cancers of HNPCC patients. However, of all MSI colorectal cancers 80– 90% are sporadic. Several molecular mechanisms have been uncovered that enable distinguishing to some extent between sporadic and HNPCC cancers with MSI including hypermethylation of hMLH1 promoter and frequent mutations in BAX and TGFBR2 in sporadic CRC with MSI-H.Conclusions: The determination of MSI status and careful separation of MSI positive colorectal cancer into sporadic MSIL, sporadic MSI-H, and HNPCC MSI-H followed by mutation detection in MMR genes is important for prevention, screening and management of colorectal cancer. In some studies we and others have already shown that large-scale molecular genetic analysis for HNPCC can be done and is sensitive enough to approve population screening. Population screening includes also colonoscopy which is restricted only to the obligate carriers of the mutation. This enables that the disease is detected in earlier stages which would greatly decrease medical treatment costs and most importantly decrease mortality. In Slovenia we have started population screening based

  18. Molecular genetic study of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Sik; Shim, Youn Sang; Lee, Je Ho

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed 15 cases of head and neck cancer (13 out of 15 were squqmous cell cancer.) by Southern blotting to identify the possible tumor suppressor gene. Firstly we searched the chromosome 17p with pYNZ22, pMCT35.1 and p144D6. 5 out of 7 informative cases showed loss of heterozygosity implying the loss of tumor suppressor gene near those loci. Afterwards analysis of these 5 cases is needed to identify the presence of tumor suppressor genes and the oncogenetic mechanism. (Author)

  19. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the nature and action of lethal and mutagenic lesions in DNA and the mechanisms by which these are produced in bacteria by ionizing radiation or by decay of radioisotopes incorporated in DNA. Studies of radioisotope decay provide the advantages that the original lesion is localized in the genetic material and the immediate physical and chemical changes that occur at decay are known. Specific types of DNA damage were related to characteristic decay properties of several radioisotopes. Incorporated 125 I, for example, induces a double-stranded break in DNA with almost every decay, but causes remarkably little damage of any other kind to the DNA. (U.S.)

  20. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer Genética molecular del cáncer colorrectal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cruz-Bustillo Clarens

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal tumours constitute an excellent system to study carcinogenesis and the molecular events implicated in the development of cancer. Attending to the way it is transmitted, colorectal cancer may appear in one of three forms: sporadic, familial, and hereditary. The sporadic form is most common and has no familial or hereditary associated factor thus far, while familial and hereditary forms show the same inheritance pattern. Hereditary colorectal cancers develop by means of defined stages that go from lesions in the crypt of the colon through adenomas to manifest cancer. They are characterised by the accumulation of multiple mutations in tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes that affect the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. The colorectal carcinogenesis pathway is not unique and there are probably several ways for the initiation, development and progression of colorectal tumours.Los tumores colorrectales constituyen un excelente sistema para estudiar la carcinogénesis y los eventos moleculares involucrados en el desarrollo de un tumor. El cáncer colorrectal puede presentarse en tres formas, según su forma de transmisión: esporádico, familiar y hereditario. La forma esporádica que es la mayoritaria, no tiene hasta el momento ningún factor familiar o hereditario asociado, mientras que las formas familiares y hereditarias siguen un patrón de herencia en la propensión familiar a padecerlo. Los cánceres colorrectales hereditarios se desarrollan mediante etapas definidas que van desde lesiones en la cripta del colon a través de adenomas hasta manifestar el cáncer y se caracterizan por la acumulación de múltiples mutaciones en genes supresores de tumor y oncogenes que afectan el balance entre la proliferación celular y la apoptosis. La vía de carcinogénesis colorrectal no es una sola y probablemente existan varios caminos para el inicio, desarrollo y progresión de un tumor colorrectal.

  1. Molecular Genetics and Gene Therapy in Esophageal Cancer: a Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Noori Daloii Ph.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: With approximately 386,000 deaths per year, esophageal cancer is the 6th most common cause of death due to cancer in the world. This cancer, like any other cancer, is the outcome of genetic alterations or environmental factors such as tobacco smoke and gastro-esophageal reflux. Tobacco smoking is a major etiologic factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in western countries, and it increases the risk by approximately 3 to 5 folds. Chronic gastro-esophageal reflux usually leads to the replacement of squamous mucosa by intestinal-type Barrett’s metaplastic mucosa which is considered the most important factor causing esophageal adenocarcinoma. In contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma, different risk factors and mechanisms, such as mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, play an important role in causing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Molecular studies on esophageal cancers have revealed frequent genetic abnormalities in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, including altered expression of p53, p16, cyclin D1, EGFR, E-cadherin, COX-2, iNOS, RARs, Rb, hTERT, p21, APC, c-MYC, VEGF, TGT-α and NF-κB. Many studies have focused on the role of different polymorphisms such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 2 in causing esophageal cancer. Different agents including bestatin, curcumin, black raspberries, 5-lipoxygenase (LOX and COX-2 inhibitors have been found to play a role in inhibiting esophageal carcinogenesis. Different gene therapy approaches including p53 and p21WAF1 replacement gene therapies and therapy by suicide genes have also been experimented. Moreover, efforts have been made to use nanotechnology and aptamer technology in this regard.

  2. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  3. Molecular Population Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  4. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis: Genetic regulation of human breast carcinoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Danny R; Steeg, Patricia S; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W

    2000-01-01

    The present is an overview of recent data that describes the genetic underpinnings of the suppression of cancer metastasis. Despite the explosion of new information about the genetics of cancer, only six human genes have thus far been shown to suppress metastasis functionally. Not all have been shown to be functional in breast carcinoma. Several additional genes inhibit various steps of the metastatic cascade, but do not necessarily block metastasis when tested using in vivo assays. The implications of this are discussed. Two recently discovered metastasis suppressor genes block proliferation of tumor cells at a secondary site, offering a new target for therapeutic intervention

  5. Progress in cancer genetics: lessons from pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goggins, M.; Kern, S. E.; Offerhaus, J. A.; Hruban, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    In the near future advances in the molecular basis of cancer are expected to facilitate cancer diagnosis, to rationalize treatment, to facilitate screening, and to identify individuals requiring cancer prevention strategies. The literature was reviewed concerning the genetic alterations that

  6. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  7. Targeted molecular profiling of rare genetic alterations in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhri, Mayank; Bhatnagar, Akanksha; Gupta, Satish; Shokeen, Yogender; Minhas, Sachin; Aggarwal, Shyam

    2016-10-01

    Mutation frequencies of common genetic alterations in colorectal cancer have been in the spotlight for many years. This study highlights few rare somatic mutations, which possess the attributes of a potential CRC biomarker yet are often neglected. Next-generation sequencing was performed over 112 tumor samples to detect genetic alterations in 31 rare genes in colorectal cancer. Mutations were detected in 26/31 (83.9 %) uncommon genes, which together contributed toward 149 gene mutations in 67/112 (59.8 %) colorectal cancer patients. The most frequent mutations include KDR (19.6 %), PTEN (17 %), FBXW7 (10.7 %), SMAD4 (10.7 %), VHL (8 %), KIT (8 %), MET (7.1 %), ATM (6.3 %), CTNNB1 (4.5 %) and CDKN2A (4.5 %). RB1, ERBB4 and ERBB2 mutations were persistent in 3.6 % patients. GNAS, FGFR2 and FGFR3 mutations were persistent in 1.8 % patients. Ten genes (EGFR, NOTCH1, SMARCB1, ABL1, STK11, SMO, RET, GNAQ, CSF1R and FLT3) were found mutated in 0.9 % patients. Lastly, no mutations were observed in AKT, HRAS, MAP2K1, PDGFR and JAK2. Significant associations were observed between VHL with tumor site, ERBB4 and SMARCB1 with tumor invasion, CTNNB1 with lack of lymph node involvement and CTNNB1, FGFR2 and FGFR3 with TNM stage. Significantly coinciding mutation pairs include PTEN and SMAD4, PTEN and KDR, EGFR and RET, EGFR and RB1, FBXW7 and CTNNB1, KDR and FGFR2, FLT3 and CTNNB1, RET and RB1, ATM and SMAD4, ATM and CDKN2A, ERBB4 and SMARCB1. This study elucidates few potential colorectal cancer biomarkers, specifically KDR, PTEN, FBXW7 and SMAD4, which are found mutated in more than 10 % patients.

  8. Molecular characterization of circulating colorectal tumor cells defines genetic signatures for individualized cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Say Li; Liu, Xingliang; Suhaimi, Nur-Afidah Mohamed; Koh, Kenneth Jia Hao; Hu, Min; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Cima, Igor; Phyo, Wai Min; Lee, Esther Xing Wei; Tai, Joyce A.; Foong, Yu Miin; Vo, Jess Honganh; Koh, Poh Koon; Zhang, Tong; Ying, Jackie Y.; Lim, Bing; Tan, Min-Han; Hillmer, Axel M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have largely focused on platform development and CTC enumeration rather than on the genomic characterization of CTCs. To address this, we performed targeted sequencing of CTCs of colorectal cancer patients and compared the mutations with the matched primary tumors. We collected preoperative blood and matched primary tumor samples from 48 colorectal cancer patients. CTCs were isolated using a label-free microfiltration device on a silicon microsieve. Upon whole genome amplification, we performed amplicon-based targeted sequencing on a panel of 39 druggable and frequently mutated genes on both CTCs and fresh-frozen tumor samples. We developed an analysis pipeline to minimize false-positive detection of somatic mutations in amplified DNA. In 60% of the CTC-enriched blood samples, we detected primary tumor matching mutations. We found a significant positive correlation between the allele frequencies of somatic mutations detected in CTCs and abnormal CEA serum level. Strikingly, we found driver mutations and amplifications in cancer and druggable genes such as APC, KRAS, TP53, ERBB3, FBXW7 and ERBB2. In addition, we found that CTCs carried mutation signatures that resembled the signatures of their primary tumors. Cumulatively, our study defined genetic signatures and somatic mutation frequency of colorectal CTCs. The identification of druggable mutations in CTCs of preoperative colorectal cancer patients could lead to more timely and focused therapeutic interventions. PMID:28978093

  9. Molecular genetics analysis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumittra, Nagasamy; Meenakumari, Balaiah; Parija, Tithi; Sridevi, Veluswami; Nancy, Karunakaran N; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Rajalekshmy, Kamalalayam R; Majhi, Urmila; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2009-01-01

    Background Hereditary cancers account for 5–10% of cancers. In this study BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2*(1100delC) were analyzed for mutations in 91 HBOC/HBC/HOC families and early onset breast and early onset ovarian cancer cases. Methods PCR-DHPLC was used for mutation screening followed by DNA sequencing for identification and confirmation of mutations. Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were computed for five-year survival data on Breast and Ovarian cancer cases separately, and differences were tested using the Log-rank test. Results Fifteen (16%) pathogenic mutations (12 in BRCA1 and 3 in BRCA2), of which six were novel BRCA1 mutations were identified. None of the cases showed CHEK2*1100delC mutation. Many reported polymorphisms in the exonic and intronic regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were also seen. The mutation status and the polymorphisms were analyzed for association with the clinico-pathological features like age, stage, grade, histology, disease status, survival (overall and disease free) and with prognostic molecular markers (ER, PR, c-erbB2 and p53). Conclusion The stage of the disease at diagnosis was the only statistically significant (p < 0.0035) prognostic parameter. The mutation frequency and the polymorphisms were similar to reports on other ethnic populations. The lack of association between the clinico-pathological variables, mutation status and the disease status is likely to be due to the small numbers. PMID:19656415

  10. Molecular genetics analysis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumittra Nagasamy

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cancers account for 5–10% of cancers. In this study BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2*(1100delC were analyzed for mutations in 91 HBOC/HBC/HOC families and early onset breast and early onset ovarian cancer cases. Methods PCR-DHPLC was used for mutation screening followed by DNA sequencing for identification and confirmation of mutations. Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were computed for five-year survival data on Breast and Ovarian cancer cases separately, and differences were tested using the Log-rank test. Results Fifteen (16% pathogenic mutations (12 in BRCA1 and 3 in BRCA2, of which six were novel BRCA1 mutations were identified. None of the cases showed CHEK2*1100delC mutation. Many reported polymorphisms in the exonic and intronic regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were also seen. The mutation status and the polymorphisms were analyzed for association with the clinico-pathological features like age, stage, grade, histology, disease status, survival (overall and disease free and with prognostic molecular markers (ER, PR, c-erbB2 and p53. Conclusion The stage of the disease at diagnosis was the only statistically significant (p

  11. Genética molecular aplicada ao câncer cutâneo não melanoma Molecular genetics of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Rodrigues Martinez

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Os cânceres cutâneos não melanoma são as neoplasias malignas mais comuns em humanos. O carcinoma basocelular e o carcinoma espinocelular representam cerca de 95% dos cânceres cutâneos não melanoma, o que os torna um crescente problema para a saúde p��blica mundial devido a suas prevalências cada vez maiores. As alterações genéticas que ocorrem no desenvolvimento dessas malignidades cutâneas são apenas parcialmente compreendidas, havendo muito interesse no conhecimento e determinação das bases genéticas dos cânceres cutâneos não melanoma que expliquem seus fenótipos, comportamentos biológicos e potenciais metastáticos distintos. Apresenta-se uma revisão atualizada da genética molecular aplicada aos cânceres cutâneos não melanoma, em especial ao carcinoma basocelular e carcinoma espinocelular, enfatizando os mais freqüentes genes e os principais mecanismos de instabilidade genômica envolvidos no desenvolvimento dessas malignidades cutâneas.Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common malignant neoplasms in humans. About 95% of all non-melanoma skin cancers are represented by basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Their prevalences are still increasing worldwide, representing an important public health problem. The genetic alterations underlying basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma development are only partly understood. Much interest lies in determining the genetic basis of non-melanoma skin cancers, to explain their distinctive phenotypes, biological behaviors and metastatic potential. We present here a molecular genetic update, focusing on the most frequent genes and genomic instability involved in the development and progression of non-melanoma skin cancers.

  12. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. [Genetic diagnostics of cancer diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobilanschi, Joana

    2013-11-27

    Cancer is caused by genetic alterations, but only 10% of the cancer diseases are inherited. The probability for an individual or a family of having inherited cancer, individual consequences of the respective results of genetic testing, as well as its costs and reimbursement by the health insurance must be addressed by expert genetic counseling which at-risk requires special expertise. Identification of a germline mutation which may predispose to a variety of different cancer types allows determination of an individual's specific life time risk in symptomatic as well as in a-symptomatic family members. Identification of the underlying defective gene in heritable cancer disorders also enables optimized preventive and novel therapeutic approaches specifically targeting the underlying molecular pathomechanisms.

  14. Molecular biology from bench-to-bedside - which colorectal cancer patients should be referred for genetic counselling and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Dysager, Lars; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is associated with deficiency of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. However, most MLH1 deficient tumours are sporadic in origin, and they can be identified if harbouring a BRAF V600E mutation or hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. The aim of this study...... (PMS2 were negative in 29 cases (10%). DNA quality allowed BRAF analysis in 27 of these with 14 mutations and 13 wild-type. DNA quality allowed methylation analysis in 11 of the 13 BRAF wild-type, and all but one were methylated. Subsequently, Lynch syndrome could...... was to validate our previously suggested clinically applicable strategy based on molecular characteristics for identifying which patients to refer for genetic counselling. The strategy was validated in an unselected cohort of 287 colorectal cancer patients. All tumours were tested for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6...

  15. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  16. Descriptive Epidemiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics of Hereditary Prostate Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer.......A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer....

  17. Promoting Self-Directed Learning in Developing or Poorly Defined Subject Areas: A Problem-Based Course in Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Katherine M.

    A new problem-based course in molecular biology, genetics, and cancer for first-year veterinary students was developed at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University (New York). The course was developed out of a desire to foster student-centered and lifelong learning and to integrate basic and clinical science knowledge despite a lack…

  18. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  19. Methods in Molecular Biology Mouse Genetics: Methods and Protocols | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouse Genetics: Methods and Protocols provides selected mouse genetic techniques and their application in modeling varieties of human diseases. The chapters are mainly focused on the generation of different transgenic mice to accomplish the manipulation of genes of interest, tracing cell lineages, and modeling human diseases.

  20. Molecular genetics analysis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in India

    OpenAIRE

    Soumittra, Nagasamy; Meenakumari, Balaiah; Parija, Tithi; Sridevi, Veluswami; Nancy, Karunakaran N; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Rajalekshmy, Kamalalayam R; Majhi, Urmila; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Hereditary cancers account for 5–10% of cancers. In this study BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2*(1100delC) were analyzed for mutations in 91 HBOC/HBC/HOC families and early onset breast and early onset ovarian cancer cases. Methods PCR-DHPLC was used for mutation screening followed by DNA sequencing for identification and confirmation of mutations. Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were computed for five-year survival data on Breast and Ovarian cancer cases separately, and differe...

  1. [Molecular-Genetic Diagnosis and Molecular-Targeted Therapy in Cancer: Challenges in the Era of Precision Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Hayato

    2015-10-01

    Elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of neoplasms and application of emerging technologies for testing and therapy have resulted in a series of paradigm shifts in patient care, from conventional to personalized medicine. This has been promoted by companion diagnostics and molecular targeted therapy, tailoring the treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient. Precision oncology has been accelerated by integrating the enhanced resolution of molecular analysis, mechanism clarity, and therapeutic relevance through genomic knowledge. In its clinical implementation, there are laboratory challenges concerning accurate measurement using stored samples, differentiation between driver and passenger mutations as well as between germline and somatic mutations, bioinformatics availability, practical decision-making algorithms, and ethical issues regarding incidental findings. The medical laboratory has a new role in providing not only testing services but also an instructive approach to users to ensure the sample quality and privacy protection of personal genome information, supporting the quality of patient practice based on laboratory diagnosis.

  2. Molecular genetics made simple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Sh. Kassem

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients.

  3. Molecular genetics made simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Heba Sh.; Girolami, Francesca; Sanoudou, Despina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients. PMID:25610837

  4. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention.

  5. Genetic prognostic markers in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Houlston, R S; Tomlinson, I P

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of molecular genetics to colorectal cancer has been restricted largely to relatively rare inherited tumours and to the detection of germline mutations predisposing to these cancers. However, much is now also known about somatic events leading to colorectal cancer. A number of studies has been undertaken examining possible relations between genetic features and prognostic indices. While many of these studies are small and inconclusive, it is clear that a number of different pa...

  6. Genetic etiology of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Johar; Sabiha, Bibi; Jan, Hanif Ullah; Haider, Syed Adnan; Khan, Abid Ali; Ali, Saima S

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. It accounts for 2.5% of all new cancer cases and 1.9% of all cancer deaths annually. More than 90% of oral cancers (occurring in the mouth, lip, and tongue) are oral squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate of oral cancer varies widely throughout the world, with an evident prevalence in South Asian countries. This high incidence occurs in correlation with oral cancer-associated behaviors such as alcohol, tobacco use. Researchers have reported that these behaviors lead to genetic variations in tumor suppressor genes (APC, p53), proto-oncogenes (Myc), oncogene (Ras) and genes controlling normal cellular processes (EIF3E, GSTM1). Processes such as segregation of chromosomes, genomic copy number, loss of heterozygosity, telomere stabilities, regulations of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA damage repairs and defects in notch signaling pathways are involved in causing oral cancer. In order to develop preventive and therapeutic options, it is necessary to comprehend the basic molecular mechanisms forcing oral tumorigenesis. This review examines, in detail, the mechanisms of genetic alteration which are considered to be responsible for the initiation of oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer Genetics and Signaling | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer, Genetics, and Signaling (CGS) Group at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick  offers a competitive postdoctoral training and mentoring program focusing on molecular and genetic aspects of cancer. The CGS Fellows Program is designed to attract and train exceptional postdoctoral fellows interested in pursuing independent research career tracks. CGS Fellows participate in a structured mentoring program designed for scientific and career development and transition to independent positions.

  8. Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilayo F. Olopade MD, FACP, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and Director of the Cancer Risk Clinic Department of Medicine, BSD Section of Hematology/Oncology University of Chicago, presented "Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention".

  9. Complex polarimetric and spectral techniques in diagnostics of blood plasma of patients with ovarian cancer as a preliminary stage molecular genetic screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorzewski, B.; Peresunko, O. P.; Yermolenko, S. B.

    2018-01-01

    This work is devoted to the substantiation and selection of patients with ovarian cancer (OC) for the purpose of conducting expensive molecular genetic studies on genotyping. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5 - 25 microns) dry residue of plasma polarization and laser diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues. Obtained results showed that the use of spectrophotometry in the range of 1000-3000 cm-1 allowed to establish quantitative parameters of the plasma absorption rate of blood of patients in the third group in different ranges, which would allow in the future to conduct an express analysis of the patient's condition (procedure screening) for further molecular-genetic typing on BRCA I and II.

  10. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsit, C. J.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Nelson, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hyper methylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hyper methylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hyper methylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hyper methylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  11. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Marsit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hypermethylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hypermethylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  12. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M. [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia); University of New South Wales, Kensington Campus, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersen, Desiree C., E-mail: dpetersen@ccia.unsw.edu.au [Cancer Genetics Group, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, PO Box 81, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia)

    2010-06-08

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk.

  13. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Vanessa M.; Petersen, Desiree C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk

  14. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  15. Molecular genetics in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J B

    1993-12-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the identification of mutations in genes that cause inherited neurological disorders. Abnormalities in the genes for Huntington disease, neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Kennedy syndrome, Menkes disease, and several forms of retinitis pigmentosa have been elucidated. Rare disorders of neuronal migration such as Kallmann syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome, and Norrie disease have been shown to be due to specific gene defects. Several muscle disorders characterized by abnormal membrane excitability have been defined as mutations of the muscle sodium or chloride channels. These advances provide opportunity for accurate molecular diagnosis of at-risk individuals and are the harbinger of new approaches to therapy of these diseases.

  16. Molecular genetics of craniosynostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterine; Auerkari, Elza Ibrahim

    2018-03-01

    Tight regulation process and complex interplay occur along the osteogenic interfaces of the cranial sutures in normal growth and development of the skull. Cranial sutures serve as sites of bone growth while maintaining a state of patency to accommodate the developing brain. Cranial sutures are fibro-cellular structures that separate the rigid plates of the skull bones. Premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures leads to a condition known as craniosynostosis. Craniosynostosis is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies with a prevalence of 1 in 2,500 newborns. Several genes have been identified in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. Molecular signaling events and the intracellular signal transduction pathways implicated in the suture pathobiology will provide a useful approach for therapeutic targeting.

  17. Environmental and genetic interactions in human cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, M.C.

    Humans, depending upon their genetic make-up, differ in their susceptibility to the cancer-causing effects of extrinsic agents. Clinical and laboratory studies on the hereditary disorder, ataxia telangiectasia (AT) show that persons afflicted with this are cancer-prone and unusually sensitive to conventional radiotherapy. Their skin cells, when cultured, are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation, being defective in the enzymatic repair of radiation-induced damange to the genetic material, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). This molecular finding implicates DNA damage and its imperfect repair as an early step in the induction of human cancer by radiation and other carcinogens. The parents of AT patients are clincally normal but their cultured cells are often moderately radiosensitive. The increased radiosensitivity of cultured cells offers a means of identifying a presumed cancer-prone subpopulation that should avoid undue exposure to certain carcinogens. The radioresponse of cells from patients with other cancer-associated genetic disorders and persons suspected of being genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer has also been measured. Increased cell killing by γ-rays appears in the complex genetic disease, tuberous sclerosis. Cells from cancer-stricken members of a leukemia-prone family are also radiosensitive, as are cells from one patient with radiation-associated breast cancer. These radiobiological data, taken together, strongly suggest that genetic factors can interact with extrinsic agents and thereby play a greater causative role in the development of common cancers in man than previously thought. (L.L.)

  18. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  19. Molecular Testing for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Seung Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent advances in molecular diagnostic methods and targeted cancer therapies, several molecular tests have been recommended for gastric cancer (GC and colorectal cancer (CRC. Microsatellite instability analysis of gastrointestinal cancers is performed to screen for Lynch syndrome, predict favorable prognosis, and screen patients for immunotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been approved in metastatic CRCs with wildtype RAS (KRAS and NRAS exon 2–4. A BRAF mutation is required for predicting poor prognosis. Additionally, amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and MET is also associated with resistance to EGFR inhibitor in metastatic CRC patients. The BRAF V600E mutation is found in sporadic microsatellite unstable CRCs, and thus is helpful for ruling out Lynch syndrome. In addition, the KRAS mutation is a prognostic biomarker and the PIK3CA mutation is a molecular biomarker predicting response to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and response to aspirin therapy in CRC patients. Additionally, HER2 testing should be performed in all recurrent or metastatic GCs. If the results of HER2 immunohistochemistry are equivocal, HER2 silver or fluorescence in situ hybridization testing are essential for confirmative determination of HER2 status. Epstein-Barr virus–positive GCs have distinct characteristics, including heavy lymphoid stroma, hypermethylation phenotype, and high expression of immune modulators. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies enable us to examine various genetic alterations using a single test. Pathologists play a crucial role in ensuring reliable molecular testing and they should also take an integral role between molecular laboratories and clinicians.

  20. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  1. Molecular genetics of follicular cell thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina D. Yakushina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most frequent endocrine malignancy. In the most cases thyroid cancer arises from follicular cells. Diagnosis of the cancer is based on the cytological analysis of fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodes. But the accuracy of the cytological diagnosis is about 80% that leads to the false positive and false negative cases and wrong strategy of treatment. Identification of genetic and epigenetic markers in the biopsies will allow to improve diagnostic accuracy. This article describes mutations, aberrant DNA methylation and abnormal microRNA expression constituting the core of molecular genetics of follicular cell thyroid cancer. The mutations given in the article includes point mutations, fusions and copy number variation. Besides frequent and well described driver mutations in genes of МАРK, PI3K/Akt and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as TP53 and TERT genes, we introduce here less frequent mutations appeared in the literature during the past two years. In addition the article contains examples of diagnostic panels applying these markers.

  2. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  3. Rare endocrine cancers have novel genetic alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A molecular characterization of adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare cancer of the adrenal cortex, analyzed 91 cases for alterations in the tumor genomes and identified several novel genetic mutations as likely mechanisms driving the disease as well as whole genome doubling as a probable driver of the disease.

  4. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, S.Z.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the h allmarks of lung cancer . Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  5. Genetics of Endometrial Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancers exhibit a different mechanism of tumorigenesis and progression depending on histopathological and clinical types. The most frequently altered gene in estrogen-dependent endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors is PTEN. Microsatellite instability is another important genetic event in this type of tumor. In contrast, p53 mutations or Her2/neu overexpression are more frequent in non-endometrioid tumors. On the other hand, it is possible that the clear cell type may arise from a unique pathway which appears similar to the ovarian clear cell carcinoma. K-ras mutations are detected in approximately 15%–30% of endometrioid carcinomas, are unrelated to the existence of endometrial hyperplasia. A β-catenin mutation was detected in about 20% of endometrioid carcinomas, but is rare in serous carcinoma. Telomere shortening is another important type of genomic instability observed in endometrial cancer. Only non-endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors were significantly associated with critical telomere shortening in the adjacent morphologically normal epithelium. Lynch syndrome, which is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of cancer susceptibility and is characterized by a MSH2/MSH6 protein complex deficiency, is associated with the development of non-endometrioid carcinomas.

  6. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  7. RESEARCH NOTE Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous families with primary microcephaly ... Translational Research Institute, Academic Health System, Hamad Medical ..... bridging the gap between homozygosity mapping and deep sequencing.

  8. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  9. Applications of genetic programming in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worzel, William P; Yu, Jianjun; Almal, Arpit A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2009-02-01

    The theory of Darwinian evolution is the fundamental keystones of modern biology. Late in the last century, computer scientists began adapting its principles, in particular natural selection, to complex computational challenges, leading to the emergence of evolutionary algorithms. The conceptual model of selective pressure and recombination in evolutionary algorithms allow scientists to efficiently search high dimensional space for solutions to complex problems. In the last decade, genetic programming has been developed and extensively applied for analysis of molecular data to classify cancer subtypes and characterize the mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis and development. This article reviews current successes using genetic programming and discusses its potential impact in cancer research and treatment in the near future.

  10. Advances in genetics. Volume 22: Molecular genetics of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandalios, J.G.; Caspari, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following four chapters: Structural Variation in Mitochondrial DNA; The Structure and Expression of Nuclear Genes in Higher Plants; Chromatin Structure and Gene Regulation in Higher Plants; and The Molecular Genetics of Crown Gall Tumorigenesis

  11. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer | Miakhil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Numerous molecular markers for bladder cancer have been identified and investigated with various laboratory techniques. Molecular markers are isolated from tissue, serum and urine. They fall into proteomic, genetic and epigenetic categories. Some of molecular markers show promising results in terms of ...

  12. Molecular concept in human oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U S

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which multiple genetic events occur that alter the normal functions of proto-oncogenes/oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Furthermore, these gene alterations can deregulate the normal activity such as increase in the production of growth factors (transforming growth factor-α [TGF-α], TGF-β, platelet-derived growth factor, etc.) or numbers of cell surface receptors (epidermal growth factor receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor, etc.), enhanced intracellular messenger signaling and mutated production of transcription factors (ras gene family, c-myc gene) which results disturb to tightly regulated signaling pathways of normal cell. Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been implicated in oral cancer especially cyclin family, ras, PRAD-1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p53 and RB1. Viral infections, particularly with oncogenic human papilloma virus subtype (16 and 18) and Epstein-Barr virus have tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia. Worldwide, this is an urgent need to initiate oral cancer research programs at molecular and genetic level which investigates the causes of genetic and molecular defect, responsible for malignancy. This approach may lead to development of target dependent tumor-specific drugs and appropriate gene therapy.

  13. Histopathological, Molecular, and Genetic Profile of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer: Current Knowledge and Challenges for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Gullo, Irene; Oliveira, Carla; Tang, Laura H; Grabsch, Heike I; O'Donovan, Maria; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; van Krieken, Han; Carneiro, Fátima

    Familial clustering is seen in 10 % of gastric cancer cases and approximately 1-3 % of gastric cancer arises in the setting of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In families with HDGC, gastric cancer presents at young age. HDGC is predominantly caused by germline mutations in CDH1 and in a minority by mutations in other genes, including CTNNA1. Early stage HDGC is characterized by a few, up to dozens of intramucosal foci of signet ring cell carcinoma and its precursor lesions. These include in situ signet ring cell carcinoma and pagetoid spread of signet ring cells. Advanced HDGC presents as poorly cohesive/diffuse type carcinoma, normally with very few typical signet ring cells, and has a poor prognosis. Currently, it is unknown which factors drive the progression towards aggressive disease, but it is clear that most intramucosal lesions will not have such progression.Immunohistochemical profile of early and advanced HDGC is often characterized by abnormal E-cadherin immunoexpression, including absent or reduced membranous expression, as well as "dotted" or cytoplasmic expression. However, membranous expression of E-cadherin does not exclude HDGC. Intramucosal HDGC (pT1a) presents with an "indolent" phenotype, characterized by typical signet ring cells without immunoexpression of Ki-67 and p53, while advanced carcinomas (pT > 1) display an "aggressive" phenotype with pleomorphic cells, that are immunoreactive for Ki-67 and p53. These features show that the IHC profile is different between intramucosal and more advanced HDGC, providing evidence of phenotypic heterogeneity, and may help to define predictive biomarkers of progression from indolent to aggressive, widely invasive carcinomas.

  14. Protocols in human molecular genetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathew, Christopher G

    1991-01-01

    ... sequences has led to the development of DNA fingerprinting. The application of these techniques to the study of the human genome has culminated in major advances such as the cloning of the cystic fibrosis gene, the construction of genetic linkage maps of each human chromosome, the mapping of many genes responsible for human inherited disorders, genet...

  15. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale. E. Santos, M. Matos, P. Silva, A. M. Figueiras, C. Benito and O. Pinto-Carnide. J. Genet. 95, 273–281. Table 1. RAPD and ISSR primers used in this study. Primer. 5 –3. Primer. 5 –3. RAPDs (Operon). A1. CAGGCCCTTC. C5. CATGACCGCC. A4. AATCGGGCTG. C6.

  16. Molecular cytogenetic in the familial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer diseases is accompanied by number of genetic changes at different levels of the genome. Some of these changes are still subject of research but others are already known in such an extent that they are associated with a specific type of malignity, the development, or treatment possibilities. The cancer genetics dispose of wide range of techniques, with reliable detection of the causal changes. Starting the molecular cytogenetics has launched a new era in diagnostics of genetic aberrations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) definitely changed cytogenetic world from black and white to color one and set the foundation of modern investigative methods such as M-FISH, CGH, array CGH and many others. Successively all these methodologies have become a part of routine cancer diagnostics thorough the world. Actually, when much attention is given mostly to submicroscopic changes in DNA supposed as predispositions to various malignancies, the molecular cytogenetics is trying to success in competition of modern highly sensitive molecular biology methods. (author)

  17. Genetic predisposition to kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2016-10-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease but is made up of a number of different types of cancer classified by histology that are disparate in presentation, clinical course, and genetic basis. Studies of families with inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have provided the basis for our understanding of the causative genes and altered metabolic pathways in renal cancer with different histologies. Von Hippel-Lindau disease was the first renal cancer disorder with a defined genetic basis. Over the next two decades, the genes responsible for a number of other inherited renal cancer syndromes including hereditary papillary renal carcinoma, Birt-Hogg-Dube´syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma, and succinate dehydrogenase-associated renal cancer were identified. Recently, renal cell carcinoma has been confirmed as part of the clinical phenotype in individuals from families with BAP1-associated tumor predisposition syndrome and MiTF-associated cancer syndrome. Here we summarize the clinical characteristics of and causative genes for these and other inherited RCC syndromes, the pathways that are dysregulated when the inherited genes are mutated, and recommended clinical management of patients with these inherited renal cancer syndromes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Cancer: Some genetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-09-22

    Sep 22, 2014 ... The current disappointing situation as regards research trials aiming at constructing ..... parallels that can be found between stem cells and cancer cells ...... specific strand segments is a prerequisite for successful effects,.

  19. Molecular perspectives in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, C; Groussin, L

    2015-02-01

    Progress in understanding the molecular genetics of thyroid cancer in the last 20 years has accelerated recently with the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies known as Next-Generation Sequencing. Besides classical molecular abnormalities involving the MAPK (Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase) and PI3K (PhosphoInositide 3-Kinase) pathways that play a key role in follicular-derived thyroid tumorigenesis, new molecular abnormalities have been discovered. The major advances in recent years have been the discovery of new somatic driver gene point mutations (such as RASAL1 [RAS protein activator Like 1] mutations in follicular cancer) and/or mutations that have prognostic value (such as TERT [Telomerase reverse transcriptase] promoter mutations); new chromosomal rearrangements, usually having close connection with exposure to ionizing radiation (such as ALK [Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase] rearrangements); and deregulation of some gene or microRNA expression representing a molecular signature. Progress made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of thyroid cancer offers new perspectives for the diagnosis of the benign or malignant status of a thyroid nodule, to refine prognosis and offer new perspectives of targeted therapy for radioiodine-refractory cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic cancer risk assessment in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, S.

    2004-01-01

    The advent of genetic testing has made a dramatic impact on the management of individuals with inherited susceptibility to cancer and their relatives. Genetic counsel ing, with or without testing, is warranted when clues to familial cancer are recognized. Today, genetic testing for classic cancer genetic syndromes is now the standard of care, and has been complemented by genetic testing for other situations commonly encountered in clinical practice. Genetic testing for colorectal cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, thyroid cancer, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer raise important issues about the parameters for testing. Genetic cancer risk assessment can lead to measurable reductions in morbidity and mortality through strategies that rely on surveillance, chemo prevention, and risk-reducing surgery

  1. Application Form for NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, and others) may fill out this application form to be listed in the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genetics Services Directory.

  2. Inclusion Criteria for NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, and others) must meet these criteria before applying to be listed in the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genetics Services Directory.

  3. The molecular genetics of holoprosencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) has captivated the imagination of Man for millennia because its most extreme manifestation, the single-eyed cyclopic newborn infant, brings to mind the fantastical creature Cyclops from Greek mythology. Attempting to understand this common malformation of the forebrain in modern medical terms requires a systematic synthesis of genetic, cytogenetic, and environmental information typical for studies of a complex disorder. However, even with the advances in our understanding of HPE in recent years, there are significant obstacles remaining to fully understand its heterogeneity and extensive variability in phenotype. General lessons learned from HPE will likely be applicable to other malformation syndromes. Here we outline the common, and rare, genetic and environmental influences on this conserved developmental program of forebrain development and illustrate the similarities and differences between these malformations in humans and those of animal models. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter, as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers.

  5. Genetic susceptibility to cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    1995-01-01

    The normal development and function of tissues are under the regulation of programmed expression of genes involved in the proliferation and differentiation. Tumor development can be identified as the abnormal or deregulated expression of such genes. Two distinct classes of genes have been implicated in cancer development; oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. Those genes are potential target for radiation carcinogenesis. However, contemporal view of mutations of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in radiogenic and non-radiogenic human cancers do not match to the spectrum of radiation-induced mutation in the selected genes, and raise the question whether radiations are primarily responsible for the initiation of carcinogenesis by mutation of those genes as primary target. There is now a growing evidence for the radiation to stimulate cell growth, which is followed by suppression. Such stimulatory effects of radiation may evoke the growth-promoting and -suppressing genes, or oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This may lead to a testable proposition that constitutively present gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and/or loss-of-function mutations in tumor-suppressor genes, accumulated spontaneously or environmentally, may play a significant role in the radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  6. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHAN, Sairah R.; ROCKALL, Andrea G.; BARWICK, Tara D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed.

  7. Progress in molecular-based management of differentiated thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingzhao; Haugen, Bryan R; Schlumberger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Substantial developments have occurred in the past 5–10 years in clinical translational research of thyroid cancer. Diagnostic molecular markers, such as RET-PTC, RAS, and BRAFV600E mutations; galectin 3; and a new gene expression classifier, are outstanding examples that have improved diagnosis of thyroid nodules. BRAF mutation is a prognostic genetic marker that has improved risk stratification and hence tailored management of patients with thyroid cancer, including those with conventionally low risks. Novel molecular-targeted treatments hold great promise for radioiodine-refractory and surgically inoperable thyroid cancers as shown in clinical trials; such treatments are likely to become a component of the standard treatment regimen for patients with thyroid cancer in the near future. These novel molecular-based management strategies for thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer are the most exciting developments in this unprecedented era of molecular thyroid-cancer medicine. PMID:23668556

  8. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and its functional characterisation: The PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Rizzato, C.; Capurso, G.; Giese, N.; Funel, N.; Greenhalf, W.; Souček, P.; Gazouli, M.; Pezzilli, R.; Pasquali, C.; Talar-Wojnarowska, R.; Cantore, M.; Andriulli, A.; Scarpa, A.; Jamroziak, K.; Delle Fave, G.; Costello, E.; Khaw, K. T.; Heller, A.; Key, T. K.; Theodoropoulos, G.; Malecka-Panas, E.; Mambrini, A.; Bambi, F.; Landi, S.; Pedrazzoli, S.; Bassi, C.; Pacetti, P.; Piepoli, A.; Tavano, F.; di Sebastiano, P.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Basso, D.; Plebani, M.; Fogar, P.; Buechler, M. W.; Bugert, P.; Vodička, Pavel; Boggi, U.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Werner, J.; Canzian, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2013), s. 95-99 ISSN 1590-8658 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * genetic polymorphisms * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.889, year: 2013

  9. Molecular species identification and population genetics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular genetic techniques, such as DNA barcoding and genotyping, are increasingly being used to assist with the conservation and management of chondrichthyans worldwide. Southern Africa is a shark biodiversity hotspot, with a large number of endemic species. According to the IUCN Red List, a quarter of South ...

  10. A molecular genetic toolbox for Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredeweg, Erin L.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Dai, Ziyu

    2017-01-01

    used these tools to build the "Yarrowia lipolytica Cell Atlas," a collection of strains with endogenous fluorescently tagged organelles in the same genetic background, in order to define organelle morphology in live cells. Conclusions: These molecular and isogenetic tools are useful for live assessment...

  11. Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Kotwal S., Dhar M. K., Kour B., Raj K. and Kaul S. 2013 Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic variability in ... of bowel problems including chronic constipation, amoebic ..... while to select parents from accessions, Pov80 and Pov79 ... nology (DBT), Govt. of India, for financial assistance in the form.

  12. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships amongSecalespp. and among cultivars ofSecale ... Faculty of Sciences, Campo Grande, Lisboa, Portugal; Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Complutense, C/ José Antonio Novais, 12, ...

  13. Personalized Cancer Medicine: Molecular Diagnostics, Predictive biomarkers, and Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez de Castro, D; Clarke, P A; Al-Lazikani, B; Workman, P

    2013-01-01

    The progressive elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has fueled the rational development of targeted drugs for patient populations stratified by genetic characteristics. Here we discuss general challenges relating to molecular diagnostics and describe predictive biomarkers for personalized cancer medicine. We also highlight resistance mechanisms for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in lung cancer. We envisage a future requiring the use of longitudinal genome sequencing and other omics technologies alongside combinatorial treatment to overcome cellular and molecular heterogeneity and prevent resistance caused by clonal evolution. PMID:23361103

  14. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Young Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus–positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  15. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  16. Molecular biology of prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Timothy C.; Sehgal, I.; Timme, T.L.; Rn, C.; Yang, G.; Park, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    'control' gene in human prostate cancer was supported by studies using molecular biological and immunohistochemical techniques (Eastham et al, Clin Cancer Res 1:1111-1118, 1995 and Yang et al, Clin Cancer Res 2:399-401, 1996). Another possible ''control'' gene related to prostate cancer metastases may be the gene which encodes TGF-β1. We have previously shown that overexpression of TGF-β1 is associated with mouse and human prostate cancer and occurs predominantly in metastatic disease (Eastham et al, Lab Invest 73:628-635, 1995). To investigate a possible role of TGF-β1 in metastatic progression, we compared growth and extracellular matrix responses to TGF-β1 in six metastatic and six primary tumor cell lines derived from our metastatic mouse prostate cancer model system. The results indicated that tumor cell lines derived from focal pulmonary metastases secrete greater quantities of total TGF-β's and have lost most or all TGF-β1 growth inhibition, but respond to TGF-β1 through induction of type IV collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase-9. Cell lines derived from primary site tumors retain TGF-β1 growth inhibition, but lack TGF-β1-induced collagenase activity. Our results indicate that the elimination and/or subversion of TGF-β1 responsive pathways should be considered a mechanistic framework for metastatic events (Sehgal et al., Cancer Res 56:3359-3365, 1996). Both p53 and TGF-β1 can regulate the expression of downstream genetic targets, therefore, we are currently pursuing a strategy using differential display-polymerase chain reaction to elucidate additional changes in gene expression resulting from loss and/or subversion of function for these two putative ''control'' genes in prostate cancer metastasis. Hopefully, identification of these target genes will lead to greater understanding of the mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis and possibly provide novel therapeutic targets

  17. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. (Erasme Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. The Molecular Genetics of von Willebrand Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Berber

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and/or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (vWF is associated with the most common inherited bleeding disease von Willebrand disease (vWD. vWD is a complex disease with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Incomplete penetrance and variable expression due to genetic and environmental factors contribute to its complexity. vWD also has a complex molecular pathogenesis. Some vWF gene mutations are associated with the affected vWF biosynthesis and multimerization, whereas others are associated with increased clearance and functional impairment. Moreover, in addition to a particular mutation, type O blood may result in the more severe phenotype. The present review aimed to provide a summary of the current literature on the molecular genetics of vWD.

  19. The molecular genetics of von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ergül

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and/or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (vWF) is associated with the most common inherited bleeding disease von Willebrand disease (vWD). vWD is a complex disease with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Incomplete penetrance and variable expression due to genetic and environmental factors contribute to its complexity. vWD also has a complex molecular pathogenesis. Some vWF gene mutations are associated with the affected vWF biosynthesis and multimerization, whereas others are associated with increased clearance and functional impairment. Moreover, in addition to a particular mutation, type O blood may result in the more severe phenotype. The present review aimed to provide a summary of the current literature on the molecular genetics of vWD. None declared.

  20. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  2. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  3. Guidelines on the use of molecular genetics in reintroduction programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The use of molecular genetics can play a key role in reintroduction efforts. Prior to the introduction of any individuals, molecular genetics can be used to identify the most appropriate source population for the reintroduction, ensure that no relic populations exist in the reintroduction area, and guide captive breeding programs. The use of molecular genetics post-...

  4. Molecular marker systems for Oenothera genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-11-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome-genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9.8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed.

  5. Genetically modified dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 153-155 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  6. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  7. Molecular targeted therapies of aggressive thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martina eFerrari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTC that arise from follicular cells account > 90% of thyroid cancer (TC [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC accounts < 5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts towards the development of new drugs.Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the last decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the above-mentioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds, and to personalize

  8. Genetic counseling about cancer in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Manrique, Javier E.; Dirección de Promoción de la Salud, Prevención y Control Nacional del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas. Lima, Perú. Cirujano oncólogo.; Sullcahuamán-Allende, Yasser; Unidad de Genética y Biología Molecular, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas. Lima, Perú. médico genetista.; Limache-García, Abel; Dirección de Promoción de la Salud, Prevención y Control Nacional del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas. Lima, Perú. enfermero.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease caused by changes in the DNA sequence or expression. Based on the origin of these changes, cancer can be classified as sporadic, and hereditary or familial. Based on the cancer records in Peru, it is expected that 5 to 30% of all patients with cancer, i.e. about 2,000 to 12,000 people, have hereditary cancer, meaning that a similar number of families have a higher risk of developing cancer compared to the general population. Therefore, the purpose of genetic co...

  9. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  10. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Genetics Overview discusses hereditary cancers and the role of genetic variants (mutations). Get information about genetic counseling, familial cancer syndromes, genomic sequencing, germline and somatic testing, ethical and legal issues and more in this summary for clinicians.

  11. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in...

  12. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Derstine, P.L.; Griego, V.M.; Matsushita, T.; Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Reynolds, P.R.; Webb, R.B.; Williams-Hill, D.

    1981-01-01

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  13. Molecular genetic studies of bacteroides fragilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southern, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    This study aimed at providing a means for probing the molecular genetic organization of B.fragilis, particularly those strains where the DNA repair mechanisms had been described. The following routes of investigation were followed: the bacteriocin of B.fragilis BF-1; the investigation of any plasmids which might be discovered, with the aim of constructing a hybrid plasmid which might replicate in both E.coli and B.fragilis; and the preparation of a genetic library which could be screened for Bacteroides genes which might function in E.coli. Should any genes be isolated by screening the library they were to be studied with regard to their expression and regulation in E.coli. The above assays make use of radioactive markers such as 14 C, 35 S, 32 P, and 3 H in the labelling of RNA, plasmids and probes

  14. Genetics and molecular biology of hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Major strides in the molecular biology of essential hypertension are currently underway. This has tended to obscure the fact that a number of inherited disorders associated with low blood pressure exist and that these diseases may have milder and underrecognized phenotypes that contribute importantly to blood pressure variation in the general population. This review highlights some of the gene products that, if abnormal, could cause hypotension in some individuals. Diseases due to abnormalities in the catecholamine enzymes are discussed in detail. It is likely that genetic abnormalities with hypotensive phenotypes will be as interesting and diverse as those that give rise to hypertensive disorders.

  15. Genetic evidence linking lung cancer and COPD: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crapo JD

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Young1,4, Raewyn J Hopkins1, Gregory D Gamble1, Carol Etzel2, Randa El-Zein2, James D Crapo31Department of Medicine and School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Epidemiology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 4Synergenz Biosciences Ltd, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: Epidemiological studies indicate that tobacco smoke exposure accounts for nearly 90% of cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer. However, genetic factors may explain why 10%–30% of smokers develop these complications. This perspective reviews the evidence suggesting that COPD is closely linked to susceptibility to lung cancer and outlines the potential relevance of this observation. Epidemiological studies show that COPD is the single most important risk factor for lung cancer among smokers and predates lung cancer in up to 80% of cases. Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer, lung function, and COPD have identified a number of overlapping “susceptibility” loci. With stringent phenotyping, it has recently been shown that several of these overlapping loci are independently associated with both COPD and lung cancer. These loci implicate genes underlying pulmonary inflammation and apoptotic processes mediated by the bronchial epithelium, and link COPD with lung cancer at a molecular genetic level. It is currently possible to derive risk models for lung cancer that incorporate lung cancer-specific genetic variants, recently identified “COPD-related” genetic variants, and clinical variables. Early studies suggest that single nucleotide polymorphism-based risk stratification of smokers might help better target novel prevention and early diagnostic strategies in lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk model

  16. Molecular and pro-inflammatory genetic profile in gastric carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitarz, R.

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a result from the combination of environmental factors and an accumulation of specific genetic alterations, and affects mainly the older population. It is known that genetic factors play a more important role in early onset gastric cancers than in conventional gastric cancer

  17. Testicular germ cell tumors: Molecular genetic and clinicomorphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nemtsova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Testicular tumors are the most common form of solid cancer in young men. According to the 2004 WHO classification, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT may present with different histological types. Embryonic cells of varying grade may be a source of TGCT and the occurrence of this type of tumors is directly related to the formation of a pool of male sex cells and gametogenesis. The paper gives information on mo- lecular stages for the process of formation of male sex cells in health, as well as ways of their impairments leading to TGCT. An investigation of the profiles of gene expression and the spectrum of molecular damages revealed genes responsible for a predisposition to the sporadic and hereditary forms of TGCT. The paper presents the current molecular genetic and clinicomorphological characteristics of TGCT. 

  18. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide

  19. Implementation of molecular karyotyping in clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Lovrecic

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of technologies for the study of the human genome is an expected step after the discovery and sequencing of the entire human genome. Chromosomal microarrays, which allow us to perform tens of thousands of previously individual experiments simultaneously, are being utilized in all areas of human genetics and genomics. Initially, this was applicable only for research purposes, but in the last few years their clinical diagnostic purposes are becoming more and more relevant. Using molecular karyotyping (also chromosomal microarray, comparative genomic hybridization with microarray, aCGH, one can analyze microdeletions / microduplications in the whole human genome at once. It is a first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test instead of G-banded karyotyping in patients with developmental delay and/or congenital anomalies. Molecular karyotyping is used as a diagnostic test in patients with unexplained developmental delay and/or idiopathic intellectual disability and/or dysmorphic features and/or multiple congenital anomalies (DD/ID/DF/MCA. In addition, the method is used in prenatal diagnostics and in some centres also in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.The aim of this paper is to inform the professional community in the field about this new diagnostic method and its implementation in Slovenia, and to define the clinical situations where the method is appropriate.

  20. Hemangiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy of breast cancer. Report of four cases with molecular genetic diagnosis and literature review; Haemangiosarkom nach brusterhaltender Therapie beim Mammakarzinom. Vier Fallbeispiele mit molekulargenetischer Diagnostik und Literaturuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle-Kraemling, Carolin [Universitaetsklinikum, Duesseldorf (Germany). Frauenklinik; Boelke, Edwin; Budach, Wilfried [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf (DE). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und radiologische Onkologie] (and others)

    2011-10-15

    Hemangiosarcomas of the breast represent a rare disease of the breast mainly occurring as secondary neoplasias with a latency of 5-10 years after primary treatment of breast cancer and are associated with an unfavourable prognosis. Radiation therapy, which is integrated within the concept of breast conserving therapy ranks as the main risk factor. In this report we describe the clinical course of 4 patients including their molecular genetic pattern and give a summary of the actual literature. Hemangiosarcomas occur as a secondary neoplasm with a latency of 5-10 years after primary treatment of breast cancer and have an unfavorable prognosis. A genetic predisposition is assumed, but we could not find a significant role of tumor suppressor genes BRCA1, BRCA2 or p53 in our patients. Due to limited data available for these tumors, recommendations for therapy include radical tumor resection achieving wide free margins and inconsistent regimens of chemo- and/or immunetherapy modalities. In the majority these are based on systemic therapy regimens for other cutaneous sarcomas, such as Kaposi's sarcoma. Efforts should be taken for a nation-wide systematic registration of all cases of post-irradiation hemangiosarcomas.

  1. Molecular Genetic Identification Of Some Flax Mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMER, I.M.; MOUSTAFA, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Five flax genotypes (Linum usitatissimum L.) i.e., commercial cultivar Sakha 2, the mother variety Giza 4 and three mutant types induced by gamma rays, were screened for their salinity tolerance in field experiments (salinity concentration was 8600 and 8300 ppm for soil and irrigation water, respectively). Mutation 6 was the most salt tolerant as compared to the other four genotypes.RAPD technique was used to detect some molecular markers associated with salt tolerance in flax (Mut 6), RAPD-PCR results using 12 random primers exhibited 149 amplified fragments; 91.9% of them were polymorphic and twelve molecular markers (8.1%) for salt tolerant (mutant 6) were identified with molecular size ranged from 191 to 4159 bp and only eight primers successes to amplify these specific markers. Concerning the other mutants, Mut 15 and Mut 25 exhibited 4.3% and 16.2% specific markers, respectively. The induced mutants exhibited genetic similarity to the parent variety were about 51%, 58.3% and 61.1% for Mut 25, Mut 6 and Mut 15, respectively. These specific markers (SM) are used for identification of the induced mutations and it is important for new variety registration.

  2. Molecular characterization and assessment of genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R Madhusudhana

    genetic diversity available at molecular level among a set of phenotypically different ... allele matching and cluster analysis based on unweighted neighbor- joining (Gascuel, 1997) ..... on isozyme data-a simulation study. Theor. Appl. Genet.

  3. Molecular characterization of genetic diversity in some durum wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of genetic diversity in some durum wheat ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Thus, RAPD offer a potentially simple, rapid and reliable method to evaluate genetic variation and relatedness among ten wheat ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  5. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John... encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  6. Genetic testing and your cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000842.htm Genetic testing and your cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  7. Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) using the random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methods.

  8. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the Indian Population. Single gene disorders. Complex eye diseases. Genotype-phenotype correlation. Molecular diagnostics.

  9. Oral mucosa and lung cancer: Are genetic changes in the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... to lung cancer, although other risk factors (such as genetic tendency) ... analysis of oral mucosa identifying individuals predisposed to lung cancer. ... of the study is that oral epithelial cells of smokers who have lung cancer are ... Stratec Molecular, Berlin, Germany). p53 codon 72 ..... Validity and reliability of.

  10. Chondrosarcoma: With Updates on Molecular Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma (CHS is a malignant cartilage-forming tumor and usually occurs within the medullary canal of long bones and pelvic bones. Based on the morphologic feature alone, a correct diangosis of CHS may be difficult, Therefore, correlation of radiological and clinicopathological features is mandatory in the diagnosis of CHS. The prognosis of CHS is closely related to histologic grading, however, histologic grading may be subjective with high inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present histologic grading system and clinicopathological and radiological findings of conventional CHS. Subtypes of CHSs, such as dedifferentiated, mesenchymal, and clear cell CHSs are also presented. In addition, we introduce updated cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings to expand our understanding of CHS biology. New markers of cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell signaling might offer important therapeutic and prognostic information in near future.

  11. Intention to seek information on cancer genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Andrews

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The public has a high interest in seeking personal genetic information, which holds implications for health information seeking research and health care policy. Rapid advances in cancer genetics research promise early detection, prevention and treatment, yet consumers may have greater difficulty finding and using the information they may need to make informed decisions regarding their personal health and the future of their families. Design. A statewide telephone survey was conducted of non-institutionalized Kentucky residents 18 years of age or older to investigate factors associated with the intention to seek cancer genetics information, including the need for such information seeking help. Results. The results show that intention to seek cancer genetics information, if testing were readily available, is moderately high (62.5% of those responding; n=835, and that status as a racial minority, the perception that cancer runs in one's family, and frequent worrying about cancer risk are statistically significant predictors of intent to seek genetics information. Conclusion. . We argue that an already complex health information environment will be even more difficult for individuals to navigate as genetic research becomes more ubiquitous in health care. An increase in demand for genetics information in various forms, as suggested by these results and those of other studies, implies that enduring intervention strategies are needed to help individuals acquire necessary health information literacy skills, with special attention given to racial minorities.

  12. Update on Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Karin M

    2018-05-01

    Our understanding of the genetics of colorectal cancer has changed dramatically over recent years. Colorectal cancer can be classified in multiple different ways. Along with the advent of whole-exome sequencing, we have gained an understanding of the scale of the genetic changes found in sporadic colorectal cancer. We now know that there are multiple pathways that are commonly involved in the evolution of colorectal cancer including Wnt/β-catenin, RAS, EGFR, and PIK3 kinase. Another recent leap in our understanding of colorectal cancer genetics is the recognition that many, if not all tumors, are actually genetically heterogeneous within individual tumors and also between tumors. Recent research has revealed the prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications of various specific mutations, including specific mutations in BRAF and KRAS . There is increasing interest in the use of mutation testing for screening and surveillance through stool and circulating DNA testing. Recent advances in translational research in colorectal cancer genetics are dramatically changing our understanding of colorectal cancer and will likely change therapy and surveillance in the near future.

  13. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Skin Cancer includes information about genes and hereditary syndromes associated with basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma skin cancer. Get comprehensive information about the genetics of skin cancer and interventions in this summary for clinicians.

  14. The molecular genetics of crown gall tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Schilperoort, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes are the causative agents of the widespread plant diseases ''crown gall'' and ''hairy root'' respectively. It is now well established that virulent strains of these bacterial species transfer a piece of bacterial DNA into plant cells, thereby transforming these into tumor cells. In research much attention has been paid to the agrobacteria for several reasons. First is the desire to develop a system for the genetic engineering of plant cells based on the natural system for gene transfer between Agrobacterium species and plant cells. Second, there is a striking resemblance between the etiology of animal cancers and the plant cancer crown gall that was recognized as early as in 1927. This led to basic studies on the process of plant tumor induction and on the recovery of plant cells from the tumorous state. A third important interest lies in crown gall as a disease that is the cause of economically important losses in agriculture an horticulture in Europe, North America, and Austrailia. Research has been aimed at finding means to prevent crown gall and to cure plants of this disease

  15. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoers, Nine V A M; Monnens, Leo A H

    2006-02-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide (protein). In addition, several basic and frequently used general molecular tools, such as restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, DNA amplification and sequencing are discussed, in order to lay the foundations for the forthcoming chapters.

  16. Lung cancer, genetic predisposition and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob; Korhonen, Tellervo; Holst, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to disentangle genetic and environmental causes in lung cancer while considering smoking status. Methods: Four Nordic twin cohorts (43 512 monozygotic (MZ) and 71 895 same sex dizygotic (DZ) twin individuals) had smoking data before cancer diagnosis. We used time...

  17. Molecular pathology of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, L H; Drake, R R; Esquela-Kirscher, A; Lance, R S; Semmes, O J; Troyer, D A

    2010-01-01

    This chapter includes discussion of the molecular pathology of tissue, blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions. Because we are unable to reliably image the disease in vivo, a 12 core method that oversamples the peripheral zone is widely used. This generates large numbers of cores that need to be carefully processed and sampled. In spite of the large number of tissue cores, the amount of tumor available for study is often quite limited. This is a particular challenge for research, as new biomarker assays will need to preserve tissue architecture intact for histopathology. Methods of processing and reporting pathology are discussed. With the exception of ductal variants, recognized subtypes of prostate cancer are largely confined to research applications, and most prostate cancers are acinar. Biomarker discovery in urine and expressed prostatic secretions would be useful since these are readily obtained and are proximate fluids. The well-known challenges of biomarker discovery in blood and urine are referenced and discussed. Mediators of carcinogenesis can serve as biomarkers as exemplified by mutations in PTEN and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The use of proteomics in biomarker discovery with an emphasis on imaging mass spectroscopy of tissues is discussed. Small RNAs are of great interest, however, their usefulness as biomarkers in clinical decision making remains the subject of ongoing research. The chapter concludes with an overview of blood biomarkers such as circulating nucleic acids and tumor cells and bound/free isoforms of prostate specific antigen (PSA).

  18. Genetic variation in adipokine genes and risk of colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechlivanis, S.; Bermejo, J. L.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel; Försti, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 6 (2009), s. 933-940 ISSN 0804-4643 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:EU(SE) LSHC-CT-2004-503465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : colorectal cancer * diabetes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.539, year: 2009

  19. Genetic variants in selenoprotein genes increase risk of colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Méplan, C.; Hughes, D. J.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Souček, P.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Hlavatá, I.; Vrána, D.; Vodička, Pavel; Hesketh, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 6 (2010), s. 1074-1079 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GP305/09/P194 Grant - others:EU(XE) FP6-505360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : colorectal cancer * Selenium Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.402, year: 2010

  20. [Epidemiology, risk factors and molecular pathogenesis of primary liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2008-03-23

    Primary liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for 85-90% of primary liver cancers. Distribution of hepatocellular carcinoma shows variations among geographic regions and ethnic groups. Males have higher liver cancer rates than females. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs within an established background of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (70-90%). Major causes (80%) of hepatocellular carcinoma are hepatitis B, C virus infection, and aflatoxin exposition. Its development is a multistep process. We have a growing understanding on the molecular pathogenesis. Genetic and epigenetic changes activate oncogenes, inhibit tumorsuppressor genes, which result in autonomous cell proliferation. The chromosomal instability caused by telomere dysfunction, the growth-retrained environment and the alterations of the micro- and macroenvironment help the expansion of the malignant cells. Understanding the molecular mechanisms could improve the screening of patients with chronic liver disease, or cirrhosis, and the prevention as well as treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Child Development and Molecular Genetics: 14 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first article on molecular genetics was published in this journal: "Child Development, Molecular Genetics, and What to Do With Genes Once They Are Found" (R. Plomin & M. Rutter, 1998). The goal of the article was to outline what developmentalists can do with genes once they are found. These new directions for developmental…

  2. Application of molecular genetic tools for forest pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; John Hanna; Amy Ross-Davis; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular genetics have provided powerful tools to address critical issues in forest pathology to help promote resilient forests. Although molecular genetic tools are initially applied to understand individual components of forest pathosystems, forest pathosystems involve dynamic interactions among biotic and abiotic components of the...

  3. Cancer-related inflammation, the seventh hallmark of cancer: links to genetic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colotta, Francesco; Allavena, Paola; Sica, Antonio; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory conditions in selected organs increase the risk of cancer. An inflammatory component is present also in the microenvironment of tumors that are not epidemiologically related to inflammation. Recent studies have begun to unravel molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. In the tumor microenvironment, smoldering inflammation contributes to proliferation and survival of malignant cells, angiogenesis, metastasis, subversion of adaptive immunity, reduced response to hormones and chemotherapeutic agents. Recent data suggest that an additional mechanism involved in cancer-related inflammation (CRI) is induction of genetic instability by inflammatory mediators, leading to accumulation of random genetic alterations in cancer cells. In a seminal contribution, Hanahan and Weinberg [(2000) Cell, 100, 57-70] identified the six hallmarks of cancer. We surmise that CRI represents the seventh hallmark.

  4. Cystic fibrosis, molecular genetics for all life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausilia Elce

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most frequent lethal autosomal recessive disorder among Caucasians (incidence: 1:2,500 newborn. In the last two decades CF prognosis considerably improved and many patients well survive into their adulthood. Furthermore, milder CF with a late onset was described. CF is a challenge for laboratory of molecular genetics that greatly contributes to the natural history of the disease since fetal age. Carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis, also by non-invasive analysis of maternal blood fetal DNA, are now available, and many labs offer preimplantation diagnosis. The major criticism in prenatal medicine is the lack of an effective multidisciplinary counseling that helps the couples to plan their reasoned reproductive choice. Most countries offer newborn screening that significantly reduce CF morbidity but different protocols based on blood trypsin, molecular analysis and sweat chloride cause a variable efficiency of the screening programs. Again, laboratory is crucial for CF diagnosis in symptomatic patients: sweat chloride is the diagnostic golden standard, but different methodologies and the lack of quality control in most labs reduce its effectiveness. Molecular analysis contributes to confirm diagnosis in symptomatic subjects; furthermore, it helps to predict the disease outcome on the basis of the mutation (genotype-phenotype correlation and mutations in a myriad of genes, inherited independently by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, which may modulate the clinical expression of the disease in each single patient (modifier genes. More recently, the search of the CFTR mutations gained a role in selecting CF patients that may benefit from biological therapy based on correctors and potentiators that are effective in patients bearing specific mutations (personalized therapy. All such applications of molecular diagnostics confirm the “uniqueness” of each CF patient, offering to laboratory medicine the

  5. Molecular Cancer Prevention: Current Status & Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresso, Karen Colbert; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Brown, Powel H.; Szabo, Eva; Lippman, Scott; Hawk, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneity and complexity of advanced cancers strongly supports the rationale for an enhanced focus on molecular prevention as a priority strategy to reduce the burden of cancer. Molecular prevention encompasses traditional chemopreventive agents as well as vaccinations and therapeutic approaches to cancer-predisposing conditions. Despite challenges to the field, we now have refined insights into cancer etiology and early pathogenesis; successful risk assessment and new risk models; agents with broad preventive efficacy (e.g., aspirin) in common chronic diseases, including cancer; and a successful track record of more than 10 agents approved by the FDA for the treatment of precancerous lesions or cancer risk reduction. The development of molecular preventive agents does not differ significantly from the development of therapies for advanced cancers, yet has unique challenges and special considerations given that it most often involves healthy or asymptomatic individuals. Agents, biomarkers, cohorts, overall design, and endpoints are key determinants of molecular preventive trials, as with therapeutic trials, although distinctions exist for each within the preventive setting. Progress in the development and evolution of molecular preventive agents has been steadier in some organ systems, such as breast and skin, than in others. In order for molecular prevention to be fully realized as an effective strategy, a number of challenges to the field must be addressed. Here we provide a brief overview of the context for and special considerations of molecular prevention along with a discussion of the results of major randomized controlled trials. PMID:26284997

  6. Molecular genetic studies in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromans, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis five molecular genetic studies on flax ( Linum usitatissimum L.) are described, of which two chapters aim to characterize the genetic structure and the amount of genetic diversity in the primary and secondary gene pool of the crop species. Three chapters describe the development of

  7. Cancer molecular markers: A guide to cancer detection and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Meera; Sandhu, Sardul Singh; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2018-02-08

    Cancer is generally caused by the molecular alterations which lead to specific mutations. Advances in molecular biology have provided an impetus to the study of cancers with valuable prognostic and predictive significance. Over the hindsight various attempts have been undertaken by scientists worldwide, in the management of cancer; where, we have witnessed a number of molecular markers which allow the early detection of cancers and lead to a decrease in its mortality rate. Recent advances in oncology have led to the discovery of cancer markers that has allowed early detection and targeted therapy of tumors. In this context, current review provides a detail outlook on various molecular markers for diagnosis, prognosis and management of therapeutic response in cancer patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    George H Sakorafas; Vasileios Smyrniotis

    2012-01-01

    Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular bio...

  9. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletta, Federica; Wadham, Carol; Ziegler, David S; Marshall, Glenn M; Haber, Michelle; McCowage, Geoffrey; Norris, Murray D; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    Technological advances including high-throughput sequencing have identified numerous tumor-specific genetic changes in pediatric and adolescent cancers that can be exploited as targets for novel therapies. This review provides a detailed overview of recent advances in the application of target-specific therapies for childhood cancers, either as single agents or in combination with other therapies. The review summarizes preclinical evidence on which clinical trials are based, early phase clinical trial results, and the incorporation of predictive biomarkers into clinical practice, according to cancer type. There is growing evidence that molecularly targeted therapies can valuably add to the arsenal available for treating childhood cancers, particularly when used in combination with other therapies. Nonetheless the introduction of molecularly targeted agents into practice remains challenging, due to the use of unselected populations in some clinical trials, inadequate methods to evaluate efficacy, and the need for improved preclinical models to both evaluate dosing and safety of combination therapies. The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  10. Molecular subtyping of cancer: current status and moving toward clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan; Lee, Victor H F; Ng, Michael K; Yan, Hong; Bijlsma, Maarten F

    2018-04-12

    Cancer is a collection of genetic diseases, with large phenotypic differences and genetic heterogeneity between different types of cancers and even within the same cancer type. Recent advances in genome-wide profiling provide an opportunity to investigate global molecular changes during the development and progression of cancer. Meanwhile, numerous statistical and machine learning algorithms have been designed for the processing and interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Molecular subtyping studies have allowed the allocation of cancer into homogeneous groups that are considered to harbor similar molecular and clinical characteristics. Furthermore, this has helped researchers to identify both actionable targets for drug design as well as biomarkers for response prediction. In this review, we introduce five frequently applied techniques for generating molecular data, which are microarray, RNA sequencing, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, NanoString and tissue microarray. Commonly used molecular data for cancer subtyping and clinical applications are discussed. Next, we summarize a workflow for molecular subtyping of cancer, including data preprocessing, cluster analysis, supervised classification and subtype characterizations. Finally, we identify and describe four major challenges in the molecular subtyping of cancer that may preclude clinical implementation. We suggest that standardized methods should be established to help identify intrinsic subgroup signatures and build robust classifiers that pave the way toward stratified treatment of cancer patients.

  11. Genetic counseling of the cancer survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvihill, J.J.; Byrne, J.

    1989-01-01

    Each year, tens of thousands of persons are diagnosed with cancer, are treated, and become survivors while still in their reproductive years. Their concerns about possible germ-cell damage as a result of life-saving radiation, chemotherapy, or both are plausible, based on evidence from animal models and from somatic cell mutations in human beings. A 40-year follow-up of survivors of the atomic bomb blasts in Japan showed no detectable genetic damage and suggested that the human gonad is more resistant to radiogenic mutation than the laboratory mouse. The pooled results of studying 12 series of offspring of cancer patients showed a 4% rate of major birth defects (similar to that of the general population) and an excess of fetal loss and low birth weight in offspring of women who received abdominal radiotherapy. According to preliminary evaluation of a new National Cancer Institute collaboration with five cancer registries, offspring of survivors of childhood cancers had no more birth defects than expected and, beyond an increase in probably familial cancers in children younger than 5, no overall increase in childhood cancer. Ideally, genetic and reproductive counseling should take place as soon as cancer is diagnosed (before therapy starts) and again when pregnancy is contemplated. 28 references

  12. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Henry T

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HNPCC (Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC, wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  13. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome): Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    HNPCC (Lynch syndrome) is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: parathyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skeletal problems. These problems include increased urine production (polyuria), deposits of calcium in the kidneys (nephrocalcinosis) leading ... Institute: Parathyroid Cancer Treatment PDQ National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Primary Hyperparathyroidism Educational ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Malignant tumor of urinary bladder Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Bladder Cancer General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  16. Molecular Diagnosis in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiologyBladder cancer (BC) is the most prevalent type of urothelial cancer and is associated with thehighest costs of all cancer types due to intensive patient surveillance. Because bladder tumorsfrequently recur, patients need to be monitored extensively [1-4]. Incidence increases

  17. Molecular Classification and Correlates in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ogino, Shuji; Goel, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Molecular classification of colorectal cancer is evolving. As our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis improves, we are incorporating new knowledge into the classification system. In particular, global genomic status [microsatellite instability (MSI) status and chromosomal instability (CIN) status] and epigenomic status [CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status] play a significant role in determining clinical, pathological and biological characteristics of colorectal cancer. In thi...

  18. History, genetics, and strategies for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrinos, Fay; Stoffel, Elena M

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the third cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The majority of CRC cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events, but up to 6% are attributed to known monogenic disorders that confer a markedly increased risk for the development of CRC and multiple extracolonic malignancies. Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited CRC syndrome and is associated with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2 but also MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Although the risk of CRC and endometrial cancer may approach near 75% and 50%, respectively, in gene mutation carriers, the identification of these individuals and at-risk family members through predictive genetic testing provides opportunities for cancer prevention including specialized cancer screening, intensified surveillance, and/or prophylactic surgeries. This article will provide a review of the major advances in risk assessment, molecular genetics, DNA mutational analyses, and cancer prevention and management made since Lynch syndrome was first described 100 years ago. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic epidemiology of sporadic colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Souček, P.; Novotný, J.; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Hánová, Monika; Tulupová, Elena; Poláková, Veronika; Halamková, J.; Hemminki, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 18, Supplement 1 (2006), S8-S8 ISSN 1107-3756. [The 11th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and 9th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine . 12.10.2006-14.10.2006, Hersonissos] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2626; GA MZd NR8563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : DNA repair genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. Genetically modified vaccines augment the efficacy of cancer surgery and chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2009), s. 199-200 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : genetically modified vaccines * cancer surgery and chemotherapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  1. Molecular genetic researches on the radiation genetics of Drosophila in JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, K.P.; Aleksandrova, M.V.; Aleksandrov, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies of radiation-induced heritable DNA lesions are carried out by the genetic group of Laboratory of nuclear problem in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The first results of molecular analysis of γ –ray- and neutron-induced vestigial mutations using PCR and sequencing will be presented. (authors)

  2. Molecular biology of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Doyle, William; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2015-04-01

    Classic as well as more recent large-scale genomic analyses have uncovered multiple genes and pathways important for bladder cancer development. Genes involved in cell-cycle control, chromatin regulation, and receptor tyrosine and PI3 kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways are commonly mutated in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Expression-based analyses have identified distinct types of bladder cancer that are similar to subsets of breast cancer, and have prognostic and therapeutic significance. These observations are leading to novel therapeutic approaches in bladder cancer, providing optimism for therapeutic progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [The genetics of thrombosis in cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, José Manuel; López, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial and complex disease in which the interaction of genetic factors (estimated at 60%) and environmental factors (e.g., the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, immobility and cancer) determine the risk of thrombosis for each individual. In particular, the association between thrombosis and cancer is well established. Approximately 20% of patients with cancer develop a thromboembolic event over the course of the natural history of the tumor process, with thrombosis being the second leading cause of death for these patients. One of the greatest challenges currently facing the field of oncology is the identification of patients at high risk of VTE who can benefit from thromboprophylaxis. Currently, there is a VTE risk prediction model for patients with cancer (the Khorana risk score); however, its ability to identify patients at high risk is very low. It is important to note that this score, which is based on five clinical parameters, ignores the genetic variability associated with VTE risk. In this article, we present the preliminary results of the Oncothromb study, whose objective is to develop an individual VTE risk prediction model for patients with cancer who are treated with outpatient chemotherapy. Our model includes the clinical and genetic data on each patient (Thrombo inCode(®) genetic profile). Only by integrating multiple layers of biological information (clinical, plasmatic and genetic) we could obtain models that provide accurate information as to which patients are at high risk of developing a thromboembolic event associated with cancer so as to take appropriate prophylactic measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic bases of the radiosensitivity of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaloge, S.; Marsiglia, H.

    2005-01-01

    Local-regional radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic means in the management of breast cancer. Three questions however arise from the important advances, achieved in this domain in the past years. The first question concerns the possibilities to identify and overcome the radioresistance of a subset of tumours. The second question is how to recognize women likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy, and therefore to diminish treatment indications in other groups. Finally, the third question is how to identify subjects at high risk for long term injury following breast irradiation, in order to adapt techniques and indications in such populations. The major advances of breast cancer molecular genetics in the past years should provide clinicians with tools to answer these important questions. In this paper, we review the molecular germ line (BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM,...) and somatic (p53, tyrosine kinase receptors, as well as actors of cell cycle, signal transduction, apoptosis, DNA repair...) main bases of breast cancer radiosensitivity. Recent methods of exploration of the genetic background of both the host and the tumours (gene and protein expression profiles) are also reviewed as major tools of breast cancer management in the next few years. (author)

  5. Synthetic Genetic Targeting of Genome Instability in Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajesh, Babu V.; Guppy, Brent J.; McManus, Kirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death throughout the World. A limitation of many current chemotherapeutic approaches is that their cytotoxic effects are not restricted to cancer cells, and adverse side effects can occur within normal tissues. Consequently, novel strategies are urgently needed to better target cancer cells. As we approach the era of personalized medicine, targeting the specific molecular defect(s) within a given patient’s tumor will become a more effective treatment strategy than traditional approaches that often target a given cancer type or sub-type. Synthetic genetic interactions are now being examined for their therapeutic potential and are designed to target the specific genetic and epigenetic phenomena associated with tumor formation, and thus are predicted to be highly selective. In general, two complementary approaches have been employed, including synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, to target aberrant expression and/or function associated with tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, respectively. Here we discuss the concepts of synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, and explain three general experimental approaches designed to identify novel genetic interactors. We present examples and discuss the merits and caveats of each approach. Finally, we provide insight into the subsequent pre-clinical work required to validate novel candidate drug targets

  6. The molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-10

    Dec 10, 2009 ... this review, we have provided an overview on the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms in AMD worldwide and highlight ..... eases like diabetes (Scott et al. ...... 2006 Systematic review and meta-analysis of.

  7. A genetic analysis of segregation distortion revealed by molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 90, No. ... Segregation analysis was based on 64 molecular markers, including 26 .... FHB of RIL populations was controlled by quantitative trait ... The authors acknowledge financial support by the National Basic.

  8. Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase deficiency in a Tunisian family. Jaouani Mouna, Hamdi Nadia, Chaouch Leila, Kalai Miniar, Mellouli Fethi, Darragi Imen, Boudriga Imen, Chaouachi Dorra, Bejaoui Mohamed, Abbes Salem ...

  9. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baylink, David

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of the proposed work is to apply several state of the art molecular genetic and gene therapy technologies to address fundamental questions in bone biology with a particular emphasis on attempting: l...

  10. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, L. A.; Brenner, H.; Buch, S.; Campbell, H.; Carracedo, A.; Carvajal-Carmona, L.; Castells, A.; Castellví-Bel, S.; Cheadle, J. P.; Devilee, P.; Dunlop, M.; Echeverry, M.; Gallinger, S.; Galvan, A.; Hampe, J.; Hemminki, K.; Ho, J. W. C.; Hofstra, R. M. W.; Hudson, T. J.; Kirac, I.; Lerch, M. M.; Li, L.; Lindblom, A.; Lipton, L.; Matsuda, K.; Maughan, T. S.; Moreno, V.; Morreau, H.; Naccarati, Alessio; Nakamura, Y.; Peterlongo, P.; Pharoah, P. D.; Sieber, O.; Radice, P.; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Schafmayer, C.; Schmidt, C. A.; von Schönfels, W.; Schreiber, S.; Scott, R.; Sham, P.; Souček, P.; Tenesa, A.; Tomplinson, P. M.; Velez, A.; Villanueva, C. M.; Vodička, Pavel; Völzke, H.; van Wezel, T.; Wijnen, J.T.; Zanke, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 143-151 ISSN 0267-8357 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : identification of low-risk variants * disease causing variants * susceptibility alleles Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  11. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jan;73(2):169-75. doi: 10.1002/pros.22552. Epub 2012 Jun 21. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Nakagawa H. Prostate cancer genomics by high-throughput technologies: genome-wide association study and sequencing analysis. Endocr ...

  12. Genetic determinants of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western world and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will have a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2). The degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the

  13. Genetic Determinants of Gastric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Boccia (Stefania)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractResults show that gastric cancer risk is increased by the inheritance of the variant alleles of the metabolic genes SULT1A1 and CYP2E1 *6, especially among smokers and drinkers, respectively. An additional increased risk is conferred by the inheritance of GSTT1 null variant, especially

  14. NEW MOLECULAR TECHNOLOGIES IN GENETIC DIAGNOSIS OF MALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Chernykh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the accelerated development of technologies in the field of molecular genetics and cytogenetics has led to significant opportunities of the research and diagnosis of mutations and variations of the genome. This article provides a brief review of new molecular technology, also as the results of their use in reproductive medicine and their perspectives in the genetic diagnosis of male infertility. 

  15. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A person’s reaction to trauma depends on the traumatic situation itself, personality characteristics of the person exposed to trauma, and posttraumatic social environment. Stressor must be extreme event that is extremely dangerous or fatal nature, and which is outside normal human experience [1].Studies investigating psychological consequences of military and civil trauma confirmed the correlation between the nature and intensity of trauma, previous traumatic experience, and psychological consequences. Stress causes the autonomic nervous system hyperactivity. If the stress is extreme or constant symptoms of hyperactivity, increased heart rate, increased respiration, sweating, muscle tension, insomnia and increased anxiety are becoming significant for the prolonging the symptoms of PTSD. Our cells are well adapted to exposure to a mild stress for a short time. In contrast there are potentially serious consequences of exposure to the prolonged stress[2].Various damages arising from the war in Bosnia (1992 - 1995 are almost undetectable, and the consequences for the mental health of the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina are long and painful. It is estimated that in Bosnia and Herzegovina there are 1.75 million people who have some stress-related mental disorders, of which 1 million in the Federation.PTSD may be represented by mutations that must be carried by many genes. There may even be epigenetic reasons for the disorder that have nothing to do with heritable mutations per se. Epigenetic means related to functional changes in the genome that can be regulated by external environmental events that do not involve alterations in the genetic code. One epigenetic mechanism is called “methylation,” a molecular process that affects the activity of a large percentage of genes. Epigenetic investigations say that methylation may be involved in the development of stress regulation in early life[3].A number of longitudinal studies have looked at

  16. Assessing Date Palm Genetic Diversity Using Different Molecular Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Mohamed A M; Sakr, Mahmoud M; Adawy, Sami S

    2017-01-01

    Molecular marker technologies which rely on DNA analysis provide powerful tools to assess biodiversity at different levels, i.e., among and within species. A range of different molecular marker techniques have been developed and extensively applied for detecting variability in date palm at the DNA level. Recently, the employment of gene-targeting molecular marker approaches to study biodiversity and genetic variations in many plant species has increased the attention of researchers interested in date palm to carry out phylogenetic studies using these novel marker systems. Molecular markers are good indicators of genetic distances among accessions, because DNA-based markers are neutral in the face of selection. Here we describe the employment of multidisciplinary molecular marker approaches: amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism, conserved DNA-derived polymorphism (CDDP), intron-targeted amplified polymorphism (ITAP), simple sequence repeats (SSR), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to assess genetic diversity in date palm.

  17. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fuhai; Meng Zhaowei; Tan Jian

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  18. Awareness of Cancer Susceptibility Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Phuong L.; Vadaparampil, Susan Thomas; Breen, Nancy; McNeel, Timothy S.; Wideroff, Louise; Graubard, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic testing for several cancer susceptibility syndromes is clinically available; however, existing data suggest limited population awareness of such tests. Purpose To examine awareness regarding cancer genetic testing in the U.S. population aged ≥25 years in the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys. Methods The weighted percentages of respondents aware of cancer genetic tests, and percent changes from 2000–2005 and 2005–2010, overall and by demographic, family history, and healthcare factors were calculated. Interactions were used to evaluate the patterns of change in awareness between 2005 and 2010 among subgroups within each factor. To evaluate associations with awareness in 2005 and 2010, percentages were adjusted for covariates using multiple logistic regression. The analysis was performed in 2012. Results Awareness decreased from 44.4% to 41.5% (pAwareness increased between 2005 and 2010 in most subgroups, particularly among individuals in the South (p-interaction=0.03) or with a usual place of care (p-interaction=0.01). In 2005 and 2010, awareness was positively associated with personal or family cancer history and high perceived cancer risk, and inversely associated with racial/ethnic minorities, age 25–39 or ≥60 years, male gender, lower education and income levels, public or no health insurance, and no provider contact in 12 months. Conclusions Despite improvement from 2005 to 2010, ≤50% of the U.S. adult population was aware of cancer genetic testing in 2010. Notably, disparities persist for racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with limited health care access or income. PMID:24745633

  19. Supplementary data: Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in cluster bean. (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) genotypes. Rakesh Pathak, S. K. Singh, Manjit Singh and A. Henry. J. Genet. 89, 243–246. Figure 1. RAPD profile of 1–16 Cyamopsis tetragonoloba genotypes amplified with arbitrary primer OPA-16. Figure 2. RAPD profile of 17–32 ...

  20. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in rice. (Oryza sativa L.) C. Vanniarajan, K. K. Vinod and Andy Pereira. J. Genet. 91, 9–19. Table 1. Chromosome-wise distribution of SSR alleles and their number (k), polymorphic information content (PIC) and allele discrimination index (Dm). Chromosome.

  1. Molecular research and genetic engineering of resistance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the recent research progress on genetic methods of resistance, the status and existing problems, traditional breeding, the main resistance mechanism, molecular markers and genetic engineering of resistance genes. It is hoped that new breeding methods and new varieties resistant to Verticillium wilt will ...

  2. Use of molecular genetics and historical records to reconstruct the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent advances in molecular genetics made the inference of past demographic events through the analysis of gene pools from modern populations possible. The technology uses genetic markers to provide previously unavailable resolution into questions of human evolution, migration and the historical relationship of ...

  3. Molecular Darwinism: The Contingency of Spontaneous Genetic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The availability of spontaneously occurring genetic variants is an important driving force of biological evolution. Largely thanks to experimental investigations by microbial geneticists, we know today that several different molecular mechanisms contribute to the overall genetic variations. These mechanisms can be assigned to three natural strategies to generate genetic variants: 1) local sequence changes, 2) intragenomic reshuffling of DNA segments, and 3) acquisition of a segment of foreign...

  4. [Prognostic and predictive molecular markers for urologic cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A; Schlomm, T; Bertz, S; Heinzelmann, J; Hölters, S; Simon, R; Stoehr, R; Junker, K

    2014-04-01

    Molecular prognostic factors and genetic alterations as predictive markers for cancer-specific targeted therapies are used today in the clinic for many malignancies. In recent years, many molecular markers for urogenital cancers have also been identified. However, these markers are not clinically used yet. In prostate cancer, novel next-generation sequencing methods revealed a detailed picture of the molecular changes. There is growing evidence that a combination of classical histopathological and validated molecular markers could lead to a more precise estimation of prognosis, thus, resulting in an increasing number of patients with active surveillance as a possible treatment option. In patients with urothelial carcinoma, histopathological factors but also the proliferation of the tumor, mutations in oncogenes leading to an increasing proliferation rate and changes in genes responsible for invasion and metastasis are important. In addition, gene expression profiles which could distinguish aggressive tumors with high risk of metastasis from nonmetastasizing tumors have been recently identified. In the future, this could potentially allow better selection of patients needing systemic perioperative treatment. In renal cell carcinoma, many molecular markers that are associated with metastasis and survival have been identified. Some of these markers were also validated as independent prognostic markers. Selection of patients with primarily organ-confined tumors and increased risk of metastasis for adjuvant systemic therapy could be clinically relevant in the future.

  5. Micropropagation, genetic engineering, and molecular biology of Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; Y. W. Chun; M. -S. Kim; M. A. Ahuja; M. C. Dillon; R. C. Carman; L. G. Eskew

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-four Populus biotechnology chapters, written by 85 authors, are comprised in 5 sections: 1) in vitro culture (micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, protoplasts, somaclonal variation, and germplasm preservation); 2) transformation and foreign gene expression; 3) molecular biology (molecular/genetic characterization); 4) biotic and abiotic resistance (disease,...

  6. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicholas Le Maitre

    Phylogenetic trees were created for leaf and stem rust pathotypes. Field isolates of ... Key words: Prevalence, microsatellite, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), phylogeny, Puccinia. INTRODUCTION. Puccinia triticina Eriks ..... Genetic distances and reconstruction phylogenetic trees from microsatellite DNA.

  7. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001); and molecular methods such as amplified fragment length polymorphism ... to the maintenance and rational use of germplasm resources in the improvement of ... study of diversity of ScMATE1 gene in different species of. Secale genus.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  9. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedan, Benoit; Thomas, Rachael; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Abadie, Jerome; Andre, Catherine; Cullen, John; Breen, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model for the human counterpart, providing additional evidence towards

  10. [The molecular biology of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Alexandra; Pautier, Patricia; Tazi, Youssef; Morice, Philippe; Duvillard, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Uzan, Catherine; Gauthier, Hélène; Balleyguier, Corinne; Lhommé, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer frequently presents at an advanced stage where the cornerstone of management remains surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Unfortunately, despite sometimes dramatic initial responses, advanced ovarian cancer almost invariably relapses. Little progress has been made in the identification of effective targeted-therapies for ovarian cancer. The majority of clinical trials investigating novel agents have been negative and the only approved targeted-therapy is bevacizumab, for which reliable predictive biomarkers still elude us. Ovarian cancer is treated as a uniform disease. Yet, biological studies have highlighted the heterogeneity of this malignancy with marked differences in histology, oncogenesis, prognosis, chemo-responsiveness, and molecular profile. Recent high throughput molecular analyses have identified a huge number of genomic/phenotypic alterations. Broadly speaking, high grade serous carcinomas (type II) display significant genomic instability and numerous amplifications and losses; low grade (type I) tumors are genomically stable but display frequent mutations. Importantly, many of these genomic alterations relate to known oncogenes for which targeted-therapies are available or in development. There is today a real potential for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer. We will review the current literature regarding the molecular characterization of epithelial ovarian cancer and discuss the biological rationale for a number of targeted strategies. In order to translate these biological advances into meaningful clinical improvements for our patients, it is imperative to incorporate translational research in ovarian cancer trials, a number of strategies will be proposed such as the acquisition of quality tumor samples, including sequential pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the potential of liquid biopsies, and novel trial designs more adapted to the molecular era of ovarian cancer research.

  11. Genetic factors and breast cancer laterality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Magid H

    2014-01-01

    between patients and their first-degree relatives in regards to cancer laterality and possibly age at initial diagnosis of cancer may suggest an underlying inherited genetic predisposition

  12. Molecular profiling of cancer--the future of personalized cancer medicine: a primer on cancer biology and the tools necessary to bring molecular testing to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Thomas; Catenacci, Daniel V T; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2011-04-01

    Cancers arise as a result of an accumulation of genetic aberrations that are either acquired or inborn. Virtually every cancer has its unique set of molecular changes. Technologies have been developed to study cancers and derive molecular characteristics that increasingly have implications for clinical care. Indeed, the identification of key genetic aberrations (molecular drivers) may ultimately translate into dramatic benefit for patients through the development of highly targeted therapies. With the increasing availability of newer, more powerful, and cheaper technologies such as multiplex mutational screening, next generation sequencing, array-based approaches that can determine gene copy numbers, methylation, expression, and others, as well as more sophisticated interpretation of high-throughput molecular information using bioinformatics tools like signatures and predictive algorithms, cancers will routinely be characterized in the near future. This review examines the background information and technologies that clinicians and physician-scientists will need to interpret in order to develop better, personalized treatment strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    Evaluation of an individual with a suspected bleeding disorder includes: platelet count .... information for genetic counseling of at-risk family members. It is indicated for ... Patients with blood group O and a low von Willebrand antigen level have a ..... [4] Husain N. Carrier analysis for hemophilia A: ideal versus acceptable.

  14. Molecular markers: a potential resource for ginger genetic diversity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nor Asiah; Rafii, M Y; Mahmud, T M M; Hanafi, M M; Miah, Gous

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is an economically important and valuable plant around the world. Ginger is used as a food, spice, condiment, medicine and ornament. There is available information on biochemical aspects of ginger, but few studies have been reported on its molecular aspects. The main objective of this review is to accumulate the available molecular marker information and its application in diverse ginger studies. This review article was prepared by combing material from published articles and our own research. Molecular markers allow the identification and characterization of plant genotypes through direct access to hereditary material. In crop species, molecular markers are applied in different aspects and are useful in breeding programs. In ginger, molecular markers are commonly used to identify genetic variation and classify the relatedness among varieties, accessions, and species. Consequently, it provides important input in determining resourceful management strategies for ginger improvement programs. Alternatively, a molecular marker could function as a harmonizing tool for documenting species. This review highlights the application of molecular markers (isozyme, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and others such as RFLP, SCAR, NBS and SNP) in genetic diversity studies of ginger species. Some insights on the advantages of the markers are discussed. The detection of genetic variation among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. This update of recent literature will help researchers and students select the appropriate molecular markers for ginger-related research.

  15. Genetic, functional and molecular features of glucocorticoid receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Luca

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are key mediators of stress response and are widely used as pharmacological agents to treat immune diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, and certain types of cancer. GCs act mainly by activating the GC receptor (GR, which interacts with other transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Here, we combined different functional genomics approaches to gain molecular insights into the mechanisms of action of GC. By profiling the transcriptional response to GC over time in 4 Yoruba (YRI and 4 Tuscans (TSI lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, we suggest that the transcriptional response to GC is variable not only in time, but also in direction (positive or negative depending on the presence of specific interacting transcription factors. Accordingly, when we performed ChIP-seq for GR and NF-κB in two YRI LCLs treated with GC or with vehicle control, we observed that features of GR binding sites differ for up- and down-regulated genes. Finally, we show that eQTLs that affect expression patterns only in the presence of GC are 1.9-fold more likely to occur in GR binding sites, compared to eQTLs that affect expression only in its absence. Our results indicate that genetic variation at GR and interacting transcription factors binding sites influences variability in gene expression, and attest to the power of combining different functional genomic approaches.

  16. Colorectal Cancer in Iran: Molecular Epidemiology and Screening Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Dolatkhah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in the past three decades in Iran has made it a major public health burden. This study aimed to report its epidemiologic features, molecular genetic aspects, survival, heredity, and screening pattern in Iran. Methods. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the relevant published articles. We used medical subject headings, including colorectal cancer, molecular genetics, KRAS and BRAF mutations, screening, survival, epidemiologic study, and Iran. Results. Age standardized incidence rate of Iranian CRCs was 11.6 and 10.5 for men and women, respectively. Overall five-year survival rate was 41%, and the proportion of CRC among the younger age group was higher than that of western countries. Depending on ethnicity, geographical region, dietary, and genetic predisposition, mutation genes were considerably diverse and distinct among CRCs across Iran. The high occurrence of CRC in records of relatives of CRC patients showed that family history of CRC was more common among young CRCs. Conclusion. Appropriate screening strategies for CRC which is amenable to early detection through screening, especially in relatives of CRCs, should be considered as the first step in CRC screening programs.

  17. Colorectal Cancer in Iran: Molecular Epidemiology and Screening Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolatkhah, R.; Somi, M. H.; Dolatkhah, R.; Kermani, I. A.; Dastgiri, S.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the past three decades in Iran has made it a major public health burden. This study aimed to report its epidemiologic features, molecular genetic aspects, survival, heredity, and screening pattern in Iran. Methods. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the relevant published articles. We used medical subject headings, including colorectal cancer, molecular genetics, KRAS and BRAF mutations, screening, survival, epidemiologic study, and Iran. Results. Age standardized incidence rate of Iranian CRCs was 11.6 and 10.5 for men and women, respectively. Overall five-year survival rate was 41%, and the proportion of CRC among the younger age group was higher than that of western countries. Depending on ethnicity, geographical region, dietary, and genetic predisposition, mutation genes were considerably diverse and distinct among CRCs across Iran. The high occurrence of CRC in records of relatives of CRC patients showed that family history of CRC was more common among young CRCs. Conclusion. Appropriate screening strategies for CRC which is amenable to early detection through screening, especially in relatives of CRCs, should be considered as the first step in CRC screening programs.

  18. Molecular discrimination and genetic relationships between some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cucurbita pepo ssp. pepo; zucchini group is a widely grown and economically important group belonging to genus Cucurbita, and being one of the easiest groups to cultivate in temperate climate with overwhelming production. Since, RAPD analysis provides a fast and reliable method for molecular characterization and ...

  19. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh Balaram; Kumar Amrendra

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biologica...

  20. Molecular and biological interactions in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heer, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The current thesis discusses the use of molecular and biological tumor markers to predict clinical outcome. By studying several key processes in the develepment of cancer as regulation of cell motility (non-receptor protein tyrosin adesion kinases, FAK, Src and paxillin, Apoptosis (caspase-3

  1. Molecular causes and consequences of genetic instability with respect to the FA/BRCA Caretaker Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Neveling, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    In the context of this thesis, I investigated the molecular causes and functional consequences of genetic instability using a human inherited disease, Fanconi anemia. FA patients display a highly variable clinical phenotype, including congenital abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure and a high cancer risk. The FA cellular phenotype is characterized by spontaneous and inducible chromosomal instability, and a typical S/G2 phase arrest after exposure to DNA-damaging agents. So far, 13 g...

  2. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrau, P.; Doerffer, K.

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author)

  3. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P; Doerffer, K

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author) 1 tab., 4 figs.

  4. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Rodriguez, Maria Teresa; Sinconegui Gomez, Belkys; Cruz Cruz, Anaisa

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  5. Molecular biology and riddle of cancer: the ‘Tom & Jerry’ show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Al Mamun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available From the conventional Bird’s eye, cancer initiation and metastasis are generally intended to be understood beneath the light of classical clonal genetic, epigenetic and cancer stem cell model. But inspite decades of investigation, molecular biology has shown hard success to give Eagle’s eye in unraveling the riddle of cancer. And it seems, tiring Tom runs in vague behind naughty Jerry.

  6. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  7. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment.

  8. Genetics and Molecular Diagnostics in Retinoblastoma--An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sameh E; Racher, Hilary; Zhang, Chengyue; MacDonald, Heather; Gallie, Brenda L

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the prototype genetic cancer: in one or both eyes of young children, most retinoblastomas are initiated by biallelic mutation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, RB1, in a developing retinal cell. All those with bilateral retinoblastoma have heritable cancer, although 95% have not inherited the RB1 mutation. Non-heritable retinoblastoma is always unilateral, with 98% caused by loss of both RB1 alleles from the tumor, whereas 2% have normal RB1 in tumors initiated by amplification of the MYCN oncogene. Good understanding of retinoblastoma genetics supports optimal care for retinoblastoma children and their families. Retinoblastoma is the first cancer to officially acknowledge the seminal role of genetics in cancer, by incorporating "H" into the eighth edition of cancer staging (2017): those who carry the RB1 cancer-predisposing gene are H1; those proven to not carry the familial RB1 mutation are H0; and those at unknown risk are HX. We suggest H0* be used for those with residual <1% risk to carry a RB1 mutation due to undetectable mosaicism. Loss of RB1 from a susceptible developing retinal cell initiates the benign precursor, retinoma. Progressive genomic changes result in retinoblastoma, and cancer progression ensues with increasing genomic disarray. Looking forward, novel therapies are anticipated from studies of retinoblastoma and metastatic tumor cells and the second primary cancers that the carriers of RB1 mutations are at high risk to develop. Here, we summarize the concepts of retinoblastoma genetics for ophthalmologists in a question/answer format to assist in the care of patients and their families. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  9. Advances in molecular genetic studies of primary dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Ling-yan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystonias are heterogeneous hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which result in twisting, repetitive movements and abnormal postures. In recent years, there was a great advance in molecular genetic studies of primary dystonia. This paper will review the clinical characteristics and molecular genetic studies of primary dystonia, including early-onset generalized torsion dystonia (DYT1, whispering dysphonia (DYT4, dopa-responsive dystonia (DYT5, mixed-type dystonia (DYT6, paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (DYT10, myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (DYT11, rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (DYT12, adult-onset cervical dystonia (DYT23, craniocervical dystonia (DYT24 and primary torsion dystonia (DYT25.

  10. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2 have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  11. Molecular genetics of inherited eye disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I M; Sasi, R

    1994-10-01

    In the past 10 y, there have been considerable advances in the mapping, isolation, and characterization of many genes for important ocular conditions: retinitis pigmentosa, Norrie disease, Waardenburg syndrome, choroideremia, aniridia, retinoblastoma, and others. The candidate gene approach has now supplemented classical linkage studies and positional cloning in the investigation of ocular disorders. Developmentally expressed genes and animal models have provided insights as to the etiology of other disorders. With this knowledge at hand, genetic counselling for heritable eye diseases has been greatly improved.

  12. Molecular genetics of pituitary development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    The pituitary gland of vertebrates consists of two major parts, the neurohypophysis (NH) and the adenohypophysis (AH). As a central part of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system (HHS), it constitutes a functional link between the nervous and the endocrine system to regulate basic body functions, such as growth, metabolism and reproduction. The development of the AH has been intensively studied in mouse, serving as a model for organogenesis and differential cell specification. However, given that the AH is a relatively recent evolutionary advance of the chordate phylum, it is also interesting to understand its development in lower chordate systems. In recent years, the zebrafish has emerged as a powerful lower vertebrate system for developmental studies, being amenable for large-scale genetic approaches, embryological manipulations, and in vivo imaging. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge of the mechanisms and genetic control of pituitary formation during zebrafish development. First, we describe the components of the zebrafish HHS, and the different pituitary cell types and hormones, followed by a description of the different steps of normal pituitary development. The central part of the review deals with the genes found to be essential for zebrafish AH development, accompanied by a description of the corresponding mutant phenotypes. Finally, we discuss future directions, with particular focus on evolutionary aspects, and some novel functional aspects with growing medical and social relevance.

  13. Molecular genetics and epigenetics of CACTA elements

    KAUST Repository

    Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2013-08-21

    The CACTA transposons, so named for a highly conserved motif at element ends, comprise one of the most abundant superfamilies of Class 2 (cut-and-paste) plant transposons. CACTA transposons characteristically include subterminal sequences of several hundred nucleotides containing closely spaced direct and inverted repeats of a short, conserved sequence of 14-15 bp. The Supressor-mutator (Spm) transposon, identified and subjected to detailed genetic analysis by Barbara McClintock, remains the paradigmatic element of the CACTA family. The Spm transposon encodes two proteins required for transposition, the transposase (TnpD) and a regulatory protein (TnpA) that binds to the subterminal repeats. Spm expression is subject to both genetic and epigenetic regulation. The Spm-encoded TnpA serves as an activator of the epigenetically inactivated, methylated Spm, stimulating both transient and heritable activation of the transposon. TnpA also serves as a negative regulator of the demethylated active element promoter and is required, in addition to the TnpD, for transposition. © Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2013.

  14. Genetic factors and molecular mechanisms in dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ling; Garrett, Qian; Flanagan, Judith; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata; Papas, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a complex condition with a multifactorial etiology that can be difficult to manage successfully. While external factors are modifiable, treatment success is limited if genetic factors contribute to the disease. The purpose of this review is to compile research describing normal and abnormal ocular surface function on a molecular level, appraise genetic studies involving DED or DED-associated diseases, and introduce the basic methods used for conducting genetic epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic Breeding and Diversity of the Genus Passiflora: Progress and Perspectives in Molecular and Genetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bernard M. Cerqueira-Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp., molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit.

  16. Molecular Darwinism: the contingency of spontaneous genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The availability of spontaneously occurring genetic variants is an important driving force of biological evolution. Largely thanks to experimental investigations by microbial geneticists, we know today that several different molecular mechanisms contribute to the overall genetic variations. These mechanisms can be assigned to three natural strategies to generate genetic variants: 1) local sequence changes, 2) intragenomic reshuffling of DNA segments, and 3) acquisition of a segment of foreign DNA. In these processes, specific gene products are involved in cooperation with different nongenetic elements. Some genetic variations occur fully at random along the DNA filaments, others rather with a statistical reproducibility, although at many possible sites. We have to be aware that evolution in natural ecosystems is of higher complexity than under most laboratory conditions, not at least in view of symbiotic associations and the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer. The encountered contingency of genetic variation can possibly best ensure a long-term persistence of life under steadily changing living conditions.

  17. Cancer of the Pancreas: Molecular Pathways and Current Advancement in Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers among all malignances, with a median overall survival of cancers harbor a variety of genetic alternations that render it difficult to treat even with targeted therapy. Recent studies revealed that pancreatic cancers are highly enriched with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population, which is resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs, and therefore escapes chemotherapy and promotes tumor recurrence. Cancer cell epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is highly associated with metastasis, generation of CSCs, and treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. Reviewed here are the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the major signaling pathways regulating pancreatic cancer EMT and CSCs, and the advancement in current clinical and experimental treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Molecular Cochaperones: Tumor Growth and Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K. Calderwood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones play important roles in all cellular organisms by maintaining the proteome in an optimally folded state. They appear to be at a premium in cancer cells whose evolution along the malignant pathways requires the fostering of cohorts of mutant proteins that are employed to overcome tumor suppressive regulation. To function at significant rates in cells, HSPs interact with cochaperones, proteins that assist in catalyzing individual steps in molecular chaperoning as well as in posttranslational modification and intracellular localization. We review current knowledge regarding the roles of chaperones such as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 and Hsp70 and their cochaperones in cancer. Cochaperones are potential targets for cancer therapy in themselves and can be used to assess the likely prognosis of individual malignancies. Hsp70 cochaperones Bag1, Bag3, and Hop play significant roles in the etiology of some cancers as do Hsp90 cochaperones Aha1, p23, Cdc37, and FKBP1. Others such as the J domain protein family, HspBP1, TTC4, and FKBPL appear to be associated with more benign tumor phenotypes. The key importance of cochaperones for many pathways of protein folding in cancer suggests high promise for the future development of novel pharmaceutical agents.

  19. Signature of genetic associations in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishwas; Nandan, Amrita; Sharma, Amitesh Kumar; Singh, Harpreet; Bharadwaj, Mausumi; Sinha, Dhirendra Narain; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2017-10-01

    Oral cancer etiology is complex and controlled by multi-factorial events including genetic events. Candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and next-generation sequencing identified various chromosomal loci to be associated with oral cancer. There is no available review that could give us the comprehensive picture of genetic loci identified to be associated with oral cancer by candidate gene studies-based, genome-wide association studies-based, and next-generation sequencing-based approaches. A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed database to identify the loci associated with oral cancer by exclusive candidate gene studies-based, genome-wide association studies-based, and next-generation sequencing-based study approaches. The information of loci associated with oral cancer is made online through the resource "ORNATE." Next, screening of the loci validated by candidate gene studies and next-generation sequencing approach or by two independent studies within candidate gene studies or next-generation sequencing approaches were performed. A total of 264 loci were identified to be associated with oral cancer by candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and next-generation sequencing approaches. In total, 28 loci, that is, 14q32.33 (AKT1), 5q22.2 (APC), 11q22.3 (ATM), 2q33.1 (CASP8), 11q13.3 (CCND1), 16q22.1 (CDH1), 9p21.3 (CDKN2A), 1q31.1 (COX-2), 7p11.2 (EGFR), 22q13.2 (EP300), 4q35.2 (FAT1), 4q31.3 (FBXW7), 4p16.3 (FGFR3), 1p13.3 (GSTM1-GSTT1), 11q13.2 (GSTP1), 11p15.5 (H-RAS), 3p25.3 (hOGG1), 1q32.1 (IL-10), 4q13.3 (IL-8), 12p12.1 (KRAS), 12q15 (MDM2), 12q13.12 (MLL2), 9q34.3 (NOTCH1), 17p13.1 (p53), 3q26.32 (PIK3CA), 10q23.31 (PTEN), 13q14.2 (RB1), and 5q14.2 (XRCC4), were validated to be associated with oral cancer. "ORNATE" gives a snapshot of genetic loci associated with oral cancer. All 28 loci were validated to be linked to oral cancer for which further fine-mapping followed by gene-by-gene and gene

  20. Genetic and epigenetic markers in colorectal cancer screening: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish Pratap; Rai, Sandhya; Suyal, Shradha; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Nand Kumar; Agarwal, Akash; Srivastava, Sameer

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogenous disease which develops from benign intraepithelial lesions known as adenomas to malignant carcinomas. Acquired alterations in Wnt signaling, TGFβ, MAPK pathway genes and clonal propagation of altered cells are responsible for this transformation. Detection of adenomas or early stage cancer in asymptomatic patients and better prognostic and predictive markers is important for improving the clinical management of CRC. Area covered: In this review, the authors have evaluated the potential of genetic and epigenetic alterations as markers for early detection, prognosis and therapeutic predictive potential in the context of CRC. We have discussed molecular heterogeneity present in CRC and its correlation to prognosis and response to therapy. Expert commentary: Molecular marker based CRC screening methods still fail to gain trust of clinicians. Invasive screening methods, molecular heterogeneity, chemoresistance and low quality test samples are some key challenges which need to be addressed in the present context. New sequencing technologies and integrated omics data analysis of individual or population cohort results in GWAS. MPE studies following a GWAS could be future line of research to establish accurate correlations between CRC and its risk factors. This strategy would identify most reliable biomarkers for CRC screening and management.

  1. Molecular Models of Genetic and Organismic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    In recent studies we showed that the earlier relational theories of organismic sets (Rashevsky,1967), Metabolic-Replication (M,R)-systems (Rosen,1958)and molecular sets (Bartholomay,1968) share a joint foundation that can be studied within a unified categorical framework of functional organismic structures (Baianu,1980. This is possible because all relational theories have a biomolecular basis, that is, complex structures such as genomes, cells,organs and biological organisms are mathematically represented in terms of biomolecular properties and entities,(that are often implicit in their representation axioms. The definition of organismic sets, for example, requires that certain essential quantities be determined from experiment: these are specified by special sets of values of general observables that are derived from physicochemical measurements(Baianu,1970; Baianu,1980; Baianu et al, 2004a.)Such observables are context-dependent and lead directly to natural transformations in categories and Topoi, that are...

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: a distinct molecular subtype of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jácome, Alexandre Andrade Dos Anjos; Lima, Enaldo Melo de; Kazzi, Ana Izabela; Chaves, Gabriela Freitas; Mendonça, Diego Cavalheiro de; Maciel, Marina Mara; Santos, José Sebastião Dos

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 90% of the world population is infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Usually, it infects B lymphocytes, predisposing them to malignant transformation. Infection of epithelial cells occurs rarely, and it is estimated that about to 10% of gastric cancer patients harbor EBV in their malignant cells. Given that gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with a global annual incidence of over 950,000 cases, EBV-positive gastric cancer is the largest group of EBV-associated malignancies. Based on gene expression profile studies, gastric cancer was recently categorized into four subtypes; EBV-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosomal instability. Together with previous studies, this report provided a more detailed molecular characterization of gastric cancer, demonstrating that EBV-positive gastric cancer is a distinct molecular subtype of the disease, with unique genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, reflected in a specific phenotype. The recognition of characteristic molecular alterations in gastric cancer allows the identification of molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival, with the potential to identify therapeutic targets. These findings highlight the enormous heterogeneity of gastric cancer, and the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in the disease, and provide a roadmap to implementation of genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. The present review discusses the initial studies describing EBV-positive gastric cancer as a distinct clinical entity, presents recently described genetic and epigenetic alterations, and considers potential therapeutic insights derived from the recognition of this new molecular subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  3. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familial prostate cancer is associated with certain inherited gene mutations (variants). Learn about the hereditary prostate cancer genes, genetic testing, clinical management, and psychosocial issues in this expert-reviewed summary.

  4. Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling Share Tweet ... knowledge for others with this disease,” Prowell says. Breast Cancer Symptoms for Men Each year, about 2,000 ...

  5. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  6. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of a yeast strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yeast was identified by molecular genetics technique based on sequence analysis of the variable D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA. Subsequent 26S rRNA gene sequencing showed 100% base sequence homology and it was identified as Candida viswanathii. The degradation of PAHs

  7. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of Wilms' tumor of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slater, R. M.; Mannens, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the way in which application of cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to the study of Wilms' tumor (WT) of the kidney and the associated congenital disorders, such as sporadic aniridia and the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, has led to identification of two regions on the short arm

  8. Molecular markers for genetic diversity and phylogeny research of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brazilian sheep descended from several breeds brought to the New World by Portuguese and Spanish colonists, and they have evolved and adapted to local climatic variations and acquired tolerance or resistance to many diseases. Molecular markers are widely used in analyzing genetic variability, and markers such as ...

  9. Construction of intergeneric conjugal transfer for molecular genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-26

    Mar 26, 2014 ... The attB integration site in the S. mobaraensis genome was detected as a single attB ... present study, to promote the molecular genetic study of. S. mobaraensis .... further increase in the number of E. coli donor cells. (≥1.25 × 108) (Choi et .... rational mutagenesis and random mutagenesis. Appl. Microbiol.

  10. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives | Tantawy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the publication of the sequence of the factor VIII (F8) gene in 1984, a large number of mutations that cause hemophilia A have been identified and a significant progress has been made in translating this knowledge for clinical diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Molecular genetic testing is used to determine the ...

  11. DataGenno: building a new tool to bridge molecular and clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio F Costa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fabricio F Costa1,2, Luciano S Foly1, Marcelo P Coutinho11DataGenno Interactive Research Ltd., Itaperuna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Cancer Biology and Epigenomics Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Clinical genetics is one of the most challenging fields in medicine, with thousands of children born every year with congenital defects that have no satisfactory diagnosis. There are more than 6,000 known single-gene disorders that can cause birth defects or diseases in approximately 1 in every 200 births. Clinical and molecular information on genetic diseases and syndromes are widespread in the literature, and there are few databases combining this information. Therefore, it is very challenging for health care professionals and researchers to translate the latest advances in science and medicine into effective clinical interventions and new treatments. In order to overcome this obstacle and promote networking, we are building DataGenno, an online medical and scientific portal. DataGenno has been developed to be a source of information on genetic diseases and syndromes for the needs of all heath care professionals and researchers. Our database will be able to integrate both clinical and molecular aspects of genetic diseases in a fully interactive environment. DataGenno’s system already contains clinical and molecular information for 300 diseases, with approximately 6,000 signs and symptoms of these diseases in a database combined with a search engine. Our main goal is to cover all genetic diseases described to date, providing not only clinical information such as morphological and anatomical features but also the most comprehensive molecular genetics/genomics features and available testing information. We are also developing ways to connect DataGenno’s portal with Electronic Health Records in order to improve the efficiency of patient care. Additionally

  12. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  13. Molecular genetic studies on irradiated wheat plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, O.M.

    2002-01-01

    Composite genotype(octamer hybrid) was obtained from crossing among eight Egyptian hexaploid wheat cultivars differing in their tolerance to drought stress to produce a genotype, which can economize on the irrigation water requirements or can tolerate drought stress. Gamma irradiation with 10-Krad was used to induce mutations, which could improve drought tolerance for this composite. From eight Egyptian wheat cultivars, two were chosen as drought tolerant and drought sensitive genotypes (G-160 and Sk-61, respectively. They were evaluated along with their F1 and F2 for their relative drought tolerance for some yield-related traits. Bulked segregating analysis developed some RAPD and SSR markers with different primers, which were considered as molecular for drought tolerance in wheat. Hal 2-like gene was introduced into Egyptian wheat cultivar G-164 via micro projectile bombardment. Two putative transgenic plants were successfully detected by leaf painting with the herbicide basta. PCR/ Southern blotting analysis indicated the presence of both/either bar and/or Hal 2-like genes in the genomic background of the two transgenic plants

  14. Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes Among Moroccan Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissal Mahir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast cancer remains despite the therapeutic progress, the leading cause of death by cancer among women. It represents a group of very heterogeneous clinical, histopathological and molecular diseases. Molecular heterogeneity has been demonstrated by genomic analysis, even for similar histology cancers. Four subgroups of breast carcinomas are distinguished: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2 over expression and Basal - like. The Immuno-histo-chemical analysis useip (estrogen receptors RE, the PR (progesterone receptors, the ((Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2, the Ki67 (proliferation marker HER2, CK5/6 has shown a subdivision into subgroups similar to those found by genomic analysis. These subgroups are different from the point of view of clinical course and response to adjuvant treatment.Objectives: The aim of this work is to study the molecular profile of the breast cancers by immunostaining on Moroccan series to a classification with a prognostic value allowing a treatment tailored to each group of patients. Furthermore, the molecular subgroups were correlated to other clinical and histological factors.Material and methods: It is a prospective study of the laboratory of Anatomy and Pathologic cytology of the children's Hospital, the service I of the maternity hospital in Rabat and in cooperation with the United Nations Centre of pathological anatomy. To do this, 88 cases of breast cancer together were diagnosed between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014, taking a period of five years. All tissue samples made subject study of Immuno-histo-chemistry with the following markers: RE, PR, HER2 and Ki67. Only negative triple cases (HR and HER2 negative benefited from an additional marking with CK5/6 and EGFR to set the basal profile.Results: Series of 88 cases of mammary carcinomas observed on operating parts, ranged in age between 28 and 84 years old, with an average of 51 ± 12, 8. Carcinoma infiltrating non-specific (DOCTORS was

  15. Comprehensive Molecular Portraits of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Giovanni; Gatza, Michael L; Beck, Andrew H; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Rhie, Suhn K; Pastore, Alessandro; Zhang, Hailei; McLellan, Michael; Yau, Christina; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bowlby, Reanne; Shen, Hui; Hayat, Sikander; Fieldhouse, Robert; Lester, Susan C; Tse, Gary M K; Factor, Rachel E; Collins, Laura C; Allison, Kimberly H; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Jensen, Kristin; Johnson, Nicole B; Oesterreich, Steffi; Mills, Gordon B; Cherniack, Andrew D; Robertson, Gordon; Benz, Christopher; Sander, Chris; Laird, Peter W; Hoadley, Katherine A; King, Tari A; Perou, Charles M

    2015-10-08

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most prevalent histologic subtype of invasive breast cancer. Here, we comprehensively profiled 817 breast tumors, including 127 ILC, 490 ductal (IDC), and 88 mixed IDC/ILC. Besides E-cadherin loss, the best known ILC genetic hallmark, we identified mutations targeting PTEN, TBX3, and FOXA1 as ILC enriched features. PTEN loss associated with increased AKT phosphorylation, which was highest in ILC among all breast cancer subtypes. Spatially clustered FOXA1 mutations correlated with increased FOXA1 expression and activity. Conversely, GATA3 mutations and high expression characterized luminal A IDC, suggesting differential modulation of ER activity in ILC and IDC. Proliferation and immune-related signatures determined three ILC transcriptional subtypes associated with survival differences. Mixed IDC/ILC cases were molecularly classified as ILC-like and IDC-like revealing no true hybrid features. This multidimensional molecular atlas sheds new light on the genetic bases of ILC and provides potential clinical options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  17. Rexin-G, a targeted genetic medicine for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Hall, Frederick L

    2010-05-01

    Rexin-G, a tumor-targeted retrovector bearing a cytocidal cyclin G1 construct, is the first targeted gene therapy vector to gain fast track designation and orphan drug priorities for multiple cancer indications in the US. This review describes the major milestones in the clinical development of Rexin-G: from the molecular cloning and characterization of the human cyclin G1 proto-oncogene in 1994, to the design of the first knockout constructs and genetic engineering of the targeted delivery system from 1995 to 1997, through the initial proofs-of-concept, molecular pharmacology and toxicology studies of Rexin-G in preclinical cancer models from 1997 to 2001, to the pioneering clinical studies in humans from 2002 to 2004, which--together with the advancements in bioprocess development of high-potency clinical grade vectors circa 2005 - 2006--led to the accelerated approval of Rexin-G for all solid tumors by the Philippine FDA in 2007 and the rapid progression of clinical studies from 2007 to 2009 to the cusp of pivotal Phase III trials in the US. In recording the development of Rexin-G as a novel form of targeted biological therapy, this review also highlights important aspects of vector design engineering which served to overcome the physiological barriers to gene delivery as it addresses the key regulatory issues involved in the development of a targeted gene therapy product. Progressive clinical development of Rexin-G demonstrates the potential safety and efficacy of targeted genetic medicine, while validating the design engineering of the molecular biotechnology platform.

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  20. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  1. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer: how useful is it in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Smyrniotis, Vasileios

    2012-07-10

    During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Reports about clinical implications of molecular biology in patients with pancreatic cancer were retrieved from PubMed. These reports were selected on the basis of their clinical relevance, and the data of their publication (preferentially within the last 5 years). Emphasis was placed on reports investigating diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Molecular biology can be used to identify individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. Intensive surveillance is indicated in these patients to detect pancreatic neoplasia ideally at a preinvasive stage, when curative resection is still possible. Molecular biology can also be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, with molecular analysis on samples of biologic material, such as serum or plasma, duodenal fluid or preferentially pure pancreatic juice, pancreatic cells or tissue, and stools. Molecular indices have also prognostic significance. Finally, molecular biology may have therapeutic implications by using various therapeutic approaches, such as antiangiogenic factors, purine synthesis inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, factors modulating tumor-stroma interaction, inactivation of the hedgehog pathway, gene therapy, oncolytic viral therapy, immunotherapy (both passive as well as active) etc. Molecular biology may have important clinical implications in patients with pancreatic cancer and represents one of the most active areas on cancer research. Hopefully clinical applications of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer will expand in the future, improving the

  2. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetics and tumor genomics in familial colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, Janneke Willemijn

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world and in about 30% hereditary factors play a role. Although several genetic factors that predispose families to CRC are known, in many families affected with CRC the underlying genetics remain elusive. The work described in

  4. Prevalence and detection of psychosocial problems in cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijzenga, W.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Hahn, D.E.E.; van der Kolk, L.E.; Sidharta, G.N.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Only a minority of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling experience heightened levels of psychological distress, but many more experience a range of cancer genetic-specific psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of such psychosocial problems, and to

  5. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Guo (Qi); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); S. Kar (Siddhartha); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); B. Holleczek (B.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); C.D. Berg (Christine); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  7. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  8. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  9. Hereditary breast/ovarian cancer--pitfalls in genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, E; Gershoni-Baruch, R

    2001-10-01

    Genetic counseling and risk assessment, given to women with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, are regularly based on pedigree analysis. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population, hereditary breast/ovarian cancer is mainly attributed to three founder mutations, namely, 185delAG, 5382insC, and 6174delT, in BRCA1/2 genes. The overall frequency of these mutations, in the Jewish Ashkenazi population, is as high as 2.5%. Based on clinical and family history data, the results of BRCA molecular testing, in Ashkenazi individuals at risk, are appropriately anticipated in most cases. Here we report on five families, in which the segregation of BRCA1/2 mutations, in affected and unaffected family members, was unexpected, emphasizing the need to test, for founder mutations, every Ashkenazi individual at risk, irrespective of the genotype of affected family members. Ultimately, risk assessments and recommendations, in Ashkenazi women, should be invariably based on the results of genetic testing.

  10. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  11. MEGA X: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis across Computing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Stecher, Glen; Li, Michael; Knyaz, Christina; Tamura, Koichiro

    2018-06-01

    The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (Mega) software implements many analytical methods and tools for phylogenomics and phylomedicine. Here, we report a transformation of Mega to enable cross-platform use on Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. Mega X does not require virtualization or emulation software and provides a uniform user experience across platforms. Mega X has additionally been upgraded to use multiple computing cores for many molecular evolutionary analyses. Mega X is available in two interfaces (graphical and command line) and can be downloaded from www.megasoftware.net free of charge.

  12. Identifying molecular targets of lifestyle modifications in colon cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Marie Derry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; ~20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes that could positively influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals.

  13. Molecular epidemiology, and possible real-world applications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction, a key idea in molecular epidemiology, has enabled the development of personalized medicine. This concept includes personalized prevention. While genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic susceptibility loci in breast cancer risk, however, the application of this knowledge to practical prevention is still underway. Here, we briefly review the history of molecular epidemiology and its progress in breast cancer epidemiology. We then introduce our experience with the trial combination of GWAS-identified loci and well-established lifestyle and reproductive risk factors in the risk prediction of breast cancer. Finally, we report our exploration of the cumulative risk of breast cancer based on this risk prediction model as a potential tool for individual risk communication, including genetic risk factors and gene-environment interaction with obesity.

  14. Prognostic molecular markers in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteva, Francisco J; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N

    2004-01-01

    A multitude of molecules involved in breast cancer biology have been studied as potential prognostic markers. In the present review we discuss the role of established molecular markers, as well as potential applications of emerging new technologies. Those molecules used routinely to make treatment decisions in patients with early-stage breast cancer include markers of proliferation (e.g. Ki-67), hormone receptors, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Tumor markers shown to have prognostic value but not used routinely include cyclin D 1 and cyclin E, urokinase-like plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor, and cathepsin D. The level of evidence for other molecular markers is lower, in part because most studies were retrospective and not adequately powered, making their findings unsuitable for choosing treatments for individual patients. Gene microarrays have been successfuly used to classify breast cancers into subtypes with specific gene expression profiles and to evaluate prognosis. RT-PCR has also been used to evaluate expression of multiple genes in archival tissue. Proteomics technologies are in development

  15. Whole-genome sequencing and comprehensive molecular profiling identify new driver mutations in gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Xu, Jiangchun; Lee, Siu Po; Yan, Helen H N; Shi, Stephanie T; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Deng, Shibing; Chu, Kent Man; Law, Simon; Chan, Kok Hoe; Chan, Annie S Y; Tsui, Wai Yin; Ho, Siu Lun; Chan, Anthony K W; Man, Jonathan L K; Foglizzo, Valentina; Ng, Man Kin; Chan, April S; Ching, Yick Pang; Cheng, Grace H W; Xie, Tao; Fernandez, Julio; Li, Vivian S W; Clevers, Hans; Rejto, Paul A; Mao, Mao; Leung, Suet Yi

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease with diverse molecular and histological subtypes. We performed whole-genome sequencing in 100 tumor-normal pairs, along with DNA copy number, gene expression and methylation profiling, for integrative genomic analysis. We found subtype-specific genetic and

  16. Enhancing genetic gain in the era of molecular breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunbi; Li, Ping; Zou, Cheng; Lu, Yanli; Xie, Chuanxiao; Zhang, Xuecai; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Olsen, Michael S

    2017-05-17

    As one of the important concepts in conventional quantitative genetics and breeding, genetic gain can be defined as the amount of increase in performance that is achieved annually through artificial selection. To develop pro ducts that meet the increasing demand of mankind, especially for food and feed, in addition to various industrial uses, breeders are challenged to enhance the potential of genetic gain continuously, at ever higher rates, while they close the gaps that remain between the yield potential in breeders' demonstration trials and the actual yield in farmers' fields. Factors affecting genetic gain include genetic variation available in breeding materials, heritability for traits of interest, selection intensity, and the time required to complete a breeding cycle. Genetic gain can be improved through enhancing the potential and closing the gaps, which has been evolving and complemented with modern breeding techniques and platforms, mainly driven by molecular and genomic tools, combined with improved agronomic practice. Several key strategies are reviewed in this article. Favorable genetic variation can be unlocked and created through molecular and genomic approaches including mutation, gene mapping and discovery, and transgene and genome editing. Estimation of heritability can be improved by refining field experiments through well-controlled and precisely assayed environmental factors or envirotyping, particularly for understanding and controlling spatial heterogeneity at the field level. Selection intensity can be significantly heightened through improvements in the scale and precision of genotyping and phenotyping. The breeding cycle time can be shortened by accelerating breeding procedures through integrated breeding approaches such as marker-assisted selection and doubled haploid development. All the strategies can be integrated with other widely used conventional approaches in breeding programs to enhance genetic gain. More transdisciplinary

  17. Molecular evaluation of genetic variability of wheat elite breeding material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brbaklić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of genetic variability of breeding material is essential for yield improvement in wheat cultivars. Modern techniques based on molecular markers application are more efficient and precise in genetic variability evaluation then conventional methods. Variability of 96 wheat cultivars and lines was analyzed using four microsatellite markers (Gwm11, Gwm428, Psp3200, Psp3071. The markers were chosen according to their potential association with important agronomical traits indicated in the literature. Total of 31 alleles were detected with maximum number of alleles (11 in Xgwm11 locus. The highest polymorphism information content (PIC value (0,831 was found in the locus Xpsp3071. The genotypes were grouped into three subpopulations based on their similarity in the analyzed loci. The results have indicated wide genetic variability of the studied material and possibility of its application in further breeding process after validation of marker-trait association. .

  18. Hamartomatous polyps - a clinical and molecular genetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    the knowledge on clinical course and molecular genetics in patients with HPs and HPS, and to investigate research participants' attitude towards the results of extensive genetic testing. Paper I: In the first paper we investigated the occurrence, anatomic distribution, and other demographics of juvenile polyps...... appearance. Patients with one or a few juvenile polyps are usually not offered clinical follow-up as the polyp(s) are considered not to harbour any malignant potential. Nevertheless, it is important to note that juvenile polyps and HPs are also found in patients with hereditary hamartomatous polyposis......-Jeghers syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome. Currently, the HPS diagnoses are based on clinical criteria and are often assisted with genetic testing as candidate genes have been described for each syndrome. This thesis is based on six scientific papers. The overall aim of the studies was to expand...

  19. Secondary Analysis and Integration of Existing Data to Elucidate the Genetic Architecture of Cancer Risk and Related Outcomes, R21 | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications that propose to conduct secondary data analysis and integration of existing datasets and database resources, with the ultimate aim to elucidate the genetic architecture of cancer risk and related outcomes. The goal of this initiative is to address key scientific questions relevant to cancer epidemiology by supporting the analysis of existing genetic or genomic datasets, possibly in combination with environmental, outcomes, behavioral, lifestyle, and molecular profiles data.

  20. Secondary Analysis and Integration of Existing Data to Elucidate the Genetic Architecture of Cancer Risk and Related Outcomes, R01 | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications that propose to conduct secondary data analysis and integration of existing datasets and database resources, with the ultimate aim to elucidate the genetic architecture of cancer risk and related outcomes. The goal of this initiative is to address key scientific questions relevant to cancer epidemiology by supporting the analysis of existing genetic or genomic datasets, possibly in combination with environmental, outcomes, behavioral, lifestyle, and molecular profiles data.

  1. Molecular Genetics of Beauveria bassiana Infection of Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Urquiza, A; Keyhani, N O

    2016-01-01

    Research on the insect pathogenic filamentous fungus, Beauveria bassiana has witnessed significant growth in recent years from mainly physiological studies related to its insect biological control potential, to addressing fundamental questions regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms of fungal development and virulence. This has been in part due to a confluence of robust genetic tools and genomic resources for the fungus, and recognition of expanded ecological interactions with which the fungus engages. Beauveria bassiana is a broad host range insect pathogen that has the ability to form intimate symbiotic relationships with plants. Indeed, there is an increasing realization that the latter may be the predominant environmental interaction in which the fungus participates, and that insect parasitism may be an opportunist lifestyle evolved due to the carbon- and nitrogen-rich resources present in insect bodies. Here, we will review progress on the molecular genetics of B. bassiana, which has largely been directed toward identifying genetic pathways involved in stress response and virulence assumed to have practical applications in improving the insect control potential of the fungus. Important strides have also been made in understanding aspects of B. bassiana development. Finally, although increasingly apparent in a number of studies, there is a need for progressing beyond phenotypic mutant characterization to sufficiently investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying B. bassiana's unique and diverse lifestyles as saprophyte, insect pathogen, and plant mutualist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The molecular genetic architecture of self-employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loos, Matthijs J H M; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Eklund, Niina; Koellinger, Philipp D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Ankra-Badu, Georgina A; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Benjamin, Daniel J; Biffar, Reiner; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cesarini, David; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J C; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Guðny; Eriksson, Johan; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Höhne, Birgit; Holle, Rolf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isaacs, Aaron; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loitfelder, Marisa; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Naitza, Silvia; Oostra, Ben A; Perola, Markus; Petrovic, Katja; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Ripatti, Samuli; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Senft, Andrea; Smith, Albert V; Spector, Timothy D; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Terracciano, Antonio; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Viikari, Jorma; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Philipp S; Willems, Sara M; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Rooij, Frank J A; Groenen, Patrick J F; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Thurik, A Roy

    2013-01-01

    Economic variables such as income, education, and occupation are known to affect mortality and morbidity, such as cardiovascular disease, and have also been shown to be partly heritable. However, very little is known about which genes influence economic variables, although these genes may have both a direct and an indirect effect on health. We report results from the first large-scale collaboration that studies the molecular genetic architecture of an economic variable-entrepreneurship-that was operationalized using self-employment, a widely-available proxy. Our results suggest that common SNPs when considered jointly explain about half of the narrow-sense heritability of self-employment estimated in twin data (σ(g)(2)/σ(P)(2) = 25%, h(2) = 55%). However, a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies across sixteen studies comprising 50,627 participants did not identify genome-wide significant SNPs. 58 SNPs with pself-employment in an independent sample (p≥0.039). Our results are consistent with a highly polygenic molecular genetic architecture of self-employment, with many genetic variants of small effect. Although self-employment is a multi-faceted, heavily environmentally influenced, and biologically distal trait, our results are similar to those for other genetically complex and biologically more proximate outcomes, such as height, intelligence, personality, and several diseases.

  3. Human fertility, molecular genetics, and natural selection in modern societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix C Tropf

    Full Text Available Research on genetic influences on human fertility outcomes such as number of children ever born (NEB or the age at first childbirth (AFB has been solely based on twin and family-designs that suffer from problematic assumptions and practical limitations. The current study exploits recent advances in the field of molecular genetics by applying the genomic-relationship-matrix based restricted maximum likelihood (GREML methods to quantify for the first time the extent to which common genetic variants influence the NEB and the AFB of women. Using data from the UK and the Netherlands (N = 6,758, results show significant additive genetic effects on both traits explaining 10% (SE = 5 of the variance in the NEB and 15% (SE = 4 in the AFB. We further find a significant negative genetic correlation between AFB and NEB in the pooled sample of -0.62 (SE = 0.27, p-value = 0.02. This finding implies that individuals with genetic predispositions for an earlier AFB had a reproductive advantage and that natural selection operated not only in historical, but also in contemporary populations. The observed postponement in the AFB across the past century in Europe contrasts with these findings, suggesting an evolutionary override by environmental effects and underscoring that evolutionary predictions in modern human societies are not straight forward. It emphasizes the necessity for an integrative research design from the fields of genetics and social sciences in order to understand and predict fertility outcomes. Finally, our results suggest that we may be able to find genetic variants associated with human fertility when conducting GWAS-meta analyses with sufficient sample size.

  4. Update on the Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics of Chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larizza Lidia

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chordoma is a rare mesenchymal tumour of complex biology for which only histologic and immunohistochemical criteria have been defined, but no biomarkers predicting the clinical outcome and response to treatment have yet been recognised. We herein review the interdisciplinary information achieved by epidemiologists, neurosurgeons and basic scientists on chordoma, usually a sporadic tumour, which also includes a small fraction of familial cases. Main focus is on the current knowledge of the genetic alterations which might pinpoint candidate genes and molecular mechanisms shared by sporadic and familiar chordomas. Due to the scarcity of the investigated tumour specimens and the multiple chromosome abnormalities found in tumours with aberrant karyotypes, conventional cytogenetics and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization failed to detect recurrent chordoma-specific chromosomal rearrangements. Genome-wide approaches such as Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH are yet at an initial stage of application and should be implemented using BAC arrays either genome-wide or targeting selected genomic regions, disclosed by Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH studies. An LOH region was shown by a systematic study on a consistent number of chordomas to encompass 1p36, a genomic interval where a candidate gene was suggested to reside. Despite the rarity of multiplex families with chordoma impaired linkage studies, a chordoma locus could be mapped to chromosome 7q33 by positive lod score in three independent families. The role in chordomagenesis of the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC genes has been proved, but the extent of involvement of TSC1 and TSC2 oncosuppressors in chordoma remains to be assessed. In spite of the scarce knowledge on the genetics and molecular biology of chordoma, recent initiation of clinical trials using molecular-targeted therapy, should validate new molecular targets and predict the efficacy of a given therapy. Comparative genetic and

  5. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated WithConstipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Laugsand, Eivor Alette; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation a...

  6. Molecular imaging of apoptosis in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakumaeki, Juhana M.; Liimatainen, Timo

    2005-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in cancer. Mechanisms hindering its action are implicated in a number of malignancies. Also, the induction of apoptosis plays a pivotal role in non-surgical cancer treatment regimes such as irradiation, chemotherapy, or hormones. Recent advanced in imaging science have made it now possible for us to detect and visualize previously inaccessible and even unrecognized biological phenomena in cells and tissue undergoing apoptosis in vivo. Not only are these imaging techniques painting an intriguing picture of the spatiotemporal characteristics and metabolic and biophysical of apoptosis in situ, but they are expected to have an ever increasing impact in preclinical testing and design of new anticancer agents as well. Rapid and accurate visualization of apoptotic response in the clinical settings can also be of significant diagnostic and prognostic worth. With the advent of molecular medicine and patient-tailored treatment options and therapeutic agents, such monitoring techniques are becoming paramount

  7. Genetic basis of interindividual susceptibility to cancer cachexia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifactorial disease. Evolving definitions highlight the fact that a diverse range of biological processes contribute to cancer cachexia. Part of the variation in who will and who will not develop cancer cachexia may be genetically determined. As new definitions, classifications and biological ...

  8. Reliable prediction of adsorption isotherms via genetic algorithm molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoftiKatooli, L; Shahsavand, A

    2017-01-01

    Conventional molecular simulation techniques such as grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) strictly rely on purely random search inside the simulation box for predicting the adsorption isotherms. This blind search is usually extremely time demanding for providing a faithful approximation of the real isotherm and in some cases may lead to non-optimal solutions. A novel approach is presented in this article which does not use any of the classical steps of the standard GCMC method, such as displacement, insertation, and removal. The new approach is based on the well-known genetic algorithm to find the optimal configuration for adsorption of any adsorbate on a structured adsorbent under prevailing pressure and temperature. The proposed approach considers the molecular simulation problem as a global optimization challenge. A detailed flow chart of our so-called genetic algorithm molecular simulation (GAMS) method is presented, which is entirely different from traditions molecular simulation approaches. Three real case studies (for adsorption of CO 2 and H 2 over various zeolites) are borrowed from literature to clearly illustrate the superior performances of the proposed method over the standard GCMC technique. For the present method, the average absolute values of percentage errors are around 11% (RHO-H 2 ), 5% (CHA-CO 2 ), and 16% (BEA-CO 2 ), while they were about 70%, 15%, and 40% for the standard GCMC technique, respectively.

  9. Empirical Refinements of a Molecular Genetics Learning Progression: The Molecular Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Amber; Kenyon, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes revisions to four of the eight constructs of the Duncan molecular genetics learning progression [Duncan, Rogat, & Yarden, (2009)]. As learning progressions remain hypothetical models until validated by multiple rounds of empirical studies, these revisions are an important step toward validating the progression. Our…

  10. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  11. WHO HAS TO UNDERGO CANCER GENETIC TESTING? A PERSPECTIVE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rinaldi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing is a medical tool employed to screen changes in genes linked to cancer and other genetic diseases. Genetic tests are available for breast, ovarian, colon, thyroid, and some other cancers and they represent the main tool for early identification of the “risk” subjects. The choice to undergo genetic testing by a healthy or affected cancer patient with family history of the cancer has to be the fruit of a careful and prudent assessment of the advantages and disadvantages discussed during oncogenetic counselling. The latter, in turn, in the case of a patient's positive and informed choice, must constantly affiliate the genetic testing, in order to preserve the prediction and information role of the test as much as possible.

  12. [Molecular diagnostics of ALK-positive lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tímár, József; Lotz, Gábor; Rásó, Erzsébet; Moldvay, Judit

    2017-09-20

    ALK translocation is the 3rd most frequent genetic aberration in lung adenocarcinoma, and several inhibitors are now clinically available in first and second line settings. Accordingly, molecular diagnostics of ALK-positive lung cancer is very important and can be done with the rational combination of several methods. All international recommendations suggest that, except for cytological samples, screening technology for ALK-positive tumors is immunohistochemistry using a validated test. It is highly recommended that in case of ALK protein positive samples gene translocation must be confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). In case of cytological samples FISH technique must be used as ALK diagnostics. In equivocal cases the genetic alteration of ALK can be confirmed by alternative molecular techniques such as next generation sequencing or RNAbased PCR methods. Upon administration of ALK inhibitors, acquired resistance is frequent which is mostly due to ALK amplification and/or mutation. It is evident that the diagnostics of these secondary ALK gene alterations must be done from recurrent tumors or circulating nucleic acids.

  13. Influence of genetic discrimination perceptions and knowledge on cancer genetics referral practice among clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowstuter, Katrina J; Sand, Sharon; Blazer, Kathleen R; MacDonald, Deborah J; Banks, Kimberly C; Lee, Carol A; Schwerin, Barbara U; Juarez, Margaret; Uman, Gwen C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2008-09-01

    To describe nongenetics clinicians' perceptions and knowledge of cancer genetics and laws prohibiting genetic discrimination, attitudes toward the use of cancer genetic testing, and referral practices. Invitations to participate were sent to a random stratified sample of California Medical Association members and to all members of California Association of Nurse Practitioners and California Latino Medical Association. Responders in active practice were eligible and completed a 47-item survey. There were 1181 qualified participants (62% physicians). Although 96% viewed genetic testing as beneficial for their patients, 75% believed fear of genetic discrimination would cause patients to decline testing. More than 60% were not aware of federal or California laws prohibiting health insurance discrimination--concern about genetic discrimination was selected as a reason for nonreferral by 11%. A positive attitude toward genetic testing was the strongest predictor of referral (odds ratio: 3.55 [95% confidence interval: 2.24-5.63], P genetic discrimination, the less likely a participant was to refer (odds ratio: 0.72 [95% confidence interval: 0.518-0.991], P genetic discrimination law was associated with comfort recommending (odds ratio: 1.18 [95% confidence interval: 1.11-1.25], P genetic discrimination and knowledge deficits may be barriers to cancer genetics referrals. Clinician education may help promote access to cancer screening and prevention.

  14. Preanalytical blood sample workup for cell-free DNA analysis using Droplet Digital PCR for future molecular cancer diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, Joost H.; van den Broek, Daan A.; van Kuik, Joyce; Linders, Dorothé; de Weger, Roel; Willems, Stefan M.; Huibers, Manon M.H.

    2017-01-01

    In current molecular cancer diagnostics, using blood samples of cancer patients for the detection of genetic alterations in plasma (cell-free) circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is an emerging practice. Since ctDNA levels in blood are low, highly sensitive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) can be used for

  15. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  16. Molecular genetics and livestock selection. Approaches, opportunities and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Following domestication, livestock were selected both naturally through adaptation to their environments and by man so that they would fulfil a particular use. As selection methods have become more sophisticated, rapid progress has been made in improving those traits that are easily measured. However, selection has also resulted in decreased diversity. In some cases, improved breeds have replaced local breeds, risking the loss of important survival traits. The advent of molecular genetics provides the opportunity to identify the genes that control particular traits by a gene mapping approach. However, as with selection, the early mapping studies focused on traits that are easy to measure. Where molecular genetics can play a valuable role in livestock production is by providing the means to select effectively for traits that are difficult to measure. Identifying the genes underpinning particular traits requires a population in which these traits are segregating. Fortunately, several experimental populations have been created that have allowed a wide range of traits to be studied. Gene mapping work in these populations has shown that the role of particular genes in controlling variation in a given trait can depend on the genetic background. A second finding is that the most favourable alleles for a trait may in fact. be present in animals that perform poorly for the trait. In the long term, knowledge of -the genes controlling particular traits, and the way they interact with the genetic background, will allow introgression between breeds and the assembly of genotypes that are best suited to particular environments, producing animals with the desired characteristics. If used wisely, this approach will maintain genetic diversity while improving performance over a wide range of desired traits. (author)

  17. The Molecular Genetic Architecture of Self-Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loos, Matthijs J. H. M.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Eklund, Niina; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Ankra-Badu, Georgina A.; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Biffar, Reiner; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cesarini, David; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Guðny; Eriksson, Johan; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Höhne, Birgit; Holle, Rolf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isaacs, Aaron; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Laaksonen, Maarit A.; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loitfelder, Marisa; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Naitza, Silvia; Oostra, Ben A.; Perola, Markus; Petrovic, Katja; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Ripatti, Samuli; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Senft, Andrea; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Timothy D.; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Terracciano, Antonio; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Viikari, Jorma; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Thurik, A. Roy

    2013-01-01

    Economic variables such as income, education, and occupation are known to affect mortality and morbidity, such as cardiovascular disease, and have also been shown to be partly heritable. However, very little is known about which genes influence economic variables, although these genes may have both a direct and an indirect effect on health. We report results from the first large-scale collaboration that studies the molecular genetic architecture of an economic variable–entrepreneurship–that was operationalized using self-employment, a widely-available proxy. Our results suggest that common SNPs when considered jointly explain about half of the narrow-sense heritability of self-employment estimated in twin data (σg 2/σP 2 = 25%, h 2 = 55%). However, a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies across sixteen studies comprising 50,627 participants did not identify genome-wide significant SNPs. 58 SNPs with pentrepreneurship reveal significant associations. Finally, SNP-based genetic scores that use results from the meta-analysis capture less than 0.2% of the variance in self-employment in an independent sample (p≥0.039). Our results are consistent with a highly polygenic molecular genetic architecture of self-employment, with many genetic variants of small effect. Although self-employment is a multi-faceted, heavily environmentally influenced, and biologically distal trait, our results are similar to those for other genetically complex and biologically more proximate outcomes, such as height, intelligence, personality, and several diseases. PMID:23593239

  18. MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE PREDICTION OF PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Vtorushin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to review the available data on molecular-genetic diagnostic and prognostic markers in prostate cancer. Material and methods. The following electronic databases were used for our systematic review: Medline, Cochrane Library and Elibrary. Of 540 studies, 61 were used for our systematic review. Results. There are currently a variety of both prognostic and diagnostic markers used for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. The review presents the classification of markers depending on the method and medium in which they were identified. The molecular mechanisms of participation of the different genes and proteins in the pathogenesis and progression of prostate carcinoma were analyzed and the potential importance of their use in clinical practice was provided. Conclusion. Many of the existing markers can be used for screening and early detection of tumors, and they have been proved to have a prognostic value. However, contradictory findings with regard to certain proteins and genes require further study, their validation with the subsequent implementation into clinical practice.

  19. The molecular biology of prostate cancer: current understanding and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Jason; Afridi, Adil; Vatsia, Sohrab; Joshi, Gargi; Joshi, Gunjan; Kaplan, Steven A; Smith, Noel L; Khan, Sardar Ali

    2018-04-01

    With continuous progress over the past few decades in understanding diagnosis, treatment, and genetics, much has been learned about the prostate cancer-diagnosed genome. A comprehensive MEDLINE® and Google scholar literature search was conducted using keyword variations relating to the genetics of prostate cancer such as chromosomal alterations, androgen receptor, castration-resistant, inheritance, polymorphisms, oncogenes, metastasis, biomarkers, and immunotherapy. Traditionally, androgen receptors (AR) have been the focus of research. Recently, identification of recurrent chromosomal alterations that lead to either multiplication of regions (gain-of-function) or deletion of regions (loss-of-function) has opened the door to greater genetic accessibility. These chromosomal aberrations lead to variation in copy number and gene expression. Some of these chromosomal alterations are inherited, while others undergo somatic mutations during disease progression. Inherited gene mutations that make one susceptible to prostate cancer have been identified with familial-linked studies. Somatic genes that progress tumorigenesis have also been identified. Research on the molecular biology of prostate cancer has characterized these genes into tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Additionally, genome-wide assay studies have identified many high-risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms recurrent throughout the prostate cancer-diagnosed genome. Castration-resistant prostate cancer is the most aggressive form of prostate cancer, and its research has elucidated many types of mutations associated with AR itself, including enhanced expression and amplification, point mutations, and alternative splicing. Understanding the molecular biology of prostate cancer has permitted more accurate identification using advanced biomarkers and therapy for aggressive forms using immunotherapy. An age-related disease, prostate cancer commands profound attention. With increasing life expectancy and the

  20. [Genetic variants in miRNAs and its association with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Gómez, Susana; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel; Dolores-Vergara, Maria; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer represents the first cause of cancer death in females. At the molecular level, non-coding RNAs and especially microRNAs have played an important role in the origin and development of this neoplasm In the Anglo-Saxon population, diverse genetic variants in microRNA genes and in their targets are associated with the development of this disease. In the Mexican population it is not known if these or other variants exist. Identification of these or new variants in our population is fundamental in order to have a better understanding of cancer development and to help establish a better diagnostic strategy. DNA was isolated from mammary tumors, adjacent tissue and peripheral blood of Mexican females with or without cancer. From DNA, five microRNA genes and three of their targets were amplified and sequenced. Genetic variants associated with breast cancer in an Anglo- Saxon population have been previously identified in these sequences. In the samples studied we identified seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two had not been previously described and were identified only in women with cancer. The new variants may be genetic predisposition factors for the development of breast cancer in our population. Further experiments are needed to determine the involvement of these variants in the development, establishment and progression of breast cancer.

  1. Molecular genetics: Step by step implementation in maize breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinov Kosana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency in plant breeding is determined primarily by the ability to screen for genetic polymorphism, productivity and yield stability early in program. Dependent on the knowledge about the biochemical bases of the trait and nature of its genetic control, trait could be modified either through mutagenesis of genes controlling it or through the transfer of already existing mutant genes, controlling desired trait to different plant genotypes by classic crossing. Objective of this report is to present partly results on the investigation of the possibilities to apply ionizing radiations (fast neutrons, γ -rays and chemical mutagens (EI, iPMS, EMS, ENU to get maize and wheat mutants with increased amount and improved protein quality. Besides this approach in mutation breeding, results on the very early investigation of biochemical background of opaque -2 mutation including use of coupled cell - free RNA and protein synthesis containing components from both wild and opaque - 2 maize genotypes (chromatin, RNA polymerase, microsomall fraction, protein bodies will be presented. Partial results on opaque - 2 gene incorporation in different genetic background are reviewed. Part of report is dealing with different classes of molecular markers (proteins, RFLP, AFLP, RAPD, and SSR application in maize genome polymorphism investigation. Besides application of different molecular markers classes in the investigation of heterosis phenomena they are useful in biochemical pathway of important traits control determination as well. .

  2. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: review of the genetic and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Viviane Boaventura de

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA is a rare fibrovascular tumor of unknown etiology, with few studies analyzing its pathogenesis. Objective: Reviewing JNA's pathogenesis, emphasizing genetic and molecular aspects. Method: All the relevant articles indexed in PUBMED and LILACS, besides reference book chapters, published between 1959 and 2007 were reviewed. Results: The sex selectivity seen in JNA may be explained by intranuclear accumulation of androgen receptor and beta-catenin, a co-activator which increases the tumor sensitivity to androgynous. The genetic alterations seen in JNA are most frequently located in sexual chromosomes. A number of growth factors seem to be related to the tumor pathogenesis. The insulin-like growth factor II is highly expressed while the vascular endothelial growth factor and the transforming growth factor beta are released by stromal cells and may influence the JNA's growth and vascularization. Conclusion: In spite of the scarce data describing the JNA etiology and pathogenesis, genetic and molecular factors seem to collaborate to the understanding of the disease's many clinical and morphological features. Knowledge regarding these specific issues could contribute for the establishment of potential therapeutic targets in the future.

  3. Molecular genetic identification of some wheat cultivars in the sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekki, I. I; El Amin, H. B.

    2002-01-01

    Four wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, namely condor, El-Nellene, Wadi El Neil and Debeira were characterized on biochemical and molecular bases. The biochemical ones were protein-banding patterns, using sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and isozymes to identify the biochemical genetic fingerprint of the four cultivars. Water-soluble protein-banding pattern showed no polymorphisms among the tested cultivars. The data from starch gel electrophoresis of enzymes, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), esterase (EST) and acid phosphate (ACPH) showed that the cultivars are monomorphic. Further trials to identify the molecular genetic fingerprints of the studied cultivars were carried out using RAPD-PCR twenty-five primers were tested to perform. RAPD-PCR analysis. From the PCR products, a phylogenetic map, i.e, dendrogram, was constructed for the studied cultivars which depicted tow groups. The first group contained Wadi El Neil and Deberia with 48.4% similarity, and the second group contained Condor and El Neileen with 100% similarity. There was no similarity between Condor and Debeira (100% dissimilarity). Therefor, these data can be used subsequently for genetic engineering research and for wheat breeding programmes in the Sudan.(Author)

  4. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  5. Molecular pathways and therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Hensing, Thomas; Simon, George R.; Dennis, Phillip A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Bueno, Raphael; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Both histologically and molecularly lung cancer is heterogeneous. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the pathways involved in the various types of lung cancer with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the increasing number of actionable molecular targets. It describes the major pathways and molecular alterations implicated in the development and progression of non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma and squamous cancer), and of small cell carcinoma, emphasizing the molecular alterations comprising the specific blueprints in each group. The approved and investigational targeted therapies as well as the immune therapies, and clinical trials exploring the variety of targeted approaches to treatment of lung cancer are the main focus of this review. PMID:24722523

  6. Colorectal cancer: genetic abnormalities, tumor progression, tumor heterogeneity, clonal evolution and tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Ugo; Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana

    2018-04-13

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Most colorectal cancer occurrences are sporadic, not related to genetic predisposition or family history; however, 20-30% of patients with colorectal cancer have a family history of colorectal cancer and 5% of these tumors arise in the setting of a Mendelian inheritance syndrome. In many patients, the development of a colorectal cancer is preceded by a benign neoplastic lesion: either an adenomatous polyp or a serrated polyp. Studies carried out in the last years have characterized the main molecular alterations occurring in colorectal cancers, showing that the tumor of each patient displays from two to eight driver mutations. The ensemble of molecular studies, including gene expression studies, has led to two proposed classifications of colorectal cancers, with the identification of four/five non-overlapping groups. The homeostasis of the rapidly renewing intestinal epithelium is ensured by few stem cells present at the level of the base of intestinal crypts. Various experimental evidence suggests that colorectal cancers may derive from the malignant transformation of intestinal stem cells or of intestinal cells that acquire stem cell properties following malignant transformation. Colon cancer stem cells seem to be involved in tumor chemoresistance, radioresistance and relapse.

  7. MAJOR MOLECULAR GENETIC DRIVERS IN SPORADIC PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is primarily due to a solitary parathyroid adenoma but multi-gland disease, parathyroid carcinoma, and ectopic parathyroid hormone production can occur. Although primary hyperparathyroidism mostly presents sporadically, strong familial predispositions also exist. Much is known about heritable genetic mutations responsible for these syndromes, including multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2A, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome, and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. Acquired mutations in common sporadic hyperparathyroidism have also been discovered. Here we focus on the most common and well-established genetic drivers: 1) involvement of the oncogene cyclin D1 in human neoplasia was first established in parathyroid adenomas, followed by recognition of its importance in other tumor types including breast cancer and B-lymphoid malignancy; and 2) somatic mutation of the MEN1 gene, first identified as the source of pathogenic germline mutations in patients with familial endocrinopathies, is found in a substantial fraction of non-familial parathyroid adenomas.

  8. Molecular Pathology: A Requirement for Precision Medicine in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of targeting drugs and check-point inhibitors in the treatment of several tumor entities (breast, colon, lung, malignant melanoma, lymphoma, etc.) and the necessity of a companion diagnostic (HER2, (pan)RAS, EGFR, ALK, BRAF, ROS1, MET, PD-L1, etc.) is leading to new challenges for surgical pathology. Since almost all the biomarkers to be specifically detected are tissue based, a precise and reliable diagnostic is absolutely crucial. To meet this challenge surgical pathology has adapted a number of molecular methods (semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR and its multiple variants, (pyro/Sanger) sequencing, next generation sequencing (amplicon, whole exome, whole genome), DNA arrays, methylation analyses, etc.) to be applicable for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Reading a patient's tissue as 'deeply' as possible and obtaining information on the morphological, genetic, proteomic and epigenetic background are the tasks of pathologists and molecular biologists and provide the clinicians with information relevant for precision medicine. Intensified cooperation between clinicians and pathologists will provide the basis of improved clinical drug selection and guide development of new cancer gene therapies and molecularly targeted drugs by research units and the pharmaceutical industry. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  9. CRISPR-Cas9: a promising genetic engineering approach in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Son, Young-Jin; Uddin, Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab; Yusuf, Md. Abdullah; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Banu, Laila Anjuman

    2018-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea possess adaptive immunity against foreign genetic materials through clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) systems. The discovery of this intriguing bacterial system heralded a revolutionary change in the field of medical science. The CRISPR and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) based molecular mechanism has been applied to genome editing. This CRISPR-Cas9 technique is now able to mediate precise genetic corrections or disruptions in in vitro and in vivo environments. The accuracy and versatility of CRISPR-Cas have been capitalized upon in biological and medical research and bring new hope to cancer research. Cancer involves complex alterations and multiple mutations, translocations and chromosomal losses and gains. The ability to identify and correct such mutations is an important goal in cancer treatment. In the context of this complex cancer genomic landscape, there is a need for a simple and flexible genetic tool that can easily identify functional cancer driver genes within a comparatively short time. The CRISPR-Cas system shows promising potential for modeling, repairing and correcting genetic events in different types of cancer. This article reviews the concept of CRISPR-Cas, its application and related advantages in oncology. PMID:29434679

  10. [Assisted Reproduction and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Patients Susceptible to Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselá, K; Kocur, T; Horák, J; Horňák, M; Oráčová, E; Hromadová, L; Veselý, J; Trávník, P

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproduction, as well as pregnancy itself, in patients with breast cancer or other hereditary type of cancer, is a widely discussed topic. In the past, patients treated for breast cancer were rarely involved in the discussion about reproductive possibilities or infertility treatment. However, current knowledge suggests, that breast cancer is neither a contraindication to pregnancy, nor to assisted reproduction techniques. On the contrary, assisted reproduction and preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods might prevent the transmission of genetic risks to the fetus. In this review we summarize data concerning pregnancy risks in patients with increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, we introduce current possibilities and approaches to fertility preservation prior to assisted reproduction treatment as well as novel methods improving the safety of fertility treatment. In the second part of this review, we focus on karyomapping--an advanced molecular genetic tool for elimination of germinal mutations in patients with predisposition to cancer. Moreover, the rapid development of preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods contributes to detection of both chromosomal aneuploidy and causal mutations in a relatively short time-span.

  11. Prostate cancer molecular profiling: the Achilles heel for the implementation of precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Barros, Eliane Gouvêa; Nicolau-Neto, Pedro; Da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Pinto, Luís Felipe Ribeiro; Palumbo, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico

    2017-11-01

    Cancer has been mainly treated by traditional therapeutic approaches which do not consider the human genetic diversity and present limitations, probably as a consequence of a poor knowledge of both patient's genetic background and tumor biology. Due to genome project conclusion and large-scale gene analyses emergence, the therapeutic management of several prevalent and aggressive tumors has dramatically improved and represents the closest examples of a precision medicine intervention in this field. Nonetheless, prostate cancer (PCa) remains as a challenge to personalized medicine implementation, probably due to its notorious heterogeneous molecular profile. Cancer treatment personalized approaches rely on the premise that a well-defined panorama of tumor molecular alterations can help selecting new and specific therapeutic targets for its treatment and potentially discriminate tumors which behave differentially. Lately, molecular and genetic studies have been investigating PCa basis, revealing multiple recurrent genomic alterations that include mutations, DNA copy-number variations, rearrangements, and gene fusions, among others. In addition to the increment on PCa molecular biology knowledge, mapping the molecular alterations pattern of this neoplasia, especially the differences existent between tumors displaying distinct behaviors, could represent a great improvement concerning the identification of new targets, personalized medicine, and patients' management and prognosis. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  12. Prevalence and detection of psychosocial problems in cancer genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijzenga, W; Bleiker, E M A; Hahn, D E E; Van der Kolk, L E; Sidharta, G N; Aaronson, N K

    2015-12-01

    Only a minority of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling experience heightened levels of psychological distress, but many more experience a range of cancer genetic-specific psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of such psychosocial problems, and to identify possible demographic and clinical variables associated significantly with them. Consenting individuals scheduled to undergo cancer genetic counseling completed the Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Distress Thermometer (DT) prior to or immediately following their counseling session. More than half of the 137 participants reported problems on three or more domains of the PAHC, most often in the domains 'living with cancer' (84%), 'family issues' (46%), 'hereditary predisposition' (45%), and 'child-related issues' (42%). Correlations between the PAHC, the HADS and the DT were low. Previous contact with a psychosocial worker, and having a personal history of cancer were associated significantly with HADS scores, but explained little variance (9%). No background variables were associated significantly with the DT. Previous contact with a psychosocial worker, and having children were significantly associated with several PAHC domains, again explaining only a small percentage of the variance (2-14%). The majority of counselees experience specific cancer genetic counseling-related psychosocial problems. Only a few background variables are associated significantly with distress or psychosocial problems. Thus we recommend using the PAHC or a similar problem-oriented questionnaire routinely in cancer genetic counseling to identify individuals with such problems.

  13. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for approximately five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, USA and the first kidney cancer-associated gene, VHL, was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided the basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at the germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of the causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms of how an alteration of each kidney cancer-associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Classical and molecular genetics of malignant melanoma and dysplastic naevi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traupe, H.; Macher, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors conclude that the prevailing concept of monogenic autosomaldominant inheritance of dysplastic naevi and familial melanoma is not compatible with the principles of formal (Mendelian) genetics. The concept of polygenic inheritance offers instead a sound basis to explain familial aggregation of dysplastic naevi and melanoma. The various genes involved have not yet been identified at the molecular level. The recent advances made possible by modern DNA technology have given us a new view of carcinogenesis. In human malignant melanoma, chromosomes 1, 6, 7 are of particular interest and oncogenes located on these chromosomes may be involved with the initiation, promotion and progression of melanoma. Carcinogenesis is viewed as a multistep process and even tumour initiation requires the input of at least two independent oncogenes. Molecular genetics thus adds an important argument for the existence of a polygenic predisposition to melanoma. The concept of polygenic inheritance is not restricted to familial melanoma, but implies that all melanomas basically share the same predisposition and are due to similar genetic mechanisms. In some patients an inherited genetic predisposition is of great importance, whereas in others (the majority) environmental factors (e.g. UV-light-induced mutations) will be the cause of initial steps in the malignant transformation. The concept of polygenic inheritance has consequences for the management of our patients. In contrast to simple Mendelian inheritance, the risk for dysplastic naevi and melanoma is not constantly 50%, but increases with the number of family members already affected. Persons belonging to families with more that 2 affected close relatives should be considered at high risk regardless of the dysplastic naevus status. Strict surveillance of this patient group is warranted for melanoma prevention

  15. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  16. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hughes, Chanita

    2004-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study are to develop a Culturally Tailored Genetic (CTGC) protocol for African American women and evaluate its impact on decision-making and satisfaction about BRCAl/2 testing, quality of life, and cancer control practices...

  17. Molecular markers in bladder cancer: Novel research frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguedolce, Francesca; Cormio, Antonella; Bufo, Pantaleo; Carrieri, Giuseppe; Cormio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease encompassing distinct biologic features that lead to extremely different clinical behaviors. In the last 20 years, great efforts have been made to predict disease outcome and response to treatment by developing risk assessment calculators based on multiple standard clinical-pathological factors, as well as by testing several molecular markers. Unfortunately, risk assessment calculators alone fail to accurately assess a single patient's prognosis and response to different treatment options. Several molecular markers easily assessable by routine immunohistochemical techniques hold promise for becoming widely available and cost-effective tools for a more reliable risk assessment, but none have yet entered routine clinical practice. Current research is therefore moving towards (i) identifying novel molecular markers; (ii) testing old and new markers in homogeneous patients' populations receiving homogeneous treatments; (iii) generating a multimarker panel that could be easily, and thus routinely, used in clinical practice; (iv) developing novel risk assessment tools, possibly combining standard clinical-pathological factors with molecular markers. This review analyses the emerging body of literature concerning novel biomarkers, ranging from genetic changes to altered expression of a huge variety of molecules, potentially involved in BC outcome and response to treatment. Findings suggest that some of these indicators, such as serum circulating tumor cells and tissue mitochondrial DNA, seem to be easily assessable and provide reliable information. Other markers, such as the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT (serine-threonine kinase)/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway and epigenetic changes in DNA methylation seem to not only have prognostic/predictive value but also, most importantly, represent valuable therapeutic targets. Finally, there is increasing evidence that the development of novel risk assessment tools

  18. Endogenous Molecular-Cellular Network Cancer Theory: A Systems Biology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaowei; Yuan, Ruoshi; Zhu, Xiaomei; Ao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In light of ever apparent limitation of the current dominant cancer mutation theory, a quantitative hypothesis for cancer genesis and progression, endogenous molecular-cellular network hypothesis has been proposed from the systems biology perspective, now for more than 10 years. It was intended to include both the genetic and epigenetic causes to understand cancer. Its development enters the stage of meaningful interaction with experimental and clinical data and the limitation of the traditional cancer mutation theory becomes more evident. Under this endogenous network hypothesis, we established a core working network of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) according to the hypothesis and quantified the working network by a nonlinear dynamical system. We showed that the two stable states of the working network reproduce the main known features of normal liver and HCC at both the modular and molecular levels. Using endogenous network hypothesis and validated working network, we explored genetic mutation pattern in cancer and potential strategies to cure or relieve HCC from a totally new perspective. Patterns of genetic mutations have been traditionally analyzed by posteriori statistical association approaches in light of traditional cancer mutation theory. One may wonder the possibility of a priori determination of any mutation regularity. Here, we found that based on the endogenous network theory the features of genetic mutations in cancers may be predicted without any prior knowledge of mutation propensities. Normal hepatocyte and cancerous hepatocyte stable states, specified by distinct patterns of expressions or activities of proteins in the network, provide means to directly identify a set of most probable genetic mutations and their effects in HCC. As the key proteins and main interactions in the network are conserved through cell types in an organism, similar mutational features may also be found in other cancers. This analysis yielded straightforward and testable

  19. Molecular genetics of glioblastomas: defining subtypes and understanding the biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Ilana Zalcberg; Golgher, Denise

    2015-02-01

    Despite comprehensive therapy, which includes surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme is very poor. Diagnosed individuals present an average of 12 to 18 months of life. This article provides an overview of the molecular genetics of these tumors. Despite the overwhelming amount of data available, so far little has been translated into real benefits for the patient. Because this is such a complex topic, the goal is to point out the main alterations in the biological pathways that lead to tumor formation, and how this can contribute to the development of better therapies and clinical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  1. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Garg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/controllers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  2. Genetic variation in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are part of the TGF-β-signaling pathway; genetic variation in these genes may be involved in colorectal cancer. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic variation in BMP1 (11 tagSNPs), BMP2 (5 tagSNPs), BMP4 (3 tagSNPs), BMPR1A (9 tagSNPs), BMPR1B (21 tagSNPs), BMPR2 (11 tagSNPs), and GDF10 (7 tagSNPs) with risk of colon and rectal cancer and tumor molecular phenotype. We used data from population-based case-control studies (colon cancer n=1574 cases, 1970 controls; rectal cancer n=791 cases, 999 controls). We observed that genetic variation in BMPR1A, BMPR1B, BMPR2, BMP2, and BMP4 was associated with risk of developing colon cancer, with 20 to 30% increased risk for most high-risk genotypes. A summary of high-risk genotypes showed over a twofold increase in colon cancer risk at the upper risk category (OR 2.49 95% CI 1.95, 3.18). BMPR2, BMPR1B, BMP2, and GDF10 were associated with rectal cancer. BMPR2 rs2228545 was associated with an almost twofold increased risk of rectal cancer. The risk associated with the highest category of the summary score for rectal cancer was 2.97 (95% CI 1.87, 4.72). Genes in the BMP-signaling pathway were consistently associated with CIMP+ status in combination with both KRAS-mutated and MSI tumors. BMP genes interacted statistically significantly with other genes in the TGF-β-signaling pathway, including TGFβ1, TGFβR1, Smad 3, Smad 4, and Smad 7. Our data support a role for genetic variation in BMP-related genes in the etiology of colon and rectal cancer. One possible mechanism is via the TGF-β-signaling pathway. PMID:21387313

  3. Combinations of genetic data in a study of oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling Thyge; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mondal, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    In the single locus strategy a number of genetic variants are analyzed, in order to find variants that are distributed significantly different between controls and patients. A supplementary strategy is to analyze combinations of genetic variants. A combination that is the genetic basis...... for a polygenic disorder will not occur in in control persons genetically unrelated to patients, so the strategy is to analyze combinations of genetic variants present exclusively in patients. In a previous study of oral cancer and leukoplakia 325 SNPs were analyzed. This study has been supplemented...

  4. Genetic structure of Mexican Mestizo women with breast cancer based on three STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Rivera-Prieto, Roxana A; Ortíz-Lopez, Rocio; Rivas, Fernando; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this population genetics study was to compare the genetic structure of Mexican women with breast cancer (BrCa) with previously reported data of four random populations (Nuevo León, Hispanics, Chihuahua, and Central Region of Mexico). A sample of 115 unrelated women with BrCa and whose four grandparents were born in five zones of Mexico were interviewed at a reference hospital in Northeastern Mexico. Noncodifying STRs D7S820, D13S317, and D16S39 were analyzed; genotype distribution was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations for all three markers. Similar allele frequencies among four random populations and this selected population were found. According with this and previous studies using molecular and nonmolecular nuclear DNA markers not associated with any disease, Mexican Mestizo population is genetically homogeneous and therefore, genetic causes of BrCa are less heterogeneous, simplifying genetic epidemiologic studies.

  5. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genetics risk assessment and genetic counseling includes family history, psychosocial assessments, and education on hereditary cancer syndromes, testing, and risk. Get more information including the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetic testing in this summary for clinicians.

  6. Molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects evolutionary changes in gene expression under the pressure of systemic therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, K. E.; Novosadová, Vendula; Bendahl, P.-O.; Graffman, C.; Larsson, A.-M.; Ryden, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 28 (2017), s. 45544-45565 ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : metastatic breast cancer * circulating tumor cells * gene expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  7. 76 FR 18227 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ...] Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... comment period for the notice announcing a meeting of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel (the panel... Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, and the opening of a public docket to...

  8. Population genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: founder mutations to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, William D; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The current standard model for identifying carriers of high-risk mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes (CSGs) generally involves a process that is not amenable to population-based testing: access to genetic tests is typically regulated by health-care providers on the basis of a labour-intensive assessment of an individual's personal and family history of cancer, with face-to-face genetic counselling performed before mutation testing. Several studies have shown that application of these selection criteria results in a substantial proportion of mutation carriers being missed. Population-based genetic testing has been proposed as an alternative approach to determining cancer susceptibility, and aims for a more-comprehensive detection of mutation carriers. Herein, we review the existing data on population-based genetic testing, and consider some of the barriers, pitfalls, and challenges related to the possible expansion of this approach. We consider mechanisms by which population-based genetic testing for cancer susceptibility could be delivered, and suggest how such genetic testing might be integrated into existing and emerging health-care structures. The existing models of genetic testing (including issues relating to informed consent) will very likely require considerable alteration if the potential benefits of population-based genetic testing are to be fully realized.

  9. Genetic Mutations and Epigenetic Modifications: Driving Cancer and Informing Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Krysta Mila; Boudreau, Jeanette E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer treatment is undergoing a significant revolution from “one-size-fits-all” cytotoxic therapies to tailored approaches that precisely target molecular alterations. Precision strategies for drug development and patient stratification, based on the molecular features of tumors, are the next logical step in a long history of approaches to cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss the history of cancer treatment from generic natural extracts and radical surgical procedures to site-specific and combinatorial treatment regimens, which have incrementally improved patient outcomes. We discuss the related contributions of genetics and epigenetics to cancer progression and the response to targeted therapies and identify challenges and opportunities for the success of precision medicine. The identification of patients who will benefit from targeted therapies is more complex than simply identifying patients whose tumors harbour the targeted aberration, and intratumoral heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine if a precision therapy is successful during treatment. This heterogeneity enables tumors to develop resistance to targeted approaches; therefore, the rational combination of therapeutic agents will limit the threat of acquired resistance to therapeutic success. By incorporating the view of malignant transformation modulated by networks of genetic and epigenetic interactions, molecular strategies will enable precision medicine for effective treatment across cancer subtypes. PMID:28685150

  10. Genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer: An evolving hallmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, N; Mathew, B B; Jatawa, S K; Tiwari, A

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a major health-care concern. A successful treatment of bladder cancer depends on its early diagnosis at the initial stage. Genetic instability is an essential early step toward the development of bladder cancer. This instability is found more often at the chromosomal level than at the nucleotide level. Microsatellite and chromosomal instability markers can be used as a prognostic marker for screening bladder cancer. Bladder cancer can be distinguished in two different categories according to genetic instability: Cancers with chromosomal level instability and cancers with nucleotide level instability. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair (MMR) system and its correlation with other biologic pathway, both are essential to understand the basic mechanisms of cancer development. Microsatellite instability occurs due to defects in DNA MMR genes, including human mutL homolog 1 and human mutL homolog 2. Chromosomal alterations including deletions on chromosome 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 17 have been detected in bladder cancer. In the current review, the most recent literature of genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer has been summarized.

  11. Genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer: An evolving hallmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wadhwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is a major health-care concern. A successful treatment of bladder cancer depends on its early diagnosis at the initial stage. Genetic instability is an essential early step toward the development of bladder cancer. This instability is found more often at the chromosomal level than at the nucleotide level. Microsatellite and chromosomal instability markers can be used as a prognostic marker for screening bladder cancer. Bladder cancer can be distinguished in two different categories according to genetic instability: Cancers with chromosomal level instability and cancers with nucleotide level instability. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA mismatch repair (MMR system and its correlation with other biologic pathway, both are essential to understand the basic mechanisms of cancer development. Microsatellite instability occurs due to defects in DNA MMR genes, including human mutL homolog 1 and human mutL homolog 2. Chromosomal alterations including deletions on chromosome 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 17 have been detected in bladder cancer. In the current review, the most recent literature of genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer has been summarized.

  12. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Gwang

    2013-03-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  13. Plant genetic and molecular responses to water deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Salvi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant productivity is severely affected by unfavourable environmental conditions (biotic and abiotic stresses. Among others, water deficit is the plant stress condition which mostly limits the quality and the quantity of plant products. Tolerance to water deficit is a polygenic trait strictly dependent on the coordinated expression of a large set of genes coding for proteins directly involved in stress-induced protection/repair mechanisms (dehydrins, chaperonins, enzymes for the synthesis of osmoprotectants and detoxifying compounds, and others as well as genes involved in transducing the stress signal and regulating gene expression (transcription factors, kinases, phosphatases. Recently, research activities in the field evolved from the study of single genes directly involved in cellular stress tolerance (functional genes to the identification and characterization of key regulatory genes involved in stress perception and transduction and able to rapidly and efficiently activate the complex gene network involved in the response to stress. The complexity of the events occurring in response to stress have been recently approached by genomics tools; in fact the analysis of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of a plant tissue/cell in response to stress already allowed to have a global view of the cellular and molecular events occurring in response to water deficit, by the identification of genes activated and co-regulated by the stress conditions and the characterization of new signalling pathways. Moreover the recent application of forward and reverse genetic approaches, trough mutant collection development, screening and characterization, is giving a tremendous impulse to the identification of gene functions with key role in stress tolerance. The integration of data obtained by high-throughput genomic approaches, by means of powerful informatic tools, is allowing nowadays to rapidly identify of major genes/QTLs involved in stress tolerance

  14. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes include Lynch syndrome and several polyposis syndromes (familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and serrated polyposis syndrome). Learn about the genetics, clinical manifestations, management, and psychosocial aspects of these and other hereditary colon cancer syndromes in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Gómez García, Encarna; Ruijs, Mariëlle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  16. Genetic counseling and testing for gynecological cancers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    undergraduates of universities in Ibadan to genetic counseling and testing (GCT) for ... questionnaire, information on their understanding of GCT, perception of implications, and ... by genetic counseling from suitably trained health-care providers and genetic testing of selected high-risk individuals ..... Multiple sexual partners.

  17. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Marie Agnese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families, but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. As a surgeon with additional training in clinical cancer genetics, I have perhaps a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important.

  18. The rapid evolution of molecular genetic diagnostics in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Alexander E; Kubisch, Christian

    2017-10-01

    The development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has revolutionized molecular genetic diagnostics in monogenic disorders. The present review gives a brief overview of different MPS-based approaches used in clinical diagnostics of neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) and highlights their advantages and limitations. MPS-based approaches like gene panel sequencing, (whole) exome sequencing, (whole) genome sequencing, and RNA sequencing have been used to identify the genetic cause in NMDs. Although gene panel sequencing has evolved as a standard test for heterogeneous diseases, it is still debated, mainly because of financial issues and unsolved problems of variant interpretation, whether genome sequencing (and to a lesser extent also exome sequencing) of single patients can already be regarded as routine diagnostics. However, it has been shown that the inclusion of parents and additional family members often leads to a substantial increase in the diagnostic yield in exome-wide/genome-wide MPS approaches. In addition, MPS-based RNA sequencing just enters the research and diagnostic scene. Next-generation sequencing increasingly enables the detection of the genetic cause in highly heterogeneous diseases like NMDs in an efficient and affordable way. Gene panel sequencing and family-based exome sequencing have been proven as potent and cost-efficient diagnostic tools. Although clinical validation and interpretation of genome sequencing is still challenging, diagnostic RNA sequencing represents a promising tool to bypass some hurdles of diagnostics using genomic DNA.

  19. GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND PIG MEAT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. BULLA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goals in pig breeding have for many years been to improve growth rate, feedconversion and carcass composition. There have been less efforts to improve meat qualityparameters (WHC, pH, tenderness, colour etc. but the main contribution has been areduction of stress susceptibility and PSE meat. Unfortunately, the quantitative geneticapproach has yielded few clues regarding the fundamental genetic changes that accompaniedthe selection of animal for superior carcass attributes. While mapping efforts are makingsignificant major effects on carcass and his quality composition DNA test would be availableto detect some positive or negative alleles. There are clear breed effects on meat quality,which in some cases are fully related to the presence of a single gene with major effect (RYR1,MYF4, H-FABP, LEPR, IGF2. Molecular biology methods provides excellent opportunitiesto improve meat quality in selection schemes within breeds and lines. Selection on majorgenes will not only increase average levels of quality but also decrease variability (ei increaseuniformity. The aim of this paper is to discuss there genetic and non-genetic opportunities.

  20. GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND PIG MEAT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BULLA, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goals in pig breeding have for many years been to improve growth rate, feedconversion and carcass composition. There have been less efforts to improve meat qualityparameters (WHC, pH, tenderness, colour etc. but the main contribution has been areduction of stress susceptibility and PSE meat. Unfortunately, the quantitative geneticapproach has yielded few clues regarding the fundamental genetic changes that accompaniedthe selection of animal for superior carcass attributes. While mapping efforts are makingsignificant major effects on carcass and his quality composition DNA test would be availableto detect some positive or negative alleles. There are clear breed effects on meat quality,which in some cases are fully related to the presence of a single gene with major effect (RYR1,MYF4, H-FABP, LEPR, IGF2. Molecular biology methods provides excellent opportunitiesto improve meat quality in selection schemes within breeds and lines. Selection on majorgenes will not only increase average levels of quality but also decrease variability (ei increaseuniformity. The aim of this paper is to discuss there genetic and non-genetic opportunities.

  1. [Malignant Melanoma - from Classical Histology towards Molecular Genetic Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryška, A; Horký, O; Berkovcová, J; Tichá, I; Kalinová, M; Matějčková, M; Bóday, Á; Drábek, J; Martínek, P; Šimová, J; Sieglová, K; Vošmiková, H

    Malignant melanoma is - in comparison with other skin tumors - a relatively rare malignant neoplasm with highly aggressive biologic behavior and variable prognosis. Recent data in pathology and molecular diagnostics indicate that malignant melanoma is in fact not a single entity but a group of different neoplasms with variable etiopathogenesis, biologic behavior and prognosis. New therapeutic options using targeted treatment blocking MAPK signaling pathway require testing of BRAF gene mutation status. This helps to select patients with highest probability of benefit from this treatment. This article summarizes information on the correlation of morphological findings with genetic changes, discusses the representation of individual genetic types in various morphological subgroups and deals with the newly proposed genetic classification of melanoma and the current possibilities, pitfalls and challenges in BRAF testing of malignant melanoma. It also describes the current testing situation in the Czech Republic - the methods used, the representation of BRAF mutations in the tested population and the future of testing. It also shows the limitations of the BRAF and MEK targeted treatment concept resulting from the heterogeneity of the tumor population. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors, possibilities of their detection, and issues of combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy are discussed.Key words: malignant melanoma - BRAF - mutation - molecular targeted therapy - tumor microenvironment - tumor heterogeneity This work was supported by projects PROGRES Q40/11, BBMRICZ LM2015089, SVV 260398 and GACR 17-10331S. The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 28. 3. 2017Accepted: 16. 5. 2017.

  2. Genetic and environmental factors in experimental and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, S.; Takebe, H.; Gelboin, H.V.; MaChahon, B.; Matsushima, T.; Sugimura, T.

    1980-01-01

    Recently technological advances in assaying mutagenic principles have revealed that there are many mutagens in the environment, some of which might be carcinogenic to human beings. Other advances in genetics have shown that genetic factors might play an important role in the induction of cancer in human beings, e.g., the high incidence of skin cancers in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. These proceedings deal with the relationships between genetic and environmental factors in carcinogenesis. The contributors cover mixed-function oxidases, pharmacogenetics, twin studies, DNA repair, immunology, and epidemiology.

  3. Changes in cytogenetics and molecular genetics in acute myeloid leukemia from childhood to adult age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rasche, Mareike; von Neuhoff, Christine; Alpermann, Tamara; Dworzak, Michael; Perglerová, Karolína; Zemanova, Zuzana; Tchinda, Joelle; Bradtke, Jutta; Thiede, Christian; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-12-15

    To obtain better insight into the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in various age groups, this study focused on the genetic changes occurring during a lifetime. This study analyzed the relation between age and genetics from birth to 100 years in 5564 patients with de novo AML diagnosed from 1998 to 2012 (1192 patients from nationwide pediatric studies [AML Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster studies 98 and 2004] and 4372 adults registered with the Munich Leukemia Laboratory). The frequencies of cytogenetic subgroups were age-dependent. Favorable subtypes (t(8;21), inv(16)/t(16;16), and t(15;17)) decreased in general from the pediatric age group (2 to groups ( 70 years; P age-specific incidence with age. Interestingly, the frequency of 11q23 abnormalities decreased from infants to older patients. The proportion of clinically relevant molecular aberrations of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, nucleophosmin (NPM1), and NPM1/fms-related tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication increased with age. Altogether, with the exclusion of infants, a significant decrease in the proportion of favorable cytogenetic subtypes and an increase in unfavorable cytogenetics were observed with increasing age. These findings indicate different mechanisms for the pathogenesis of AML; these different mechanisms also suggest directions for etiological research and contribute to the more unfavorable prognosis with increasing age. Cancer 2016;122:3821-3830. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Catecholaminergic systems in stress: structural and molecular genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Sabban, Esther L; Palkovits, Miklos

    2009-04-01

    Stressful stimuli evoke complex endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses that are extremely variable and specific depending on the type and nature of the stressors. We first provide a short overview of physiology, biochemistry, and molecular genetics of sympatho-adrenomedullary, sympatho-neural, and brain catecholaminergic systems. Important processes of catecholamine biosynthesis, storage, release, secretion, uptake, reuptake, degradation, and transporters in acutely or chronically stressed organisms are described. We emphasize the structural variability of catecholamine systems and the molecular genetics of enzymes involved in biosynthesis and degradation of catecholamines and transporters. Characterization of enzyme gene promoters, transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, transcription factors, gene expression and protein translation, as well as different phases of stress-activated transcription and quantitative determination of mRNA levels in stressed organisms are discussed. Data from catecholamine enzyme gene knockout mice are shown. Interaction of catecholaminergic systems with other neurotransmitter and hormonal systems are discussed. We describe the effects of homotypic and heterotypic stressors, adaptation and maladaptation of the organism, and the specificity of stressors (physical, emotional, metabolic, etc.) on activation of catecholaminergic systems at all levels from plasma catecholamines to gene expression of catecholamine enzymes. We also discuss cross-adaptation and the effect of novel heterotypic stressors on organisms adapted to long-term monotypic stressors. The extra-adrenal nonneuronal adrenergic system is described. Stress-related central neuronal regulatory circuits and central organization of responses to various stressors are presented with selected examples of regulatory molecular mechanisms. Data summarized here indicate that catecholaminergic systems are activated in different ways following exposure to distinct

  5. Molecular markers in well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Anil K; Vaish, Richa; Vaidya, Abhishek; Nixon, Iain J; Williams, Michelle D; Vander Poorten, Vincent; López, Fernando; Angelos, Peter; Shaha, Ashok R; Khafif, Avi; Skalova, Alena; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Hunt, Jennifer L; Ferlito, Alfio

    2018-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are of common occurrence in the general population. About a fourth of these nodules are indeterminate on aspiration cytology placing many a patient at risk of unwanted surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss various molecular markers described to date and place their role in proper perspective. This review covers the fundamental role of the signaling pathways and genetic changes involved in thyroid carcinogenesis. The current literature on the prognostic significance of these markers is also described. PubMed was used to search relevant articles. The key terms "thyroid nodules", "thyroid cancer papillary", "carcinoma papillary follicular", "carcinoma papillary", "adenocarcinoma follicular" were searched in MeSH, and "molecular markers", "molecular testing", mutation, BRAF, RAS, RET/PTC, PAX 8, miRNA, NIFTP in title and abstract fields. Multiple combinations were done and a group of experts in the subject from the International Head and Neck Scientific Group extracted the relevant articles and formulated the review. There has been considerable progress in the understanding of thyroid carcinogenesis and the emergence of numerous molecular markers in the recent years with potential to be used in the diagnostic algorithm of these nodules. However, their precise role in routine clinical practice continues to be a contentious issue. Majority of the studies in this context are retrospective and impact of these mutations is not independent of other prognostic factors making the interpretation difficult. The prevalence of these mutations in thyroid nodule is high and it is a continuously evolving field. Clinicians should stay informed as recommendation on the use of these markers is expected to evolve.

  6. DNA repair genetic polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Novotný, J.; Šmerhovský, Z.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Poláková, Veronika; Hánová, Monika; Slyšková, Jana; Tulupová, Elena; Kumar, R.; Bortlík, M.; Barale, R.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 638, 1-2 (2008), s. 146-153 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2626; GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:EU(SE) 505609 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Colorectal cancer * Individual susceptibility * DNA repair Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  7. Pathological Bases for a Robust Application of Cancer Molecular Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Diaz-Cano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Any robust classification system depends on its purpose and must refer to accepted standards, its strength relying on predictive values and a careful consideration of known factors that can affect its reliability. In this context, a molecular classification of human cancer must refer to the current gold standard (histological classification and try to improve it with key prognosticators for metastatic potential, staging and grading. Although organ-specific examples have been published based on proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics evaluations, the most popular approach uses gene expression analysis as a direct correlate of cellular differentiation, which represents the key feature of the histological classification. RNA is a labile molecule that varies significantly according with the preservation protocol, its transcription reflect the adaptation of the tumor cells to the microenvironment, it can be passed through mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes, and it is exposed to epigenetic modifications. More robust classifications should be based on stable molecules, at the genetic level represented by DNA to improve reliability, and its analysis must deal with the concept of intratumoral heterogeneity, which is at the origin of tumor progression and is the byproduct of the selection process during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The simultaneous analysis of multiple DNA targets and next generation sequencing offer the best practical approach for an analytical genomic classification of tumors.

  8. Understanding participation by African Americans in cancer genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jasmine A; Barg, Frances K; Weathers, Benita; Guerra, Carmen E; Troxel, Andrea B; Domchek, Susan; Bowen, Deborah; Shea, Judy A; Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic factors that contribute to racial differences in cancer outcomes may reduce racial disparities in cancer morbidity and mortality. Achieving this goal will be limited by low rates of African American participation in cancer genetics research. We conducted a qualitative study with African American adults (n = 91) to understand attitudes about participating in cancer genetics research and to identify factors that are considered when making a decision about participating in this type of research. Participants would consider the potential benefits to themselves, family members, and their community when making a decision to participate in cancer genetics research. However, concerns about exploitation, distrust of researchers, and investigators' motives were also important to participation decisions. Individuals would also consider who has access to their personal information and what would happen to these data. Side effects, logistical issues, and the potential to gain knowledge about health issues were also described as important factors in decision making. African Americans may consider a number of ethical, legal, and social issues when making a decision to participate in cancer genetics research. These issues should be addressed as part of recruitment efforts.

  9. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before 50). Dave has Lynch syndrome and had colorectal cancer at 28. Amy found out she has Lynch syndrome when she was diagnosed with colorectal cancer days after turning 47. Why is it Important ...

  10. HER2 Genetic Link to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When researchers discovered the HER2 gene's importance to breast cancer growth, this led to the development of trastuzumab and other treatments that have improved survival for women with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  11. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 December 2012 - 31 January 2013

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendel, Jan; Urbánková, Soňa; Vyskočilová, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 546-549 ISSN 1755-098X Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : genetic database * microsatellite marker loci Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.626, year: 2013

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in Korean Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabrielson, Edward

    2002-01-01

    ... profiles as objective measures of breast cancer phenotypes. The study is being conducted using samples from Korean women because this likely represents a relatively homogeneous population from genetic and cultural perspectives...

  13. Review- Cancer: Some genetic considerations | Salem | Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malignant transformation of normal cells to cancer cells represents an enigmatic phenomenon because of the many ambiguous controversies embodied within most of its aspects. Within a clinical context, cancer, with very few exceptions, is a dreadful disease that ends lethally. Within a biological context, however, cancer is ...

  14. Role of genetic testing for inherited prostate cancer risk: Philadelphia prostate cancer consensus conference 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.N. Giri (Veda); Knudsen, K.E. (Karen E.); Kelly, W.K. (William K.); Abida, W. (Wassim); G.L. Andriole (Gerald); C.H. Bangma (Chris); Bekelman, J.E. (Justin E.); Benson, M.C. (Mitchell C.); A. Blanco (Amie); Burnett, A. (Arthur); Catalona, W.J. (William J.); Cooney, K.A. (Kathleen A.); M.R. Cooperberg (Matthew); D. Crawford (David); Den, R.B. (Robert B.); Dicker, A.P. (Adam P.); S. Eggener (Scott); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); Freedman, M.L. (Matthew L.); F. Hamdy (Freddie); Hoffman-Censits, J. (Jean); Hurwitz, M.D. (Mark D.); Hyatt, C. (Colette); Isaacs, W.B. (William B.); Kane, C.J. (Christopher J.); Kantoff, P. (Philip); R.J. Karnes (Jeffrey); Karsh, L.I. (Lawrence I.); Klein, E.A. (Eric A.); Lin, D.W. (Daniel W.); Loughlin, K.R. (Kevin R.); Lu-Yao, G. (Grace); Malkowicz, S.B. (S. Bruce); Mann, M.J. (Mark J.); Mark, J.R. (James R.); McCue, P.A. (Peter A.); Miner, M.M. (Martin M.); Morgan, T. (Todd); Moul, J.W. (Judd W.); Myers, R.E. (Ronald E.); Nielsen, S.M. (Sarah M.); Obeid, E. (Elias); Pavlovich, C.P. (Christian P.); Peiper, S.C. (Stephen C.); D.F. Penson (David F.); D.P. Petrylak (Daniel P); Pettaway, C.A. (Curtis A.); R. Pilarski (Robert); P. Pinto (Peter); Poage, W. (Wendy); Raj, G.V. (Ganesh V.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M. Robson (Mark); Rosenberg, M.T. (Matt T.); Sandler, H. (Howard); A.O. Sartor (Oliver); Schaeffer, E. (Edward); Schwartz, G.F. (Gordon F.); Shahin, M.S. (Mark S.); N.D. Shore (Neal); Shuch, B. (Brian); Soule, H.R. (Howard R.); S.A. Tomlins (Scott A); Trabulsi, E.J. (Edouard J.); Uzzo, R. (Robert); Griend, D.J.V. (Donald J. Vander); P.C. Walsh (Patrick); Weil, C.J. (Carol J.); Wender, R. (Richard); Gomella, L.G. (Leonard G.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling,

  15. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth facto...

  16. Inflammation to cancer: The molecular biology in the pancreas (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    LING, SUNBIN; FENG, TINGTING; JIA, KAIQI; TIAN, YU; LI, YAN

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are known to be correlated with cancer initiation and progression, and exploration of the route from inflammation to cancer makes a great contribution in elucidating the mechanisms underlying cancer development. Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal disease with a low radical-resection rate and a poor prognosis. As chronic pancreatitis is considered to be a significant etiological factor for PC development, the current review aims to describe the molecular pathways from in...

  17. Spontaneous chromosome aberrations in cancer cells. Evidence of existence of hidden genetic lesions in genetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poryadkova-Luchnik, N.A.; Kuz'mina, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations spontaneously observed in cancer cells were quantitively studied under the effect of non-mutagenic (suboptimal temperature, low content of propilgallate and caffeine) and mutagenic (ionizing radiation) factors. Human larynx cancer cells during several years or gamma-irradiation were used to carry out experiments. The experiments linked with cloning of the initial population and investigation into chromosome aberrations in 22 clones demonstrated persuasively the occurrence of latent genetic lesions in cancer cells

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Linking Exercise to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Gehl, Julie; Christensen, Jesper F.

    2018-01-01

    The benefits of exercise training for cancer patients are becoming increasingly evident. Physical exercise has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and inhibit tumor growth. Here we provide the status of the current molecular understanding of the effect of exercise on cancer. We propose...... that exercise has a role in controlling cancer progression through a direct effect on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of anti-cancer treatment efficacy. These findings have wide-ranging societal implications......, as this understanding may lead to changes in cancer treatment strategies. Hojman et al. discuss the role of exercise in controlling cancer progression through direct effects on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of cancer...

  19. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  20. Targeted next generation sequencing of parotid gland cancer uncovers genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Inga; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Meinrath, Jeannine; Meyer, Moritz F; Heukamp, Lukas C; Drebber, Uta; Quaas, Alexander; Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Odenthal, Margarete; Stenner, Markus

    2015-07-20

    Salivary gland cancer represents a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors. Due to their low incidence and the existence of multiple morphologically defined subtypes, these tumors are still poorly understood with regard to their molecular pathogenesis and therapeutically relevant genetic alterations.Performing a systematic and comprehensive study covering 13 subtypes of salivary gland cancer, next generation sequencing was done on 84 tissue samples of parotid gland cancer using multiplex PCR for enrichment of cancer related gene loci covering hotspots of 46 cancer genes.Mutations were identified in 22 different genes. The most frequent alterations affected TP53, followed by RAS genes, PIK3CA, SMAD4 and members of the ERB family. HRAS mutations accounted for more than 90% of RAS mutations, occurring especially in epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas and salivary duct carcinomas. Additional mutations in PIK3CA also affected particularly epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas and salivary duct carcinomas, occurring simultaneously with HRAS mutations in almost all cases, pointing to an unknown and therapeutically relevant molecular constellation. Interestingly, 14% of tumors revealed mutations in surface growth factor receptor genes including ALK, HER2, ERBB4, FGFR, cMET and RET, which might prove to be targetable by new therapeutic agents. 6% of tumors revealed mutations in SMAD4.In summary, our data provide novel insight into the fundamental molecular heterogeneity of salivary gland cancer, relevant in terms of tumor classification and the establishment of targeted therapeutic concepts.

  1. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Zea

    Full Text Available Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation. Molecular genetic analysis findings, conducted as part of a recent spaceflight investigation, support the proposed model. This investigation indicated an overexpression of genes associated with starvation, the search for alternative energy sources, increased metabolism, enhanced acetate production, and other systematic responses to acidity-all of which can be associated with reduced extracellular mass transport.

  2. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nripesh; Levy, Shawn E.; Stodieck, Louis; Jones, Angela; Shrestha, Shristi; Klaus, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation. Molecular genetic analysis findings, conducted as part of a recent spaceflight investigation, support the proposed model. This investigation indicated an overexpression of genes associated with starvation, the search for alternative energy sources, increased metabolism, enhanced acetate production, and other systematic responses to acidity—all of which can be associated with reduced extracellular mass transport. PMID:27806055

  3. Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Cancer) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell) includes the hereditary cancer syndromes von Hippel-Lindau disease, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, and hereditary papillary renal carcinoma. Get comprehensive information on these syndromes in this clinician summary.

  4. MODY in Siberia – molecular genetics and clinical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Konstantinovna Ovsyannikova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY has high clinical significance in young patients (no absolute need for exogenous insulin; normoglycaemia in most patients achieved by dieting or taking oral hypoglycaemic agents and their relatives (high probability of first-degree relatives being carriers of mutations, which requires a thorough collection of family history and determination of the parameters of carbohydrate metabolism. Aim. This study aimed was to determine the clinical characteristics of different subtypes of MODY in a Siberian region. Materials and Methods. We performed an examination, biochemical and hormonal blood tests, ultrasound and molecular genetic testing of 20 patients with a clinical diagnosis of MODY. Results. Four subtypes of MODY were verified: MODY2 in 11 patients, MODY3 in two, MODY8 in one and MODY12 in two. Eleven patients (69% exhibited no clinical manifestations of carbohydrate metabolism disorders, and one patient showed weight loss during early stage of the disease. Comorbidities included dyslipidemia, thyroid gland disorders and arterial hypertension. One patient (6% exhibited diabetic nephropathy; two (13%, diabetic retinopathy and three (19%, peripheral neuropathy of lower legs. All patients achieved the target carbohydrate metabolism; the level of C-peptide was within the reference range. Conclusion. Four different subtypes of MODY (2, 3, 8, 12 were diagnosed in the present study, which differed in their clinical characteristics, presence of complications and treatment strategies. Our knowledge of monogenic forms of diabetes is expanding with the development in molecular genetics, but several aspects related to them require further study.

  5. Histologic and molecular-genetic characteristics of precancerous lesions in chronic gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Zidar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic gastritis is an inflammatory condition of the gastric mucosa, which may include glandular alterations. It is most frequently caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori, a smaller proportion is related to chemical agents and autoimmune mechanisms. Chronic gastritis may lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma, depending on environmental factors, bacterial strain and host immune response. The vast majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are the final step in a complex cascade process of cancerogenesis involving sequential steps of precancerous lesions – atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia.The process of cancerogenesis is associated with progressive genetic and epigenetic alterations, these being more frequent in dysplasia than in atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Despite extensive research of gastric cancerogenesis, there are no molecular markers to be used for detecting patients at risk for cancer development.Biopsy remains among the most reliable ways of detecting gastric precancerous lesions. Apart from the correct histologic diagnosis, the assessment of topography is important. Biopsies must be taken according to the updated Sydney protocol. For further classifying patients at risk for gastric cancer, two systems have been developed: OLGA (Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment and OLGIM (Operative Link for Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment.Slovenian Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Slovenian Society for Pathology and Forensic Medicine have accepted guidelines for endoscopic and histologic management of patients with gastric precancerosis. The aim of these recommendations is to diagnose gastric cancer at an early stage and to improve survival of patients with gastric cancer in Slovenia.

  6. Ovarian cancer: Novel molecular aspects for clinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Silvestris, Erica; D'Oronzo, Stella; Cardascia, Angela; Silvestris, Franco

    2017-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a very heterogeneous tumor which has been traditionally characterized according to the different histological subtypes and differentiation degree. In recent years, innovative molecular screening biotechnologies have allowed to identify further subtypes of this cancer based on gene expression profiles, mutational features, and epigenetic factors. These novel classification systems emphasizing the molecular signatures within the broad spectrum of ovarian cancer have not only allowed a more precise prognostic prediction, but also proper therapeutic strategies for specific subgroups of patients. The bulk of available scientific data and the high refinement of molecular classifications of ovarian cancers can today address the research towards innovative drugs with the adoption of targeted therapies tailored for single molecular profiles leading to a better prediction of therapeutic response. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge on the molecular bases of ovarian cancer, from the description of its molecular subtypes derived from wide high-throughput analyses to the latest discoveries of the ovarian cancer stem cells. The latest personalized treatment options are also presented with recent advances in using PARP inhibitors, anti-angiogenic, anti-folate receptor and anti-cancer stem cells treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Discretization of Gene Expression Data Unmasks Molecular Subgroups Recurring in Different Human Cancer Types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Beleut

    Full Text Available Despite the individually different molecular alterations in tumors, the malignancy associated biological traits are strikingly similar. Results of a previous study using renal cell carcinoma (RCC as a model pointed towards cancer-related features, which could be visualized as three groups by microarray based gene expression analysis. In this study, we used a mathematic model to verify the presence of these groups in RCC as well as in other cancer types. We developed an algorithm for gene-expression deviation profiling for analyzing gene expression data of a total of 8397 patients with 13 different cancer types and normal tissues. We revealed three common Cancer Transcriptomic Profiles (CTPs which recurred in all investigated tumors. Additionally, CTPs remained robust regardless of the functions or numbers of genes analyzed. CTPs may represent common genetic fingerprints, which potentially reflect the closely related biological traits of human cancers.

  8. Molecular genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2016-06-01

    As the discovery of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD), gene discovery in familial EOAD came more or less to a standstill. Only 5% of EOAD patients are carrying a pathogenic mutation in one of the AD genes or a apolipoprotein E (APOE) risk allele ε4, most of EOAD patients remain unexplained. Here, we aimed at summarizing the current knowledge of EOAD genetics and its role in ongoing approaches to understand the biology of AD and disease symptomatology as well as developing new therapeutics. Next, we explored the possible molecular mechanisms that might underlie the missing genetic etiology of EOAD and discussed how the use of massive parallel sequencing technologies triggered novel gene discoveries. To conclude, we commented on the relevance of reinvestigating EOAD patients as a means to explore potential new avenues for translational research and therapeutic discoveries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular basis of the triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Feyda Nursal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women and more than 1 million breast cancer cases are diagnosed each year all over the world. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease in terms of its molecular structure, mutation type, metastase properties, clinical course and therapeutic response. Breast cancer is divided into subtypes based on expression properties of molecular markers as estrogen receptor, progestron receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Triple-negative breast cancer is characterized by the lack of tumors that estrogen receptor, progestron receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene expression. These type of tumors lead to agressive clinical course due to unresponsiveness to systemic endocrine therapy and poor prognosis. Triple negative breast cancer constitutes 10-20% of all breast cancers. It affects generally young and African-American women. Triple negative breast cancer have several subtypes based on the gene expression properties. The majority of them are basal-like breast cancers. In this review, current literature is revised and summarized with respect to the molecular basis of triple negative cancers. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(2.000: 251-259

  10. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis Molecular expression of vascular markers by aggressive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, Mary JC; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Seftor, Richard EB

    2000-01-01

    During embryogenesis, the formation of primary vascular networks occurs via the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In uveal melanoma, vasculogenic mimicry describes the 'embryonic-like' ability of aggressive, but not nonaggressive, tumor cells to form networks surrounding spheroids of tumor cells in three-dimensional culture; these recapitulate the patterned networks seen in patients' aggressive tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. The molecular profile of these aggressive tumor cells suggests that they have a deregulated genotype, capable of expressing vascular phenotypes. Similarly, the embryonic-like phenotype expressed by the aggressive human breast cancer cells is associated with their ability to express a variety of vascular markers. These studies may offer new insights for consideration in breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies

  11. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers includes information on BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants (breast and ovarian cancer) and Lynch syndrome (endometrial cancer). Get more information about hereditary breast and gynecologic cancer syndromes in this clinician summary.

  12. The promise of molecular epidemiology in defining the association between radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, R.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology involves the inclusion in epidemiologic studies of biologic measurements made at a genetic and molecular level and aims to improve the current knowledge of disease etiology and risk. One of the goals of molecular epidemiology studies of cancer is to determine the role of environmental and genetic factors in initiation and progression of malignancies and to use this knowledge to develop preventive strategies. This approach promises extraordinary opportunities for revolutionizing the practice of medicine and reducing risk. However, this will be accompanied by the need to address and resolve many challenges, such as ensuring the appropriate interpretation of molecular testing and resolving associated ethical, legal, and social issues. Traditional epidemiologic approaches determined that exposure to ionizing radiation poses significantly increased risk of leukemia and several other types of cancer. Such studies provided the basis for setting exposure standards to protect the public and the workforce from potentially adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These standards were set by using modeling approaches to extrapolate from the biological effects observed in high-dose radiation studies to predicted, but mostly immeasurable, effects at low radiation doses. It is anticipated that the addition of the molecular parameters to the population-based studies will help identify the genes and pathways characteristic of cancers due to radiation exposure of individuals, as well as identify susceptible or resistant subpopulations. In turn, the information about the molecular mechanisms should aid to improve risk assessment. While studies on radiogenic concerns are currently limited to only a few candidate genes, the exponential growth of scientific knowledge and technology promises expansion of knowledge about identity of participating genes and pathways in the future. This article is meant to provide an introductory overview of recent advances in

  13. Introductory guide to the statistics of molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Thalia C; Rijsdijk, Frühling

    2005-10-01

    This introductory guide presents the main two analytical approaches used by molecular geneticists: linkage and association. Traditional linkage and association methods are described, along with more recent advances in methodologies such as those using a variance components approach. New methods are being developed all the time but the core principles of linkage and association remain the same. The basis of linkage is the transmission of a marker along with a disease within families, whereas association is based on the comparison of marker frequencies in case and control groups. It is becoming increasingly clear that effect sizes of individual markers on diseases and traits are likely to be very small. As such, much greater power is needed, and correspondingly greater sample sizes. Although non-replication is still a problem, molecular genetic studies in some areas such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are starting to show greater convergence. Epidemiologists and other researchers with large well-characterized samples will be well placed to use these methods. Inter-disciplinary studies can then ask far more interesting questions such as those relating to developmental, multivariate and gene-environment interaction hypotheses.

  14. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies on some cyanobacterial isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, E.A.R.; Ebrahim, S.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the isolation and purification of a set of Cyanobacteria strains belonging to genus Oscillatoria was undertaken, followed by the analyses of phylogenetic relationships using different biochemical and molecular genetic techniques (SOS-PAGE and RAPO-PCR). A total of 45 protein bands were observed within the studied Osci/latoria isolates by SOS-PAGE (only three unique bands, eight monomorphic bands and 37 polymorphic bands). On the other hand, extracted ONA from isolates was used to identify the molecular fingerprints. A sum of 94 polymorphic bands was generated by these primers in the Ocsi/laloria genotypes under study. A total of 20 unique bands were identified out of the polymorphic ones. These unique bands were used to discriminate among the studied Ocsi/latoria isolates. Most isolates of Ocsi/latoria genotypes were discriminated by one or more unique bands. Numerical taxonomic using 45 protein attributes of 19 isolates and RAPO markers on five isolates. Two methods -Clustering (UPGMA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used for these analyses. The similarities and clusters produced between the studied isolates were discussed.

  15. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies on some cyanobacterial isolates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, E A.R. [Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Biology; Ebrahim, S A.A. [Ain Sham University, Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Cytogenetic

    2011-11-15

    In the present study, the isolation and purification of a set of Cyanobacteria strains belonging to genus Oscillatoria was undertaken, followed by the analyses of phylogenetic relationships using different biochemical and molecular genetic techniques (SOS-PAGE and RAPO-PCR). A total of 45 protein bands were observed within the studied Osci/latoria isolates by SOS-PAGE (only three unique bands, eight monomorphic bands and 37 polymorphic bands). On the other hand, extracted ONA from isolates was used to identify the molecular fingerprints. A sum of 94 polymorphic bands was generated by these primers in the Ocsi/laloria genotypes under study. A total of 20 unique bands were identified out of the polymorphic ones. These unique bands were used to discriminate among the studied Ocsi/latoria isolates. Most isolates of Ocsi/latoria genotypes were discriminated by one or more unique bands. Numerical taxonomic using 45 protein attributes of 19 isolates and RAPO markers on five isolates. Two methods -Clustering (UPGMA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used for these analyses. The similarities and clusters produced between the studied isolates were discussed.

  16. [Establishing Individualized Medicine for Intractable Cancer Based on Clinical Molecular Pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jono, Hirofumi

    2018-01-01

     Although cancer treatment has dramatically improved with the development of molecular-targeted agents over the past decade, identifying eligible patients and predicting the therapeutic effects remain a major challenge. Because intratumoral heterogeneity represents genetic and molecular differences affecting patients' responses to these therapeutic agents, establishing individualized medicine based on precise molecular pathological analysis of tumors is urgently required. This review focuses on the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a common head and neck neoplasm, and introduces our approaches toward developing novel anticancer therapies particularly based on clinical molecular pathogenesis. Deeper understanding of more precise molecular pathogenesis in clinical settings may open up novel strategies for establishing individualized medicine for OSCC.

  17. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics): an international consortium to study the role of polymorphic variation on the risk of colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomlinson, I. P. M.; Dunlop, M.; Cambell, H.; Zanke, B.; Gallinger, S.; Hudson, T.; Koessler, T.; Pharoah, P. D.; Niittymäkix, I.; Tuupanenx, S.; Aaltonen, L. A.; Hemminki, K.; Lindblom, A.; Försti, A.; Sieber, O.; Lipton, L.; van Wezel, T.; Morreau, H.; Wijnen, J.T.; Devilee, P.; Matsuda, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Castellví-Bel, S.; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Castells, A.; Carracedo, A.; Ho, J.W.C.; Sham, P.; Hofstra, R. M. W.; Vodička, Pavel; Brenner, H.; Hampe, J.; Schafmayer, C.; Tepel, J.; Schreiber, S.; Völzke, H.; Lerch, M. M.; Schmidt, A.; Buch, S.; Moreno, V.; Villanueva, C. M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Echeverry, M.; Velez, A.; Carvajal-Carmona, L.; Scott, R.; Penegar, S.; Broderick, P.; Tenesa, A.; Houlston, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 2 (2010), s. 447-454 ISSN 0007-0920 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : colorectal cancer * association * polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.831, year: 2010

  18. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Molecular Beacons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Lily

    2008-01-01

    .... We proposed to use molecular beacon technology to detect the level of expression of several biomarker genes that are highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in normal breast epithelial cells...

  19. Introduction to the cellular and molecular biology of cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selby, P. (Peter); Knowles, Margaret A

    2005-01-01

    ... A. Prigent 186xii CONTENTS 12 Apoptosis: molecular physiology and significance for cancer therapeutics Dean A. Fennell 210 13 Mechanisms of viral carcinogenesis Paul Farrell 229 14 Cytokines and canc...

  20. Genetic Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S; Giannakis, Marios; Wells, Daniel K; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Quist, Michael; Nowak, Jonathan A; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Inamura, Kentaro; Morikawa, Teppei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Connolly, Charles; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Geybels, Milan S; Grady, William M; Hsu, Li; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Kim, Yeon Joo; Krystofinski, Paige; Leiserson, Mark D M; Montoya, Dennis J; Nadel, Brian B; Pellegrini, Matteo; Pritchard, Colin C; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Quist, Elleanor H; Raphael, Ben J; Salipante, Stephen J; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Shinbrot, Eve; Shirts, Brian; Shukla, Sachet; Stanford, Janet L; Sun, Wei; Tsoi, Jennifer; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Wheeler, David A; Wu, Catherine J; Yu, Ming; Zaidi, Syed H; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Garraway, Levi A; Hudson, Thomas J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ribas, Antoni; Ogino, Shuji; Peters, Ulrike

    2018-06-01

    To understand the genetic drivers of immune recognition and evasion in colorectal cancer, we analyzed 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumor samples, including 179 classified as microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high). This set includes The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal cancer cohort of 592 samples, completed and analyzed here. MSI-high, a hypermutated, immunogenic subtype of colorectal cancer, had a high rate of significantly mutated genes in important immune-modulating pathways and in the antigen presentation machinery, including biallelic losses of B2M and HLA genes due to copy-number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. WNT/β-catenin signaling genes were significantly mutated in all colorectal cancer subtypes, and activated WNT/β-catenin signaling was correlated with the absence of T-cell infiltration. This large-scale genomic analysis of colorectal cancer demonstrates that MSI-high cases frequently undergo an immunoediting process that provides them with genetic events allowing immune escape despite high mutational load and frequent lymphocytic infiltration and, furthermore, that colorectal cancer tumors have genetic and methylation events associated with activated WNT signaling and T-cell exclusion. Significance: This multi-omic analysis of 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumors reveals that it should be possible to better monitor resistance in the 15% of cases that respond to immune blockade therapy and also to use WNT signaling inhibitors to reverse immune exclusion in the 85% of cases that currently do not. Cancer Discov; 8(6); 730-49. ©2018 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 663 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Improving Molecular Genetic Test Utilization through Order Restriction, Test Review, and Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jacquelyn D; Procop, Gary W; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Wyllie, Robert; Lacbawan, Felicitas L

    2015-05-01

    The ordering of molecular genetic tests by health providers not well trained in genetics may have a variety of untoward effects. These include the selection of inappropriate tests, the ordering of panels when the assessment of individual or fewer genes would be more appropriate, inaccurate result interpretation and inappropriate patient guidance, and significant unwarranted cost expenditure. We sought to improve the utilization of molecular genetic tests by requiring providers without specialty training in genetics to use genetic counselors and molecular genetic pathologists to assist in test selection. We used a genetic and genomic test review process wherein the laboratory-based genetic counselor performed the preanalytic assessment of test orders and test triage. Test indication and clinical findings were evaluated against the test panel composition, methods, and test limitations under the supervision of the molecular genetic pathologist. These test utilization management efforts resulted in a decrease in genetic test ordering and a gross cost savings of $1,531,913 since the inception of these programs in September 2011 through December 2013. The combination of limiting the availability of complex genetic tests and providing guidance regarding appropriate test strategies is an effective way to improve genetic tests, contributing to judicious use of limited health care resources. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Racial Disparities in the Molecular Landscape of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elisabeth I; Lynce, Filipa; Xiu, Joanne; Ellerbrock, Angela; Reddy, Sandeep K; Obeid, Elias; Liu, Stephen V; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Separovic, Duska; Vanderwalde, Ari

    2018-04-01

    African Americans (AA) have the highest incidence and mortality of any racial/ethnic group in the US for most cancer types. Heterogeneity in the molecular biology of cancer, as a contributing factor to this disparity, is poorly understood. To address this gap in knowledge, we explored the molecular landscape of colorectal cancer (CRC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and high-grade glioma (HGG) from 271 AA and 636 Caucasian (CC) cases. DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors was sequenced using next-generation sequencing. Additionally, we evaluated protein expression using immunohistochemistry. The Exome Aggregation Consortium Database was evaluated for known ethnicity associations. Considering only pathogenic or presumed pathogenic mutations, as determined by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines, and using Bonferroni and Benjamini-Hochberg corrections for multiple comparisons, we found that CRC tumors from AA patients harbored significantly more mutations of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) than those from CC patients. CRC tumors in AA patients also appeared to harbor more mutations of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1/MEK1), MPL proto-oncogene (MPL), thrombo-poietin receptor, and neurofibromin 1 (NF1) than those from CC patients. In contrast, CRCs from AA patients were likely to carry fewer mutations of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), as well as of proto-oncogene B-Raf (BRAF), including the V600E variant, than those from CC patients. Rates of immunohistochemical positivity for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha (TOP2A) tended to be higher in CRCs from AA patients than in CC patients. In NSCLC adenocarcinoma, BRAF variants appeared to be more frequent in the AA than in the CC cohort, whereas in squamous cell lung carcinoma, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression tended to be lower in the AA than in CC group. Moreover

  3. DNA fingerprinting techniques for the analysis of genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Johanna K; Alonso, Sergio; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Perucho, Manuel

    2010-11-10

    Genetic somatic alterations are fundamental hallmarks of cancer. In addition to point and other small mutations targeting cancer genes, solid tumors often exhibit aneuploidy as well as multiple chromosomal rearrangements of large fragments of the genome. Whether somatic chromosomal alterations and aneuploidy are a driving force or a mere consequence of tumorigenesis remains controversial. Recently it became apparent that not only genetic but also epigenetic alterations play a major role in carcinogenesis. Epigenetic regulation mechanisms underlie the maintenance of cell identity crucial for development and differentiation. These epigenetic regulatory mechanisms have been found substantially altered during cancer development and progression. In this review, we discuss approaches designed to analyze genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer, especially DNA fingerprinting approaches to detect changes in DNA copy number and methylation. DNA fingerprinting techniques, despite their modest throughput, played a pivotal role in significant discoveries in the molecular basis of colorectal cancer. The aim of this review is to revisit the fingerprinting technologies employed and the oncogenic processes that they unveiled. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sporadic colorectal cancer and individual susceptibility: A review of the association studies investigating the role of DNA repair genetic polymorphisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, B.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 635, 2-3(2007), s.118-145 ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563; GA ČR GA310/05/2626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Sporadic colorectal cancer * Individual susceptibility * DNA repair Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.353, year: 2007

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair and oxidative stress pathways may modify the association between body size and postmenopausal breast cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McCullough, L. E.; Eng, S. M.; Bradshaw, P. T.; Cleveland, R. J.; Steck, S. E.; Terry, M. B.; Shen, J.; Crew, K.D.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Ahn, J.; Ambrosone, Ch.B.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.; Gammon, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2015), s. 263-269 ISSN 1047-2797 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : breast cancer * body mass index * oxidative stress * DNA repair * Epidemiology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2015

  6. Genetic variants in C-type lectin genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and clinical outcome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lu, S.; Bevier, M.; Huhn, S.; Sainz, J.; Lascorz, J.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel; Försti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 10 (2013), s. 2325-2333 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : CD209 * colorectal cancer * polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.007, year: 2013

  7. Application of molecular biology of differentiated thyroid cancer for clinical prognostication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Vincenzo; Sciammarella, Concetta; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2016-11-01

    Although cancer outcome results from the interplay between genetics and environment, researchers are making a great effort for applying molecular biology in the prognostication of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Nevertheless, role of molecular characterisation in the prognostic setting of DTC is still nebulous. Among the most common and well-characterised genetic alterations related to DTC, including mutations of BRAF and RAS and RET rearrangements, BRAF V600E is the only mutation showing unequivocal association with clinical outcome. Unfortunately, its accuracy is strongly limited by low specificity. Recently, the introduction of next-generation sequencing techniques led to the identification of TERT promoter and TP53 mutations in DTC. These genetic abnormalities may identify a small subgroup of tumours with highly aggressive behaviour, thus improving specificity of molecular prognostication. Although knowledge of prognostic significance of TP53 mutations is still anecdotal, mutations of the TERT promoter have showed clear association with clinical outcome. Nevertheless, this genetic marker needs to be analysed according to a multigenetic model, as its prognostic effect becomes negligible when present in isolation. Given that any genetic alteration has demonstrated, taken alone, enough specificity, the co-occurrence of driving mutations is emerging as an independent genetic signature of aggressiveness, with possible future application in clinical practice. DTC prognostication may be empowered in the near future by non-tissue molecular prognosticators, including circulating BRAF V600E and miRNAs. Although promising, use of these markers needs to be refined by the technical sight, and the actual prognostic value is still yet to be validated. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Genética molecular: avanços e problemas Molecular genetics: advances and problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi S. Garcia

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo traz a discussão sobre genética molecular em saúde ao campo da saúde pública. Com a revolução produzida pela chegada da engenharia genética, é importante discutir alguns dos avanços e problemas desta tecnologia para a sociedade. Está na hora de se fazer uma avaliação clara e bem informada acerca do que já se conseguiu e do que ainda podemos conseguir através desta tecnologia. A sociedade precisa compreender as implicações éticas e práticas de uma tecnologia capaz de produzir drogas milagrosas, dagnósticos modernos e a cura de todas as doenças. Alguns pontos particularmente delicados pertinentes às questões sociais ligadas à biologia molecular e ao projeto genoma humano são discutidos.This article is an attempt to draw the discussion on molecular genetics in health into the public health domain. Now that the genetic engineering revolution has arrived, it is important to point out the advances and problems this technology poses for society. It is time for a clear, informed assessment of what we have already achieved and may soon achieve using this technology. Clearly, society needs to understand the ethical and practical implications of a technology which can produce miracle drugs and modern diagnoses and cure virtually every disease. Important points from sensitive social issues raised by molecular biology and the human genome project are discussed.

  9. Molecular alterations in childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident and low-dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of radiation carcinogenesis has been used for evaluating the risk from radiation exposure. While the epidemiological studies have supported the LNT model at doses above 100 mGy, more uncertainties are still existed in the LNT model at low doses below 100 mGy. Thus, it is urged to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis. After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, significant amount of childhood thyroid cancer has emerged in the children living in the contaminated area. As the incidence of sporadic childhood thyroid cancer is very low, it is quite evident that those cancer cases have been induced by radiation exposure caused mainly by the intake of contaminated foods, such as milk. Because genetic alterations in childhood thyroid cancers have extensively been studied, it should provide a unique chance to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. In a current review, molecular signatures obtained from the molecular studies of childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident have been overviewed, and new roles of radiation exposure in thyroid carcinogenesis will be discussed. (author)

  10. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-01-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and γ-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by γ-rays, α-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than γ-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate γ-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed

  11. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Esther; Thippsandra, Shwetha; Yanamadala, Anusha; Redy, Siddaling; Pattanayak, Puskar; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using tumor genomic profiling information has revolutionized personalized cancer treatment. Head and neck (HN) cancer management is being influenced by recent discoveries of activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and related targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, targeted therapies for Kristen Rat Sarcoma, and MET proto-oncogenes. Molecular imaging using PET plays an important role in assessing the biologic behavior of HN cancer with the goal of delivering individualized cancer treatment. This review summarizes recent genomic discoveries in HN cancer and their implications for functional PET imaging in assessing response to targeted therapies, and drug resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Determinants of Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    receptor is no longer essential for survival, collectively termed androgen pathway independent prostate cancer (APIPC) (Nelson, 2012). A subset of these...Reciprocal feedback regulation of PI3K and androgen receptor signaling in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer . Cancer Cell. 2011 May 17;19(5):575-86. Chen J, Li...2005a). The androgen receptor and signal-transduction pathways in hormone-refractory prostate cancer . Part 1: Modifications to the androgen receptor

  13. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address...... this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested...... that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We...

  14. Understanding the Effectiveness of Natural Compound Mixtures in Cancer through Their Molecular Mode of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thazin Nwe Aung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Many approaches to cancer management are often ineffective due to adverse reactions, drug resistance, or inadequate target specificity of single anti-cancer agents. In contrast, a combinatorial approach with the application of two or more anti-cancer agents at their respective effective dosages can achieve a synergistic effect that boosts cytotoxicity to cancer cells. In cancer, aberrant apoptotic pathways allow cells that should be killed to survive with genetic abnormalities, leading to cancer progression. Mutations in apoptotic mechanism arising during the treatment of cancer through cancer progression can consequently lead to chemoresistance. Natural compound mixtures that are believed to have multiple specific targets with minimal acceptable side-effects are now of interest to many researchers due to their cytotoxic and chemosensitizing activities. Synergistic interactions within a drug mixture enhance the search for potential molecular targets in cancer cells. Nonetheless, biased/flawed scientific evidence from natural products can suggest false positive therapeutic benefits during drug screening. In this review, we have taken these factors into consideration when discussing the evidence for these compounds and their synergistic therapeutic benefits in cancer. While there is limited evidence for clinical efficacy for these mixtures, in vitro data suggest that these preparations merit further investigation, both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta-analysis ......BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta......-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference...... panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24...

  16. Establishing a Cancer Genetics Programme in Asia - the Singapore Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieng Wei-Shieng

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer genetics is now an established oncology subspecialty with the primary prevention role of identifying high-risk individuals through genetic information for enrolment into screening and preventive programmes. Integrated into major Western centres since the late 1990s, such a programme has been established in Singapore since 2001. Our programme has evaluated 367 index patients comprising mainly breast and colorectal cancer cases. Cancer patients were receptive to genetic counselling, but cost posed a major barrier to genetic testing. However, when the cost barrier was removed through government subsidy plans, more than half of high-risk patients still declined testing. The major barriers were reluctance to involve family members, perception that the information would not change management, and fears of negative feelings. Confirmed mutation carriers were compliant to screening and receptive to prophylactic surgery. Uptake of predictive testing among cancer-free family members has been low, possibly arising from the stigma associated with cancer in our Asian culture. These potential barriers are being addressed through government subsidy plans, continuing education to increase awareness, and being culturally sensitive when dealing with the Asian family.

  17. Courting the future: cancer and genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Describing this double issue of MEDICC Review could be an exercise for a first-year philosophy course in logic. It's not about "cancer and genetics" in Cuba. It's about cancer in Cuba and about genetics in Cuba, not about exploring relationships between them. Nevertheless, while the marriage of the two themes was fortuitous, in that the two had long been scheduled for the journal in 2014, there is a certain felicity to their sharing an issue. To date, the outstanding accomplishments of genetics have been most helpful for conditions occurring at the beginning of life and cancer is largely (though not exclusively) a disease related to aging. But the two are intrinsically connected: Although only a few of the more than 100 different diseases grouped under the term cancer are known to be hereditary, every cancer begins with a mutation in one or more genes, whether the mutation is inherited, due to an exposure, or is simply a random error in the millions of cell divisions that are part and parcel of cellular reproduction. Our cover image, a stained-glass window by Cuban artist Rosa María de la Terga at Cuba's National Medical Genetics Center, illustrates the elegance of the DNA molecule, the intricate key to life.

  18. High-throughput molecular analysis in lung cancer: insights into biology and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, S; Sos, M L; Thomas, R K; Massion, P P

    2009-08-01

    During the last decade, high-throughput technologies including genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic and proteomic have been applied to further our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this heterogeneous disease, and to develop strategies that aim to improve the management of patients with lung cancer. Ultimately, these approaches should lead to sensitive, specific and noninvasive methods for early diagnosis, and facilitate the prediction of response to therapy and outcome, as well as the identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. Genomic studies were the first to move this field forward by providing novel insights into the molecular biology of lung cancer and by generating candidate biomarkers of disease progression. Lung carcinogenesis is driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function; however, the challenge remains to pinpoint the key regulatory control mechanisms and to distinguish driver from passenger alterations that may have a small but additive effect on cancer development. Epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation and histone modifications modulate chromatin structure and, in turn, either activate or silence gene expression. Proteomic approaches critically complement these molecular studies, as the phenotype of a cancer cell is determined by proteins and cannot be predicted by genomics or transcriptomics alone. The present article focuses on the technological platforms available and some proposed clinical applications. We illustrate herein how the "-omics" have revolutionised our approach to lung cancer biology and hold promise for personalised management of lung cancer.

  19. Integrated Molecular Imaging and Therapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2008-01-01

    ...) and NIR dosing of cancer cells using SWCNT. While previous studies have shown the transport of DNA into cells using nanotubes, in this study we show multi-component molecular targeting of both IGF1R and Her2 surface markers in cancer cells...

  20. Molecular genetics of pancreatic neoplasms and their morphologic correlates: an update on recent advances and potential diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michelle D; Saka, Burcu; Balci, Serdar; Goldblum, Andrew S; Adsay, N Volkan

    2014-02-01

    To summarize the most clinically and biologically relevant advances in molecular/genetic characteristics of various pancreatic neoplasms, with morphologic correlation. Whole-exome sequencing of numerous benign and malignant pancreatic tumors, along with the plethora of highly sensitive molecular studies now available for analyzing these tumors, provide mounting evidence to support the long-held belief that cancer is essentially a genetic disease. These genetic discoveries have not only helped to confirm the age-old, morphology-based classifications of pancreatic neoplasia but have shed new light on their mechanisms. Many of these molecular discoveries are currently being used in preoperative diagnosis. Mutations in KRAS, P16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4 are commonly seen in ductal neoplasia but not in nonductal tumors; ductal adenocarcinomas with SMAD4/DPC4 loss are associated with widespread metastasis and poor prognosis. GNAS and RNF43 mutations have been discovered in most intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms, providing critical molecular fingerprints for their diagnosis. Mutation in DAXX/ATRX is only seen in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, making it a useful potential marker in distinguishing these tumors from mimics. When combined with morphologic observations, molecular studies will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis and morphomolecular signatures associated with specific neoplasms and provide new horizons for precision medicine and targeted therapies.

  1. Cancer Screening and Genetics: A Tale of Two Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Edwards, Heather M.; Khoury, Muin J.; Taplin, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The long-standing medical tradition to “first do no harm” is reflected in population-wide evidence-based recommendations for cancer screening tests that focus primarily on reducing morbidity and mortality. The conventional cancer screening process is predicated on finding early-stage disease that can be treated effectively; yet emerging genetic and genomic testing technologies have moved the target earlier in the disease development process to identify a probabilistic predisposition to diseas...

  2. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  3. Competences, education and support for new roles in cancer genetics services: outcomes from the cancer genetics pilot projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Catherine; Burton, Hilary; Farndon, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 the Department of Health in collaboration with Macmillan Cancer Support set up service development projects to pilot the integration of genetics in mainstream medicine in the area of cancer genetics.In developing these services, new roles and responsibilities were devised that required supporting programmes of education and training. The NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre has worked with the projects to draw together their experience in these aspects. New roles include the Cancer Family Nurse Specialist, in which a nurse working in a cancer setting was trained to identify and manage genetic or family history concerns, and the Genetic Risk Assessment Practitioner--a small team of practitioners working within a secondary care setting to deliver a standardised risk assessment pathway. Existing roles were also adapted for a different setting, in particular the use of genetic counsellors working in a community ethnic minority setting. These practitioners undertook a range of clinical activities that can be mapped directly to the 'UK National Workforce Competences for Genetics in Clinical Practice for Non-genetics Healthcare Staff' framework developed by Skills for Health and the NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre (2007; draft competence framework). The main differences between the various roles were in the ordering of genetic tests and the provision of advice on invasive preventive options such as mastectomy. Those involved in service development also needed to develop competences in project management, business skills, audit and evaluation, working with users, general management (personnel, multi-agency work and marketing), educational supervision, IT, public and professional outreach, and research. Important resources to support the development of new roles and competences included pathways and guidelines, a formal statement of competences, a recognised syllabus, appropriate and timely courses, the availability of a

  4. Tracing the origin of 'blue Weimaraner' dogs by molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerding, W M; Schreiber, S; Dekomien, G; Epplen, J T

    2011-04-01

    Weimaraner dogs are defined by light brown coat colour termed grey including several shadings ranging from silver and deer to mouse grey. In contrast, the so-called blue Weimaraners (BW) with lightened black-pigmented coat have been proposed to represent spontaneous revertants in the Weimaraner breed. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the characteristic grey coat colour versus those of BW, known variation in coat colour genes including TYRP1 and MLPH were analysed in a number of grey and blue dogs. Variations at the B locus cause grey coat colour in Weimaraners via two non-functional TYRP1 copies (bb) including the b(s), b(d) and b(c) alleles. In all BW, at least one functional TYRP1 allele (Bb or BB genotype) was identified. Defined microsatellite alleles in TYRP1 intron 4 are linked to this functional B allele in BW. These alleles were also detected in various other dog breeds, but not in grey Weimaraners. The combination of a dominant trait for blue versus grey together with a specific TYRP1 haplotype in BW suggests that blue coat colour is not the result of spontaneous (back-) mutation in grey Weimaraners. This inference is even emphasized by the presence of a unique Y-chomosomal haplotype in a male offspring of the supposed ancestor of the BW population which - according to pedigree information - carries a copy of the original Y chromosome. Thus, molecular genetic analyses of coat colours combined with Y-chromosomal haplotypes allow tracing the origin of atypical dogs in respective canine populations. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Molecular Determinants of Colon Cancer Susceptibility in the East and West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, W M; Faris, M E; Peltomaki, P

    2017-01-01

    The currently available knowledge of factors that dictate the development and progression as well as the clinical outcome of colorectal cancers (CRC) is mainly derived from Western countries. Considerable number of publications document different incidence rates and contrasting clinical features of CRC in various groups such as the differences between urban vs. rural areas, young vs. old age and the East vs. the West. In particular, Egyptian CRC is a surprisingly young age disease with higher proportion of poorly differentiated and advanced stage cancers as compared to the Western counterparts. Less number of publications addressed the molecular genetics and epigenetic basis of these differences. The available data on CRC and other cancers support a substantial role of several environmental risk factors which impinge on the epigenome and alter the overall cellular and tissue homeostasis. Thus, environmental factors could play a role in predisposition to CRC in general as well as in shaping distinct disease phenotypes in different settings. On the other hand, the environment offers a wide range of preventive modalities including a selection of dietary chemopreventive agents which could play a significant role in fighting cancer at early stages. We here compare the clinical and molecular characteristics of Eastern and Western CRC based on the latest literature. The genetic, epigenetic and environmental etiologies for the observed differences are discussed. Finally, prospects for cancer prevention in light of the increased etiologic understanding are outlined. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Levels of Evidence: Cancer Genetics Studies (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levels of Evidence for Cancer Genetics Studies addresses the process and challenges of developing evidence-based summaries. Get information about how to weigh the strength of the evidence from cancer genetics studies in this summary for clinicians.

  7. Cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in differentiated type early gastric cancers with different mucin phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naomi; Watari, Jiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Tanno, Satoshi; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the biological impact and molecular pathogenesis of cellular phenotype in differentiated-type gastric cancers (DGCs), we investigated cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in early stage of DGCs. A total of 43 early gastric cancers (EGCs) were studied. EGCs were divided into 3 phenotypic categories: gastric (G type, n = 11), ordinary (O type, n = 20), and complete intestinal (CI type, n = 12) based on the combination of HGM, ConA, MUC2, and CD10. Proliferative index (PI), apoptotic index (AI), and p53 overexpression were investigated by immunohistochemical staining with anti-Ki-67, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling method, and p53 antibody, respectively. Using a high-resolution fluorescent microsatellite analysis system, microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were examined. Frameshift mutation analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor (TGF-betaRII) and bcl-2-associated X (BAX) in cancers with MSI was also performed. The mean AI/PI ratio values were 0.04 for G-type, 0.10 for O-type, and 0.13 for CI-type cancers--significantly lower in G type than in O and CI types (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No difference in the incidence of MSI and LOH was seen among the 3 cellular phenotypes. However, the major pattern of MSI, which showed drastic and widely dispersed changes and is related to an increased risk for cancer, was significantly higher in G and O types than in CI type (P cancers. These results indicate that G-type cancers are likely to show more aggressive behaviors than CI-type cancers, and that O-type cancers show the intermediate characteristics of both types. However, the molecular pathogenesis of each phenotypic cancer is not associated with microsatellite alterations. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  8. Pathway-based Analysis of the Hidden Genetic Heterogeneities in Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many cancers apparently showing similar phenotypes are actually distinct at the molecular level, leading to very different responses to the same treatment. It has been recently demonstrated that pathway-based approaches are robust and reliable for genetic analysis of cancers. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether such function-based approaches are useful in deciphering molecular heterogeneities in cancers. Therefore, we aimed to test this possibility in the present study. First, we used a NCI60 dataset to validate the ability of pathways to correctly partition samples. Next, we applied the proposed method to identify the hidden subtypes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Finally, the clinical significance of the identified subtypes was verified using survival analysis. For the NCI60 dataset, we achieved highly accurate partitions that best fit the clinical cancer phenotypes. Subsequently, for a DLBCL dataset, we identified three hidden subtypes that showed very different 10-year overall survival rates (90%, 46% and 20% and were highly significantly (P = 0.008 correlated with the clinical survival rate. This study demonstrated that the pathway-based approach is promising for unveiling genetic heterogeneities in complex human diseases.

  9. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers.

  10. MOLECULAR GENETIC MARKERS AND METHODS OF THEIR IDENTIFICATION IN MODERN FISH-FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hrytsyniak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The application of molecular genetic markers has been widely used in modern experimental fish-farming in recent years. This methodology is currently presented by a differentiated approach with individual mechanisms and clearly defined possibilities. Numerous publications in the scientific literature that are dedicated to molecular genetic markers for the most part offer purely practical data. Thus, the synthesis and analysis of existing information on the general principles of action and the limits of the main methods of using molecular genetic markers is an actual problem. In particular, such a description will make it possible to plan more effectively the experiment and to obtain the desired results with high reliability. Findings. The main types of variable parts of DNA that can be used as molecular genetic markers in determining the level of stock hybridization, conducting genetic inventory of population and solving other problems in modern fish-farming are described in this paper. Also, the article provides an overview of principal modern methods that can be used to identify molecular genetic markers. Originality. This work is a generalization of modern ideas about the mechanisms of experiments with molecular genetic markers in fish-farming. Information is provided in the form of consistent presentation of the principles and purpose of each method, as well as significant advances during their practical application. Practical value. The proposed review of classic and modern literature data on molecular genetic markers can be used for planning, modernization and correction of research activity in modern fish-farming.

  11. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both....... The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors......, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight...

  12. Molecular Cell Biology of Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christopher P; Green, Douglas R

    Cell death is a major mechanism to eliminate cells in which DNA is damaged, organelles are stressed, or oncogenes are overexpressed, all events that would otherwise predispose cells to oncogenic transformation. The pathways that initiate and execute cell death are complex, genetically encoded, and subject to significant regulation. Consequently, while these pathways are often mutated in malignancy, there is considerable interest in inducing cell death in tumor cells as therapy. This chapter addresses our current understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to two cell death pathways, apoptotic cell death and necroptosis, a regulated form of necrotic cell death. Apoptosis can be induced by a wide variety of signals, leading to protease activation that dismantles the cell. We discuss the physiological importance of each apoptosis pathway and summarize their known roles in cancer suppression and the current efforts at targeting each pathway therapeutically. The intricate mechanistic link between death receptor-mediated apoptosis and necroptosis is described, as well as the potential opportunities for utilizing necroptosis in the treatment of malignancy.

  13. [Molecular Biology for Surgical Treatment of Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Progress in lung cancer research achieved during the last 10 years was summarized. These include identification of novel driver mutations and application of targeted therapies, resistance mechanisms to targeted therapies, and immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Molecular biology also affects the field of surgical treatment. Several molecular markers have been reported to predict benign/ malignant or stable/growing tumors, although far from clinical application. In perioperative period, there is a possibility of atrial natriuretic peptide to prevent cancer metastasis. As adjuvant settings, although biomarker-based cytotoxic therapies failed to show clinical efficacy, several trials are ongoing employing molecular targeted agents (EGFR-TKI or ALK-TKI) or immune checkpoint inhibitors. In clinical practice, mutational information is sometimes used to distinguish 2nd primary tumors from pulmonary metastases of previous cancers. Surgery also has important role for oligo-progressive disease during molecular targeted therapies.

  14. Molecular and neuroendocrine mechanisms of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Costa, Felipe O; Carvalheira, José B C

    2015-09-01

    Cancer and its morbidities, such as cancer cachexia, constitute a major public health problem. Although cancer cachexia has afflicted humanity for centuries, its underlying multifactorial and complex physiopathology has hindered the understanding of its mechanism. During the last few decades we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the understanding of cancer cachexia pathophysiology. Anorexia and muscle and adipose tissue wasting are the main features of cancer cachexia. These apparently independent symptoms have humoral factors secreted by the tumor as a common cause. Importantly, the hypothalamus has emerged as an organ that senses the peripheral signals emanating from the tumoral environment, and not only elicits anorexia but also contributes to the development of muscle and adipose tissue loss. Herein, we review the roles of factors secreted by the tumor and its effects on the hypothalamus, muscle and adipose tissue, as well as highlighting the key targets that are being exploited for cancer cachexia treatment. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Molecular phenotyping of human ovarian cancer stem cells unravels the mechanisms for repair and chemoresistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvero, Ayesha B; Chen, Rui; Fu, Han-Hsuan

    2009-01-01

    A major burden in the treatment of ovarian cancer is the high percentage of recurrence and chemoresistance. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) provide a reservoir of cells that can self-renew, can maintain the tumor by generating differentiated cells [non-stem cells (non-CSCs)] which make up the bulk...... to form spheroids in suspension, and the ability to recapitulate in vivo the original tumor. Chemotherapy eliminates the bulk of the tumor but it leaves a core of cancer cells with high capacity for repair and renewal. The molecular properties identified in these cells may explain some of the unique...... of the tumor and may be the primary source of recurrence. We describe the characterization of human ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs). These cells have a distinctive genetic profile that confers them with the capacity to recapitulate the original tumor, proliferate with chemotherapy, and promote recurrence...

  16. Molecular genetic transfection of the coccidian parasite Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Zhang, Deqing; Breathnach, Cormac C; Vaishnava, Shipra; Striepen, Boris; Howe, Daniel K

    2006-11-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that is the major cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The biology of this pathogen remains poorly understood in part due to unavailability of molecular genetic tools. Hence, with an objective to develop DNA transfection capabilities for S. neurona, the 5' flanking region of the SnSAG1 gene was isolated from a genomic library and used to construct expression plasmids. In transient assays, the reporter molecules beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) could be detected in electroporated S. neurona, thereby confirming the feasibility of transgene expression in this organism. Stable transformation of S. neurona was achieved using a mutant dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene of Toxoplasma gondii that confers resistance to pyrimethamine. This selection system was used to create transgenic S. neurona that stably express beta-gal and YFP. As shown in this study, these transgenic clones can be useful for analyzing growth rate of parasites in vitro and for assessing drug sensitivities. More importantly, the DNA transfection methods described herein should greatly facilitate studies examining intracellular parasitism by this important coccidian pathogen.

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of phosphomannomutase genes in Triticum monococcum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunmei; Yu; Xinyan; Liu; Qian; Zhang; Xinyu; He; Wan; Huai; Baohua; Wang; Yunying; Cao; Rong; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In higher plants, phosphomannomutase(PMM) is essential for synthesizing the antioxidant ascorbic acid through the Smirnoff–Wheeler pathway. Previously, we characterized six PMM genes(Ta PMM-A1, A2, B1, B2, D1 and D2) in common wheat(Triticum aestivum, AABBDD).Here, we report a molecular genetic analysis of PMM genes in Triticum monococcum(AmAm), a diploid wheat species whose Amgenome is closely related to the A genome of common wheat. Two distinct PMM genes, Tm PMM-1 and Tm PMM-2, were found in T. monococcum. The coding region of Tm PMM-1 was intact and highly conserved. In contrast, two main Tm PMM-2 alleles were identified, with Tm PMM-2a possessing an intact coding sequence and Tm PMM-2b being a pseudogene. The transcript level of Tm PMM-2a was much higher than that of Tm PMM-2b, and a bacterially expressed Tm PMM-2a recombinant protein displayed relatively high PMM activity. In general, the total transcript level of PMM was substantially higher in accessions carrying Tm PMM-1 and Tm PMM-2a than those harboring Tm PMM-1 and Tm PMM-2b. However, total PMM protein and activity levels did not differ drastically between the two genotypes. This work provides new information on PMM genes in T. monococcum and expands our understanding on Triticeae PMM genes, which may aid further functional and applied studies of PMM in crop plants.

  18. [Molecular, genetic and physiological analysis of photoinhibition and photosynthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to use a combined molecular genetic, biochemical and physiological approach to understand the relationship between photosynthetic performance and the structure of the multifunctional D1 reaction center protein of Photosystem II encoded by the chloroplast psbA gene. Relative to other chloroplast proteins, turover of D1 is rapid and highly light dependent and de novo synthesis of D1 is required for a plant's recovery from short term exposure to irradiances which induce photoinhibitory damage. These observations have led to models for a damage/repair cycle of PSII involving the targeted degradation and replacement of photodamaged D1. To investigate the effects of perturbing the D1 cycle on photosynthesis and autotrophic growth under high and low irradiance, we have examined the consequences of site-specific mutations of the psbA and 16S rRNA genes affecting synthesis, maturation and function/stability of the D1 protein introduced into the chloroplast genome of wildtype strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using biolistic transformation.

  19. Molecular genetics of human primary microcephaly: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterised by microcephaly present at birth and non-progressive mental retardation. Microcephaly is the outcome of a smaller but architecturally normal brain; the cerebral cortex exhibits a significant decrease in size. MCPH is a neurogenic mitotic disorder, though affected patients demonstrate normal neuronal migration, neuronal apoptosis and neural function. Twelve MCPH loci (MCPH1-MCPH12) have been mapped to date from various populations around the world and contain the following genes: Microcephalin, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CASC5, ASPM, CENPJ, STIL, CEP135, CEP152, ZNF335, PHC1 and CDK6. It is predicted that MCPH gene mutations may lead to the disease phenotype due to a disturbed mitotic spindle orientation, premature chromosomal condensation, signalling response as a result of damaged DNA, microtubule dynamics, transcriptional control or a few other hidden centrosomal mechanisms that can regulate the number of neurons produced by neuronal precursor cells. Additional findings have further elucidated the microcephaly aetiology and pathophysiology, which has informed the clinical management of families suffering from MCPH. The provision of molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling may help to decrease the frequency of this disorder. PMID:25951892

  20. Accuracy of family history of cancer : clinical genetic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Boonstra, AE; Reefhuis, J; Hordijk-Hos, JM; de Walle, HEK; Oosterwijk, JC; Cornel, MC

    Family medical history is the cornerstone of clinical genetic diagnosis and management in cases of familial cancer. The soundness of medical decisions can be compromised if reports by the family on affected relatives are inaccurate. Although very time consuming, family medical histories are

  1. College of Science Magazine explores genetic medicine, cancer therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The newest issue of the College of Science Magazine features a host of scientific research projects underway at Virginia Tech. New avenues in genetic medicine, environmental links to breast cancer, and resistance training for diabetics are just a few of the topics.

  2. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or enviro...

  3. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hughes, Chanita

    2005-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study are to develop a Culturally Tailored Genetic (CTGC) protocol for African American women and evaluate its impact on decision-making and satisfaction about BRCA1/2 testing, quality of life, and cancer control practices...

  4. Genetic dissimilarity among sweet potato genotypes using morphological and molecular descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Knoblauch Viega de Andrade

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the genetic dissimilarity among sweet potato genotypes using morphological and molecular descriptors. The experiment was conducted in the Olericulture Sector at Federal University of Jequitinhonha and Mucuri Valleys (UFVJM and evaluated 60 sweet potato genotypes. For morphological characterization, 24 descriptors were used. For molecular characterization, 11 microsatellite primers specific for sweet potatoes were used, obtaining 210 polymorphic bands. Morphological and molecular diversity was obtained by dissimilarity matrices based on the coefficient of simple matching and the Jaccard index for morphological and molecular data, respectively. From these matrices, dendrograms were built. There is a large amount of genetic variability among sweet potato genotypes of the germplasm bank at UFVJM based on morphological and molecular characterizations. There was no duplicate suspicion or strong association between morphological and molecular analyses. Divergent accessions have been identified by molecular and morphological analyses, which can be used as parents in breeding programmes to produce progenies with high genetic variability.

  5. Prostate Cancer Detection by Molecular Urinalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    subjected to physical manipulation, thus creating the potential for their non- invasive detection in either urine or expressed prostatic fluid ( EPF ...samples or EPF . The recent application of molecular techniques to the study of PC has led to the identification of several novel molecular alterations...focused on detecting such molecular changes in the urine or EPF [7-12,15]. Paralleling the advances in biomarker discovery, sig- nificant advances in

  6. Retinoblastoma and the Genetic Theory of Cancer: An Old Paradigm Trying to Survive to the Evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangelo, D.; Lore, C.; Hadjistilianou, T.; De Francesco, S.

    2009-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is considered to represent the prototype of cancer linked to the sequential loss or inactivation of both alleles of a so-called “tumor suppressor gene”, the Rb1 gene. The pathogenetic mechanism behind this tumor was first hypothesized by Knudson in 1971 and further confirmed by others who identified the Rb1 gene whose loss or inactivation was claimed to be responsible for the disease. However, after about four decades of continuous research in the field of molecular biology, the evidence behind the role of the Rb1 gene in Rb appears to be seriously flawed in the light of epidemiological, biological, and clinical evidences. This editorial summarizes the inconsistencies on this subject. Nevertheless, the molecular biology establishment still adheres to the biased view of the genetic origin of Rb and other cancers, and hardly any alternative explanations are taken into account.

  7. Molecular Biomarkers in the Clinical Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Tomlins, Scott A

    2018-01-08

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common noncutaneous malignancies in men, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome. Although the majority of patients harbor indolent tumors that are essentially cured by local therapy, subsets of patients present with aggressive disease or recur/progress after primary treatment. With this in mind, modern clinical approaches to prostate cancer emphasize the need to reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment via personalized medicine. Advances in our understanding of prostate cancer pathogenesis, coupled with recent technologic innovations, have facilitated the development and validation of numerous molecular biomarkers, representing a range of macromolecules assayed from a variety of patient sample types, to help guide the clinical management of prostate cancer, including early detection, diagnosis, prognostication, and targeted therapeutic selection. Herein, we review the current state of the art regarding prostate cancer molecular biomarkers, emphasizing those with demonstrated utility in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  9. Molecular Biology and Prevention of Endometrial Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maxwell, George L

    2006-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the molecular aberrations associated with endometrial carcinogenesis and the biologic mechanisms underlying the protective effect of oral contraceptive (OC) therapy. 1...

  10. Molecular Biology and Prevention of Endometrial Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maxwell, George

    2003-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the molecular aberrations associated with endometrial carcinogenesis and the biologic mechanisms underlying the protective effect of oral contraceptive therapy. Methods: 1...

  11. Molecular Biology and Prevention of Endometrial Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maxwell, George L

    2004-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the molecular aberrations associated with endometrial carcinogenesis and the biologic mechanisms underlying the protective effect of oral contraceptive therapy. Methods: 1...

  12. Genetically engineered dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2001), s. 475-478 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2001

  13. Genetic toxicology and cancer risk assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choy, Wai Nang

    2001-01-01

    ... their risks to humans are obvious goals for the protection of public health. When exposure is unavoidable, an accurate estimation of human risk as a result of exposure is essential for making regulatory decisions. Quantitative cancer risk assessment is an intricate process that utilizes knowledge from many different scien...

  14. Colorectal Cancers: An Update on Their Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Kentaro

    2018-01-20

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) are the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Rather than being a single, uniform disease type, accumulating evidence suggests that CRCs comprise a group of molecularly heterogeneous diseases that are characterized by a range of genomic and epigenomic alterations. This heterogeneity slows the development of molecular-targeted therapy as a form of precision medicine. Recent data regarding comprehensive molecular characterizations and molecular pathological examinations of CRCs have increased our understanding of the genomic and epigenomic landscapes of CRCs, which has enabled CRCs to be reclassified into biologically and clinically meaningful subtypes. The increased knowledge of the molecular pathological epidemiology of CRCs has permitted their evolution from a vaguely understood, heterogeneous group of diseases with variable clinical courses to characteristic molecular subtypes, a development that will allow the implementation of personalized therapies and better management of patients with CRC. This review provides a perspective regarding recent developments in our knowledge of the molecular and epidemiological landscapes of CRCs, including results of comprehensive molecular characterizations obtained from high-throughput analyses and the latest developments regarding their molecular pathologies, immunological biomarkers, and associated gut microbiome. Advances in our understanding of potential personalized therapies for molecularly specific subtypes are also reviewed.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%-20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer.

  16. [Molecular biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Ludovic; Terrisse, Safae; Gauthier, Hélène; Pouessel, Damien; Le Maignan, Christine; Teixeira, Luis; Culine, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer was subjected to a paradigm switch from hormone resistance to androgen deprivation therapy resistance during the last decade. Indeed, new therapeutics targeting the androgen receptor showed clinical efficacy in patients with progressive disease under castration. Thus, it is a proof that the AR remains a dominant driver of oncogenesis in earlier-called hormone resistant prostate cancer. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms involved in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Inflammation to cancer: The molecular biology in the pancreas (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Sunbin; Feng, Tingting; Jia, Kaiqi; Tian, Yu; Li, Yan

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses are known to be correlated with cancer initiation and progression, and exploration of the route from inflammation to cancer makes a great contribution in elucidating the mechanisms underlying cancer development. Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal disease with a low radical-resection rate and a poor prognosis. As chronic pancreatitis is considered to be a significant etiological factor for PC development, the current review aims to describe the molecular pathways from inflammation to pancreatic carcinogenesis, in support of the strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of PC.

  18. Current and future molecular diagnostics in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Andy Hin-Fung; Cheng, Ka-Ho; Wong, Apple Siu-Ping; Ng, Simon Siu-Man; Ma, Brigette Buig-Yue; Chan, Charles Ming-Lok; Tsui, Nancy Bo-Yin; Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Yung, Benjamin Yat-Ming; Wong, Sze-Chuen Cesar

    2014-04-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in developed countries. On the other hand, CRC is also one of the most curable cancers if it is detected in early stages through regular colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. Since CRC develops slowly from precancerous lesions, early detection can reduce both the incidence and mortality of the disease. Fecal occult blood test is a widely used non-invasive screening tool for CRC. Although fecal occult blood test is simple and cost-effective in screening CRC, there is room for improvement in terms of the accuracy of the test. Genetic dysregulations have been found to play an important role in CRC development. With better understanding of the molecular basis of CRC, there is a growing expectation on the development of diagnostic tests based on more sensitive and specific molecular markers and those tests may provide a breakthrough to the limitations of current screening tests for CRC. In this review, the molecular basis of CRC development, the characteristics and applications of different non-invasive molecular biomarkers, as well as the technologies available for the detection were discussed. This review intended to provide a summary on the current and future molecular diagnostics in CRC and its pre-malignant state, colorectal adenoma.

  19. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their family history of cancer. Depending on a woman’s family history, the doctor or nurse may then use a ... against routine genetic counseling or BRCA testing of women whose family history is not associated with an increased risk for ...

  20. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... The presence of sufficient genetic diversity in the germplam is an important ..... Figure 1. PCR amplification profile of Elite-II SH Wheat using the primer OPG-2. .... genetic relationships among cowpea breeding lines and local.

  1. Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous families with primary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MUZAMMIL AHMAD KHAN

    3Institute of Human Genetics, Medical University of Graz, Graz 8010, Austria. 4Department of Cell and ... Materials and methods. Family recruitment and sample collection ..... 2014 A Drosophila genetic resource of mutats to study mechanism ...

  2. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Francesco; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss about the role of new probes for molecular imaging in the evaluation of prostate cancer (PCa). This review focuses particularly on the role of new promising radiotracers for the molecular imaging with PET/computed tomography in the detection of PCa recurrence. The role of these new imaging techniques to guide lesion-target therapies and the potential application of these molecular probes as theranostics agents is discussed. Finally, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to castration in PCa and the maintenance of active androgen receptor are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer diagnostics: The journey from histomorphology to molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Atif A; Abedalthagafi, Malak

    2016-09-06

    Although histomorphology has made significant advances into the understanding of cancer etiology, classification and pathogenesis, it is sometimes complicated by morphologic ambiguities, and other shortcomings that necessitate the development of ancillary tests to complement its diagnostic value. A new approach to cancer patient management consists of targeting specific molecules or gene mutations in the cancer genome by inhibitory therapy. Molecular diagnostic tests and genomic profiling methods are increasingly being developed to identify tumor targeted molecular profile that is the basis of targeted therapy. Novel targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, renal cell carcinoma and other cancers that were previously difficult to treat with standard chemotherapy. In this review, we discuss the role of histomorphology in cancer diagnosis and management and the rising role of molecular profiling in targeted therapy. Molecular profiling in certain diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties may provide a practical and useful complement to histomorphology and opens new avenues for targeted therapy and alternative methods of cancer patient management.

  4. Genetic changes associated with testicular cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Louise C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2016-10-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is a highly heritable cancer primarily affecting young white men. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been particularly effective in identifying multiple common variants with strong contribution to TGCT risk. These loci identified through association studies have implicated multiple genes as associated with TGCT predisposition, many of which are unique among cancer types, and regulate processes such as pluripotency, sex specification, and microtubule assembly. Together these biologically plausible genes converge on pathways involved in male germ cell development and maturation, and suggest that perturbation of them confers susceptibility to TGCT, as a developmental defect of germ cell differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetics, Cytogenetics, and Epigenetics of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Migliore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the colorectal cancer (CRC cases are sporadic, only 25% of the patients have a family history of the disease, and major genes causing syndromes predisposing to CRC only account for 5-6% of the total cases. The following subtypes can be recognized: MIN (microsatellite instability, CIN (chromosomal instability, and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype. CIN occurs in 80–85% of CRC. Chromosomal instability proceeds through two major mechanisms, missegregation that results in aneuploidy through the gain or loss of whole chromosomes, and unbalanced structural rearrangements that lead to the loss and/or gain of chromosomal regions. The loss of heterozygosity that occur in the first phases of the CRC cancerogenesis (in particular for the genes on 18q as well as the alteration of methylation pattern of multiple key genes can drive the development of colorectal cancer by facilitating the acquisition of multiple tumor-associated mutations and the instability phenotype.

  6. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost

  7. Functional and genetic deconstruction of the cellular origin in liver cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, research on primary liver cancers has particularly highlighted the uncommon plasticity of differentiated parenchymal liver cells (that is, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes (also known as biliary epithelial cells)), the role of liver progenitor cells in malignant transformation......, the importance of the tumour microenvironment and the molecular complexity of liver tumours. Whereas other reviews have focused on the landscape of genetic alterations that promote development and progression of primary liver cancers and the role of the tumour microenvironment, the crucial importance...... of the cellular origin of liver cancer has been much less explored. Therefore, in this Review, we emphasize the importance and complexity of the cellular origin in tumour initiation and progression, and attempt to integrate this aspect with recent discoveries in tumour genomics and the contribution...

  8. Molecular mechanism and genetic determinants of buprofezin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueting; Ji, Junbin; Zhao, Leizhen; Qiu, Jiguo; Dai, Chen; Wang, Weiwu; He, Jian; Jiang, Jiandong; Hong, Qing; Yan, Xin

    2017-07-14

    . However, the molecular mechanism and genetic determinants of microbial degradation of buprofezin has not been well identified. This work revealed that gene cluster bfzBA3A4A1A2C is responsible for the upstream catabolic pathway of buprofezin in R. qingshengii YL-1. The products of bfzBA3A4A1A2C could also degrade bifenthrin, a widely used pyrethroid insecticide. These findings enhance our understanding of the microbial degradation mechanism of buprofezin and benefit the application of strain YL-1 and bfzBA3A4A1A2C in the bioremediation of buprofezin contamination. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  10. Epidemiological bases and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, José Manuel; de la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2017-02-01

    The association between diabetes and cancer was hypothesized almost one century ago. Today, a vast number of epidemiological studies support that obese and diabetic populations are more likely to experience tissue-specific cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer share many hormonal, immune, and metabolic changes that may account for the relationship between diabetes and cancer. In addition, antidiabetic treatments may have an impact on the occurrence and course of some cancers. Moreover, some anticancer treatments may induce diabetes. These observations aroused a great controversy because of the ethical implications and the associated commercial interests. We report an epidemiological update from a mechanistic perspective that suggests the existence of many common and differential individual mechanisms linking obesity and type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus to certain cancers. The challenge today is to identify the molecular links responsible for this association. Classification of cancers by their molecular signatures may facilitate future mechanistic and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress and its molecular consequences in cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Surman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress, caused by psychological, physiological and physical factors has an adverse impact on human body homeostasis. There are two kind of stress: short-term and chronic. Cancer patients usually live under chronic stress, caused by diagnosis-related strong emotional experience and depression, resulting from various difficulties associated with disease progression and treatment. At the molecular level, stress factors induce production and secretion of stress-related hormones, such as catecholamines, glucocorticoids and dopamine (as a part of adaptational body response, which influence both normal and transformed cells through their specific receptors. The particular effects exerted by these molecules on cancer cells have been also observed in in vitro cultures and include changes in proliferation, apoptosis susceptibility and migration/invasion potential. As a result, it has been suggested that stress hormones may be responsible for progression of malignancy and thus accelerate the metastasis formation in cancer patients. However, the clinical data on correlation between stress and the patients survival, as well as the molecular analysis of stress hormone receptors expression and action in cancer cell, have not yet provided an unequivocal answer. For this reason, extensive studies, on molecular and clinical level are needed to fully determine stress impact on cancerprogression and on the effectiveness of anti-cancer treatment. Nowadays, it seems reasonable that the personalization of anti-cancer therapy should also focus on mental state of cancer patients, and provide them with psychological tools or techniques for stress management.

  12. Molecular Biology In Young Women With Breast Cancer: From Tumor Gene Expression To DNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Flores-Ramos, Liliana; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Peña-Curiel, Omar; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer (YWBC) represent roughly 15% of breast cancer (BC) cases in Latin America and other developing regions. Breast tumors occurring at an early age are more aggressive and have an overall worse prognosis compared to breast tumors in postmenopausal women. The expression of relevant proliferation biomarkers such as endocrine receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 appears to be unique in YWBC. Moreover, histopathological, molecular, genetic, and genomic studies have shown that YWBC exhibit a higher frequency of aggressive subtypes, differential tumor gene expression, increased genetic susceptibility, and specific genomic signatures, compared to older women with BC. This article reviews the current knowledge on tumor biology and genomic signatures in YWBC.

  13. Genetic toxicology. From exposure detection to cancer prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipic, M.

    2002-01-01

    There is a general concern that many environmental chemicals to which humans are exposed are genotoxic and may cause cancer. The main problem is not only to identify the environmental genotoxic pollutants, but also to characterise their mode of action at cellular and molecular levels. To identify genotoxic environmental pollutants we are using selected in vitro short-term assays. (author)

  14. Neuroblastoma: morphological pattern, molecular genetic features, and prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Stroganova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial tumor of childhood, arises from the developing neurons of the sympathetic nervous system (neural cress stem cells and has various biological and clinical characteristics. The mean age at disease onset is 18 months. Neuroblastoma has a number of unique characteristics: a capacity for spontaneous regression in babies younger than 12 months even in the presence of distant metastases, for differentiation (maturation into ganglioneuroma in infants after the first year of life, and for swift aggressive development and rapid metastasis. There are 2 clinical classifications of neuroblastoma: the International neuroblastoma staging system that is based on surgical results and the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group Staging System. One of the fundamentally important problems for the clinical picture of neuroblastoma is difficulties making its prognosis. Along with clinical parameters (a patient’s age, tumor extent and site, some histological, molecular biochemical (ploidy and genetic (chromosomal aberrations, MYCN gene status, deletion of the locus 1p36 and 11q, the longer arm of chromosome 17, etc. characteristics of tumor cells are of considerable promise. MYCN gene amplification is observed in 20–30 % of primary neuroblastomas and it is one of the major indicators of disease aggressiveness, early chemotherapy resistance, and a poor prognosis. There are 2 types of MYCN gene amplification: extrachromosomal (double acentric chromosomes and intrachromosomal (homogenically painted regions. Examination of double acentric chromosomes revealed an interesting fact that it may be eliminated (removed from the nucleus through the formation of micronuclei. MYCN oncogene amplification is accompanied frequently by 1p36 locus deletion and longer 17q arm and less frequently by 11q23 deletion; these are poor prognostic factors for the disease. The paper considers in detail the specific, unique characteristics of the

  15. Association of ATM and BMI-1 genetic variation with breast cancer risk in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Li-Ling; Wang, Fu-Chao; Zhang, Ming-Long; Liu, Dan; Chen, Ping; Mei, Qing-Bu; Li, Peng-Hui; Pan, Hong-Ming; Zheng, Li-Hong

    2018-04-24

    We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in ATM and BMI-1 genes can alter the risk of breast cancer through genotyping 6 variants among 524 breast cancer cases and 518 cancer-free controls of Han nationality. This was an observational, hospital-based, case-control association study. Analyses of single variant, linkage, haplotype, interaction and nomogram were performed. Risk was expressed as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). All studied variants were in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and were not linked. The mutant allele frequencies of rs1890637, rs3092856 and rs1801516 in ATM gene were significantly higher in cases than in controls (P = .005, ATM gene were significantly associated with 1.98-fold and 6.04-fold increased risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 1.36-2.90 and 1.65-22.08, respectively). Nomogram analysis estimated that the cumulative proportion of 3 significant variants in ATM gene was about 12.5%. Our findings collectively indicated that ATM gene was a candidate gene in susceptibility to breast cancer in Han Chinese. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Molecular inimitability amongst tumors: implications for precision cancer medicine in the age of personalized oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sandip P; Schwaederle, Maria; Daniels, Gregory A; Fanta, Paul T; Schwab, Richard B; Shimabukuro, Kelly A; Kesari, Santosh; Piccioni, David E; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Helsten, Teresa L; Lippman, Scott M; Parker, Barbara A; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-10-20

    Tumor sequencing has revolutionized oncology, allowing for detailed interrogation of the molecular underpinnings of cancer at an individual level. With this additional insight, it is increasingly apparent that not only do tumors vary within a sample (tumor heterogeneity), but also that each patient's individual tumor is a constellation of unique molecular aberrations that will require an equally unique personalized therapeutic regimen. We report here the results of 439 patients who underwent Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-certified next generation sequencing (NGS) across histologies. Among these patients, 98.4% had a unique molecular profile, and aside from three primary brain tumor patients with a single genetic lesion (IDH1 R132H), no two patients within a given histology were molecularly identical. Additionally, two sets of patients had identical profiles consisting of two mutations in common and no other anomalies. However, these profiles did not segregate by histology (lung adenocarcinoma-appendiceal cancer (KRAS G12D and GNAS R201C), and lung adenocarcinoma-liposarcoma (CDK4 and MDM2 amplification pairs)). These findings suggest that most advanced tumors are molecular singletons within and between histologies, and that tumors that differ in histology may still nonetheless exhibit identical molecular portraits, albeit rarely.

  17. Breast cancer lung metastasis: Molecular biology and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liting; Han, Bingchen; Siegel, Emily; Cui, Yukun; Giuliano, Armando; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2018-03-26

    Distant metastasis accounts for the vast majority of deaths in patients with cancer. Breast cancer exhibits a distinct metastatic pattern commonly involving bone, liver, lung, and brain. Breast cancer can be divided into different subtypes based on gene expression profiles, and different breast cancer subtypes show preference to distinct organ sites of metastasis. Luminal breast tumors tend to metastasize to bone while basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) displays a lung tropism of metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying this organ-specific pattern of metastasis still remain to be elucidated. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances regarding the molecular signaling pathways as well as the therapeutic strategies for treating breast cancer lung metastasis.

  18. Clinical impact of extensive molecular profiling in advanced cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Cousin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous precision medicine studies have investigated conventional molecular techniques and/or limited sets of gene alterations. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of the next-generation sequencing of the largest panel of genes used to date in tumour tissue and blood in the context of institutional molecular screening programmes. DNA analysis was performed by next-generation sequencing using a panel of 426 cancer-related genes and by comparative genomic hybridization from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archived tumour samples when available or from fresh tumour samples. Five hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. The median number of prior lines of treatment was 2 (range 0–9. The most common primary tumour types were lung (16.9%, colorectal (14.4%, breast (10.6%, ovarian (10.2% and sarcoma (10.2%. The median patient age was 63 years (range 19–88. A total of 292 patients (51.4% presented with at least one actionable genetic alteration. The 20 genes most frequently altered were TP53, CDKN2A, KRAS, PTEN, PI3KCA, RB1, APC, ERBB2, MYC, EGFR, CDKN2B, ARID1A, SMAD4, FGFR1, MDM2, BRAF, ATM, CCNE1, FGFR3 and FRS2. One hundred fifty-nine patients (28% were included in early phase trials. The treatment was matched with a tumour profile in 86 cases (15%. The two main reasons for non-inclusion were non-progressive disease (31.5% and general status deterioration (25%. Twenty-eight percent of patients presented with a growth modulation index (time to progression under the early phase trial treatment/time to progression of the previous line of treatment >1.3. Extensive molecular profiling using high-throughput techniques allows for the identification of actionable mutations in the majority of cases and is associated with substantial clinical benefit in up to one in four patients.

  19. DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Rectal Cancer: Benchmarking Its Impact on Prognosis, Neoadjuvant Response Prediction, and Clinical Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Nicole; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J; Veerapong, Jula; Borras, Ester; Krishnan, Sunil; Bednarski, Brian; Messick, Craig A; Skibber, John M; Feig, Barry W; Lynch, Patrick M; Vilar, Eduardo; You, Y Nancy

    2016-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) hallmarks consensus molecular subtype 1 of colorectal cancer. It is being routinely tested, but little is known about dMMR rectal cancers. The efficacy of novel treatment strategies cannot be established without benchmarking the outcomes of dMMR rectal cancer with current therapy. We aimed to delineate the impact of dMMR on prognosis, the predicted response to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant therapy, and implications of germline alterations in the MMR genes in rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 2012, 62 patients with dMMR rectal cancers underwent multimodality therapy. Oncologic treatment and outcomes as well as clinical genetics work-up were examined. Overall and rectal cancer-specific survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years. MMR deficiency was most commonly due to alterations in MSH2 (53%) or MSH6 (23%). After a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the 5-year rectal cancer-specific survival was 100% for stage I and II, 85.1% for stage III, and 60.0% for stage IV disease. Fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation was associated with a complete pathologic response rate of 27.6%. The extent of surgical resection was influenced by synchronous colonic disease at presentation, tumor height, clinical stage, and pelvic radiation. An informed decision for a limited resection focusing on proctectomy did not compromise overall survival. Five of the 11 (45.5%) deaths during follow-up were due to extracolorectal malignancies. dMMR rectal cancer had excellent prognosis and pathologic response with current multimodality therapy including an individualized surgical treatment plan. Identification of a dMMR rectal cancer should trigger germline testing, followed by lifelong surveillance for both colorectal and extracolorectal malignancies. We herein provide genotype-specific outcome benchmarks for comparison with novel interventions. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Harnessing Preclinical Molecular Imaging to Inform Advances in Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter M; Ebiana, Victoria A; Gosa, Laura; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Nathanson, David A

    2017-05-01

    Comprehensive molecular analysis of individual tumors provides great potential for personalized cancer therapy. However, the presence of a particular genetic alteration is often insufficient to predict therapeutic efficacy. Drugs with distinct mechanisms of action can affect the biology of tumors in specific and unique ways. Therefore, assays that can measure drug-induced perturbations of defined functional tumor properties can be highly complementary to genomic analysis. PET provides the capacity to noninvasively measure the dynamics of various tumor biologic processes in vivo. Here, we review the underlying biochemical and biologic basis for a variety of PET tracers and how they may be used to better optimize cancer therapy. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Grimm, Jan; F Donati, Olivio; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. • Advanced imaging techniques allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions in prostate cancer. • MRI/PET, optical and Cerenkov imaging facilitate the translation of molecular biology. • Multiple compounds targeting PSMA expression are currently undergoing clinical translation. • Other targets (e.g., PSA, prostate-stem cell antigen, GRPR) are in development.

  2. A methodological overview on molecular preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening: a genomic future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Xavier; Bautista-Llácer, Rosa

    2012-12-01

    The genetic diagnosis and screening of preimplantation embryos generated by assisted reproduction technology has been consolidated in the prenatal care framework. The rapid evolution of DNA technologies is tending to molecular approaches. Our intention is to present a detailed methodological view, showing different diagnostic strategies based on molecular techniques that are currently applied in preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The amount of DNA from one single, or a few cells, obtained by embryo biopsy is a limiting factor for the molecular analysis. In this sense, genetic laboratories have developed molecular protocols considering this restrictive condition. Nevertheless, the development of whole-genome amplification methods has allowed preimplantation genetic diagnosis for two or more indications simultaneously, like the selection of histocompatible embryos plus detection of monogenic diseases or aneuploidies. Moreover, molecular techniques have permitted preimplantation genetic screening to progress, by implementing microarray-based comparative genome hybridization. Finally, a future view of the embryo-genetics field based on molecular advances is proposed. The normalization, cost-effectiveness analysis, and new technological tools are the next topics for preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening. Concomitantly, these additions to assisted reproduction technologies could have a positive effect on the schedules of preimplantation studies.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haiyan Zhu, Hui Luo, Wenwen Zhang, Zhaojun Shen, Xiaoli Hu, Xueqiong Zhu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. Keywords: cisplatin, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, microRNA, molecular mechanism, resistance

  4. Pitfalls in lung cancer molecular pathology: how to limit them in routine practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, M; Hofman, P

    2012-01-01

    New treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) targeting activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations and other genetic alterations demonstrated the clinical significance of the molecular features of specific subsets of tumors. Therefore, the development of personalized medicine has stimulated the routine integration into pathology departments of somatic mutation testing. However, clinical mutation testing must be optimized and standardized with regard to histological profile, type of samples, pre-analytical steps, methodology and result reporting. Routine molecular testing in NSCLC is currently moving beyond EGFR mutational analysis. Recent progress of targeted therapies will require molecular testing for a wide panel of mutations for a personalized molecular diagnosis. As a consequence, efficient testing of multiple molecular abnormalities is an urgent requirement in thoracic oncology. Moreover, increasingly limited tumor sample becomes a major challenge for molecular pathology. Continuous efforts should be made for safe, effective and specific molecular analyses. This must be based on close collaboration between the departments involved in the management of lung cancer. In this review we explored the practical issues and pitfalls surrounding the routine implementation of molecular testing in NSCLC in a pathology laboratory.

  5. Molecular Response to Hypoxia; from C. elegans to cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Oncogenesis is governed by genetic and epigenetic events that co-opt to malignant progression. The role of the microenvironment in tumorigenesis and maintenance is increasingly appreciated. Oxygen supply is one of the rate limiting microenvironmental factors. Like healthy cells, cancer cells rely on

  6. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-06-18

    To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (Pconstipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (Phospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment.

  7. Asymmetry in family history implicates nonstandard genetic mechanisms: application to the genetics of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice R Weinberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies typically target inherited autosomal variants, but less studied genetic mechanisms can play a role in complex disease. Sex-linked variants aside, three genetic phenomena can induce differential risk in maternal versus paternal lineages of affected individuals: 1. maternal effects, reflecting the maternal genome's influence on prenatal development; 2. mitochondrial variants, which are inherited maternally; 3. autosomal genes, whose effects depend on parent of origin. We algebraically show that small asymmetries in family histories of affected individuals may reflect much larger genetic risks acting via those mechanisms. We apply these ideas to a study of sisters of women with breast cancer. Among 5,091 distinct families of women reporting that exactly one grandmother had breast cancer, risk was skewed toward maternal grandmothers (p<0.0001, especially if the granddaughter was diagnosed between age 45 and 54. Maternal genetic effects, mitochondrial variants, or variant genes with parent-of-origin effects may influence risk of perimenopausal breast cancer.

  8. Genetic susceptibility loci, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Koutros

    Full Text Available Uncovering SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms-environment interactions can generate new hypotheses about the function of poorly characterized genetic variants and environmental factors, like pesticides. We evaluated SNP-environment interactions between 30 confirmed prostate cancer susceptibility loci and 45 pesticides and prostate cancer risk in 776 cases and 1,444 controls in the Agricultural Health Study. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multiplicative SNP-pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. After correction for multiple tests using the False Discovery Rate method, two interactions remained noteworthy. Among men carrying two T alleles at rs2710647 in EH domain binding protein 1 (EHBP1 SNP, the risk of prostate cancer in those with high malathion use was 3.43 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.44-8.15 (P-interaction= 0.003. Among men carrying two A alleles at rs7679673 in TET2, the risk of prostate cancer associated with high aldrin use was 3.67 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.43, 9.41 (P-interaction= 0.006. In contrast, associations were null for other genotypes. Although additional studies are needed and the exact mechanisms are unknown, this study suggests known genetic susceptibility loci may modify the risk between pesticide use and prostate cancer.

  9. CGPD: Cancer Genetics and Proteomics Database - A Dataset for Computational Analysis and Online Cancer Diagnostic Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizwan Riaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer Genetics and Proteomics Database (CGPD is a repository for genetics and proteomics data of those Homo sapiens genes which are involved in Cancer. These genes are categorized in the database on the basis of cancer type. 72 genes of 13 types of cancers are considered in this database yet. Primers, promoters and peptides of these genes are also made available. Primers provided for each gene, with their features and conditions given to facilitate the researchers, are useful in PCR amplification, especially in cloning experiments. CGPD also contains Online Cancer Diagnostic Center (OCDC. It also contains transcription and translation tools to assist research work in progressive manner. The database is publicly available at http://www.cgpd.comyr.com.

  10. Molecular genetic contributions to socioeconomic status and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Davies, Gail; Hayward, Caroline; Liewald, Dave; Kerr, Shona M; Campbell, Archie; Luciano, Michelle; Smith, Blair H; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hocking, Lynne J; Hastie, Nicholas D; Wright, Alan F; Porteous, David J; Visscher, Peter M; Deary, Ian J

    2014-05-01

    Education, socioeconomic status, and intelligence are commonly used as predictors of health outcomes, social environment, and mortality. Education and socioeconomic status are typically viewed as environmental variables although both correlate with intelligence, which has a substantial genetic basis. Using data from 6815 unrelated subjects from the Generation Scotland study, we examined the genetic contributions to these variables and their genetic correlations. Subjects underwent genome-wide testing for common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). DNA-derived heritability estimates and genetic correlations were calculated using the 'Genome-wide Complex Trait Analyses' (GCTA) procedures. 21% of the variation in education, 18% of the variation in socioeconomic status, and 29% of the variation in general cognitive ability was explained by variation in common SNPs (SEs ~ 5%). The SNP-based genetic correlations of education and socioeconomic status with general intelligence were 0.95 (SE 0.13) and 0.26 (0.16), respectively. There are genetic contributions to intelligence and education with near-complete overlap between common additive SNP effects on these traits (genetic correlation ~ 1). Genetic influences on socioeconomic status are also associated with the genetic foundations of intelligence. The results are also compatible with substantial environmental contributions to socioeconomic status.

  11. Genetic alterations in lung cancer: Assessing limitations in routine clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Espiga Macedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer mortality worldwide, responsible for approximately 1.1 million deaths per year. Median survival is short, both as most tumours are diagnosed at an advanced stage and because of the limited efficacy of available treatments. The development of tumour molecular genetics carries the promise of altering this state of affairs, as it should lead to a more precise classification of tumours, identify specific molecular targets for therapy and, above all, allow the development of new methods for early diagnosis. Despite numerous studies demonstrating the usefulness of molecular genetic techniques in the study of lung cancer, its routine clinical use in Portugal has, however, been limited.In this study, we used a p53 mutation screen in multiple clinical samples from a series of lung cancer patients to attempt to identify the main practical limitations to the integration of molecular genetics in routine clinical practice. Our results suggest that the main limiting factor is the availability of samples with good quality DNA; a problem that could be overcome by alterations in common sample collection and storage procedures. Resumo: O cancro do pulmão é a causa mais frequente de mortalidade por cancro no mundo, sendo responsável por cerca de 1,1 milhões de mortes por ano. A sobrevivência média dos doentes é geralmente curta, por a doença se encontrar em estádios avançados na altura do diagnóstico, mas também devido à falta de eficácia dos tratamentos disponíveis. O advento da genética molecular dos tumores trouxe consigo a possibilidade de modificar esta situação, quer através do refinamento do diagnóstico, quer da identificação de alvos terapêuticos específicos, quer sobretudo por – pelo menos em teoria – permitir o diagnóstico precoce da doença. No entanto, e apesar de numerosos trabalhos terem já demonstrado a utilidade

  12. Genetic studies and a search for molecular markers that are linked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    Instead, linkage analysis resulted in the construction of a molecular marker linkage map consisting of 45 ..... This limits the application of this marker type, particularly in ... primer design when one uses RAPDs. .... Concepts of Genetics. Fourth.

  13. Distinct genetic alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ashktorab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancer (CRC development often includes chromosomal instability (CIN leading to amplifications and deletions of large DNA segments. Epidemiological, clinical, and cytogenetic studies showed that there are considerable differences between CRC tumors from African Americans (AAs and Caucasian patients. In this study, we determined genomic copy number aberrations in sporadic CRC tumors from AAs, in order to investigate possible explanations for the observed disparities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH using a 105k chip to identify copy number aberrations in samples from 15 AAs. In addition, we did a population comparative analysis with aCGH data in Caucasians as well as with a widely publicized list of colon cancer genes (CAN genes. There was an average of 20 aberrations per patient with more amplifications than deletions. Analysis of DNA copy number of frequently altered chromosomes revealed that deletions occurred primarily in chromosomes 4, 8 and 18. Chromosomal duplications occurred in more than 50% of cases on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, 20 and X. The CIN profile showed some differences when compared to Caucasian alterations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chromosome X amplification in male patients and chromosomes 4, 8 and 18 deletions were prominent aberrations in AAs. Some CAN genes were altered at high frequencies in AAs with EXOC4, EPHB6, GNAS, MLL3 and TBX22 as the most frequently deleted genes and HAPLN1, ADAM29, SMAD2 and SMAD4 as the most frequently amplified genes. The observed CIN may play a distinctive role in CRC in AAs.

  14. Clinical verification of genetic results returned to research participants: findings from a Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Mercy Y; Truitt, Anjali R; Tenney, Lederle; Fisher, Douglass; Lindor, Noralane M; Veenstra, David; Jarvik, Gail P; Newcomb, Polly A; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2017-11-01

    The extent to which participants act to clinically verify research results is largely unknown. This study examined whether participants who received Lynch syndrome (LS)-related findings pursued researchers' recommendation to clinically verify results with testing performed by a CLIA-certified laboratory. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center site of the multinational Colon Cancer Family Registry offered non-CLIA individual genetic research results to select registry participants (cases and their enrolled relatives) from 2011 to 2013. Participants who elected to receive results were counseled on the importance of verifying results at a CLIA-certified laboratory. Twenty-six (76.5%) of the 34 participants who received genetic results completed 2- and 12-month postdisclosure surveys; 42.3% of these (11/26) participated in a semistructured follow-up interview. Within 12 months of result disclosure, only 4 (15.4%) of 26 participants reported having verified their results in a CLIA-certified laboratory; of these four cases, all research and clinical results were concordant. Reasons for pursuing clinical verification included acting on the recommendation of the research team and informing future clinical care. Those who did not verify results cited lack of insurance coverage and limited perceived personal benefit of clinical verification as reasons for inaction. These findings suggest researchers will need to address barriers to seeking clinical verification in order to ensure that the intended benefits of returning genetic research results are realized. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Non-genetic health professionals' attitude towards, knowledge of and skills in discussing and ordering genetic testing for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Kirsten F. L.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Allain, Dawn C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic health professionals (NGHPs) have insufficient knowledge of cancer genetics, express educational needs and are unprepared to counsel their patients regarding their genetic test results. So far, it is unclear how NGHPs perceive their own communication skills. This study was undertaken to

  16. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Mutagenesis Using a Highly Sensitive Single-Stranded DNA Reporter System in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kin

    2018-01-01

    Mutations are permanent alterations to the coding content of DNA. They are starting material for the Darwinian evolution of species by natural selection, which has yielded an amazing diversity of life on Earth. Mutations can also be the fundamental basis of serious human maladies, most notably cancers. In this chapter, I describe a highly sensitive reporter system for the molecular genetic analysis of mutagenesis, featuring controlled generation of long stretches of single-stranded DNA in budding yeast cells. This system is ~100- to ~1000-fold more susceptible to mutation than conventional double-stranded DNA reporters, and is well suited for generating large mutational datasets to investigate the properties of mutagens.

  17. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had...... been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P... and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted....

  18. Using Genetic Buffering Relationships Identified in Fission Yeast To Elucidate the Molecular Pathology of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    tsc1 and tsc2 loss of function mutations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Northeast Regional Yeast Meeting, June 16-17, University at Buffalo, The State...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0169 TITLE: Using Genetic Buffering Relationships Identified in Fission Yeast To Elucidate the Molecular Pathology of...SUBTITLE Using Genetic Buffering Relationships Identified in Fission 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0169 Yeast to Elucidate the Molecular Pathology

  19. EMQN/CMGS best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing of Huntington disease

    OpenAIRE

    Losekoot, Monique; van Belzen, Martine J; Seneca, Sara; Bauer, Peter; Stenhouse, Susan A R; Barton, David E

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of an unstable polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG)n repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene, which translates into an extended polyglutamine tract in the protein. Laboratory diagnosis of HD involves estimation of the number of CAG repeats. Molecular genetic testing for HD is offered in a wide range of laboratories both within and outside the European community. In order to measure the quality and raise the standard of molecular genetic testing in these ...

  20. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, Amy V; Mankoff, David A

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine, basing treatment approaches on patient traits and specific molecular features of disease processes, has an important role in the management of patients with breast cancer as targeted therapies continue to improve. PET imaging offers noninvasive information that is complementary to traditional tissue biomarkers, including information about tumor burden, tumor metabolism, receptor status, and proliferation. Several PET agents that image breast cancer receptors can visually demonstrate the extent and heterogeneity of receptor-positive disease and help predict which tumors are likely to respond to targeted treatments. This review presents applications of PET imaging in the targeted treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular targets in serous gynecologic cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we describe a series of studies assessing the effectiveness of targeted therapeutics that inhibit Notch signaling or the HER2 receptor in serous gynecologic cancers. In the first part of the thesis, we have confirmed previous data by showing expression of Notch1 and Notch3 in ovarian

  2. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domestic goats in Syria may provide an interesting source of genetic variability due to its proximity to the centers of domestication. This study aimed to assess the morphological variation, genetic diversity and population substructure of the Syrian goat populations. Commonly, three goat genotypes are distinguished in Syria, ...

  3. Molecular based assessment of genetic diversity of xoconostle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Xoconostle or acidic prickly pear is an important fruit in Mexico; it is produced by a ... study, we report for the first time the estimation of genetic diversity within a set ... demonstrates the high genetic variation among genotypes of .... O. leucotricha Salm-Dyck × O. joconostle F.A.C Weber Zacatecas Wild Stock.

  4. Molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Horng-Yunn; Tseng, Fan-Chen; Lin, Chih-Wei; Chang, Jia-Ru; Sun, Jun-Ren; Tsai, Wen-Shing; Lee, Shi-Yi; Su, Ih-Jen; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2008-12-22

    The control of tuberculosis in densely populated cities is complicated by close human-to-human contacts and potential transmission of pathogens from multiple sources. We conducted a molecular epidemiologic analysis of 356 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from patients presenting pulmonary tuberculosis in metropolitan Taipei. Classical antibiogram studies and genetic characterization, using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and spoligotyping, were applied after culture. A total of 356 isolates were genotyped by standard spoligotyping and the strains were compared with in the international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4). All isolates were also categorized using the 15 loci MIRU-VNTR typing method and combin with NTF locus and RD deletion analyses. Of 356 isolates spoligotyped, 290 (81.4%) displayed known spoligotypes and 66 were not identified in the database. Major spoligotypes found were Beijing lineages (52.5%), followed by Haarlem lineages (13.5%) and EAI plus EAI-like lineages (11%). When MIRU-VNTR was employed, 140 patterns were identified, including 36 clusters by 252 isolates and 104 unique patterns, and the largest cluster comprised 95 isolates from the Beijing family. The combination of spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR revealed that 236 (67%) of the 356 isolates were clustered in 43 genotypes. Strains of the Beijing family was more likely to be of modern strain and a higher percentage of multiple drug resistance than other families combined (P = 0.08). Patients infected with Beijing strains were younger than those with other strains (mean 58.7 vs. 64.2, p = 0.02). Moreover, 85.3% of infected persons younger than 25 years had Beijing modern strain, suggesting a possible recent spread in the young population by this family of TB strain in Taipei. Our data on MTB genotype in Taipei suggest that MTB infection has not been optimally controlled. Control efforts should be reinforced in view of the

  5. Cytokine Genetic Variations and Fatigue Among Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Irwin, Michael R.; Castellon, Steven; Arevalo, Jesusa; Cole, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer treatment and may persist for years after treatment completion. However, risk factors for post-treatment fatigue have not been determined. On the basis of studies suggesting an inflammatory basis for fatigue, this study tested the hypothesis that expression-regulating polymorphisms in proinflammatory cytokine genes would predict post-treatment fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients and Methods Women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer (n = 171) completed questionnaires to assess fatigue and other behavioral symptoms (ie, depressive symptoms, memory complaints, sleep disturbance) and provided blood for genotyping within 3 months after primary treatment. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral-blood leukocytes and assayed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter regions of three cytokine genes: ILB −511 C>T (rs16944), IL6 −174 G>C (rs1800795), and TNF −308 G>A (rs1800629). An additive genetic risk score was computed by summing the number of high-expression alleles (zero, one, or two) across all three polymorphisms. Results The genetic risk index was significantly associated with fatigue; as the number of high-expression alleles increased, so did self-reported fatigue severity (P = .002). Analyses of individual SNPs showed that TNF −308 and IL6 −174 were independently associated with fatigue (P = .032). The genetic risk index was also associated with depressive symptoms (P = .007) and memory complaints (P = .016). Conclusion These findings further implicate inflammatory processes as contributors to cancer-related fatigue and suggest a new strategy for identifying and treating patients at risk for this symptom based on genetic variants in proinflammatory cytokine genes. PMID:23530106

  6. [The development of molecular human genetics and its significance for perspectives of modern medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelle, C; Speer, A; Grade, K; Rosenthal, A; Hunger, H D

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of molecular human genetics has become a paradigma for the application of genetic engineering in medicine. The main principles of this technology are the isolation of molecular probes, their application in hybridization reactions, specific gene-amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing reactions. These methods are used for the analysis of monogenic diseases by linkage studies and the elucidation of the molecular defect causing these conditions, respectively. They are also the basis for genomic diagnosis of monogenic diseases, introduced into the health care system of the GDR by a national project on Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, Cystic Fibrosis and Phenylketonuria. The rapid development of basic research on the molecular analysis of the human genome and genomic diagnosis indicates, that human molecular genetics is becoming a decisive basic discipline of modern medicine.

  7. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm......Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...

  8. Barrett's esophagus: cancer and molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, Michael K.; Dhaliwal, Arashinder S.; Clemons, Nicholas J.; Phillips, Wayne A.; Dvorak, Katerina; Tong, Daniel; Law, Simon; Pirchi, E. Daniel; Räsänen, Jari; Krasna, Mark J.; Parikh, Kaushal; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.; Chen, Yu; Griffiths, Leonard; Colleypriest, Benjamin J.; Farrant, J. Mark; Tosh, David; Das, Kiron M.; Bajpai, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    The following paper on the molecular biology of Barrett's esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on signaling pathways central to the development of BE including Hh, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT3; surgical approaches for esophagectomy and classification of lesions by appropriate therapy; the debate over the

  9. Distinct Mechanisms of Nuclease-Directed DNA-Structure-Induced Genetic Instability in Cancer Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Del Mundo, Imee M; McKinney, Jennifer A; Lu, Xiuli; Bacolla, Albino; Boulware, Stephen B; Zhang, Changsheng; Zhang, Haihua; Ren, Pengyu; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Vasquez, Karen M

    2018-01-30

    Sequences with the capacity to adopt alternative DNA structures have been implicated in cancer etiology; however, the mechanisms are unclear. For example, H-DNA-forming sequences within oncogenes have been shown to stimulate genetic instability in mammals. Here, we report that H-DNA-forming sequences are enriched at translocation breakpoints in human cancer genomes, further implicating them in cancer etiology. H-DNA-induced mutations were suppressed in human cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair nucleases, ERCC1-XPF and XPG, but were stimulated in cells deficient in FEN1, a replication-related endonuclease. Further, we found that these nucleases cleaved H-DNA conformations, and the interactions of modeled H-DNA with ERCC1-XPF, XPG, and FEN1 proteins were explored at the sub-molecular level. The results suggest mechanisms of genetic instability triggered by H-DNA through distinct structure-specific, cleavage-based replication-independent and replication-dependent pathways, providing critical evidence for a role of the DNA structure itself in the etiology of cancer and other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inherited Disease Genetics Improves the Identification of Cancer-Associated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of biologically significant variants in cancer genomes is critical to therapeutic discovery, but it is limited by the statistical power needed to discern driver from passenger. Independent biological data can be used to filter cancer exomes and increase statistical power. Large genetic databases for inherited diseases are uniquely suited to this task because they contain specific amino acid alterations with known pathogenicity and molecular mechanisms. However, no rigorous method to overlay this information onto the cancer exome exists. Here, we present a computational methodology that overlays any variant database onto the somatic mutations in all cancer exomes. We validate the computation experimentally and identify novel associations in a re-analysis of 7362 cancer exomes. This analysis identified activating SOS1 mutations associated with Noonan syndrome as significantly altered in melanoma and the first kinase-activating mutations in ACVR1 associated with adult tumors. Beyond a filter, significant variants found in both rare cancers and rare inherited diseases increase the unmet medical need for therapeutics that target these variants and may bootstrap drug discovery efforts in orphan indications.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Queva, C., Hurlin, P.J., Foley, K.P., Eisenman, R.N., 1998. Sequential Norton, T., Saveliev , A., Kioussis, D., Singh, P., 1999. Heterochromatin...and Zakian, V. A. Cell, 1990, 63,751. 9. Festenstein, R., Sharghi-Namini, S., Fox, M., Roderick, K., Tolaini, M., Norton, T., Saveliev , A., Kioussis, D...and Singh, P. Nat Genet, 1999, 23, 457. 10. Saveliev , A., Everett, C., Sharpe, T., Webster, Z. and Festenstein, R. Nature, 2003, 422, 909. 11. Park

  12. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol rich fractions derived from the pomegranate fruit have been studied for their potential chemopreventive and/or cancer therapeutic effects in several animal models. Although data from in vitro and in vivo studies look convincing, well designed clinical trials in humans are needed to ascertain whether pomegranate can become part of our armamentarium against cancer. This review summarizes the available literature on the effects of pomegranate against various cancers. PMID:23094914

  13. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature.

  14. Management of insect pests: Nuclear and related molecular and genetic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The conference was organized in eight sessions: opening, genetic engineering and molecular biology, genetics, operational programmes, F 1 sterility and insect behaviour, biocontrol, research and development on the tsetse fly, and quarantine. The 64 individual contributions have been indexed separately for INIS. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Translating clinical research of Molecular Biology into a personalized, multidisciplinary approach of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambu, V; Garofil, D; Pop, F; Radu, P; Bratucu, M; Popa, F

    2014-03-15

    Although multimodal treatment has brought important benefit, there is still great heterogeneity regarding the indication and response to chemotherapy in Stage II and III, and individual variations related to both overall survival and toxicity of new therapies in metastatic disease or tumor relapse. Recent research in molecular biology led to the development of a large scale of genetic biomarkers, but their clinical use is not concordant with the high expectations. The Aim of this review is to identify and discuss the molecular markers with proven clinical applicability as prognostic and/or predictive factors in CRC and also to establish a feasible algorithm of molecular testing, as routine practice, in the personalized, multidisciplinary approach of colorectal cancer patients in our country. Despite the revolution that occurred in the field of molecular marker research, only Serum CEA, Immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins and PCR testing for KRAS and BRAF mutations have confirmed their clinical utility in the management of colorectal cancer. Their implementation in the current practice should partially resolve some of the controversies related to this heterogenic pathology, in matters of prognosis in different TNM stages, stage II patient risk stratification, diagnosis of hereditary CRC and likelihood of benefit from anti EGFR therapy in metastatic disease. The proposed algorithms of molecular testing are very useful but still imperfect and require further validation and constant optimization.

  16. Molecular profiling techniques as tools to detect potential unintended effects in genetically engineered maize

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barros, E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Profiling Techniques as Tools to Detect Potential Unintended Effects in Genetically Engineered Maize Eugenia Barros Introduction In the early stages of production and commercialization of foods derived from genetically engineered (GE) plants... systems. In a recent paper published in Plant Biotechnology Journal,4 we compared two transgenic white maize lines with the non-transgenic counterpart to investigate two possible sources of variation: genetic engineering and environmental variation...

  17. Validation of a radiosensitivity molecular signature in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Eschrich (Steven); C. Fulp (Carl); Y. Pawitan (Yudi); J.A. Foekens (John); M. Smid (Marcel); J.W.M. Martens (John); M. Echevarria (Michelle); P.S. Kamath (Patrick); J.-H. Lee (Ji-Hyun); E.E. Harris (Eleanor); J. Bergh (Jonas); J.F. Torres-Roca (Javier)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Previously, we developed a radiosensitivity molecular signature [radiosensitivity index (RSI)] that was clinically validated in 3 independent datasets (rectal, esophageal, and head and neck) in 118 patients. Here, we test RSI in radiotherapy (RT)-treated breast cancer patients.

  18. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cree, Ian A.; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjo, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Sole, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J. Han

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this

  19. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cree, Ian A.; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjo, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Sole, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J. Han

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this

  20. [New molecular classification of colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and stomach cancer: Towards "à la carte" treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chantal; Afchain, Pauline; Trouilloud, Isabelle; André, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This review reports 3 of recently published molecular classifications of the 3 main gastro-intestinal cancers: gastric, pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma. In colorectal adenocarcinoma, 6 independent classifications were combined to finally hold 4 molecular sub-groups, Consensus Molecular Subtypes (CMS 1-4), linked to various clinical, molecular and survival data. CMS1 (14% MSI with immune activation); CMS2 (37%: canonical with epithelial differentiation and activation of the WNT/MYC pathway); CMS3 (13% metabolic with epithelial differentiation and RAS mutation); CMS4 (23%: mesenchymal with activation of TGFβ pathway and angiogenesis with stromal invasion). In gastric adenocarcinoma, 4 groups were established: subtype "EBV" (9%, high frequency of PIK3CA mutations, hypermetylation and amplification of JAK2, PD-L1 and PD-L2), subtype "MSI" (22%, high rate of mutation), subtype "genomically stable tumor" (20%, diffuse histology type and mutations of RAS and genes encoding integrins and adhesion proteins including CDH1) and subtype "tumors with chromosomal instability" (50%, intestinal type, aneuploidy and receptor tyrosine kinase amplification). In pancreatic adenocarcinomas, a classification in four sub-groups has been proposed, stable subtype (20%, aneuploidy), locally rearranged subtype (30%, focal event on one or two chromosoms), scattered subtype (36%,200 structural variation events, defects in DNA maintenance). Although currently away from the care of patients, these classifications open the way to "à la carte" treatment depending on molecular biology. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular buckets: cyclodextrins for oral cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Calleja, P. (Patricia); Huarte, J. (Judit); Agüeros, M. (Maite); Ruiz-Gaton, L. (Luisa); Espuelas, S. (Socorro); Irache, J.M. (Juan Manuel)

    2012-01-01

    The oral route is preferred by patients for drug administration due to its convenience, resulting in improved compliance. Unfortunately, for a number of drugs (e.g., anticancer drugs), this route of administration remains a challenge. Oral chemotherapy may be an attractive option and especially appropriate for chronic treatment of cancer. However, this route of administration is particularly complicated for the administration of anticancer drugs ascribed to Class IV of the Biopharmaceutical C...

  2. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  3. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  4. Lobular breast cancer: incidence and genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossus, Laure; Benusiglio, Patrick R

    2015-03-13

    While most invasive breast cancers consist of carcinomas of the ductal type, about 10% are invasive lobular carcinomas. Invasive lobular and ductal carcinomas differ with respect to risk factors. Invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with exposure to female hormones, and therefore its incidence is more subject to variation. This is illustrated by US figures during the 1987 to 2004 period: after 12 years of increases, breast cancer incidence declined steadily from 1999 to 2004, reflecting among other causes the decreasing use of menopausal hormone therapy, and these variations were stronger for invasive lobular than for invasive ductal carcinoma. Similarly, invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with early menarche, late menopause and late age at first birth. As for genetic risk factors, four high-penetrance genes are tested in clinical practice when genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is suspected, BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CDH1. Germline mutations in BRCA1 and TP53 are predominantly associated with invasive ductal carcinoma, while BRCA2 mutations are associated with both ductal and lobular cancers. CDH1, the gene coding for the E-cadherin adhesion protein, is of special interest as mutations are associated with invasive lobular carcinoma, but never with ductal carcinoma. It was initially known as the main susceptibility gene for gastric cancer of the diffuse type, but the excess of breast cancers of the lobular type in CDH1 families led researchers to identify it also as a susceptibility gene for invasive lobular carcinoma. The risk of invasive lobular carcinoma is high in female mutation carriers, as about 50% are expected to develop the disease. Carriers must therefore undergo intensive breast cancer screening, with, for example, yearly magnetic resonance imaging and mammogram starting at age 30 years.

  5. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). Results: The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (P<0.01). Age, gender, body mass index, cancer diagnosis, time on opioids, opioid dose, and type of opioid did not contribute to the inter-individual differences in constipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (P<0.01). Only rs2020917 in COMT passed the Benjamini–Hochberg criterion for a 10% false discovery rate. Conclusions: Type of laxative, mobility, hospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment. PMID:26087058

  6. Application of Proteomics to Cancer Molecular Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam HANASH

    2009-01-01

    @@ Strategies to achieve personalized medicine and improve public health encompass assessment of an individual's risk for disease, early detection and molecular classification of disease resulting in an informed choice of the most appropriate treatment instituted at an early stage of disease develop- ment. A major contribution of proteomics in this field is the development of blood based tests to achieve the goals of personalized medicine.

  7. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... the breast cancer cells do not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of HER2/neu ...

  8. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of different genotypes of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caijin Chen

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Genetic diversity studies revealed that 50 rice types were clustered into different subpopulations whereas three genotypes were admixtures. Molecular fingerprinting and 10 specific markers were obtained to identify the 53 rice genotypes. These results can facilitate the potential utilization of sibling species in rice breeding and molecular classification of O. sativa and O. glaberrima germplasms.

  9. Candidate gene molecular markers as tools for analyzing genetic susceptibility to morbillivirus infection in stranded Cetaceans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stejskalová, K.; Bayerova, Z.; Futas, J.; Hrazdilová, K.; Klumplerova, M.; Oppelt, J.; Šplíchalová, P.; Di Guardo, G.; Mazzariol, S.; Di Francesco, C. E.; Di Francesco, G.; Terracciano, G.; Paiu, R.M.; Ursache, T. D.; Modrý, David; Horin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 6 (2017), s. 343-353 ISSN 2059-2302 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cetacea * haplotype * immunity * innate * mhc-dqb * Phocoena phocoena * polymorphism * single nucleotide * Stenella coeruleoalba Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  10. Permanent genetic resources added to molecular ecology resources database 1 February 2013-31 March 2013

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arias, M. C.; Atteke, C.; Augusto, S. C.; Bailey, J.; Bazaga, P.; Beheregaray, L. B.; Benoit, L.; Blatrix, R.; Born, C.; Brito, R. M.; Chen, H.-K.; Covarrubias, S.; de Vega, C.; Djiéto-Lordon, C.; Dubois, M.-P.; Francisco, F. O.; García, C.; Concalves, P. H. P.; González, C.; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, C.; Hammer, M. P.; Herrera, C. M.; Itoh, H.; Kamimura, S.; Karaoglu, H.; Kojima, S.; Li, S.-L.; Ling, H. J.; Matos Maravi, Pavel F.; McKey, D.; Mezui-M’Eko, J.; Ornelas, J. F.; Park, R. F.; Pozo, M. I.; Ramula, S.; Rigueiro, C.; Sandoval-Castillo, J.; Santiago, L. R.; Seino, M. M.; Song, C.-B.; Takeshima, H.; Vasemägi, A.; Wellings, C. R.; Yan, J.; Du, Y.-Z.; Zhang, C.-R.; Zhang, T.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2013), s. 760-762 ISSN 1755-098X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : molecular ecology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.626, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-0998.12121/pdf

  11. A Comprehensive Pan-Cancer Molecular Study of Gynecologic and Breast Cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Ashton C.; Korkut, Anil; Kanchi, Rupa S.; Hegde, Apurva M.; Lenoir, Walter; Liu, Wenbin; Liu, Yuexin; Fan, Huihui; Shen, Hui; Ravikumar, Visweswaran; Rao, Arvind; Schultz, Andre; Li, Xubin; Sumazin, Pavel; Williams, Cecilia; Mestdagh, Pieter; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Yau, Christina; Bowlby, Reanne; Robertson, A. Gordon; Tiezzi, Daniel G.; Wang, Chen; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Rader, Janet S.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Sood, Anil K.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Adebamowo, Clement; Adebamowo, Sally N.; Baggerly, Keith A.; Chen, Ting Wen; Chiu, Hua Sheng; Lefever, Steve; Liu, Liang; MacKenzie, Karen; Orsulic, Sandra; Roszik, Jason; Shelley, Carl Simon; Song, Qianqian; Vellano, Christopher P.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Caesar-Johnson, Samantha J.; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Kasapi, Melpomeni; Ferguson, Martin L.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Cho, Juok; DeFreitas, Timothy; Frazer, Scott; Gehlenborg, Nils; Getz, Gad; Heiman, David I.; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lin, Pei; Meier, Sam; Noble, Michael S.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Doug; Zhang, Hailei; Bernard, Brady; Chambwe, Nyasha; Dhankani, Varsha; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kramer, Roger; Leinonen, Kalle; Liu, Yuexin; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila; Shmulevich, Ilya; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Akbani, Rehan; Broom, Bradley M.; Hegde, Apurva M.; Ju, Zhenlin; Kanchi, Rupa S.; Korkut, Anil; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Ng, Kwok Shing; Rao, Arvind; Ryan, Michael; Wang, Jing; Weinstein, John N.; Zhang, Jiexin; Abeshouse, Adam; Armenia, Joshua; Chakravarty, Debyani; Chatila, Walid K.; de Bruijn, Ino; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin E.; Heins, Zachary J.; Kundra, Ritika; La, Konnor; Ladanyi, Marc; Luna, Augustin; Nissan, Moriah G.; Ochoa, Angelica; Phillips, Sarah M.; Reznik, Ed; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sheridan, Robert; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Taylor, Barry S.; Wang, Jioajiao; Zhang, Hongxin; Anur, Pavana; Peto, Myron; Spellman, Paul; Benz, Christopher; Stuart, Joshua M.; Wong, Christopher K.; Yau, Christina; Hayes, D. Neil; Parker, Joel S.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chuah, Eric; Dhalla, Noreen; Holt, Robert; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sadeghi, Sara; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Tse, Kane; Wong, Tina; Berger, Ashton C.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cibulskis, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gao, Galen F.; Ha, Gavin; Meyerson, Matthew; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shih, Juliann; Kucherlapati, Melanie H.; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Baylin, Stephen; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Fan, Cheng; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Perou, Amy H.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Fan, Huihui; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Shen, Hui; Zhou, Wanding; Bellair, Michelle; Chang, Kyle; Covington, Kyle; Creighton, Chad J.; Dinh, Huyen; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Drummond, Jennifer; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glenn, Robert; Hale, Walker; Han, Yi; Hu, Jianhong; Korchina, Viktoriya; Lee, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiuping; Morgan, Margaret; Morton, Donna; Muzny, Donna; Santibanez, Jireh; Sheth, Margi; Shinbrot, Eve; Wang, Linghua; Wang, Min; Wheeler, David A.; Xi, Liu; Zhao, Fengmei; Hess, Julian; Appelbaum, Elizabeth L.; Bailey, Matthew; Cordes, Matthew G.; Ding, Li; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Mardis, Elaine R.; McLellan, Michael D.; Miller, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Wilson, Richard K.; Crain, Daniel; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Corcoran, Niall; Costello, Tony; Hovens, Christopher; Carvalho, Andre L.; de Carvalho, Ana C.; Fregnani, José H.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Reis, Rui M.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Silveira, Henrique C.S.; Vidal, Daniel O.; Burnette, Andrew; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Hermes, Beth; Noss, Ardene; Singh, Rosy; Anderson, Matthew L.; Castro, Patricia D.; Ittmann, Michael; Huntsman, David; Kohl, Bernard; Le, Xuan; Thorp, Richard; Andry, Chris; Duffy, Elizabeth R.; Lyadov, Vladimir; Paklina, Oxana; Setdikova, Galiya; Shabunin, Alexey; Tavobilov, Mikhail; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Berkowitz, Ross; Cramer, Daniel; Feltmate, Colleen; Horowitz, Neil; Kibel, Adam; Muto, Michael; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Malykh, Andrei; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Barrett, Wendi; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Shimmel, Kristen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Sloan, Andrew E.; De Rose, Agostino; Giuliante, Felice; Goodman, Marc; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Eckman, John; Harr, Jodi; Myers, Jerome; Tucker, Kelinda; Zach, Leigh Anne; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hu, Hai; Kvecher, Leonid; Larson, Caroline; Mural, Richard J.; Somiari, Stella; Vicha, Ales; Zelinka, Tomas; Bennett, Joseph; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Swanson, Patricia; Latour, Mathieu; Lacombe, Louis; Têtu, Bernard; Bergeron, Alain; McGraw, Mary; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Chabot, John; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Sepulveda, Antonia; Su, Tao; Wang, Timothy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Desjardins, Laurence; Mariani, Odette; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Sastre, Xavier; Stern, Marc Henri; Cheng, Feixiong; Signoretti, Sabina; Berchuck, Andrew; Bigner, Darell; Lipp, Eric; Marks, Jeffrey; McCall, Shannon; McLendon, Roger; Secord, Angeles; Sharp, Alexis; Behera, Madhusmita; Brat, Daniel J.; Chen, Amy; Delman, Keith; Force, Seth; Khuri, Fadlo; Magliocca, Kelly; Maithel, Shishir; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Owonikoko, Taofeek; Pickens, Alan; Ramalingam, Suresh; Shin, Dong M.; Sica, Gabriel; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Eijckenboom, Wil; Gillis, Ad; Korpershoek, Esther; Looijenga, Leendert; Oosterhuis, Wolter; Stoop, Hans; van Kessel, Kim E.; Zwarthoff, Ellen C.; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Cuppini, Lucia; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; DiMeco, Francesco; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Mattei, Luca; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Chen, Chu; Houck, John; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Hartmann, Arndt; Stoehr, Christine; Stoehr, Robert; Taubert, Helge; Wach, Sven; Wullich, Bernd; Kycler, Witold; Murawa, Dawid; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Chung, Ki; Edenfield, W. Jeffrey; Martin, Julie; Baudin, Eric; Bubley, Glenn; Bueno, Raphael; De Rienzo, Assunta; Richards, William G.; Kalkanis, Steven; Mikkelsen, Tom; Noushmehr, Houtan; Scarpace, Lisa; Girard, Nicolas; Aymerich, Marta; Campo, Elias; Giné, Eva; Guillermo, Armando López; Van Bang, Nguyen; Hanh, Phan Thi; Phu, Bui Duc; Tang, Yufang; Colman, Howard; Evason, Kimberley; Dottino, Peter R.; Martignetti, John A.; Gabra, Hani; Juhl, Hartmut; Akeredolu, Teniola; Stepa, Serghei; Hoon, Dave; Ahn, Keunsoo; Kang, Koo Jeong; Beuschlein, Felix; Breggia, Anne; Birrer, Michael; Bell, Debra; Borad, Mitesh; Bryce, Alan H.; Castle, Erik; Chandan, Vishal; Cheville, John; Copland, John A.; Farnell, Michael; Flotte, Thomas; Giama, Nasra; Ho, Thai; Kendrick, Michael; Kocher, Jean Pierre; Kopp, Karla; Moser, Catherine; Nagorney, David; O'Brien, Daniel; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Patel, Tushar; Petersen, Gloria; Que, Florencia; Rivera, Michael; Roberts, Lewis; Smallridge, Robert; Smyrk, Thomas; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Torbenson, Michael; Yang, Ju Dong; Zhang, Lizhi; Brimo, Fadi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Angulo Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Behrens, Carmen; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Broaddus, Russell; Czerniak, Bogdan; Esmaeli, Bita; Fujimoto, Junya; Gershenwald, Jeffrey; Guo, Charles; Lazar, Alexander J.; Logothetis, Christopher; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Moran, Cesar; Ramondetta, Lois; Rice, David; Sood, Anil; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thompson, Timothy; Troncoso, Patricia; Tsao, Anne; Wistuba, Ignacio; Carter, Candace; Haydu, Lauren; Hersey, Peter; Jakrot, Valerie; Kakavand, Hojabr; Kefford, Richard; Lee, Kenneth; Long, Georgina; Mann, Graham; Quinn, Michael; Saw, Robyn; Scolyer, Richard; Shannon, Kerwin; Spillane, Andrew; Stretch, Jonathan; Synott, Maria; Thompson, John; Wilmott, James; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Chan, Timothy A.; Ghossein, Ronald; Gopalan, Anuradha; Levine, Douglas A.; Reuter, Victor; Singer, Samuel; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Broudy, Thomas; Mirsaidi, Cyrus; Nair, Praveen; Drwiega, Paul; Miller, Judy; Smith, Jennifer; Zaren, Howard; Park, Joong Won; Hung, Nguyen Phi; Kebebew, Electron; Linehan, W. Marston; Metwalli, Adam R.; Pacak, Karel; Pinto, Peter A.; Schiffman, Mark; Schmidt, Laura S.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Worrell, Robert; Yang, Hannah; Moncrieff, Marc; Goparaju, Chandra; Melamed, Jonathan; Pass, Harvey; Botnariuc, Natalia; Caraman, Irina; Cernat, Mircea; Chemencedji, Inga; Clipca, Adrian; Doruc, Serghei; Gorincioi, Ghenadie; Mura, Sergiu; Pirtac, Maria; Stancul, Irina; Tcaciuc, Diana; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Arnaout, Angel; Bartlett, John; Engel, Jay; Gilbert, Sebastien; Parfitt, Jeremy; Sekhon, Harman; Thomas, George; Rassl, Doris M.; Rintoul, Robert C.; Bifulco, Carlo; Tamakawa, Raina; Urba, Walter; Hayward, Nicholas; Timmers, Henri; Antenucci, Anna; Facciolo, Francesco; Grazi, Gianluca; Marino, Mirella; Merola, Roberta; de Krijger, Ronald; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne Paule; Piché, Alain; Chevalier, Simone; McKercher, Ginette; Birsoy, Kivanc; Barnett, Gene; Brewer, Cathy; Farver, Carol; Naska, Theresa; Pennell, Nathan A.; Raymond, Daniel; Schilero, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; Williams, Felicia; Morrison, Carl; Borgia, Jeffrey A.; Liptay, Michael J.; Pool, Mark; Seder, Christopher W.; Junker, Kerstin; Omberg, Larsson; Dinkin, Mikhail; Manikhas, George; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio; Chesla, David; Cottingham, Sandra; Dubina, Michael; Moiseenko, Fedor; Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Becker, Karl Friedrich; Janssen, Klaus Peter; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H.; Aziz, Dina; Bell, Sue; Cebulla, Colleen M.; Davis, Amy; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J. Bradley; Hilty, Joe; Kumar, Bahavna; Lang, James; Lehman, Norman L.; Mandt, Randy; Nguyen, Phuong; Pilarski, Robert; Rai, Karan; Schoenfield, Lynn; Senecal, Kelly; Wakely, Paul; Hansen, Paul; Lechan, Ronald; Powers, James; Tischler, Arthur; Grizzle, William E.; Sexton, Katherine C.; Kastl, Alison; Henderson, Joel; Porten, Sima; Waldmann, Jens; Fassnacht, Martin; Asa, Sylvia L.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Couce, Marta; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Simon, Ronald; Tennstedt, Pierre; Olabode, Oluwole; Nelson, Mark; Bathe, Oliver; Carroll, Peter R.; Chan, June M.; Disaia, Philip; Glenn, Pat; Kelley, Robin K.; Landen, Charles N.; Phillips, Joanna; Prados, Michael; Simko, Jeffry; Smith-McCune, Karen; VandenBerg, Scott; Roggin, Kevin; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Kendler, Ady; Sifri, Suzanne; Steele, Ruth; Jimeno, Antonio; Carey, Francis; Forgie, Ian; Mannelli, Massimo; Carney, Michael; Hernandez, Brenda; Campos, Benito; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christin; Unterberg, Andreas; von Deimling, Andreas; Bossler, Aaron; Galbraith, Joseph; Jacobus, Laura; Knudson, Michael; Knutson, Tina; Ma, Deqin; Milhem, Mohammed; Sigmund, Rita; Godwin, Andrew K.; Madan, Rashna; Rosenthal, Howard G.; Adebamowo, Clement; Adebamowo, Sally N.; Boussioutas, Alex; Beer, David; Giordano, Thomas; Mes-Masson, Anne Marie; Saad, Fred; Bocklage, Therese; Landrum, Lisa; Mannel, Robert; Moore, Kathleen; Moxley, Katherine; Postier, Russel; Walker, Joan; Zuna, Rosemary; Feldman, Michael; Valdivieso, Federico; Dhir, Rajiv; Luketich, James; Mora Pinero, Edna M.; Quintero-Aguilo, Mario; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Dos Santos, Jose Sebastião; Kemp, Rafael; Sankarankuty, Ajith; Tirapelli, Daniela; Catto, James; Agnew, Kathy; Swisher, Elizabeth; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce; Shelley, Carl Simon; Godwin, Eryn M.; Kendall, Sara; Shipman, Cassaundra; Bradford, Carol; Carey, Thomas; Haddad, Andrea; Moyer, Jeffey; Peterson, Lisa; Prince, Mark; Rozek, Laura; Wolf, Gregory; Bowman, Rayleen; Fong, Kwun M.; Yang, Ian; Korst, Robert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Fantacone-Campbell, J. Leigh; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Kovatich, Albert J.; Shriver, Craig D.; DiPersio, John; Drake, Bettina; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Heath, Sharon; Ley, Timothy; Van Tine, Brian; Westervelt, Peter; Rubin, Mark A.; Lee, Jung Il; Aredes, Natália D.; Mariamidze, Armaz; Weinstein, John N.; Mills, Gordon B.; Levine, Douglas A.; Akbani, Rehan

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed molecular data on 2,579 tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) of four gynecological types plus breast. Our aims were to identify shared and unique molecular features, clinically significant subtypes, and potential therapeutic targets. We found 61 somatic copy-number alterations

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous families with primary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH NOTE Volume 96 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 383-387 ... Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a rare genetic disorder that is ... Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and ...

  13. A unifying study of phenotypic and molecular genetic variability in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-25

    Apr 25, 2014 ... future studies from the authors. The remaining leaves ... βij the random contribution for the jth individual of the ith biogeographic province ... quantifying genetic structure accounting for the complexities of spatial correlation in ...

  14. Phenotypic and molecular evaluation of genetic diversity of rapeseed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... basis of elite oilseed rape breeding material has been narrowed by an intensive .... breeding programs was the basic reason for detailed genetic analysis. ...... A periodical of Scientific Research on Field and. Vegetable Crops ...

  15. Molecular genetics of schizophrenia: past, present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    leucocyte antigen; IDDM, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus; MAO, monoamine oxidase; MHC, ... In this review, we summarize the evolution of schizophrenia genetics from ...... K, Yeh J I and Hsiao K J 1999 Systematic mutation analysis.

  16. Advances in genetics and molecular breeding of three legume crops ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-15

    Oct 15, 2012 ... 3. Genomic resources for SAT legumes. In the past, for genetic diversity analysis, a range of ... DNA libraries, (b) sequencing and mining the BAC (bacterial ..... spiration efficiency, biomass, specific leaf area, pod weight,.

  17. Chronic Stress and Neuropathology: Neurochemical, Molecular, and Genetic Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koob, George F; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2005-01-01

    ... to selective breeding in the rat. Genetic differences in stress responsiveness in replicate line 1 were associated with differences in anxiety-like behavior, body weight gain and voluntary intake of sweet solutions and ethanol...

  18. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... Phenotypic data were collected for yield and component traits. Pattern of ...... ical isolation, evolutionary time gaps, mutation, selection and genetic drift ..... along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.). Proc. Natl.

  19. Molecular-genetic analysis of two cases with retinoblastoma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effective counselling and management of retinoblastoma families using genetic information is presently practised in many parts of ... to chromosomal deletion, single-nucleotide alteration, microdeletion, loss ... informed consent of the parent.

  20. Genetic, molecular and functional analyses of complement factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, S.C.; Trouw, L.A.; Renault, N.

    2009-01-01

    Complete deficiency of complement inhibitor factor I (FI) results in secondary complement deficiency due to uncontrolled spontaneous alternative pathway activation leading to susceptibility to infections. Current genetic examination of two patients with near complete FI deficiency and three patie...