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Sample records for cancer mexican experience

  1. Case-control assessment of diet and lung cancer risk in African Americans and Mexican Americans.

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    Pillow, P C; Hursting, S D; Duphorne, C M; Jiang, H; Honn, S E; Chang, S; Spitz, M R

    1997-01-01

    In this case-control study we determined whether dietary differences underlie some of the ethnic and sex differences in US lung cancer rates. We examined the relationship between diet and lung cancer development in 137 lung cancer cases (93 African Americans and 44 Mexican Americans) and 187 controls (78 African Americans and 109 Mexican Americans). Cases reported a higher daily mean total fat intake (p fruits (p = 0.02). Ethnic differences in diet were also observed: Mexican Americans consumed less total fat (p fruits (p lung cancer risk (p fruit consumption and lung cancer risk (p = 0.05). In conclusion, our findings support the hypothesis that diet, particularly high fat consumption and low fruit and vegetable consumption, contributes (independent of cigarette smoking) to the excess lung cancer risk in African-American men, who have the highest lung cancer rates in the United States.

  2. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women

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    León-Maldonado, Leith; Wentzell, Emily; Brown, Brandon; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Torres-Ibarra, Leticia; Salmerón, Jorge; Billings, Deborah L.; Thrasher, James F.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico’s early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP). Research on Mexican women’s perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women’s understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender. Results Women’s confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men’s sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes’ desire for sex as natural but understood men’s negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women’s HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission. Conclusions These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women’s negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could

  3. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

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    Leith León-Maldonado

    Full Text Available HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP. Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender.Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission.These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health

  4. Novel Somatic Copy Number Alteration Identified for Cervical Cancer in the Mexican American Population

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    Alireza Torabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer affects millions of Americans, but the rate for cervical cancer in the Mexican American is approximately twice that for non-Mexican Americans. The etiologies of cervical cancer are still not fully understood. A number of somatic mutations, including several copy number alterations (CNAs, have been identified in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas in non-Mexican Americans. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate CNAs in association with cervical cancer in the Mexican American population. We conducted a pilot study of genome-wide CNA analysis using 2.5 million markers in four diagnostic groups: reference (n = 125, low grade dysplasia (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN-I, n = 4, high grade dysplasia (CIN-II and -III, n = 5 and invasive carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, n = 5 followed by data analyses using Partek. We observed a statistically-significant difference of CNA burden between case and reference groups of different sizes (>100 kb, 10–100 kb and 1–10 kb of CNAs that included deletions and amplifications, e.g., a statistically-significant difference of >100 kb deletions was observed between the reference (6.6% and pre-cancer and cancer (91.3% groups. Recurrent aberrations of 98 CNA regions were also identified in cases only. However, none of the CNAs have an impact on cancer progression. A total of 32 CNA regions identified contained tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. Moreover, the pathway analysis revealed endometrial cancer and estrogen signaling pathways associated with this cancer (p < 0.05 using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG. This is the first report of CNAs identified for cervical cancer in the U.S. Latino population using high density markers. We are aware of the small sample size in the study. Thus, additional studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm the current findings.

  5. Cultural Immersion Experience: Promoting an Understanding of Mexican American Nutrition and Food Traditions

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    Gilboy, Mary Beth; Bill, Debra E.

    2011-01-01

    A week long immersion experience in Guanajuato, Mexico provided an opportunity for public health and nutrition students to improve their understanding of Mexican culture, nutrition, and food traditions. The experience positively impacted the students' understanding of the importance of cultural sensitivity in working with the local Mexican…

  6. The Role of Ethnicity in Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White Students' Experience of Sexual Harassment

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    Kearney, Lisa K.; Gilbert, Lucia Albino

    2012-01-01

    This study explored dimensions of a social phenomenon not often investigated among Mexican American college students, namely sexual harassment. Mexican American (n = 261) and non-Hispanic White female students (n = 111) from three southwestern universities responded to scales assessing experiences of sexually harassing behaviors, harassment…

  7. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control

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    Víctor Tovar-Guzmán

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.

  8. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control

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    Tovar-Guzmán Víctor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.

  9. [Critical analysis of awards in gastroenterology research. The Mexican experience].

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    Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Téllez-Avila, Félix I; Hernández-Calleros, Jorge; López-Arce, Gustavo; Franco-Guzmán, Ada; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Mexican gastrointestinal research worldwide is limited and the outcome of the best research papers awarded by the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (AMG) is unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the publication pattern of the research work, awarded by the AMG and their impact in international journals. The abstracts accepted for the annual meeting of the AMG from 1998 to 2006 were reviewed. Those presented in a plenary session or awarded were included. Their abstracts were searched in electronic databases. When not found, the main author was contacted by e-mail. In those papers published in a journal with an impact factor, the times it was cited were assessed. 35 abstracts were identified, mainly in gastroenterology (57.1%) and hepatology (34.3). Only in 5.7% (n=2) some of the authors were members of the governing board of AMG. The awarded institutions were Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (48.6%), Universities (Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla) (31.4%), Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (8.6%), Fundación Clínica Médica Sur (5.7%), Hospital Juárez (2.9%), Private hospital (2.9%). Most of the papers were published within a year (73.7%). Only 2 papers had more than 10 citations in another international journal with impact factor, with a median for all paper of 5 citations (0-45). Considering all institutions, the rate of publication is 48%. Only half of the awarded works were published and mainly in journals of local distribution. The impact of these studies worldwide is limited.

  10. Daily School Peer Victimization Experiences Among Mexican-American Adolescents: Associations with Psychosocial, Physical and School Adjustment

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    Espinoza, Guadalupe; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    School bullying incidents, particularly experiences with victimization, are a significant social and health concern among adolescents. The current study extended past research by examining the daily peer victimization experiences of Mexican-American adolescents and examining how chronic (mean-level) and episodic (daily-level) victimization incidents at school are associated with psychosocial, physical and school adjustment. Across a two-week span, 428 ninth and tenth grade Mexican-American st...

  11. Counternarratives of Mexican-origin women with breast cancer.

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    Campesino, Maureen; Ruiz, Ester; Glover, Johannah Uriri; Koithan, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about cancer health disparities among undocumented Latino immigrant populations, who represent a rapidly growing sector in the United States. Federal and state legislative reforms to control immigration have increased significantly over the past year. Although the effects of immigration reforms are being documented in housing, education, and public service industries, no data have been found examining the impact on the health of immigrant communities. In this article, we identify the consequences of recent immigration legislation enacted in Arizona, which has created barriers to accessing cancer treatment and continued follow-up care among a sample of Latina breast cancer survivors. PMID:19461222

  12. Genetics of breast cancer: Applications to the Mexican population

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    Elad Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer research has yielded several important results including the strong susceptibility genes,BRCA1 and BRCA2 and more recently 19 genes and genetic loci that confer a more moderate risk.The pace of discovery is accelerating as genetic technology and computational methods improve. These discoveries will change the way that breast cancer risk is understood in Mexico over the next few decades.La investigación en cáncer de mama ha dado varios resultados importantes incluyendo los genes fuertemente susceptibles, BRCA1 y BRCA2, y más recientemente 19 genes y loci genéticos que confieren un riesgo moderado. El ritmo de los descubrimientos se acelera conforme mejora la tecnología y métodos computacionales.Estosdescubrimientoscambiarán la forma en que la investigación del cáncer es comprendida en México en las próximas décadas.

  13. Risk factors of breast cancer in Mexican women

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    Calderón-Garcidueñas Ana Laura

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between family history (FH of neoplasia, gyneco-obstetric factors and breast cancer (BC in a case--control study. In cases, to analyze those variables in relation with early onset of BC, the manner of detection (self-examination, prompted by pain, or casual, the size of tumor, and the elapsed time to seek medical attention. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from 151 prevalent BC cases and 235 age-matched controls were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, to assess the influence of BC risk factors. RESULTS: Ten per cent of patients and 1% of controls had first-degree relatives (FDR with BC. Family history of FDR with BC (OR, 11.2; 95% CI 2.42-51.92 or with gastric or pancreatic cancer (OR, 17.7; 95% CI 2.2-142.6 was associated with BC risk. Breastfeeding at or under 25 years of age was protective against BC (OR, 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.66. The manner of tumor detection did not influence its size at the time of diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that FH of BC and/or of gastric or pancreatic carcinoma are risk factors for BC, while lactation at 25 years of age or earlier is protective.

  14. Cancer survivors' experience of time

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    Rasmussen, Dorte M.; Elverdam, Beth

    2007-01-01

    time and life; (2) awareness of time increases, time is verbalized and reflected; and (3) the informants appropriate time. A diagnosis of cancer, even for a survivor, means a confrontation with death. It means a disruption of continuous clock and calendar time. Survivors appropriate time......AIM: This paper reports a study to explore how cancer survivors talk about, experience and manage time in everyday life. BACKGROUND: There is an increasing interest in specific physical and psychosocial aspects of life after cancer diagnosis and treatment, but hardly any research follows cancer...... survivors over time to explore how perceptions and experiences change. METHODS: An exploratory study was carried out in 2002-2004 with a purposive sample of adults who had experienced various forms of cancer. Data collection included 9 weeks of participant observation at a Cancer Rehabilitation Centre...

  15. Health insurance mediation of the Mexican American non-Hispanic white disparity on early breast cancer diagnosis

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    Haji-Jama, Sundus; Gorey, Kevin M; Luginaah, Isaac N.; Balagurusamy, Madhan K; Hamm, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    We examined health insurance mediation of the Mexican American (MA) non-Hispanic white (NHW) disparity on early breast cancer diagnosis. Based on social capital and barrio advantage theories, we hypothesized a 3-way ethnicity by poverty by health insurance interaction, that is, that 2-way poverty by health insurance interaction effects would differ between ethnic groups. We secondarily analyzed registry data for 303 MA and 3,611 NHW women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1996 and 2000 who...

  16. The impact of family history of breast cancer on knowledge, attitudes, and early detection practices of Mexican women along the Mexico-US border.

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    Bird, Yelena; Banegas, Matthew P; Moraros, John; King, Sasha; Prapasiri, Surasri; Thompson, Beti

    2011-10-01

    Rates of breast cancer (BC) have increased in Mexico, with the highest incidence and mortality rates observed in the northern Mexican states. This study aimed to describe the BC knowledge, attitudes and screening practices among Mexican women with and without a family history of BC residing along the Mexico-US border, and identify factors associated with screening behaviors. One hundred and twenty eight Mexican women aged 40 and older completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, family history, and screening practices. There were no significant differences between Mexican women with and without a family history. Over 60% of women in both groups had never had a mammogram/breast ultrasound, and more than 50% had never obtained a clinical breast exam. Age, marital status, insurance, and breast cancer knowledge significantly influenced BC screening behaviors among Mexican women. Further research is needed to examine other key factors associated with screening utilization, in effort of improving BC rates.

  17. Alternative Mixed Assessment Project (ALT.A.: The Mexican E-Learning Experience

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    Mónica A. López-Campos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an experiment of mixed evaluation (summative/formative of questions formulated by students in a distance-education environment carried out in the Total Quality Management course in the B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering offered by Mexican public universities. Questions generated by students were evaluated using a specially-designed quantitative tool: Matrix Observation of four criteria with binary scoring. The experiment showed: (1 how is it possible to enrich the evaluation process, and formalize students' skills hardly recognizable with traditional forms of assessment; and (2 how the teacher-student interaction can be increased significantly by the technique mixed evaluation of questions in reverse, i.e. by the students.

  18. In their own words: the life experiences of Mexican-American and white pregnant adolescents and adolescent mothers.

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    De Anda, D; Becerra, R M; Fielder, E

    1990-08-01

    An ethnographic study of 32 Mexican-American and 17 white adolescents (mean age 15 years), all of whom were pregnant or had been pregnant in the recent past, revealed both similarities and differences in the life experiences of these 2 groups. Only 8 (25%) Mexican-Americans and 3 (18%) had families of origin that were presently intact. Most significant was the finding that 16 (50%) of the Mexican-American respondents and 14 (82%) of whites experienced parental loss--through death, divorce, or desertion--in their early childhoods. There was a tendency among the respondents in both groups to enter puberty earlier than their peers (mean age of menarche of 11 years for both groups), without having received any information from a parent about the physical changes involved. The adolescence of the respondents was marked by a stormy relationship with parents; only 4 (13%) Mexican-American and 2 (12%) white adolescents reported a close, positive relationship with their mothers prior to their pregnancy. Parent-adolescent conflicts in the Mexican-American sample tended to focus around choice of friends, while white adolescents reported a greater variety of areas of conflict, including home responsibilities and curfews. White respondents were considerably more sexually experienced and active than their Mexican-American counterparts. In fact, 16 (50%) of the Mexican-Americans had dated no one other than the father of their baby prior to pregnancy and there was a low frequency of sexual intercourse in the sample as a whole. In contrast, white youth reported multiple sexual partners and a higher frequency of sexual relations. While preliminary, these findings have potential value for identifying risk factors for adolescent pregnancy. PMID:12316818

  19. Individual and community effectiveness of a cervical cancer screening program for semi-urban Mexican women.

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    Figueroa-Muñoz Ledo, Adriana A; Márquez-Serrano, Margarita; Idrovo, Alvaro J; Allen-Leigh, Betania

    2014-06-01

    The effectiveness at the individual and community level of an educational intervention to increase cervical cancer screening self-efficacy among semi-urban Mexican women was evaluated and changes in reported community barriers were measured after the intervention was implemented. The educational intervention was evaluated with a quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design and a control group, based on the Integrative Model of Behavior Prediction and AMIGAS project materials. For the intervention group, increased self-efficacy increased requests to obtain a Pap (p system affect the women's perceived ability to get a Pap. Better care for users is needed to increase consistent use of the test. The study shows the importance of using culturally adapted, multilevel, comprehensive interventions to achieve successful results in target populations.

  20. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

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    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Consuelo Rubio-Poo21Universidad Autónoma Metropolitano–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Departments: Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS; 2Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies-Zaragoza (FES-ZaragozaAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94 were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS.Keywords: breast cancer, Mexican women, direct and indirect costs

  1. Health literacy and breast cancer screening among Mexican American women in South Texas.

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    Pagán, José A; Brown, Cynthia J; Asch, David A; Armstrong, Katrina; Bastida, Elena; Guerra, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the main cause of cancer deaths for Hispanic women. This study analyzes the role of functional health literacy on mammography screening behavior and adherence of Hispanic women. Survey data from 722 Mexican American women age 40 and over residing in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas in 2008 were used to estimate logistic regression models to assess the role of functional health literacy on mammography screening behavior and adherence. About 51% of survey respondents had a functional health literacy level deemed as inadequate or marginally functional. After adjusting for other factors, women with adequate health literacy levels were more likely to report to have ever had a mammogram (odds ratio [OR] = 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.62-5.28), to have had a mammogram within the last 2 years (OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 1.14-2.53) or to have had one within the last year (OR = 2.30; 95% CI = 1.54-3.43), compared to women with inadequate or marginally adequate functional health literacy levels. Inadequate/marginal functional health literacy is strongly associated with lower mammography screening. Large improvements in breast cancer control in this population may come from either basic advances in health literacy or by tailored approaches to help women with low literacy navigate local health care systems.

  2. The role of obesity, physical activityand dietary factors on the risk for breast cancer: mexican experience El papel de la obesidad, la actividad física y los factores dietéticos en el riesgo de cáncer de mama: la experiencia mexicana

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    Isabelle Romieu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of the role of adiposity, physical activity and diet in the risk for breast cancer in Mexican women. Lack of physical activity, diets high in carbohydrates and in glycemic load and low intake of folate and vitamin B12 have been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer in Mexican women, in particular postmenopausal breast cancer. Other dietary factors that may begin to play a more relevant role in breast cancer incidence in Mexico are alcohol intake and vitamin D status. Recommendations to maintain a healthy weight, practice moderate physical activity, decrease intake of rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and increase consumption of fruits and vegetables could have an important impact on the epidemic of breast cancer in Mexico.Se proporciona una revisión general del papel de la adiposidad, la actividad física y la dieta sobre el riesgo de cáncer de mama en mujeres mexicanas. La falta de actividad física, una dieta alta en hidratos de carbono y en carga glicémica y la baja ingesta de ácido fólico y vitamina B12 se han relacionado con un aumento en el riesgo de cáncer de mama en mujeres mexicanas, sobre todo en mujeres posmenopáusicas. Otros factores dietéticos que han tenido un papel más relevante en la incidencia de cáncer de mama en México son la ingesta de alcohol y las concentraciones de vitamina D. Las recomendaciones sobre cómo mantener un peso saludable, realizar actividad física moderada, disminuir la ingesta de hidratos de carbono de absorción rápida e incrementar el consumo de frutas y verduras podrían tener un impacto importante en la disminución de la epidemia de cáncer de mama en México.

  3. Breast cancer quality of life evaluation in Mexican Women at La Raza Hospital, Mexico City: A preliminary approach

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    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Juan Carlos Hinojosa-Cruz2, Consuelo Rubio-Poo31Departments of Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Xochimilco, Mexico; 2La Raza Hospital of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies, Zaragoza (FES-Zaragoza, MexicoAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death among Mexican women over 40 years of age. This study aimed to identify and examine the effects of cancer stage and surgical treatment on the quality of life (QOL of Mexican women with early stage breast cancer (ESBC treated with either modified radical mastectomy (MRM or breast conservative surgery (BCS, plus adjuvant chemotherapy. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23 questionnaires were used to assess QOL. Sociodemographic characteristics and clinical factors of 102 women with early BC were also evaluated; analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed and a statistical significance of p < 0.05 was assumed. Most women were of reproductive age. Meaningful differences in QOL as a result of surgical treatment, in women receiving BCS compared with those receiving MRM, were limited to body image. We conclude that MRM and BCS are essentially equivalent choices in terms of QOL, with the exception of the impact on body image. In general, women who received BCS had a better perceived QOL.Keywords: quality of life, breast cancer, Mexican women

  4. Model linear absolute and relative risk estimates for cancer induced by ionizing radiation in Mexican cohort of occupationally exposed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the rate of natural mortality ms cancer (t) for every 100 thousand habitants, modeled by a fourth-degree polynomial function of the age data of the Mexican population (2008), and assuming: a) a relationship 1: 5 of cancer induced radiation respect to presented spontaneously, b) a size of initial cohort No = 100 k SOPs, c) a speed of HE = (2 ± 1) mSv / received by the SOPs from 18 to 65 years, d) a latency of 8 years for cancer induction after irradiation, e) a time tracking cohort to 75 years, f) and taking the coefficients absolute and relative risk BEIRs induction of cancer models II and VII (excluding leukemia); It determined: BEIR II for a total of 125 and 400 deaths from cancer for absolute and relative linear models respectively. For BEIR VII has a number of fatal cases of 345 and 927 deaths respectively for absolute and relative linear model cancer.

  5. Polymorphisms rs12998 and rs5780218 in KiSS1 Suppressor Metastasis Gene in Mexican Patients with Breast Cancer

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    Edhit Guadalupe Cruz Quevedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. KiSS1 is a metastasis suppressor gene associated with inhibition of cellular chemotaxis and invasion attenuating the metastasis in melanoma and breast cancer cell lines. Along the KiSS-1 gene at least 294 SNPs have been described; however the association of these polymorphisms as genetic markers for metastasis in breast cancer studies has not been investigated. Here we describe two simple PCR-RFLPs protocols to identify the rs5780218 (9DelT and the rs12998 (E20K KiSS1 polymorphisms and the allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in Mexican general population (GP and patients with benign breast disease (BBD or breast cancer (BC. Results. The rs5780218 polymorphism was individually associated with breast cancer (P=0.0332 and the rs12998 polymorphism shows statistically significant differences when GP versus case (BC and BBD groups were compared (P<0.0001. The H1 Haplotype (G/- occurred more frequently in BC group (0.4256 whereas H2 haplotype (G/T was the most prevalent in BBD group (0.4674. Conclusions. Our data indicated that the rs5780218 polymorphism individually confers susceptibility for development of breast cancer in Mexican population and a possible role as a genetic marker in breast cancer metastasis for H1 haplotype (Wt/variant in KiSS1 gene must be analyzed in other populations.

  6. Romantic Relationship Experiences from Late Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Role of Older Siblings in Mexican-Origin Families.

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    Wheeler, Lorey A; Killoren, Sarah E; Whiteman, Shawn D; Updegraff, Kimberly A; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2016-05-01

    Youth's experiences with romantic relationships during adolescence and young adulthood have far reaching implications for future relationships, health, and well-being; yet, although scholars have examined potential peer and parent influences, we know little about the role of siblings in youth's romantic relationships. Accordingly, this study examined the prospective longitudinal links between Mexican-origin older and younger siblings' romantic relationship experiences and variation by sibling structural and relationship characteristics (i.e., sibling age and gender similarity, younger siblings' modeling) and cultural values (i.e., younger siblings' familism values). Data from 246 Mexican-origin families with older (M = 20.65 years; SD = 1.57; 50 % female) and younger (M = 17.72 years; SD = .57; 51 % female) siblings were used to examine the likelihood of younger siblings' involvement in dating relationships, sexual relations, cohabitation, and engagement/marriage with probit path analyses. Findings revealed older siblings' reports of involvement in a dating relationship, cohabitation, and engagement/marriage predicted younger siblings' relationship experiences over a 2-year period. These links were moderated by sibling age spacing, younger siblings' reports of modeling and familism values. Our findings suggest the significance of social learning dynamics as well as relational and cultural contexts in understanding the links between older and younger siblings' romantic relationship experiences among Mexican-origin youth. PMID:26590830

  7. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rico, Jacobo Alejandro; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Cárdenas-Elizalde, Rosario; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94) were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM) surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS) were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS. PMID:22312199

  8. Association of CYP8A1 (Prostacyclin I2 synthase) polymorphism rs5602 with breast cancer in Mexican woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Sarmiento, Eduardo; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Bandala, Cindy; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most common cancer in Mexican women. Certain risk factors, such as environmental and lifestyle factors have been implicated in BCa initiation and progression. Moreover, genetic factors, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the P450 system, have been reported in BCa. In this report, and for the first time in the literature, we analyzed the rs5602 (67730 T > C) polymorphism in the CYP8A1 in patients with BCa and in healthy Mexican women to identify a potential risk between this polymorphism and BCa. Leukocyte cells from 38 control patients and tissue from radical mastectomy surgeries in 64 BCa patients were used for polymorphism analysis using an allelic discrimination assay with TaqMan probes. Links with clinic-pathological characteristics were also analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the standard χ(2) or Fisher exact test statistic. All CYP8A1 genotypes were detected in patients with BCa and the controls. Significant differences were observed in the distribution of CYP8A1 genotypes between the patients and controls (P=0.0008) and allele C was significantly associated with BCa risk (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.166-3.72, P=0.0178). All polymorphism frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) in the controls (P > 0.05). We found that variant 67730 T > C was significantly associated with an increased risk of BCa (P Mexican women. This study showed an association between the CYP8A1 polymorphism and BCa risk in a Mexican population. PMID:27186408

  9. Factors Influencing Mexican Women's Decisions to Vaccinate Daughters Against HPV in the United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzell, Emily; Flores, Yvonne N; Salmerón, Jorge; Bastani, Roshan

    2016-01-01

    Mexican and Mexican-American women bear high cervical cancer burdens, yet relationships between mothers' experiences of vaccinating daughters against cervical cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) on both sides of the border are unknown. We surveyed 400 Mexican-born women in Oxnard, California, United States and Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, about their beliefs and practices regarding daughters' HPV vaccination, conducting in-depth interviews with 35 participants. Contextualizing interview findings in survey data, we identify key factors influencing mothers' experiences regarding daughters' HPV vaccination in both countries. Although US acculturation influenced some participants' concerns, US and Mexico participants overwhelmingly desired eventual vaccination; structural rather than cultural barriers limited vaccine uptake. PMID:27536936

  10. The Mexican experience in monitoring and evaluation of public policies addressing social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Adolfo Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) have gradually become important and regular components of the policy-making process in Mexico since, and even before, the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) called for interventions and policies aimed at tackling the social determinants of health (SDH). This paper presents two case studies to show how public policies addressing the SDH have been monitored and evaluated in Mexico using reliable, valid, and complete information, which is not regularly available. Prospera, for example, evaluated programs seeking to improve the living conditions of families in extreme poverty in terms of direct effects on health, nutrition, education and income. Monitoring of Prospera's implementation has also helped policy-makers identify windows of opportunity to improve the design and operation of the program. Seguro Popular has monitored the reduction of health inequalities and inequities evaluated the positive effects of providing financial protection to its target population. Useful and sound evidence of the impact of programs such as Progresa and Seguro Popular plus legal mandates, and a regulatory evaluation agency, the National Council for Social Development Policy Evaluation, have been fundamental to institutionalizing M&E in Mexico. The Mexican experience may provide useful lessons for other countries facing the challenge of institutionalizing the M&E of public policy processes to assess the effects of SDH as recommended by the WHO CSDH.

  11. The Mexican experience in monitoring and evaluation of public policies addressing social determinants of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Martinez Valle

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring and evaluation (M&E have gradually become important and regular components of the policy-making process in Mexico since, and even before, the World Health Organization (WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH called for interventions and policies aimed at tackling the social determinants of health (SDH. This paper presents two case studies to show how public policies addressing the SDH have been monitored and evaluated in Mexico using reliable, valid, and complete information, which is not regularly available. Prospera, for example, evaluated programs seeking to improve the living conditions of families in extreme poverty in terms of direct effects on health, nutrition, education and income. Monitoring of Prospera's implementation has also helped policy-makers identify windows of opportunity to improve the design and operation of the program. Seguro Popular has monitored the reduction of health inequalities and inequities evaluated the positive effects of providing financial protection to its target population. Useful and sound evidence of the impact of programs such as Progresa and Seguro Popular plus legal mandates, and a regulatory evaluation agency, the National Council for Social Development Policy Evaluation, have been fundamental to institutionalizing M&E in Mexico. The Mexican experience may provide useful lessons for other countries facing the challenge of institutionalizing the M&E of public policy processes to assess the effects of SDH as recommended by the WHO CSDH.

  12. The Mexican experience in monitoring and evaluation of public policies addressing social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Adolfo Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) have gradually become important and regular components of the policy-making process in Mexico since, and even before, the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) called for interventions and policies aimed at tackling the social determinants of health (SDH). This paper presents two case studies to show how public policies addressing the SDH have been monitored and evaluated in Mexico using reliable, valid, and complete information, which is not regularly available. Prospera, for example, evaluated programs seeking to improve the living conditions of families in extreme poverty in terms of direct effects on health, nutrition, education and income. Monitoring of Prospera's implementation has also helped policy-makers identify windows of opportunity to improve the design and operation of the program. Seguro Popular has monitored the reduction of health inequalities and inequities evaluated the positive effects of providing financial protection to its target population. Useful and sound evidence of the impact of programs such as Progresa and Seguro Popular plus legal mandates, and a regulatory evaluation agency, the National Council for Social Development Policy Evaluation, have been fundamental to institutionalizing M&E in Mexico. The Mexican experience may provide useful lessons for other countries facing the challenge of institutionalizing the M&E of public policy processes to assess the effects of SDH as recommended by the WHO CSDH. PMID:26928215

  13. The Mexican American/Chicano Experience...A Special Report. Project R.E.A.C.H. Ethnic Perspectives Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Gary; Neal, Colleen

    Events in American history are looked at through the eyes of Mexican Americans. Chapter 1 covers the American Indian (primarily Aztec) and Spanish background of the Mexican people, and the problems between the white settlers and liberal Mexicans living in Texas that eventually gave rise to the Mexican American War of 1846. Chapter 2 discusses the…

  14. Health behavior changes following breast cancer treatment: a qualitative comparison among Chinese American, Korean American, and Mexican American survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-won; Gonzalez, Patricia; Wang-Letzkus, Ming F; Baik, Okmi; Ashing-Giwa, Kimlin T

    2013-05-01

    This study explored how Chinese American, Korean American, and Mexican American women modify their health behaviors following breast cancer treatment and identified motivators and barriers that influence their changes. An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was undertaken using six focus groups. Discussions were transcribed and translated for content analysis. Significant differences among the ethnic groups were noted in the following health behavior practices which were most commonly stated as changed behaviors after a breast cancer diagnosis: 1) eating habits, 2) physical activity, 3) alternative medicine, 4) sleeping, 5) social activity, 6) weight control, and 7) alcohol consumption. Family, financial concerns, environment, and religious faith were commonly mentioned as motivators of and/or barriers to changes in health behaviors. Findings provide insight into different perspectives related to changes in health behaviors by ethnicity, which is critical for developing culturally tailored behavioral interventions to improve underserved breast cancer survivors' quality of life and to reduce health disparities.

  15. Breast cancer quality of life evaluation in Mexican Women at La Raza Hospital, Mexico City: A preliminary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rico, Jacobo Alejandro; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Cárdenas-Elizalde, Rosario; Hinojosa-Cruz, Juan Carlos; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of death among Mexican women over 40 years of age. This study aimed to identify and examine the effects of cancer stage and surgical treatment on the quality of life (QOL) of Mexican women with early stage breast cancer (ESBC) treated with either modified radical mastectomy (MRM) or breast conservative surgery (BCS), plus adjuvant chemotherapy. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23 questionnaires were used to assess QOL. Sociodemographic characteristics and clinical factors of 102 women with early BC were also evaluated; analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed and a statistical significance of p < 0.05 was assumed. Most women were of reproductive age. Meaningful differences in QOL as a result of surgical treatment, in women receiving BCS compared with those receiving MRM, were limited to body image. We conclude that MRM and BCS are essentially equivalent choices in terms of QOL, with the exception of the impact on body image. In general, women who received BCS had a better perceived QOL. PMID:21935301

  16. Androgen receptor CAG polymorphism and sporadic and early-onset prostate cancer among Mexican men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Rocío; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; Camacho-Mejorado, Rafael; Burguete-García, Ana I; Vázquez-Salas, Ruth Argelia; Martínez-Nava, Gabriela A; Santana, Carla; Noris, Gino

    2016-09-01

    A short CAG repeat length in the gene encoding for the androgen receptor (AR) has been associated with prostate cancer (PC) risk and aggressiveness. In Latino men, information on this association is scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate this association in Mexican males. Using fragment analysis by capillary electrophoresis, we determined the number of CAG repeats-(CAG)n-in AR gene from 158 incident PC cases and 326 age-matched healthy controls (±5 years), residing in Mexico City, Mexico. According to Gleason scale and age at diagnosis, cases were classified as high (⩾7) and low grade (<7), as well as early onset (<60 years) or late onset PC (⩾60 years). At diagnosis, 78% of cases were classified as high-grade and 26.6% as early onset. Men with sporadic (no family history of PC) and early-onset PC presented shorter CAG repeat length than controls (18.6±2.2 vs 19.5±2.5; P=0.02). Lower number of CAG repeats (CAG)⩽19 were associated with a greater risk for early-onset PC (odds ratio: 2.31; 95% confidence interval: 1.14-4.69). CAG repeat length could increase the risk for sporadic and early-onset PC. The best cutoff point for identifying at-risk subjects was (CAG)19. However, further studies are necessary to replicate our findings in subjects with a family history of PC and also to evaluate the association between CAG repeats length and disease progression.

  17. Cancer and frailty in older adults: a nested case-control study of the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Cárdenas-Cárdenas, Eduardo; Cesari, Matteo; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Understanding how the convergence between chronic and complex diseases—such as cancer—and emerging conditions of older adults—such as frailty—takes place would help in halting the path that leads to disability in this age group. The objective of this manuscript is to describe the association between a past medical history of cancer and frailty in Mexican older adults. Methods This is a nested in cohort case-control study of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Frailty was categorized by developing a 55-item frailty index that was also used to define cases in two ways: incident frailty (incident >0.25 frailty index score) and worsening frailty (negative residuals from a regression between 2001 and 2012 frailty index scores). Exposition was defined as self-report of cancer between 2001 and 2012. Older adults with a cancer history were further divided into recently diagnosed (10 years from the initial diagnosis). Odds ratios were estimated by fitting a logistic regression adjusted for confounding variables. Results Out of a total of 8022 older adults with a mean age of 70.6 years, the prevalence of a past medical history of cancer was 3.6 % (n = 288). Among these participants, 45.1 % had been diagnosed with cancer more than 10 years previously. A higher risk of incident frailty compared to controls [odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.26, p = 0.03); adjusted model OR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.15–2.61, p = 0.008)] was found in the group with a recent cancer diagnosis. Also, an inverse association between a remote cancer diagnosis and worsening frailty was found [OR = 0.56 (95 % CI 0.39–0.8), p = 0.002; adjusted model OR 0.61 (95 % CI 0.38–0.99, p = 0.046)]. Conclusions Cancer is associated with a higher frailty index, with a potential relevant role of the time that has elapsed since the cancer diagnosis. Implications for cancer survivors Cancer survivors may be more likely to develop frailty or worsening of the health status at an

  18. "Trabajando Duro Todos Los Dias": Learning from the Life Experiences of Mexican-Origin Migrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Cardona, Jose Ruben; Bulock, Laurie A.; Imig, David R.; Villarruel, Francisco A.; Gold, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The agricultural economy in the United States has relied heavily on migrant farmworkers and, in particular, on Latinos. However, migrant families remain one of the most disadvantaged groups in the United States. This research focuses on a subsample of migrant families of Mexican origin (n=13), who participated in the "Rural Families Speak"…

  19. Sharing Power? An Experience of Mexican American Parents Serving on a Campus Advisory Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Delores C.

    2000-01-01

    Explores issues concerning representation, training, guidelines, and parent representative roles to determine how Mexican-American parents serving on an elementary school advisory council were involved in school decision-making. Parents' role may be minor, due to factors (like staff assumptions) resulting in unequal knowledge, respect, and…

  20. The Lived Experiences of 3rd Generation and beyond U.S.-Born Mexican Heritage College Students: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychosocial and identity challenges of 3rd generation and beyond U.S.-born (3GAB-USB) Mexican heritage college students. Alvarez (1973) has written about the psychosocial impact "hybridity" can have on a U.S.- born (USB) Mexican individual who incorporates two distinct cultures (American and Mexican)…

  1. Incidence of cancer in children residing in ten jurisdictions of the Mexican Republic: importance of the Cancer registry (a population-based study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, Mexico started to register cases of childhood cancer. Here, we describe the incidence of cancer in children, residing in ten Mexican jurisdictions, who were treated by the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). New cases of childhood cancer, which were registered prospectively in nine principal Medical Centers of IMSS during the periods 1998–2000 (five jurisdictions) and 1996–2002 (five jurisdictions), were analyzed. Personnel were specifically trained to register, capture, and encode information. For each of these jurisdictions, the frequency, average annual age-standardized incidence (AAS) and average annual incidence per period by sex and, age, were calculated (rates per 1,000,000 children/years). In total 2,615 new cases of cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio generally >1, but in some tumors there were more cases in females (retinoblastoma, germ cells tumors). The principal groups of neoplasms in seven jurisdictions were leukemias, central nervous system tumors (CNS tumors), and lymphomas, and the combined frequency for these three groups was 62.6 to 77.2%. Most frequently found (five jurisdictions) was the North American-European pattern (leukemias-CNS tumors-lymphomas). Eight jurisdictions had AAS within the range reported in the world literature. The highest incidence was found for children underless than five year of age. In eight jurisdictions, leukemia had high incidence (>50). The AAS of lymphomas was between 1.9 to 28.6. Chiapas and Guerrero had the highest AAS of CNS tumors (31.9 and 30.3, respectively). The frequency and incidence of neuroblastoma was low. Chiapas had the highest incidence of retinoblastoma (21.8). Germ-cell tumors had high incidence. The North American-European pattern of cancers was the principal one found; the overall incidence was within the range reported worldwide. In general but particularly in two jurisdictions (Yucatán and Chiapas), it will be necessary to carry out studies concerning the

  2. Polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in a healthy Mexican Mestizo population: application of the additive model for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Pérez-Morales

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Mexico and worldwide. In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of lung cancer cases in young people, which suggests an important role for genetic background in the etiology of this disease. In this study, we genetically characterized 16 polymorphisms in 12 low penetrance genes (AhR, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTPI, XRCC1, ERCC2, MGMT, CCND1 and TP53 in 382 healthy Mexican Mestizos as the first step in elucidating the genetic structure of this population and identifying high risk individuals. All of the genotypes analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but different degrees of linkage were observed for polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 and EPHX1 genes. The genetic variability of this population was distributed in six clusters that were defined based on their genetic characteristics. The use of a polygenic model to assess the additive effect of low penetrance risk alleles identified combinations of risk genotypes that could be useful in predicting a predisposition to lung cancer. Estimation of the level of genetic susceptibility showed that the individual calculated risk value (iCRV ranged from 1 to 16, with a higher iCRV indicating a greater genetic susceptibility to lung cancer.

  3. [Experiences of undocumented Mexican migrant women when accessing sexual and reproductive health services in California, USA: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb-Sossa, Natalia; Díaz Olavarrieta, Claudia; Juárez-Ramírez, Clara; García, Sandra G; Villalobos, Aremis

    2013-05-01

    This study focuses on the experience of Mexican women migrants in California, USA, with the use of formal health services for sexual and reproductive health issues. The authors used a qualitative interpretative approach with life histories, interviewing eight female users of healthcare services in California and seven key informants in Mexico and California. There were three main types of barriers to healthcare: immigration status, language, and gender. Participants reported long waiting times, discriminatory attitudes, and high cost of services. A combination of formal and informal healthcare services was common. The assessment of quality of care was closely related to undocumented immigration status. Social support networks are crucial to help solve healthcare issues. Quality of care should take intercultural health issues into account. PMID:23703003

  4. AIP mutations in young patients with acromegaly and the Tampico Giant: the Mexican experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly; Vargas, Guadalupe; Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; González, Baldomero; Zúñiga, Sergio; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anne-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Dang, Mary; Iacovazzo, Donato; Kapur, Sonal; Gabrovska, Plamena; Radian, Serban; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Although aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly, their prevalence among young patients is nonnegligible. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of AIP mutations in a cohort of Mexican patients with acromegaly with disease onset before the age of 30 and to search for molecular abnormalities in the AIP gene in teeth obtained from the "Tampico Giant". Peripheral blood DNA from 71 patients with acromegaly (51 females) with disease onset symptoms of GH excess since age 14) the c.910C>T (p.Arg304Ter), well-known truncating mutation was identified; in one of these two cases and her identical twin sister, the mutation proved to be a de novo event, since neither of their parents were found to be carriers. In the remaining three patients, new mutations were identified: a frameshift mutation (c.976_977insC, p.Gly326AfsTer), an in-frame deletion (c.872_877del, p.Val291_Leu292del) and a nonsense mutation (c.868A > T, p.Lys290Ter), which are predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis. Patients with AIP mutations tended to have an earlier onset of acromegaly and harboured larger and more invasive tumours. A previously described genetic variant of unknown significance (c.869C > T, p.Ala299Val) was identified in DNA from the Tampico Giant. The prevalence of AIP mutations in young Mexican patients with acromegaly is similar to that of European cohorts. Our results support the need for genetic evaluation of patients with early onset acromegaly.

  5. AIP mutations in young patients with acromegaly and the Tampico Giant: the Mexican experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly; Vargas, Guadalupe; Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; González, Baldomero; Zúñiga, Sergio; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anne-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Dang, Mary; Iacovazzo, Donato; Kapur, Sonal; Gabrovska, Plamena; Radian, Serban; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Although aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly, their prevalence among young patients is nonnegligible. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of AIP mutations in a cohort of Mexican patients with acromegaly with disease onset before the age of 30 and to search for molecular abnormalities in the AIP gene in teeth obtained from the "Tampico Giant". Peripheral blood DNA from 71 patients with acromegaly (51 females) with disease onset gigantism and a young man with symptoms of GH excess since age 14) the c.910C>T (p.Arg304Ter), well-known truncating mutation was identified; in one of these two cases and her identical twin sister, the mutation proved to be a de novo event, since neither of their parents were found to be carriers. In the remaining three patients, new mutations were identified: a frameshift mutation (c.976_977insC, p.Gly326AfsTer), an in-frame deletion (c.872_877del, p.Val291_Leu292del) and a nonsense mutation (c.868A > T, p.Lys290Ter), which are predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis. Patients with AIP mutations tended to have an earlier onset of acromegaly and harboured larger and more invasive tumours. A previously described genetic variant of unknown significance (c.869C > T, p.Ala299Val) was identified in DNA from the Tampico Giant. The prevalence of AIP mutations in young Mexican patients with acromegaly is similar to that of European cohorts. Our results support the need for genetic evaluation of patients with early onset acromegaly. PMID:27033541

  6. The EPIYA-ABCC motif pattern in CagA of Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Mexican population

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy Omar; Poblete, Tomás Manuel; Román-Román, Adolfo; Reyes, Salomón; de Sampedro, José; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori chronic infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA)-positive H. pylori strains increase the risk of gastric pathology. The carcinogenic potential of CagA is linked to its polymorphic EPIYA motif variants. The goals of this study were to investigate the frequency of cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori in Mexican patients with gastric pathologies and to assess the association of cagA EPIYA moti...

  7. A case study of the effects of social experiences on the science identity formation of Mexican American females in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeton, Renee P.

    Mexican Americans are a rapidly growing ethnic group in the United States. However, they are noticeably absent from physical science fields. Little research has explored the experiences of Mexican American girls in high school chemistry. The theories of identity based on communities of practice and multicultural feminism framed this year-long case study of nine Mexican American girls in a high school chemistry course. This study explored the social encounters and experiences that shaped the participants' identities and how their views of themselves affected their attitudes towards high school chemistry and future science careers. Data collection included a focus group and in-depth interviews with the participants, classroom observations, and teacher interviews. Five main identities influenced the participants' potential to become a scientist: ethnic, gender, science, student, and college. Mexican ethnic identity was the overarching identity; however gender also influenced the participants' other identities. The participants were aware of ethnic gender stereotypes that might hinder them from being successful in science. Also, ethnic factors, such as citizenship and abilities to receive financial aid limited their views of themselves as chemists. Participatory science, student, and school identities were all needed in order for the participants to be potential scientists. Family expectations, authentic relationships with teachers, and personal connections were important factors in the development of these participatory identities.

  8. Mexican American Parents' Involvement in Adolescents' Peer Relationships: Exploring the Role of Culture and Adolescents' Peer Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the nature and correlates of Mexican American mothers' and fathers' involvement in adolescents' peer relationships along 4 dimensions: support, restriction, knowledge, and time spent with adolescents and peers. Mexican American adolescents and their parents in 220 families described their family relationships, cultural…

  9. New Paradigms for Adult Learning: Building on Mexican Immigrants' Prior Experience To Develop Basic Skills for the Information Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissam, Edward

    This paper examines basic skills competencies developed by Mexican immigrant adult learners through participation in (although not always completion of) adult basic education programs conducted by the Mexican, Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos (INEA). The comparison provides the conceptual basis for configuring instructional…

  10. Relationships that create confidence : understanding postsecondary academic choices of Mexican heritage high school graduates in light of influential relationships, self-efficacy, and mathematical experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Daniel Allen

    2009-01-01

    This study examines Mexican heritage high school graduates' postsecondary academic choices through a Social Capital and Self-Efficacy lens. Mathematical experiences and the relationships within which these experiences took place are considered. A cross-sectional recruiting design was used to find out if measures of academic self-efficacy that were recalled by participants changed as time since graduation increased. Three graduates were selected from each of the classes of 1998, 2003, 2006, an...

  11. Health insurance mediation of the Mexican American non-Hispanic white disparity on early breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Jama, Sundus; Gorey, Kevin M; Luginaah, Isaac N; Balagurusamy, Madhan K; Hamm, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    We examined health insurance mediation of the Mexican American (MA) non-Hispanic white (NHW) disparity on early breast cancer diagnosis. Based on social capital and barrio advantage theories, we hypothesized a 3-way ethnicity by poverty by health insurance interaction, that is, that 2-way poverty by health insurance interaction effects would differ between ethnic groups. We secondarily analyzed registry data for 303 MA and 3,611 NHW women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1996 and 2000 who were originally followed until 2011. Predictors of early, node negative (NN) disease at diagnosis were analyzed. Socioeconomic data were obtained from the 2000 census to categorize neighborhood poverty: high (30% or more of the census tract households were poor), middle (5% to 29% poor) and low (less than 5% poor). Barrios were neighborhoods where 50% or more of the residents were MA. Primary health insurers were Medicaid, Medicare, private or none. MA women were 13% less likely to be diagnosed early with NN disease (RR = 0.87), but this MA-NHW disparity was completely mediated by the main and interacting effects of health insurance. Advantages of health insurance were largest in low poverty neighborhoods among NHW women (RR = 1.20) while among MA women they were, paradoxically, largest in high poverty, MA barrios (RR = 1.45). Advantages of being privately insured were observed for all. Medicare seemed additionally instrumental for NHW women and Medicaid for MA women. These findings are consistent with the theory that more facilitative social and economic capital is available to MA women in barrios and to NHW women in more affluent neighborhoods. It is there that each respective group of women is probably best able to absorb the indirect and direct, but uncovered, costs of breast cancer screening and diagnosis.

  12. Cancer survivors' experience of exercise-based cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Julie; Hammer, Nanna Maria; Andersen, Christina;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise training as a therapeutic and rehabilitative intervention for cancer survivors is accumulating. However, whereas the evidence for the efficacy of exercise training has been established in several meta-analyses, synthesis of qualitative...... research is lacking. In order to extend healthcare professionals' understanding of the meaningfulness of exercise in cancer survivorship care, this paper aims to identify, appraise and synthesize qualitative studies on cancer survivors' experience of participation in exercise-based rehabilitation. MATERIAL......-based rehabilitation according to cancer survivors. Accordingly, the potential of rebuilding structure in everyday life, creating a normal context and enabling the individual to re-establish confidentiality and trust in their own body and physical potential constitute substantial qualities fundamental...

  13. Experimenting with cigarettes and physical activity among Mexican origin youth: a cross sectional analysis of the interdependent associations among sensation seeking, acculturation, and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson Anna V; Okeke Nnenna L; Springer Andrew E; Stigler Melissa H; Gabriel Kelley P; Bondy Melissa L; Prokhorov Alexander V; Spitz Margaret R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensation seeking tendencies tend to manifest during adolescence and are associated with both health-compromising behaviors and health-enhancing behaviors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between sensation seeking and physical activity, a health-enhancing behavior, and between sensation seeking and experimenting with cigarettes, a health compromising-behavior, among a cohort of Mexican origin adolescents residing in the United States with differen...

  14. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Jaimes-Reyes, Ethel Zulie; Arellano-Galindo, José; García-Jiménez, Xochiketzalli; Tiznado-García, Héctor Manuel; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortíz-Torres, María Guadalupe; Ortíz-Fernández, Antonio; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count 100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population. PMID:25922837

  15. Health Care Access and Breast Cancer Screening Among Latinas Along the California–Mexican Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Foster-Fishman, Pennie G.; Davidson, William S.; Mumman, Manpreet K.; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia R.

    2013-01-01

    Latinas are more likely to exhibit late stage breast cancers at the time of diagnosis and have lower survival rates compared to white women. A contributing factor may be that Latinas have lower rates of mammography screening. This study was guided by the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to examine factors associated with mammography screening utilization among middle-aged Latinas. An academic–community health center partnership collected data from community-based sample of 208 Latinas 40 years and older in the San Diego County who completed measures assessing psychosocial factors, health care access, and recent mammography screening. Results showed that 84.6 % had ever had a mammogram and 76.2 % of women had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. Characteristics associated with mammography screening adherence included a lower acculturation (OR 3.663) a recent physician visit in the past year (OR 6.304), and a greater confidence in filling out medical forms (OR 1.743), adjusting for covariates. Results demonstrate that an annual physical examination was the strongest predictor of recent breast cancer screening. Findings suggest that in this community, improving access to care among English-speaking Latinas and addressing health literacy issues are essential for promoting breast cancer screening utilization. PMID:24150421

  16. Health care access and breast cancer screening among Latinas along the California-Mexican border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Foster-Fishman, Pennie G; Davidson, William S; Mumman, Manpreet K; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia R

    2014-08-01

    Latinas are more likely to exhibit late stage breast cancers at the time of diagnosis and have lower survival rates compared to white women. A contributing factor may be that Latinas have lower rates of mammography screening. This study was guided by the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to examine factors associated with mammography screening utilization among middle-aged Latinas. An academic-community health center partnership collected data from community-based sample of 208 Latinas 40 years and older in the San Diego County who completed measures assessing psychosocial factors, health care access, and recent mammography screening. Results showed that 84.6 % had ever had a mammogram and 76.2 % of women had received a mammogram in the past 2 years. Characteristics associated with mammography screening adherence included a lower acculturation (OR 3.663) a recent physician visit in the past year (OR 6.304), and a greater confidence in filling out medical forms (OR 1.743), adjusting for covariates. Results demonstrate that an annual physical examination was the strongest predictor of recent breast cancer screening. Findings suggest that in this community, improving access to care among English-speaking Latinas and addressing health literacy issues are essential for promoting breast cancer screening utilization.

  17. Emotion and language learning: an exploration of experience and motivation in a Mexican university context

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez López, Mariza Guadalupe

    2011-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies on motivation in foreign language learning and on emotions in general education, little research in foreign language learning have focused on the relation between motivation and learners' emotions (Maclntyre, 2002), as this shift to the affective side of motivation has only recently been suggested. Thus, this study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on how foreign language learning motivation is shaped by emotional experiences. In order t...

  18. Prof.Zhou Yiqiang'S Experience in Treatment of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范宏宇; 王黎军

    2004-01-01

    @@ Bronchogenic carcinoma, the dominant form of malignant lung cancers, refers to canceration of the bronchial mucosa. Prof. Zhou accumulated a wealth of experience in treating complicated diseases with TCM measures and was especially skillful in treating lung cancers. His understandings about the art of treating lung cancers often brought about excellent results.

  19. Implementation of a Lateral TBI protocol in a Mexican Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Francisco; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko; Sosa, Modesto A.

    2008-08-01

    The development of a Lateral Total Body Irradiation protocol to be implemented at a High Specialty Medical Unit in Mexico as preparatory regimen for bone marrow transplant and treatment of several lymphomas is presented. This protocol was developed following AAPM specifications and has been validated for application at a cancer care center in United States. This protocol fundamentally focuses on patient care, avoiding instability and discomfort that may be encountered by other treatment regimes. In vivo dose verification with TLD-100 chips for each anatomical region of interest was utilized. TLD-100 chips were calibrated using a 6 MV photon beam for 10-120 cGy. Experimental results show TLD measurements with an error less than 1%. Standard deviations for calculated and measured doses for seven patients have been obtained. Data gathered for different levels of compensation indicate that a 3% measured tolerance level is acceptable. TLD point-dose measurements have been used to verify the dose beyond partial transmission lung blocks. Dose measurements beyond the lung block showed variation about 50% respects to prescribe dose. Midplane doses to the other anatomical sites were less than 2.5% respect of the prescribed dose.

  20. Experiencing existential changes: the lived experience of having cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, S; Hamrin, E

    1996-02-01

    This phenomenological study was designed to explore the lived experience of having cancer, as perceived by people who have been diagnosed and treated for cancer. The aim of the study was to add to the knowledge and understanding of this complex human phenomenon. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with nine people who were in the remission or recovery phase of cancer. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim for each participant. Through intersubjective interactions and thematic analysis, the essential description of the lived experience of having cancer was constructed. The overriding theme of the lived experience of having cancer is "experiencing existential changes." Five basic subthemes were identified in the participants accounts, all of which are part of the existential changes involved in the lived experience of having cancer. These are: uncertainty, vulnerability, isolation, discomfort, and redefinition. The study can increase the understanding of what it is like to have cancer.

  1. [Experience of stroke prevention-Enlightenment for cancer research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Weicheng

    2015-08-01

    Cancer, stroke and heart diseases are most common causes of death. This paper summarized the experience of stroke prevention, which is an enlightenment for cancer research. In addition, this paper also described the progress of cancer epidemiological research, particular the primary and second preventions in China. PMID:26733022

  2. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elva Jiménez-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count 100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population.

  3. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  4. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  5. Experimenting with cigarettes and physical activity among Mexican origin youth: a cross sectional analysis of the interdependent associations among sensation seeking, acculturation, and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkinson Anna V

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensation seeking tendencies tend to manifest during adolescence and are associated with both health-compromising behaviors and health-enhancing behaviors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between sensation seeking and physical activity, a health-enhancing behavior, and between sensation seeking and experimenting with cigarettes, a health compromising-behavior, among a cohort of Mexican origin adolescents residing in the United States with different levels of acculturation. Methods In 2009, 1,154 Mexican origin youth (50.5% girls, mean age 14.3 years (SD = 1.04 provided data on smoking behavior, physical activity, linguistic acculturation, and sensation seeking. We conducted Pearson’s χ2 tests to examine the associations between categorical demographic characteristics (i.e. gender, age, country of birth and parental educational attainment and both cigarette experimentation and physical activity and Student’s t-tests to examine mean differences on the continuous variables (i.e. sensation seeking subscale by the behaviors. We examined mean differences in the demographic characteristics, acculturation, and both behaviors for each of the sensation seeking subscales using analysis of variance (ANOVA. To examine relationships between the sensation seeking subscales, gender, and both behaviors, at different levels of acculturation we completed unconditional logistic regression analyses stratified by level of acculturation. Results Overall, 23.3% had experimented with cigarettes and 29.0% reported being physically active for at least 60 minutes/day on at least 5 days/week. Experimenting with cigarettes and being physically active were more prevalent among boys than girls. Among girls, higher levels of sensation seeking tendencies were associated with higher levels of acculturation and experimentation with cigarettes, but not with physical activity. Among boys, higher levels of sensation seeking

  6. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26910355

  7. "They Talk Like That, But We Keep Working": Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault Experiences Among Mexican Indigenous Farmworker Women in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeanne; Samples, Julie; Morales, Mavel; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine the experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault among indigenous and non-indigenous Mexican immigrant farmworkers in Oregon's Willamette Valley, a community-academic participatory research partnership initiated a study, which included focus groups, conducted and analyzed by skilled practitioners and researchers. The themes that emerged from the focus groups included direct and indirect effects of sexual harassment and sexual assault on women and risk factors associated with the farmworker workplace environment, and the increased vulnerability of non-Spanish-speaking indigenous women due to low social status, poverty, cultural and linguistic issues, and isolation. Recommendations for prevention and improved services for vulnerable women will be discussed as well as limitations and future research directions. PMID:24514945

  8. Perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (p-anca) in chronic ulcerative colitis: Experience in a Mexican institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho; Takeshi Takahashi-Monroy; Omar Vergara-Fernandez; Edgardo Reyes; Luis Uscanga

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence and clinical value of p-ANCA in a sample of Mexican ulcerative colitis (UC) patients.METHODS: In a prospective, IRB-approved protocol,p-ANCA was determined in 80 patients with UC (mean age, 32 ± 12.9 years). The severity and extension of disease were determined by clinical methods, searching a statistical association with p-ANCA status.RESULTS: p-ANCA were detected in 41 (51%) patients.Severity of disease was the only clinical variable statistically associated with their presence (P < 0.0001; OR = 9;CI 95% = 3.2-24.7).CONCLUSION: The prevalence of p-ANCA was similar to that reported in other countries. Their presence was associated to UC severity, but offered no more information than the obtained by clinical methods.

  9. The Mexican Axolotl in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests and describes laboratory activities in which the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Shaw) is used, including experiments in embryology and early development, growth and regeneration, neoteny and metamorphosis, genetics and coloration, anatomy and physiology, and behavior. Discusses care and maintenance of animals. (CS)

  10. A qualitative investigation of cancer survivorship experiences among rural Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livaudais, Jennifer C; Thompson, Beti; Godina, Ruby; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Coronado, Gloria D

    2010-01-01

    Cancer survivorship experiences were explored among Hispanic men and women with cancer and family members of cancer survivors, recruited from two rural Washington communities in the Lower Yakima Valley. Five focus groups were conducted from February 2006 to October 2007 with 31 women and 10 men. Disbelief, fear, sadness, strength, courage, faith, and hope were common reactions to diagnosis. Concerns about family/children, losing medical coupons, and feelings of depression/isolation were identified as challenges faced after diagnosis. Participants identified smoking and environmental exposures as causes of cancer, but many believed operating on tumors caused cancer to spread. Participants used conventional treatments but identified herbal/natural remedies as cures. Most participants reported negative experiences with physicians and believed their community would benefit from language-appropriate information regarding prevention and treatment. The importance of linking survivors through support groups was emphasized and information elicited from sessions has been used to organize survivor support groups in these two communities. PMID:20623413

  11. Association of eHealth literacy with cancer information seeking and prior experience with cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Moon, Mikyung; Baeg, Jung Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a critical disease with a high mortality rate in the US. Although useful information exists on the Internet, many people experience difficulty finding information about cancer prevention because they have limited eHealth literacy. This study aimed to identify relationships between the level of eHealth literacy and cancer information seeking experience or prior experience with cancer screening tests. A total of 108 adults participated in this study through questionnaires. Data covering demographics, eHealth literacy, cancer information seeking experience, educational needs for cancer information searching, and previous cancer screening tests were obtained. Study findings show that the level of eHealth literacy influences cancer information seeking. Individuals with low eHealth literacy are likely to be less confident about finding cancer information. In addition, people who have a low level of eHealth literacy need more education about seeking information than do those with a higher level of eHealth literacy. However, there is no significant relationship between eHealth literacy and cancer screening tests. More people today are using the Internet for access to information to maintain good health. It is therefore critical to educate those with low eHealth literacy so they can better self-manage their health.

  12. My Mexican Friend Chabolla

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MiLan

    2005-01-01

    Chabolla is a Mexican learning Chinese from me. His Chinese name is Xia Boyang, pronounced similarly with his Mexican surname. On one occasion,I told him that “Xia Boyang” is a translated name of the hero in a Russian novel, he felt quite surprised and said seriously to me, “I am not Russian. I am Mexican.”

  13. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  14. Cancer and the African American Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the many factors that lead to inequalities in cancer care outcomes for African Americans.

  15. Racial Identity and Racial Treatment of Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vilma; Telles, Edward

    2012-04-01

    How racial barriers play in the experiences of Mexican Americans has been hotly debated. Some consider Mexican Americans similar to European Americans of a century ago that arrived in the United States with modest backgrounds but were eventually able to participate fully in society. In contrast, others argue that Mexican Americans have been racialized throughout U.S. history and this limits their participation in society. The evidence of persistent educational disadvantages across generations and frequent reports of discrimination and stereotyping support the racialization argument. In this paper, we explore the ways in which race plays a role in the lives of Mexican Americans by examining how education, racial characteristics, social interactions, relate to racial outcomes. We use the Mexican American Study Project, a unique data set based on a 1965 survey of Mexican Americans in Los Angeles and San Antonio combined with surveys of the same respondents and their adult children in 2000, thereby creating a longitudinal and intergenerational data set. First, we found that darker Mexican Americans, therefore appearing more stereotypically Mexican, report more experiences of discrimination. Second, darker men report much more discrimination than lighter men and than women overall. Third, more educated Mexican Americans experience more stereotyping and discrimination than their less-educated counterparts, which is partly due to their greater contact with Whites. Lastly, having greater contact with Whites leads to experiencing more stereotyping and discrimination. Our results are indicative of the ways in which Mexican Americans are racialized in the United States.

  16. The global experience of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jeannine M

    2010-01-01

    Pain is a significant problem in patients with cancer. Pain occurs in approximately 50% of patients at some point during the disease process and in up to 75% of patients with advanced cancer. Total pain impacts quality of life domains including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual realms. Unfortunately, pain is underappreciated and undermanaged throughout the world. Lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals, inadequate pain assessment, fears of addiction, and beliefs that pain is an inevitable component of cancer are common barriers. Education about comprehensive pain assessment and optimal management strategies and discussions about belief systems regarding pain can assist to bridge the gap between suffering and comfort. Self-report is the gold standard for pain assessment. Gathering information about the location(s), intensity, quality and temporal factors is essential. Intensity should be quantified on a rating scale to determine the amount of pain and the degree of relief from interventions. Quality can be used to diagnose the specific pain syndrome. Temporal factors provide input about how the pain is experienced over time and can offer input into the pain management plan of care. For patients who cannot self-report pain, non-verbal assessment tools are available to aid in assessment. The World Health Organization's Analgesic Ladder provides a template for the management of cancer pain. For step 1, pain can be managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and other nonopioid analgesics. As pain persists or increases, step 2 involves managing pain with select opioids for mild to moderate pain along with NSAIDS and nonopioid analgesics. Step 3 of the ladder is applicable to many cancer pain syndromes, and includes opioids for moderate to severe pain in conjunction with NSAIDS and nonopioids. This 3 step approach can be 80-90% effective. This polypharmaceutical employed with behavioral complimentary techniques are often employed to

  17. Patterns of caregiver experiences among partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Mulder, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    2000-01-01

    This study describes patterns of caregiving experiences in partners of patients with cancer (N=148) over a 6-month period. Caregiving experiences were assessed by means of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment Scale (CRA), which consists of four negative dimensions and one positive subscale: Disrupted S

  18. Colorectal Cancer Through Simulation and Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Kershaw, S. K.; Byrne, H.M.; Gavaghan, D. J.; Osborne, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has continued to generate a huge amount of research interest over several decades, forming a canonical example of tumourigenesis since its use in Fearon and Vogelstein’s linear model of genetic mutation. Over time, the field has witnessed a transition from solely experimental work to the inclusion of mathematical biology and computer-based modelling. The fusion of these disciplines has the potential to provide valuable insights into oncologic processes, but also presents the...

  19. Colorectal cancer through simulation and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Kershaw, Sophie K.

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has formed a canonical example of tumourigenesis ever since its use in Fearon and Vogelstein\\'s linear model of genetic mutation, and continues to generate a huge amount of research interest. Over time, the field has witnessed a transition from solely experimental work to the inclusion of mathematical and computational modelling. The fusion of these disciplines has the potential to provide valuable insights into oncologic processes, but also presents the challenge of uniting many diverse perspectives. Furthermore, the cancer cell phenotype defined by the \\'Hallmarks of Cancer\\' has been extended in recent times and provides an excellent basis for future research. The authors present a timely summary of the literature relating to CRC, addressing the traditional experimental findings, summarising the key mathematical and computational approaches, and emphasising the role of the Hallmarks in current and future developments. The authors conclude with a discussion of interdisciplinary work, outlining areas of experimental interest which would benefit from the insight that theoretical modelling can provide. © The institution of engineering and technology 2013.

  20. Inflammatory breast cancer: A decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Nascimento, Vinicius C; Rajan, Ruben; Redfern, Andrew; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and rare form of breast cancer. At present, there are no established diagnostic, radiological, pathological or molecular diagnostic criteria for this entity. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of presentation, treatment and outcomes of IBC in this institution over the course of a decade. This is a retrospective observational study using data from the Royal Perth Hospital from January 2001 to December 2010. Our results identified 57 women with IBC, representing 1.9% of all new breast cancer presentations. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple negative tumors were overrepresented (41% and 18%, respectively). Forty-four (77%) patients had early disease at diagnosis, of whom 35 underwent surgery and 16 are relapse-free. All six patients achieving complete pathological response were relapse-free in contrast to 11 (38%) with lesser responses at a median follow-up of 59 months. Median survival in 13 patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis was 21.7 months, with two patients still in remission. Clearly, this small but important group continues to offer management challenges and warrants ongoing study, including better molecular and pathological profiling of tumors to allow improved diagnostic clarity and more effective targeted therapy. PMID:26899402

  1. Actividad física y riesgo de cáncer de mama en mujeres mexicanas Physical activity and breast cancer risk in Mexican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia Ortiz-Rodríguez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el efecto de la actividad física moderada (en horas por semana y METs-hora por semana sobre el riesgo de cáncer de mama (CM. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se trata de la primera fase de un estudio multicéntrico de casos y controles con base poblacional que se desarrolló en el Distrito Federal, Monterrey y Veracruz, México, en el año 2004. Se analizaron 58 casos y 58 controles pareados a los casos por quinquenio de edad, y pertenencia al sistema de salud; participaron tres hospitales del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, tres del Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado y tres de la Secretaría de Salud. RESULTADOS: En mujeres posmenopáusicas se observó una reducción del riesgo de CM por cada hora semanal adicional de actividad física moderada (RM= 0.91; IC95% 0.85-0.97; en mujeres premenopáusicas, la disminución del riesgo no tuvo significancia estadística (RM= 0.99; IC95% 0.94-1.05 (p= 0.048, modificación de efecto. CONCLUSIONES: La actividad física reduce el riesgo de CM en mujeres mexicanas posmenopáusicas.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of moderate physical activity (hours per week and METs hours per week on the risk of breast cancer (BC in Mexican women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is the initial stage of a case control multicentric study based in the Federal District, Monterrey and Veracruz, Mexico, during 2004. Fifty eight cases paired to 58 control cases on quinquennium of age, and belonging to the health system were analyzed: three hospitals from the IMSS, three from ISSSTE and three from SS participated. RESULTS: In postmenopausal women, there was a reduction of the risk in BC by every additional hour per week of moderate physical activity (RM= 0.91; IC95% 0.85-0.97; in premenopausal women, the reduction of the risk was not statistically significant (RM= 0.99; IC95% 0.94-1.05 (p= 0.048, effect modification. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate physical activity reduces the risk of BC in

  2. Self-Knowledge and Identity in a Mexican American Counseling Course: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.; Lane, Ileana; Lerma, Eunice; Holin, Lyle, II

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of Mexican American graduate students who completed a course on Mexican American counseling and mental health. The experiences of Mexican American students taking a mental health course that focuses on their own ethnic group has not been previously discussed in the literature. Given the history of…

  3. An educational strategy for improving knowledge about breast and cervical cancer prevention among Mexican middle school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón- Garcidueñas

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The learning in preventive measures is important to sensitize individuals to prevention campaigns against cancer. This strategy proved to improve the level of knowledge of students in an easy and affordable way.

  4. Development and Psychometric Assessment of the Measure of Globalization Influence on Health Risk (MGIHR) Among Mexican Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Carvajal, Scott C; Robles-Garcia, Rebeca; Agraz, Francisco Páez; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique; Martinez, Maria Elena

    2015-08-01

    Lacking in the literature are data addressing the extent to which changes in reproductive and lifestyle factors predispose women in developing nations to higher breast cancer rates, and the degree to which these are due to globalization influences. This article describes the development and psychometric assessment of an instrument intended to measure global, predominantly U.S., influences on breast cancer risk profile among women residing in Mexico. Using investigator consensus and a focus group methodology, the Measure of Globalization Influence on Health Risk (MGIHR) was developed and completed by 341 women. Psychometric analysis support the use of an 11-item Consumerism and Modernity scale and 7-item Reproductive Control and Gender Role scale. The MGIHR is a valid and reliable instrument for understanding changing lifestyle and reproductive factors for breast cancer risk and may provide a more complete understanding of breast cancer development and needed interventions. PMID:24859806

  5. Inquiries of discomfort: Cancer experiences in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2011-01-01

    research regarding young adults with cancer. They stress the need for more specific research, clinically and politically appropriate services to this group of cancer patients. Thanks to technology, young people living with cancer, now have an opportunity to actively participate in providing information......Abstract Young adults with cancer are regarded as an emerging field for research. Because of the particular life phase they are in they are particularly vulnerable, as they are often both marginalised and individualised and their experiences are seldom described due to their small numbers. By using...... an on-line free association narrative inquiry and an experimental writing format, the purpose of this paper is to explore the subjective perspective of what it means to be a young adult living with cancer, and to discuss whether this approach contributes something new to the emerging field. Seven...

  6. Survival of breast cancer patients. Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrazzoa, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Casà, Luigi; Catalano, Filippo; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Noto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with breast carcinoma has changed in Europe over the last two decades. In Italy, the overall survival rate is about 77% at 5 years. When considering the situation in Sicily, the EUROCARE 2 study examined survival data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry, showing that the curves are worse than in other regions of Italy. Starting from these considerations we decide to evaluate whether these data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry corresponded to Palermo data. So we analysed data from 575 consecutive patients with breast cancer, treated in our Breast Unit from 1990 to 2003 according to the St. Gallen Recommendations and followed for a median period of 5 years. The prognostic role of age, tumour size, nodal status, TNM, stage, grading and hormonal receptors (OR, PR) were analysed and survival curves at 5 and 10 years were produced using the actuarial survival methods. All causes of death were considered. The median follow-up was 33 months. The Log rank test and univariate cox proportional model were used to demonstrate the association between prognostic factors and outcome. When considering T and N status, the curves showed an inverse correlation between survival and increases in these parameters. Overall survival was 92.9% at 5 years and 81.4% at 10 years for T1, 78.4% at 5 years and 61.4% at 10 years for T2 and 40.8% for T3-T4 at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival for NO was 92.1% and 78.2%, respectively, at 5 and 10 years, but decreased to 72.0% and 59.9% at 5 and 10 years for N1. In N2 patients we found that only about 50% of patients were still alive at 5 and 10 years, while for N3 patients the figures were 57.2% and 40%, respectively. PMID:17663369

  7. Breast Cancer Survivors’ Experiences of Lymphedema-Related Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Mei Rosemary; Rosedale, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe breast cancer survivors’ lymphedema-related symptom experiences. As a serious chronic condition from breast cancer treatment, lymphedema, or persistent swelling, is caused by chronic accumulation of lymph fluid in the interstitial spaces of the affected limb or surrounding areas. While significant prevalence of ongoing multiple symptoms have been reported, little is known about how survivors with lymphedema perceive and respond to lymphede...

  8. Freud's Mexican readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    This essay presents an overview of artists and writers who read Freud's work in Mexico between 1920 and 1968. The focus is on cultural readings of Freud: non-clinical interpretations of psychoanalysis that applied Freud's theory to literary, artistic, philosophical, or religious questions. The essay focuses on Salvador Novo, one of the poets associated with the Contemporáneos group, and his reading of the "Three Essays in the Theory of Sexuality;" Raúl Carrancá y Trujillo, a judge and criminologist who used psychoanalysis in his work, including the trial of Trotky's assassin; Octavio Paz, a poet and intellectual who wrote an essay on Mexican history, "The Labyrinth of Solitude," as a response to "Moses and Monotheism;" and Gregorio Lemercier, a Benedictine monk who placed his monastery in group analysis. These unorthodox readings of Freud opened the door for some of the most daring intellectual experiments in the 20th century.

  9. Freud's Mexican readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    This essay presents an overview of artists and writers who read Freud's work in Mexico between 1920 and 1968. The focus is on cultural readings of Freud: non-clinical interpretations of psychoanalysis that applied Freud's theory to literary, artistic, philosophical, or religious questions. The essay focuses on Salvador Novo, one of the poets associated with the Contemporáneos group, and his reading of the "Three Essays in the Theory of Sexuality;" Raúl Carrancá y Trujillo, a judge and criminologist who used psychoanalysis in his work, including the trial of Trotky's assassin; Octavio Paz, a poet and intellectual who wrote an essay on Mexican history, "The Labyrinth of Solitude," as a response to "Moses and Monotheism;" and Gregorio Lemercier, a Benedictine monk who placed his monastery in group analysis. These unorthodox readings of Freud opened the door for some of the most daring intellectual experiments in the 20th century. PMID:21970025

  10. The Mexican Energy Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Mitja; Rosenørn Engel, Line; Rasmussen, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    With the newly enacted energy reform, the Mexican Government introduced a variety of neoliberal measures to increase sectorial productivity. The debate within Mexico has centred on whether or not the liberalisation of the energy sector will benefit the Mexican economy. Based on a paradox of conflicting demands of securing economic development by state control or open market policies, this project analysis how Mexico attempts to balance these demands by the means of the Mexican energy reform. ...

  11. An educational strategy for improving knowledge about breast and cervical cancer prevention among Mexican middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón- Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Flores-Peña, Yolanda; De León-Leal, Silvia; Vázquez-Martínez, Carlos Alberto; Farías-Calderón, Ana Gabriela; Melo-Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Elizondo-Zapién, Rosa María; Hernandez-Hernandez, Dulce María; Garza-Moya, Rubén; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo Martín

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prevention programs have not achieved the expected results in preventing mortality from breast and cervical cancer in Mexico. Therefore, we propose a complementary strategy. Methodology An educational strategy for high school students in Mexico (2011–2013) was designed (longitudinal design, two measurements and a single intervention). The postintervention assessment included: 1) knowledge acquired by students about cancer prevention and 2) The performance of the student as a health promoter in their household. The strategy was based on analysis of cases and developed in three sessions. An assessment tool was designed and validated (Test–Retest). The levels of knowledge according to the qualifications expected by chance were determined. Wilcoxon test compared results before and after intervention. Results An assessment instrument with 0.80 reliability was obtained. 831 high school students were analyzed. Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed a significant learning after the intervention (Z = − 2.64, p = 0.008) with improvement of levels of knowledge in a 154.5%. 49% of students had a good performance as health promoters. Conclusions The learning in preventive measures is important to sensitize individuals to prevention campaigns against cancer. This strategy proved to improve the level of knowledge of students in an easy and affordable way. PMID:26844079

  12. Gastrointestinal Tumor Board: An Evolving Experience in Tehran Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI cancers are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in Iran, with stomach adenocarcinoma as the most common cancer in men and the second common cancer in women. Also, some parts of Northern Iran have one of the highest incidences of esophageal cancer in the world. Multi-disciplinary organ-based joint clinics and tumor boards are a well-recognized necessity for modern treatment of cancer and are routinely utilized in developed countries, especially in major academic centres. But this concept is relatively new in developing countries, where cancer treatment centres are burdened by huge loads of patients and have to cope with a suboptimum availability of resources and facilities. Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences is the oldest and the only comprehensive cancer treatment centre in Iran, with a long tradition of a general tumor board for all cancers. But with the requirements of modern oncology, there has been a very welcome attention to sub-specialized organ-based tumor boards and joint clinics here in the past few years. Considering this, we started a multi-disciplinary tumor board for GI cancers in our institute in early 2010 as the first such endeavor here. We hereby review this 2-year evolving experience. The process of establishment of a GI tumor board, participations from different oncology disciplines and related specialties, the cancers presented and discussed in the 2 years of this tumor board, the general intents of treatment for the decisions made and the development of interest in this tumor board among the Tehran oncology community will be reviewed. The GI tumor board of Tehran Cancer Institute started its work in January 2010, with routine weekly sessions. A core group of 2 physicians from each surgical, radiation and medical oncology departments plus one gastroenterologist, GI pathologist and radiologist was formed, but participation from all interested physicians was encouraged. An

  13. Racial and Ethnic Socialization in Later Generations of a Mexican American Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Reyes, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Later-generation Mexican American (third or more) experience diminishing educational gains compared with second-generation Mexican Americans. Positive racial and ethnic socialization (RES) and ethnic identity can facilitate strong academic performance. Using the oral histories of 18 third- and fourth-generation Mexican Americans in the same…

  14. Lessons Learned: Exploring Past Cultural Experiences of the Chicano/Mexican American Ambience To Strengthen Contemporary Multicultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Manual

    2000-01-01

    Explored the use of phenomenology research to explore lessons learned and their potential for inclusion in multicultural education, focusing on the Chicano/Mexicano experience as farmworkers in northern Colorado. Interview data indicated that respondents maintained a high context and connection with their primary culture. Phenomenology provided an…

  15. The Lived Experience of Iranian Women Confronting Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmat Mehrabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The populations who survive from breast cancer are growing; nevertheless, they mostly encounter with many cancer related problems in their life, especially after early diagnosis and have to deal with these problems. Except for the disease entity, several socio-cultural factors may affect confronting this challenge among patients and the way they deal with. Present study was carried out to prepare clear understanding of Iranian women's lived experiences confronting breast cancer diagnosis and coping ways they applied to deal with it. Methods: This study was carried out by using qualitative phenomenological design. Data gathering was done through purposive sampling using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 women who survived from breast cancer. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using Van Manen’s thematic analysis approach. Results: Two main themes were emerged from the interviews including "emotional turbulence" and "threat control". The first, comprised three sub themes including uncertainty, perceived worries, and living with fears. The second included risk control, recurrence control, immediate seeking help, seeking support and resource to spirituality. Conclusion: Emotional response was the immediate reflection to cancer diagnosis. However, during post-treatment period a variety of emotions were not uncommon findings, patients' perceptions have been changing along the time and problem-focused coping strategies have replaced. Although women may experience a degree of improvement and adjustment with illness, the emotional problems are not necessarily resolved, they may continue and gradually engender positive outcomes.

  16. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Provost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the impact of patients’ experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada. Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n=307, 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06–1.46, as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p=0.05, while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p<0.01.  Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients’ perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care.

  17. Deconstructive humour: subverting Mexican and Chicano stereotypes in ‘Un Día Sin Mexicanos’

    OpenAIRE

    Barrow, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    a long time, US cinema developed unshakeable stereotypes of Mexican ‘otherness’, with characters of Mexican cultural and ethnic heritage stigmatised as criminals or as sensual objects of desire. Filmmakers in Mexico, meanwhile, treated Mexican Americans as misfits who belonged nowhere, or ignored them and their complex experience completely. The emergence of a distinct ‘Chicano cinema’ in the 1960s allowed for the development of a more powerful set of images of Mexican Americans, exploiting t...

  18. Mexican Immigrant Families Crossing the Education Border: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata-Potter, Sandra Ixa; de Guzman, Maria Rosario T.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examines Mexican immigrant parents' experiences of helping their children navigate and succeed in school and their perceptions regarding differences between the U.S. and Mexican educational systems. Findings highlight parents' challenges in helping their children succeed in a new and unfamiliar school system and the…

  19. Promoting Reading among Mexican American Children. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Yvonne I.; Velazquez, Jose

    Good books can help children develop pride in their ethnic identity, knowledge about cultural history and positive role models, and improved self-esteem. However, Mexican American students often do not experience literature in this way. This digest briefly reviews Mexican American children's literature, recommends classroom strategies, provides…

  20. METABOLIC SYNDROME RISK ACROSS WEIGHT STATUS IN MEXICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexican Americans experience some of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in this country. With the rising rates of obesity in Mexican American children, these children are also at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially when diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. There is not, however, standard ...

  1. Psychosocially Influenced Cancer: Diverse Early-Life Stress Experiences and Links to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Linda A.; Auger, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    This perspective on Boyd et al. (beginning on page XXX in this issue of the journal) discusses recent published research examining the interplay between social stress and breast cancer. Cross-disciplinary studies using genetically defined mouse models and established neonatal and peripubertal paradigms of social stress are illuminating biological programming by diverse early-life experiences for the risk of breast cancer. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this programming can lead to id...

  2. Cultural Vignette: Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mary Ellen; And Others

    Developed as part of a multicultural research project in the San Diego Community College District, this booklet presents the findings of a 10-member research team about various elements of Mexican-American culture. The areas covered are: (1) historical background on the Mexican heritage of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present…

  3. Variations of the raw international prices and their incidence in the Mexican and Brazilian economy: Two experiences for Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author makes reference to Brazil like one of the countries more developed in the handling of energy politicians from Latin America and particularly in the oil sector, they have worried to look for energy alternatives that allow them to make him front every better time to the continuous technological, chemical and electronic inventions. The developed countries have not ceased in the search of better energy substitutes to be able to face every better time, these changes. What surprises is the oil experience of Brazil, compared with the other developing countries, being also in the industrial environment, the more developed and diversified country The author stands out several oil politicians carried out in Brazil and his possible installation in Colombia

  4. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere.

  5. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. PMID:25922881

  6. The Mexican oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the environment of growing domestic demand and enhanced international competitiveness, Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX)-the Mexican national oil company-faces the challenge of not only responding adequately to the rapid changes taking place in the Mexican economy, but making a significant contribution towards solid and stable growth. This paper reports that the relevant concern is how PEMEX is going to live up to these expectations. The Mexican oil industry, especially including the petrochemical sector, has great potential in terms of an ample domestic market as well as external foreign-currency-generating markets

  7. Breast cancer patients' narratives about positive and negative communication experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Dorthe K; Pedersen, Anette F; Johansen, Mikael B;

    2007-01-01

    Health staff-patient communication is increasingly considered an important issue in cancer research. However, questionnaires addressing satisfaction with communication limit the issues patients can raise, do not address the context of communication and often show a strong positive skew in responses...... research while at the same time being sensitive to new elaborations and categories. The participants reported both positive and negative communication-related experiences from a wide range of treatment situations. Two major themes emerged: Information giving as professional care-giving and meeting...

  8. Prostate cancer treated with HIFU: A 10-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Curiel, Laura; Gelet, Albert

    2001-05-01

    Objectives: To evaluate our overall experience in HIFU in the prostate cancer application, for its two main indications: as a primary care and as a salvage therapy after radiation. Material and method: Group 1: patients treated with HIFU as primary care for localized prostate cancer, with a baseline PSA level lower than 30 ng/ml, and with at least 1 year of follow-up were included in this analysis. Group 2: patients with a local recurrence after radiation. They were all treated using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP S.A., France). Results: Group 1: n=242 patients. The mean nadir PSA was 0.63 sd 1.30 ng/ml, and further follow-up evidenced a 81% negative biopsy rate. These results are influenced by the usual prognostic factors (clinical stage, baseline PSA, Gleason score), and, as for the other treatment option, the nadir allows prediction of the patient outcome. Group 2: n=71 patients. After HIFU treatment, 80% of the patients presented negative biopsies, and 61% had a nadir PSA level lower than 0.5 ng/ml, obtained within 3 months. No rectal injury occurred since the use of specific parameters. Conclusion: Transrectal HIFU is a valuable option for prostate cancer, for primary care as well as for salvage therapy.

  9. Surviving breast cancer: women's experiences with their changed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M; Burke, Shaunna

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we explored women's experiences with their bodies following treatment for breast cancer. Eleven women who had been treated for the disease (M(time since treatment)=4.45 years) were interviewed. Data were collected and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith et al., 2009). Four main themes emerged from the data: changing visibly and invisibly; experiencing intense thoughts and emotions; meaning of the body: a vehicle of health, well-being, and social expression; and managing and dealing with physical changes. Overall, the women experienced various physical changes that shaped, mostly in a negative way, their perceptions, thoughts, attitudes, feelings, and beliefs about their bodies. The women described attempts to make positive lifestyle behavior choices (e.g., diet, participate in physical activity), and used other strategies (e.g., wigs, make-up, clothes) to manage their appearances and restore positive body-related experiences. Based on these findings, it is important to be cognizant of women's body image concerns following breast cancer given the poignant and lasting effects they can have on their psychosocial and emotional well-being.

  10. The Wealth of Mexican Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.; Hildebrand, Vincent A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sources of disparities in the relative wealth position of Mexican Americans. Results reveal that--unlike the racial wealth gap--Mexican Americans' wealth disadvantage is in large part not the result of differences in wealth distributions conditional on the underlying determinants of wealth. Rather, Mexican Americans' wealth…

  11. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    cells and peptide pulsed DCs. The principle behind combining NK cells and CTLs is a dual advantage approach combining the innate immune system and adaptive immune system wherein the CTLs will kill the MHC expressing cancer cells while NK cells will kill the MHC non-expressing cancer cells also. [10] In case of NK cells and DCs, DCs will in turn activate the CTLs thereby giving rise to the dual advantage mentioned above. We have recently suggested that the AIET using expanded NK cells, particularly in combination with monoclonal antibody drugs, may be very useful tool for cancer immunotherapy. [14] Our experience: In our studies in NOG SCID mice, activated NK cells were shown to reduce the size of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231 [15] and the volume of ascites also inhibiting lung metastasis of pleural effusion lymphoma (PEL cells. [16] In a primary lung adenocarcinoma patient where AIET was administered in combination with Hyperthermia, the CEA values decreased from 4.8 ng/ml to 1.6 ng/ml, the SLX decreased from 30 U/ml to 27 U/ml, the IAP reduced from 300 μg/ml to 221 μg/ml along with resolution of the lung lesions in four months. A 55 year old woman treated for invasive ductal carcinoma of breast presented with metastasis to the lungs. She was then treated with trastuzumab in combination with multiple injections of activated natural killer (NK cells (at two week intervals following which the tumor markers decreased. Progression free survival was 10 months. [11] Fifty-two patients with advanced cancers in organs like lung, breast, colon, prostate, liver, kidney, ovary etc, refractory to conventional therapy when treated with a combination of hyperthermia and NK cell-and CTL-based immune cell therapy with low-dose chemotherapy, in 18 of 52 patients, objective responses was observed including one complete response (CR and 17 partial responses (PR evaluated according to the to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST guidelines. Sixteen patients had stable

  12. [Mexican] Private-sector petroleum companies and agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the Mexican petroleum sector. The sector is largely controlled by the state company PEMEX and is not completely open to foreign participation and supply, however the trend towards privatization and open competition, combined with the drive for competitiveness of PEMEX operations in particular, is creating market opportunities for foreign suppliers of petroleum equipment and services. Detailed profiles are provided of 50 Mexican companies and their primary products and services, specific areas of expertise, client base, international experience, interest in Canada, other relevant information, and a contact person. A less detailed list is also provided of additional Mexican contacts, petroleum industry associations and chambers of commerce

  13. Palliative low dose fortnightly methotrexate in oral cancers: Experience at a rural cancer centre from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santam Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Palliative fortnightly chemotherapy in oral cancers. Aims: We present our experience with a regimen employing fortnightly (once in 2 weeks injectable methotrexate (MTX (40 mg/m 2 in a predominantly elderly cohort of patients with carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx. Settings and Design: Retrospective chart review conducted at a rural cancer center in India. Materials and Methods: All patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers started on treatment with fortnightly injectable MTX (40 mg/m 2 between 01/01/2011 and 31/12/2011. Statistical Analysis Used: The factors analyzed included the duration of disease control, pain control, overall survival and progression free survival which were evaluated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: A total of 60 patients with a median age of 66.5 years were analyzed. Majority of the patients had poor nutritional status, performance status or co-morbidities. MTX was given for recurrent disease in 19 patients and after initial palliative radiotherapy in 41 patients. The median number of cycles delivered was nine. Grade 3/4 toxicities were seen in 2 patients only. Disease control rate at the end of treatment was seen in 33 (55% patients. Median overall survival was 34 weeks (interquartile range: 17-50 weeks. Conclusions: The fortnightly regimen of MTX was well-tolerated and showed a good clinical activity in this elderly cohort of patients with advanced oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers.

  14. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3–88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4–6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  16. 26 Feburary 2013 - Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs J. A. Meade Kuribreña welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer at LHC Point 2, signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, visiting the ALICE experiment and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli; Alice

    2013-01-01

    26 Feburary 2013 - Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs J. A. Meade Kuribreña welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer at LHC Point 2, signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, visiting the ALICE experiment and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  17. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. ...

  18. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. Main outcome measure...

  19. What's Values Got to Do with It? Thriving among Mexican/Mexican American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L.; Llamas, Jasmín; Consoli, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined traditional Mexican/Mexican American and perceived U.S. mainstream cultural values as predictors of thriving. One hundred twenty-four (37 men, 87 women) self-identified Mexican/Mexican American college students participated in the study. The traditional Mexican/Mexican American cultural values of family support and religion…

  20. Fostering Growth in the Survivorship Experience: Investigating Breast Cancer Survivors' Lived Experiences Scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a Posttraumatic Growth Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Shaunna M.; Sabiston, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use an ethnographic case study approach to explore breast cancer survivors' experiences scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a posttraumatic growth perspective. Three breast cancer survivors who participated in interviews and observations during a nine-day climb on the mountain were included in this study. Findings are…

  1. Mexican Folkart for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Graciela; And Others

    Directions, suggested materials, and illustrations are given for making paper mache pinatas and masks, cascarones, Ojos de Dios, maracas, dresser scarf embroidery, burlap murals, yarn designs, paper plate trays, paper cut designs, the poppy, sarape aprons, and paper Mexican dolls. Filled with candy and broken, the pinata is used on most Mexican…

  2. Proposal for a Group Counseling Experience for Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linda S.

    A model for using group counseling with cancer patients is proposed in this document. The literature on the psychological effects of cancer and the effects of social support are summarized. It is concluded that the literature shows cancer patients are subjected to intense psychological distress and that at the same time their social supports may…

  3. Approximating Mexican highways with slime mould

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Chapa-Vergara, Sergio V; Asomoza-Palacio, Rene; Stephens, Christopher R

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is a single cell visible by unaided eye. During its foraging behavior the cell spans spatially distributed sources of nutrients with a protoplasmic network. Geometrical structure of the protoplasmic networks allows the plasmodium to optimize transport of nutrients between remote parts of its body. Assuming major Mexican cities are sources of nutrients how much structure of Physarum protoplasmic network correspond to structure of Mexican Federal highway network? To find an answer undertook a series of laboratory experiments with living Physarum polycephalum. We represent geographical locations of major cities by oat flakes, place a piece of plasmodium in Mexico city area, record the plasmodium's foraging behavior and extract topology of nutrient transport networks. Results of our experiments show that the protoplasmic network formed by Physarum is isomorphic, subject to limitations imposed, to a network of principle highways. Ideas and results of the paper may contribute tow...

  4. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    Cancer, the major killer disease of the century requires a multi-pronged approach and among the latest modalities of treatments, Immunotherapy occupies a promising role. Immunotherapy for cancer was first started to be practised in the NIH and cell based immunotherapy for cancer is in practice for the past three decades. [1, 2] There are several literatures from various countries on the successful application of cell based Immunotherapies for various solid tumours and haematological malignanc...

  5. An unintended experiment in fisheries science: a marine area protected by war results in Mexican waves in fish numbers-at-age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Doug; Hölker, Franz; Engelhard, Georg H.; McKenzie, Eddie; Reid, David G.

    2010-09-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are attaining increasing importance in the management of marine ecosystems. They are effective for conservation in tropical and subtropical areas (mainly coral and rocky reefs), but it is debated whether they are useful in the management of migratory fish stocks in open temperate regions. World War II created a large marine area within which commercial fishing was prevented for 6 years. Here we analyse scientific trawl data for three important North Sea gadoids, collected between 1928 and 1958. Using statistical models to summarise the data, we demonstrate the potential of MPAs for expediting the recovery of over-exploited fisheries in open temperate regions. Our age-structured data and population models suggest that wild fish stocks will respond rapidly and positively to reductions in harvesting rates and that the numbers of older fish in a population will react before, and in much greater proportion, than their younger counterparts in a kind of Mexican wave. Our analyses demonstrate both the overall increase in survival due to the lack of harvesting in the War and the form of the age-dependent wave in numbers. We conclude that large closed areas can be very useful in the conservation of migratory species from temperate areas and that older fish benefit fastest and in greater proportion. Importantly, any rise in spawning stock biomass may also not immediately result in better recruitment, which can respond more slowly and hence take longer to contribute to higher future harvestable biomass levels.

  6. An unintended experiment in fisheries science: a marine area protected by war results in Mexican waves in fish numbers-at-age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Doug; Hölker, Franz; Engelhard, Georg H; McKenzie, Eddie; Reid, David G

    2010-09-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are attaining increasing importance in the management of marine ecosystems. They are effective for conservation in tropical and subtropical areas (mainly coral and rocky reefs), but it is debated whether they are useful in the management of migratory fish stocks in open temperate regions. World War II created a large marine area within which commercial fishing was prevented for 6 years. Here we analyse scientific trawl data for three important North Sea gadoids, collected between 1928 and 1958. Using statistical models to summarise the data, we demonstrate the potential of MPAs for expediting the recovery of over-exploited fisheries in open temperate regions. Our age-structured data and population models suggest that wild fish stocks will respond rapidly and positively to reductions in harvesting rates and that the numbers of older fish in a population will react before, and in much greater proportion, than their younger counterparts in a kind of Mexican wave. Our analyses demonstrate both the overall increase in survival due to the lack of harvesting in the War and the form of the age-dependent wave in numbers. We conclude that large closed areas can be very useful in the conservation of migratory species from temperate areas and that older fish benefit fastest and in greater proportion. Importantly, any rise in spawning stock biomass may also not immediately result in better recruitment, which can respond more slowly and hence take longer to contribute to higher future harvestable biomass levels.

  7. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  8. Counsellee's experience of cancer genetic counselling with pedigrees that automatically incorporate genealogical and cancer database information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Skirton, Heather; Jonsson, Jon J

    2016-07-01

    While pedigree drawing software is often utilised in genetic services, the use of genealogical databases in genetic counselling is unusual. This is mainly because of the unavailability of such databases in most countries. Electronically generated pedigrees used for cancer genetic counselling in Iceland create pedigrees that automatically incorporate information from a large, comprehensive genealogy database and nation-wide cancer registry. The aim of this descriptive qualitative study was to explore counsellees' experiences of genetic services, including family history taking, using these electronically generated pedigrees. Four online focus groups with 19 participants were formed, using an asynchronous posting method. Participants were encouraged to discuss their responses to questions posted on the website by the researcher. The main themes arising were motivation, information and trust, impact of testing and emotional responses. Most of the participants expressed trust in the method of using electronically generated pedigrees, although some voiced worries about information safety. Many experienced worry and anxiety while waiting for results of genetic testing, but limited survival guilt was noted. Family communication was either unchanged or improved following genetic counselling. The use of electronically generated pedigrees was well received by participants, and they trusted the information obtained via the databases. Age did not seem to influence responses. These results may be indicative of the particular culture in Iceland, where genealogical information is well known and freely shared. Further studies are needed to determine whether use of similar approaches to genealogical information gathering may be acceptable elsewhere. PMID:27372834

  9. Treatment of localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy: six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a biochemical relapse. One of them was submitted to a recovery radical prostatectomy and another one has a full androgenic block. The remaining five patients were not submitted to any further treatment to the date. No prostate RTU was required for any patient. Complications were disurya 27%, rectal disorder 27% and acute urine retention 5%. 58% of the patients did not manifest any complication. 98% of the patients claim to have an acceptable quality of life. Conclusion: According to our experience, we can assert that prostate brachytherapy is efficient for localized prostate cancer. The proper selection of patients allows the obtaining of good oncological results. Complications appeared in a low percentage and no case was serious. The quality of life of the patients after the implant is excellent. (author)

  10. European cervical cancer screening:experiences and results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Europe has devoted great efforts to cervical cancer screening over 30 years.The mortality was generally declining although incidence rates of cervical cancer among young women have been increasing in many countries of Europe.The efficiency of screening,however,needs to be addressed by planners for an improved cost-effectiveness in the future.

  11. Sperm cryopreservation before cancer treatment: a 15-year monocentric experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizet, P; Saias-Magnan, J; Jouve, E; Grillo, J M; Karsenty, G; Metzler-Guillemain, C; Perrin, J

    2012-03-01

    Sperm banking is an important procedure to preserve fertility before cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to comprehensively analyse cryopreservation activity retrospectively for 1080 patients referred to the sperm bank for sperm cryopreservation before cancer treatment. This study included 1007 patients diagnosed with testicular cancer (TC) (41.7%), lymphoma (26%), other haematological cancers (9.4%) or other types of cancer (22.8%); of these, 29 patients did not produce any semen sample and cryopreservation was impossible for 67 patients. Semen characteristics before treatment were within normal ranges, except moderate asthenospermia. Sperm concentration was significantly lower in TC than in non-TC. Straws from 57 patients (6.3%) were used in assisted reproductive technologies, which led to a 46.8% cumulative birth rate. Straws were destroyed for 170 patients (18.7%) and 140 patients performed semen analyses after cancer therapy. After an average delay of 22.5 months after the end of therapy, 43 patients (30.7%) exhibited azoospermia. This study of a large population of cancer patients revealed a high level of successful sperm storage. Utilization of cryopreserved spermatozoa led to good chances of fatherhood. Nevertheless, sperm banks should be aware of the low rates of straw use and straw destruction by cancer patients.

  12. Qualitative analysis of cancer patients' experiences using donated human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rough, Susanne M; Sakamoto, Pauline; Fee, Caroline H; Hollenbeck, Clarie B

    2009-05-01

    This represents the first published account from the patient's perspective of the use of human milk as cancer therapy. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 10 participants. Five were patients and 5 were family proxies. Individual interviews were conducted using confirmatory interviewing technique to obtain individual perspectives on the motivation for cancer patients to take donated human milk. Human milk therapy improved the quality of life (QOL) measures in the physical, psychological, and spiritual domains for most patients interviewed. The patients continued their use of human milk despite cost, taste, and discouragement from the conventional medical community. The study results support the theory that QOL may be more important to cancer patients than cancer outcomes and may improve patient medical care overall. These interviews offer information to cancer patients, their practitioners, and donor milk banks on outcomes and symptom relief from this therapy.

  13. The Originality of Chicano Literature: A Comparison with Contemporary Mexican Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Ted

    During the last 15 years, Chicano literature has not only repeated some of the topics of Mexican literature, but has added many more. Similar to Mexican literature, Chicano literature deals with: the pains, trials, and common experiences of childhood; the loss of religion, as traditional Catholicism confronts the changing needs and desires of the…

  14. Stories of Social Class: Self-Identified Mexican Male College Students Crack the Silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jana L.; Donovan, Jody; Guido-DiBrito, Florence

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the meaning of social class in the lives of five self-identified Mexican male college students. Participants shared the significant influence social class has on their college experience. Intersections of social class and students' Mexican identity are illuminated throughout the findings. Themes include: social class rules and…

  15. Mexican Origin Students in the Borderlands: The Construction of Social Identity in the School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Sosa, Leticia

    2011-01-01

    There has been continued concern over the continued high dropout rate among Mexican origin youth. The purpose of this study is to understand how everyday experiences in school shape the content and meaning of Mexican origin students' social identities and how those social identities influence their academic trajectories over the transition to…

  16. Impacts of Arizona's SB 1070 on Mexican American Students' Stress, School Attachment, and Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Richard; López, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of immigration legislation on Mexican ethnic students who are citizens of the United States is needed. This study investigates how passage of Arizona's antiimmigration law, SB 1070, in 2010 bears upon the schooling experiences of Mexican American high school students. Applying Meyer's Minority Stress Model as the…

  17. Mexican-Origin Parents’ Involvement in Adolescent Peer Relationships: A Pattern Analytic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.

    2007-01-01

    The cultural backgrounds and experiences of Mexican-origin mothers and fathers (including their Anglo and Mexican cultural orientations and their familism values) and their socioeconomic background (parental education, family income, neighborhood poverty rate) are linked to the nature of their involvement in adolescent peer relationships.

  18. Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) Meetings and Mexican American Parents: Let's Talk About It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Loretta

    2004-01-01

    This study explores the relation between Mexican American parents and the special education system, especially the Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) meetings. Within this narrative account, 10 Mexican American women were interviewed throughout a school year to comprehend how they felt about their experiences during IEP meetings concerning…

  19. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Abdelli, Omar; Buy, Xavier [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mathelin, Michel de [University of Strasbourg, Lsiit, Strasbourg (France); Jacqmin, Didier; Lang, Herve [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Urology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-08-15

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  1. Breast cancer survival experiences at a tertiary hospital in sub-Saharan Africa: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Galukande, Moses; Wabinga, Henry; Mirembe, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer of the breast is a major health burden and the most common cancer among women worldwide. Though its incidence is fourfold greater in high-income countries, in sharp contrast, mortality rates are greatest among the low-income countries. Early detection linked to appropriate treatment is the most effective strategy to improve survival. The purpose of this study therefore was to establish the survival experiences of women with breast cancer at a Ugandan hospital. Methods This s...

  2. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer: Experiences in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Haeng Lee; Jae J Kim

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been established as one of the treatment options for early gastric cancer (EGC). However, there are many uncertain areas such as indications of EMR, best treatment methods, management of complications and follow-up methods after the procedure. Most studies on this topic have been carried out by researchers in Japan. In Korea,gastric cancer is the most common malignant disease,and the second leading cause of cancer death. In these days, EMR for EGC is widely performed in many centers in Korea. In this review, we will provide an overview of the techniques and outcomes of EMR in Korea.

  3. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control Câncer de mama em mulheres mexicanas: estudo epidemiológico com controles de câncer cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Tovar-Guzmán

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.OBJETIVO: O câncer de mama (CM é uma das principais causas de morte por câncer em mulheres, no México, com aumento da incidência e da mortalidade nos últimos anos. O estudo realizado objetivou identificar possíveis fatores de risco

  4. Ring of Silence: African American Women's Experiences Related to Their Breasts and Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore women's memories and feelings concerning their breasts and breast cancer screening experiences in relation to their current breast cancer screening behaviors. Twelve African American women shared stories that were generated in written narratives and individual interviews. Two core themes emerged from the…

  5. Dr. Wu Liangcun's Experience in Treating Primary Liver Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Having been engaged in clinical treatment of tumors and cancers for more than 40 years, Dr. Wu Liangcun (吴良村),professor of Zhejiang Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has put forward a unique method for treatment of liver cancer. His academic thought is to nourish yin, clear away heat, soothe the liver and strengthen the spleen, and clinically, he has obtained good therapeutic results as introduced in the following.

  6. Treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: Experience from a tertiary Indian cancer center

    OpenAIRE

    Sirohi, B; S Dawood; S. Rastogi; Pandey, A.; Bal, M; N Shetty; Shrikhande, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to look at the outcome of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer treated at a tertiary cancer center in India. Patients And Methods: A total of 101 patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer diagnosed between May 2012 and July 2013 were identified from a prospectively maintained database at the tertiary cancer center. Overall survival (OS) was computed using the Kaplan–Meir product limit method and compared across groups using the...

  7. Conservative Surgery and Primary Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer; Yonsei Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Chang Ok; Lee, Hy De; Lee, Kyung Sik; Jung, Woo Hee; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    Breast conserving surgery and irradiation is now accepted as preferable treatment method for the patients with stage I and II breast cancer. Our institution activated team approach for breast conservation 1991 and treated on hundred and forty patients during the next three years. Purpose: To present our early experience with eligibility criteria, treatment techniques, and the morbidities of primary radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty four patients with early stage breast cancer who received breast conserving treatment between January 1991 and December 1992 were evaluated. All patients received partial mastectomy(wide excision to quadrantectomy) and axillary node dissection followed by radiotherapy. Total dose of 4500-5040 cGy in 5-5 1/2 weeks was given to entire involved breast and boost dose of 1000-2000 cGy in 1-2 weeks was given to the primary tumor site. Linac 4 MV X-ray was used for breast irradiation and electron beam was used for boost. Thirty five patients received chemotherapy before or after radiotherapy. Patients characteristics, treatment techniques, and treatment related morbidities were analyzed. Results: Age distribution was ranged from 23 to 59 year old with median age of 40. Twenty-seven patients had T1 lesions and 34 patients had T2 lesions. In three patients, pathologic diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ. Thirty-seven patients were N0 and 27 patients were N1. There were three recurrences, one in the breast and two distant metastases during follow-up period(6-30 months, median 14 months). Only one breast recurrence occurred at undetected separate lesion with microcalcifications on initial mammogram. There was no serious side reaction which interrupted treatment courses or severe late complication. Only one symptomatic radiation pneumonitis and one asymptomatic radiation peumonitis were noted. Conclusions: Conservative surgery and primary radiotherapy for early breast cancer in proven to be safe and comfortable treatment method without

  8. Adverse childhood experiences are associated with the risk of lung cancer: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Brown (David); R.F. Anda (Robert); V.J. Felitti (Vincent); V.J. Edwards (Valerie); A.M. Malarcher (Ann Marie); J.B. Croft (Janet); W.H. Giles (Wayne)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Strong relationships between exposure to childhood traumatic stressors and smoking behaviours inspire the question whether these adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer during adulthood. Methods. Baseline survey data on health

  9. Young women's experiences with complementary therapies during cancer described through illness blogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Albrecht, Tara A; Steeves, Richard H; Danhauer, Suzanne C

    2013-11-01

    Many young women with cancer have a high symptom burden and negative psychosocial consequences as a result of their disease. To offset some of these experiences, a growing number of young women with cancer are writing about their experience with complementary therapies through online illness blogs. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine descriptions of complementary therapy use among young women (diagnosed between 20 and 39 years of age) who maintained an online cancer blog. Women's narratives describe several themes of the experience of using complementary therapies including awakening, new identities (that incorporate loss), the good stuff, and release. Online illness blogs allow researchers to understand the complete experience of the patient through personal accounts and substantially contributes to the body of knowledge surrounding cancer in young adulthood and complementary therapy use.

  10. Determinants of caregiving experiences and mental health of partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Research regarding informal caregiving showed considerable individual variation in responses to cancer caregiving. The current longitudinal study examined determinants of caregiver outcomes in terms of caregiver experiences at 3 months and caregiver's mental health at 6 months after hosp

  11. CANCER PATIENT’S EXPERIENCE CROSSING THE HEALTH CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura G. Felea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive anthropology does not predict human behavior, but tries to access principles that rule behavior. Cross-cultural communication is a skill acquired through a learning process, and it can improve doctor-patient relationship and enhance the outcomes of care. The unfulfilled expectations of a patient may influence the patient self-esteem and his perceived role in the society. For some patients living with cancer, it was found as an unforeseen benefit of learning to be closer to God. Based on a narrative communication, we tried to underline cross-cultural differences in cancer patients from different countries with various backgrounds. We described the patient reactions, his way of interpreting the things that happened to him, and his actions regarding adaptive changes in behavior. The originality of the study resides in understanding cross-cultural patterns of cancer patients. The innovative element is the use of qualitative research and its application in health care.

  12. Whose power/authority/knowledge? Conundrums in the experiences of parents whose children have cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on data collected from two different studies of parents (76 mothers and 14 fathers) whose children had been diagnosed with cancer. Although the goal of the first study, to describe parental experiences when their children have cancer, was different than the goal of the second study, to describe the home health care work done by parents whose children had cancer, the themes outlined here were reiterated from study to study. In both sets of data conflicts in the dynamics of power, authority and knowledge were pivotal to the dilemmas experienced by parents in their interactions with health care staff both during the time of diagnosis and later during the treatments when their children had cancer. The paper points to the significance of fundamental social processes such as power, authority and knowledge in understanding and ameliorating parental experiences when a child has cancer.

  13. Effective Alu repeat based RT-Qpcr normalization in cancer cell perturbation experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rihani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measuring messenger RNA (mRNA levels using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is common practice in many laboratories. A specific set of mRNAs as internal control reference genes is considered as the preferred strategy to normalize RT-qPCR data. Proper selection of reference genes is a critical issue, especially in cancer cells that are subjected to different in vitro manipulations. These manipulations may result in dramatic alterations in gene expression levels, even of assumed reference genes. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of 11 commonly used reference genes as internal controls for normalization of 19 experiments that include neuroblastoma, T-ALL, melanoma, breast cancer, non small cell lung cancer (NSCL, acute myeloid leukemia (AML, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer cell lines subjected to various perturbations. RESULTS: The geNorm algorithm in the software package qbase+ was used to rank the candidate reference genes according to their expression stability. We observed that the stability of most of the candidate reference genes varies greatly in perturbation experiments. Expressed Alu repeats show relatively stable expression regardless of experimental condition. These Alu repeats are ranked among the best reference assays in all perturbation experiments and display acceptable average expression stability values (M<0.5. CONCLUSIONS: We propose the use of Alu repeats as a reference assay when performing cancer cell perturbation experiments.

  14. Integrative Cancer Care in a US Academic Cancer Centre: The Memorial Sloan–Kettering Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, G

    2008-01-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (cam) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many cam modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer “cures,” targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients...

  15. Implantable port thrombosis in cancer patients: a monocentric experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Manel; Mejri, Nesrine; Labidi, Soumaya; Afrit, Mehdi; Benna, Houda El; Miled, Khaoula Ben; Boussen, Hamouda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Implantable port thrombosis (IPT) in cancer patients is a relatively rare but severe complication. Several factors are reportedly associated with the occurrence of thrombosis. We aimed to describe the prevalence and the anatomoclinical features of IPT observed in cancer patients who were treated in a medical oncology department in Tunisia. Methods: A total of 600 cancer patients who had port implantation from January 2013 to December 2015 were retrospectively identified. Cases with symptomatic/incidental IPT (radiologically confirmed) were further identified. Epidemiological and anatomoclinical features were collected from patient records and the department database. Results: We observed that 33 of the 600 patients had IPT; thus, the prevalence was 5.5%. The median age was 57 years, and the gender ratio was 0.43. Overweight or obesity was observed in 73% of the patients. IPT occurred mainly in patients with breast (36.4%) and colorectal (33.3%) cancers, which were mostly nonmetastatic (79%). At least one identified classical thromboembolic risk factor was found in 13 patients (smoking in 9, tamoxifen in 2). IPT was symptomatic in 93% of the cases, occurring within an average time of 56 days. Implantable ports were removed because of infection in 2 cases and nonfunctionality in 3 cases. IPT treatment was based on low-molecular-weight heparins (94%) and antivitamin K (6%) for an average of 130 days. Four patients had post-therapy complications: one thrombosis recurrence and three infections. Conclusions: IPT cases in the 600 patients were observed to occur in obese nonmetastatic cancer patients within the first 3 months after IP implantation.

  16. Radio-guided surgery in vulvar cancer - first experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Lymphatic mapping is known to be useful in melanoma and breast cancer. The aim of our study is to evaluate the feasibility of the Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN) biopsy in patients with vulvar cancer. Material and Methods: We performed dynamic lymphoscintigraphy in 13 patients with evidence of early stage vulvar cancer one day before surgery. We injected intradermally 99mTc-labelled human colloides, Albu-Res, (on average 76 MBq, 0,4-0,6ml NaCl) at 4 locations round the tumor regarding the midline. The colloid was filtered before to obtain the small particle fraction between 200-450nm. The dynamic scintigraphy was performed immediately after injection (anterior view, 28 images, 1 minute per frame); static images were required 30 minutes and 2 hours p.i. (anterior and lateral views, 5 minutes per images). Additional the SLN were marked on the skin. After SLN identification by using a hand-held gamma probe a standard lymphadenectomy was done. The harvested lymph nodes were also measured after excision and referred to pathologist (for HE-staining and immunohistochemistry). Results: In 13/13 cases SLN were visualized (7/13 with lymph channels) on scintigraphy and in 11/13 cases the SLN (on average 3) detection by gamma probe was successful. Among these 13 patients we didn't found any false-negatives, 4/13 had lymph node metastasis in the SLN (3/4 only the SLN was positive and 1/4 SLN and other lymph nodes were positive). Conclusion: Lymphatic mapping in patients with vulvar cancer by using scintigraphy and gamma probe seems to be feasible to reduce the morbidity due to radical lymphadenectomy. 7/13 patients underwent a radical groin dissection without benefit for survival. However in 2/13 cases we could not detect the SLN by gamma probe, which should always result in a complete lymphadenectomy (learning curve). Larger studies are needed, we have to evaluate the accuracy of the selective SLN-biopsy in vulvar cancer. This method should be restricted to patients with early

  17. Real world experience with cancer genetic counseling via telephone

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphen, Rebecca; Davila, Barbara; Shappell, Heather; Holtje, Tricia; Vadaparampil, Susan; Friedman, Sue; Toscano, Michele; Armstrong, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    One barrier to genetic testing is the lack of access to genetic counselors. We provided cancer genetic counseling via telephone, through a pilot project for employees of a national health insurer, Aetna, Inc. Knowledge transfer, behavioral intentions, and patient satisfaction were assessed by survey after genetic counseling. Aetna sent an individual email to its employees nationwide notifying them of the availability of a new telephone genetic counseling and testing program and providing a li...

  18. Rapid Arc for heat and Neck cancer (200 patients experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Triana, G.; Gesto, C.; Diaz, I.; Candal, A.; Fernandez, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Poncet, M.; Silva, M. C.; Soto, M.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy is increasingly standard for head and neck cancer. These advances have resulted in longer treatment times when compared to 3D Conformal Radiotherapy. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy potentially enables shorter treatment time, achieving similar dose results. We report feasibility and acute toxicity profile of patients treated with moderate hypo fractionation and simultaneous integrated boost by means of Image Guided- Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy technique in the first two years from its clinical implementation at COG. (Author)

  19. The Struggles of Solidarity: Chicana/o-Mexican Networks, 1960s–1970s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nydia A. Martinez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, members of the Chicana/o Movement reached across class, borders, and ideologies to proclaim a political solidarity with the Mexican Left. Both, Chicana/os and Mexican activists expressed a narrative of political solidarity that encompassed a perceived shared experience of oppression and struggles for liberation. I contend, however, that both groups saw the source of their oppression and forms of resistance through different lenses. Chicana/o activists identified racism, discrimination, and cultural erasure with oppression, and they retrofit Mexican nationalism with political radicalism. In contrast, Mexican activists celebrated Marxist ideologies as radical political resistance against an increasing authoritarian government and associated Mexican nationalism with state repression and political manipulation.

  20. Risk factors of breast cancer in Mexican women Factores de riesco de cáncer de mama en mujeres mexicanas

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas; Franklin Uriel Parás-Barrientos; Lilia Cárdenas-Ibarra; Juan Francisco González-Guerrero; Enrique Villarreal-Ríos; Tamara Staines-Boone; Hugo A. Barrera-Saldaña

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between family history (FH) of neoplasia, gyneco-obstetric factors and breast cancer (BC) in a case--control study. In cases, to analyze those variables in relation with early onset of BC, the manner of detection (self-examination, prompted by pain, or casual), the size of tumor, and the elapsed time to seek medical attention. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from 151 prevalent BC cases and 235 age-matched controls were analyzed by multiple logistic regress...

  1. Eight-year experience in esophageal cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem. In Nepal, not much has been explored about its management. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective review of esophageal cancer patients undergoing surgery or combined modality treatment at a cancer hospital in Nepal. Materials and Methods: Resectable cases were treated primarily with surgery. Locally advanced cases with doubtful or obviously unresectability underwent preoperative chemo/radiation or chemoradiation followed by surgery. Results: Among 900 patients, 103 were treated with curative intent. Mean age of patients was 54 years, and 100% of the patients presented with complaint of dysphagia. Surgery as a single modality of treatment was done in 57% of cases, and the remaining underwent combined modality treatment. Transthoracic and transhiatal approaches were used in 95% and 5% of cases, respectively. Nodal sampling, two-field (2-FD, and three-field lymphadenectomy (3-FD were done in 18%, 59%, and 20% of cases, respectively. A majority of patients had pathological stage III disease (46.6%. In-hospitality mortality was 5%, and anastomotic leakage rate was 14%. In 87% of patients, R0 resection was achieved. Overall, 4-year survival was 20%. A R0 resection, early-stage disease and 3-FD favored the survival advantage (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The mortality, complication, and survival results were in the acceptable range. R0 resection and radical nodal dissection should be standard practice.

  2. Experience of ReCell in Skin Cancer Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Gilleard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ReCell system (Avita Medical is a cell culture product that allows the immediate processingof a small split-thickness skin biopsy to produce a complete population of cells includingkeratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and fibroblasts. This series is the first to highlightthe reconstructive applications of ReCell following ablative skin cancer surgery. The ReCell systemwas utilized for three patients following skin cancer excision. In two cases, the cells were appliedto forehead flap donor sites following nasal reconstruction. In one case, the cells were appliedto the calvarial periosteum following wide local excision of a melanoma scar. Assessment of thetreated area was performed using the patient and observer scar assessment scale after 1 year.The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS scores for the 2 patients treated withReCell following forehead flap surgery were 22 and 32. The score for the patient that underwentwide local excision of a melanoma scar was 45. The absence of a donor site, accelerated healingand the satisfactory aesthetic appearance of the mature scars in this series suggest that ReCellmay play a useful role in reconstruction following skin cancer excision.

  3. Developing a discrete choice experiment in Malawi: eliciting preferences for breast cancer early detection services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohler RE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Racquel E Kohler,1 Clara N Lee,2 Satish Gopal,3 Bryce B Reeve,1 Bryan J Weiner,1 Stephanie B Wheeler11Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3UNC Project-Malawi, Tidziwe Center, Lilongwe, MalawiBackground: In Malawi, routine breast cancer screening is not available and little is known about women’s preferences regarding early detection services. Discrete choice experiments are increasingly used to reveal preferences about new health services; however, selecting appropriate attributes that describe a new health service is imperative to ensure validity of the choice experiment.Objective: To identify important factors that are relevant to Malawian women’s preferences for breast cancer detection services and to select attributes and levels for a discrete choice experiment in a setting where both breast cancer early detection and choice experiments are rare.Methods: We reviewed the literature to establish an initial list of potential attributes and levels for a discrete choice experiment and conducted qualitative interviews with health workers and community women to explore relevant local factors affecting decisions to use cancer detection services. We tested the design through cognitive interviews and refined the levels, descriptions, and designs.Results: Themes that emerged from interviews provided critical information about breast cancer detection services, specifically, that breast cancer interventions should be integrated into other health services because asymptomatic screening may not be practical as an individual service. Based on participants’ responses, the final attributes of the choice experiment included travel time, health encounter, health worker type and sex, and breast cancer early detection strategy. Cognitive testing confirmed the acceptability of the final attributes

  4. Development and Pilot Evaluation of Native CREST – a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Christine A; Bauer, Mark C.; Horazdovsky, Bruce F.; Garrison, Edward R.; Patten, Christi A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates’ interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience & Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program provi...

  5. The Smell of Memories. A Mexican Migrant’s Search for Emotional Sustainability through Mexican Films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Coronado

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For more than 10 years living as a Mexican migrant, between two countries (Mexico and Australia, two cities (Mexico City and Sydney, and two social worlds (Mexican and multicultural Australian ‘families-friends’, I have been immersed in a systematic process of self observation and self reflection on my life in my country of destination. During this time I have explored my memories of place and their relationship with my emotional experiences, looking for strategies to continue to be connected with my country of origin and my people. In this process I discovered films were especially significant in sustaining me emotionally. I benefited from the memory associations triggered by representations of Mexico in films produced by Mexicans or by filmmakers from other nationalities. By reflecting on my responses to those films, in this paper I explore how representations of their country of origin can impact on migrants’ emotional life. Using autoethnography, examining my own subjectivity as a way to arrive at a deeper grasp of these processes, I analyse the roles played by different senses in the process of recollection and in the emotional effects produced, which come to embody the experience. My particular focus in this article is the sense of smell triggered by complex interactions within the sensorium while watching films, producing associations and feelings through which I re-live my memories and maintain my emotional sustainability.

  6. Mexican women seeking safe abortion services in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Daniel; Garcia, Sandra G; Kingston, Jessica; Schweikert, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Except for in Mexico City, abortion is legally restricted throughout Mexico, and unsafe abortion is prevalent. We surveyed 1,516 women seeking abortions in San Diego, California. Of these, 87 women (5.7%) self-identified as Mexican residents. We performed in-depth interviews with 17 of these women about their experiences seeking abortions in California. The Mexican women interviewed were generally well-educated and lived near the U.S.-Mexican border; most sought care in the United States due to mistrust of services in Mexico, and the desire to access mifepristone, a drug registered in the United States for early medical abortion. Several reported difficulties obtaining health care in Mexico or reentering the United States when they had postabortion complications. Several areas for improvement were identified, including outreach to clinics in Mexico. PMID:23066967

  7. Employment status and intimate partner violence among Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Carrillo, Elizabeth C; McWhirter, Paula T

    2015-04-01

    Exploring risk factors and profiles of intimate partner violence in other countries provides information about whether existing theories of this phenomenon hold consistent in different cultural settings. This study will present results of a regression analysis involving domestic violence among Mexican women (n = 83,159). Significant predictors of domestic violence among Mexican women included age, number of children in the household, income, education, self-esteem, family history of abuse, and controlling behavior of the husband. Women's employment status was not a significant predictor when all variables were included in the model; however, when controlling behavior of the husband was withdrawn from the model, women's employment status was a significant predictor of domestic violence toward women. Results from this research indicate that spousal controlling behavior may serve as a mediator of the predictive relationship between women's employment status and domestic violence among Mexican women. Findings provide support for continued exploration of the factors that mediate experiences of domestic violence among women worldwide.

  8. Mexican Space Weather Service (SCIESMEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; De la Luz, V.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez, L. X.

    2015-12-01

    Recent modifications of the Civil Protection Law in Mexico include now specific mentions to space hazards and space weather phenomena. During the last few years, the UN has promoted international cooperation on Space Weather awareness, studies and monitoring. Internal and external conditions motivated the creation of a Space Weather Service in Mexico (SCIESMEX). The SCIESMEX (www.sciesmex.unam.mx) is operated by the Geophysics Institute at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The UNAM has the experience of operating several critical national services, including the National Seismological Service (SSN); besides that has a well established scientific group with expertise in space physics and solar- terrestrial phenomena. The SCIESMEX is also related with the recent creation of the Mexican Space Agency (AEM). The project combines a network of different ground instruments covering solar, interplanetary, geomagnetic, and ionospheric observations. The SCIESMEX has already in operation computing infrastructure running the web application, a virtual observatory and a high performance computing server to run numerical models. SCIESMEX participates in the International Space Environment Services (ISES) and in the Inter-progamme Coordination Team on Space Weather (ICTSW) of the Word Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  9. "Mexicans Now, Italians Then: Intermarriage Patterns"

    OpenAIRE

    Perlmann, Joel

    2003-01-01

    This working paper continues earlier efforts to compare the experiences of today's second-generation Mexican Americans with those of second-generation members of major immigrant groups of a century ago. Here the focus is on intermarriage. Contemporary data comes from 1998-2001 CPS data sets and historical data from the IPUMS data sets for 1920 and 1960. As in earlier papers, the precise definition of the relevant second-generation members is an important dimension of the work. In this paper t...

  10. The Realities of Middle School for Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollin, Gail G.

    2003-01-01

    Presents information about the middle school educational system in Mexico. Considers the implications for better meeting the needs of Mexican children in U.S. schools. Describes experiences and knowledge gained while the author taught a graduate workshop to American teachers in Guanajuato, Mexico. Places the information gained in the context of…

  11. Panorama epidemiológico de la mortalidad por cáncer en el Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 1991-1995 Epidemiologic panorama of cancer mortality in the Mexican Institute of Social Security: 1991-1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE SALMERÓN-CASTRO

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Describir el comportamiento de la mortalidad global por cáncer, así como la mortalidad específica para las principales neoplasias malignas en población adulta derechohabiente (DH del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS. Material y métodos. A partir de los registros oficiales de defunción y de la información sobre la población para los años 1991-1995, se estimaron las tasas anuales de mortalidad global y específica para las 10 principales neoplasias malignas por sexo, en mayores de 20 años. Asimismo, se estimaron las tendencias nacionales y estatales para las principales neoplasias malignas para cada sexo por medio de regresión de Poisson. Se calcularon las diferencias de tasas de mortalidad específica para las dos principales neoplasias por sexo restando las tasas estatales a su respectiva tasa nacional en 1995. Resultados. La mortalidad global por cáncer en los hombres se incrementó de 76.2 en 1991, a 94.8 por 100 000 DH en 1995; entre las mujeres, ésta se incrementó de 85.6 a 105.8 por 100 000 DH, representando un incremento de 24.4 y de 24% en hombres y mujeres, respectivamente, durante el periodo de estudio. Entre los hombres las neoplasias de riñón, leucemia, páncreas, próstata y pulmón; y entre mujeres las de colon, mama, páncreas, leucemias e hígado, mostraron los incrementos más significativos. Conclusiones. En el IMSS es impostergable la conformación de un registro poblacional de cáncer que permita una mejor vigilancia epidemiológica de las neoplasias y una evaluación permanente del impacto de programas específicos para la prevención y control de este padecimiento en las instituciones.Objective. This paper describes the global cancer mortality and the specific mortality patterns for the main neoplasms among adult members of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Material and methods. Using official death certificates and information about the population of the IMSS members during

  12. Ziconotide in severe, drug-resistant cancer pain. preliminary experience

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Lavano

    2008-01-01

    The Author reports the case of ziconotide intrathecal treatment in three terminal cancer patients, with nociceptive and neuropathic pain, unresponsive to the treatment with intrathecal opioid and adjuvant drugs. An external pump for continuous subarachnoid infusion was implanted to the three patients. The initial dose was 2,4 mcg/die, with increments of 1,2 mcg/die every three days till the maximum dose of 4,8 mcg/die in two patients (survival 61 and 45 days) and 7,2 mcg/die in a pat...

  13. EXPERIENCE WITH OCTREOTIDE IN PATIENTS WITH CASTRATION REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Ganov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen patients with castration refractory prostate cancer have been treated with sustained-release octreotide in combination with dexamethasone at the Altai Territory Oncology Dispensary since 2008. Control PSA test revealed that 9 (60 % patients had positive changes; tumor process stabilization was noted in 4 (26.7 % and only 2 (13.3 % were found to have disease progression. Thus, more than 86 % of patients responded to combination treatment with sustained-release octreotide + dexamethasone. Octreotide treatment caused no serious specific adverse toxic reactions.

  14. Experiences and perceived needs of children and teenagers with cancer and their families

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar González Carrión

    2005-01-01

    Purpose:- To know the experiencies and perceived needs of children and teenagers with cancer and their care givers regarding the received care and their oncological process. - To identify proposals for improving care.Methodology: A qualitative study based on individual semistructured interviews and focus interviews with children and teenagers diagnosed of cancer was designed. Results: Hospitalization, therapeutic and diagnose procedures, side effects and isolation when neutropenia, were ident...

  15. A discrete choice experiment of preferences for genetic counselling among Jewish women seeking cancer genetics services

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, S.; Apicella, C; Andrews, L; Tucker, K.; Bankier, A; Daly, M. B.; Hopper, J L

    2006-01-01

    To determine which aspects of breast cancer genetic counselling are important to Ashkenazi Jewish women, a discrete choice experiment was conducted. Participants consisted of 339 Australian Ashkenazi Jewish women who provided a blood sample for research used to test for Ashkenazi Jewish ancestral mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, and were offered their genetic test result through a cancer genetics service. Main outcome measures were women's preferences for, and trade-offs between, the g...

  16. The Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE): A Model for Training Underserved Scientists in Cancer Research

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Idalid; Bailey, LeeAnn O.; Bakos, Alexis D.; Springfield, Sanya A.

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring is a critical aspect of research and training; and the adoption of a successful mentoring model for guiding researchers through the educational pipeline is lacking. The Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) program was established in the Comprehensive Minority Biomedical Branch; which is part of the National Cancer Institute. This program offers unique training and career development opportunities to enhance diversity in cancer research. The CURE initiative focuses on b...

  17. Yoga in adult cancer: an exploratory, qualitative analysis of the patient experience

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, Marcy; Thorne, Sally; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients receiving treatment in conventional health care systems access therapeutic yoga outside their mainstream care to improve cancer symptoms. Given the current knowledge gap around patient preferences and documented experiences of yoga in adult cancer, this study aimed to describe patient-reported benefits, barriers and characteristics of programming for yoga practice during conventional treatment. Methods In depth semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were conducted in men...

  18. Teenagers losing a parent to cancer : experiences, modifiable risk-factors and long-term outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Bylund Grenklo, Tove

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated the experiences of cancer-bereaved teenagers. The goal was to identify potentially modifiable risk-factors for long-term psychological consequences and thus be able to guide health-care providers in ways to support bereaved-to-be teenagers. Subjects and Methods: A study-specific questionnaire was made based on semi-structured interviews with cancer-bereaved youths and tested for face-to-face validity. Through population-based registers, we identified cancer-bere...

  19. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  20. Laparoscopic hysterectomy in the treatment of endometrial cancer: NCI experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard treatment for women with endometrial cancer is total abdominal hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for surgical staging. Total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (TLH) is an alternative approach providing surgical and patient related advantages to laparoscopy. Methods: Twenty female patients with early stage endometrial cancer were operated upon by TLH and pelvic lymphadenectomy, aiming to assess the safety and efficacy of TLH. Results: The mean operative time was 296.8 min conversion to laparotomy was done in one patient due to bleeding from the uterine vessels. The mean blood loss was 517.5 cc. The uterus was removed transvaginally in 18 patients (90%) and via a small Pfannenstiel incision in two patients (10%). The mean number of pelvic lymph nodes retrieval was 21.2. Postoperative bleeding occurred in one patient (5%) which necessitated exploration. One patient (5%) suffered a pulmonary embolism. Four patients (20%) developed pyrexia, and one patient (5%) suffered from a chest infection. One patient (5%) had wound infection. The mean hospital stay was 4.5 days (range 3-10). Conclusion: TLH with pelvic lymphadenectomy is a safe and effective approach in the treatment of early endometrial carcinoma.

  1. Cancer-related trauma, stigma and growth: the 'lived' experience of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threader, J; McCormack, L

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is associated with multiple layers of distress including stigma. Stigma attraction or devalued social identity is twofold: (1) it is a cancer associated with lifestyle risk factors and (2) treatment often results in confronting facial disfigurement. Subjective interpretations from nine head and neck cancer patients were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. An overarching superordinate theme--Distress, Stigma and Psychological Growth--encompassed four subordinate themes. Two themes captured the expressed trauma and terror as a result of diagnosis and treatment, and two the redefining of self despite stigma through meaning making. Distress was interpreted as a catalyst for awakening new life interpretations and combined with social support to facilitate two distinct pathways of growth: (1) psychological growth without support; (2) psychological and relational growth with support. Previously unfelt empathetic understanding and altruism for others with cancer emerged from the impact of stigma on 'self'. Acceptance allowed a new sense of identity that recognised cancer-related traumatic distress as integral to growth for these participants. The present study offers a unique insight into cancer-related trauma and stigma and the potential to redefine a more accepting, empathic and altruistic 'self' for psychological growth. Implications are discussed. PMID:25899673

  2. Integrative cancer care in a US academic cancer centre: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, G

    2008-08-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many CAM modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer "cures," targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of CAM from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient's overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of CAM modalities. PMID:18769574

  3. Integrative Cancer Care in a US Academic Cancer Centre: The Memorial Sloan–Kettering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (cam) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many cam modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer “cures,” targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of cam from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient’s overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of cam modalities. PMID:18769574

  4. From Chemo to College: The College Experience of Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, MaryAnn; Conte, Teresa M

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how childhood cancer survivors experience college life. Five undergraduate students who are childhood cancer survivors, aged 19 to 22 years, participated in a 75-minute focus group interview. The survivors attended the same university located in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. A transcript-based content analysis was used to analyze the data. Four themes and 2 subthemes were generated from the data analysis. Survivors described that the emotional growth they experienced from their cancer experience has provided them some psychological protection in managing the day-to-day challenges of college life and in making informed choices about engaging in high-risk behaviors. As a result of their cancer experience, the findings suggest that these childhood cancer survivors have a strong foundation of self-awareness and self-worth, which has assisted them in making a successful transition into college life and in enjoying positive collegiate experiences. PMID:26510645

  5. Ziconotide in severe, drug-resistant cancer pain. preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Lavano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Author reports the case of ziconotide intrathecal treatment in three terminal cancer patients, with nociceptive and neuropathic pain, unresponsive to the treatment with intrathecal opioid and adjuvant drugs. An external pump for continuous subarachnoid infusion was implanted to the three patients. The initial dose was 2,4 mcg/die, with increments of 1,2 mcg/die every three days till the maximum dose of 4,8 mcg/die in two patients (survival 61 and 45 days and 7,2 mcg/die in a patient (survival 52 days. VAS reduction was 50% in the fi rst patient, of 57% in the second one and 70% in the third one. In one case, at the dose of 4,8 mcg/die, the treatment was associated with important collateral effects, that requested the temporary suspension of the drug.

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Cancer with Behcets Disease: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Bozkurt Duman

    2014-02-01

    Results: One of our 105 patients with BD was found to have solid tumor in the rate of 0.9 %. The remaining 104 patients with BD were in follow up without any malignancy in this period. The malignancy that we reported was invasive right breast carcinoma in a 55-year-old woman with BD. A radically modified right mastectomy and axillary lymphadenectomy were performed and postoperative doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide therapy for four cycles and hormonal therapy with tamoxifen and leuprolide acetate was administered as adjuvant therapy. This patient had a history of 16 years colchicine usage as medication for BD. Conclusion:The rheumatologic diseases can predispose malignancy, the autoimmune nature of BD or the immunosupressive medicines could be possible causes of this carcinoma. However, in our study only one patient had malignancy. The another point of view; management and also prevention of cancer with BD is important entity.

  7. Cancer of the Throat: A Physician's Experience as a Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    The author, a practicing physician, was diagnosed with throat cancer and lost his vocal cords. He endured the side effects of radiation, repeated surgeries, and the effects of prolonged hospitalizations; confronted medical mistakes and discrimination after losing his vocal cords; and struggled to regain his speech and find new meaning and purpose for his life. Facing the hardship and trials of becoming a laryngectomee illustrated to him how dependent and helpless a patient can become. Being unable to speak, eat, and breathe normally, while dealing with a potentially terminal illness, makes the patient very vulnerable, both physically and emotionally. A skillful, competent, error-free, empathetic, and caring approach that recognizes what the patient is experiencing can expedite recovery and well-being and help the patient return to a productive and meaningful life. PMID:27487313

  8. Micropropagation effect on the anti-carcinogenic activitiy of polyphenolics from Mexican oregano (Poliomintha glabrescens Gray) in human colon cancer cells HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Enrique; Noratto, Giuliana D; García-Lara, Silverio; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic extracts obtained from spices are known to have anti-carcinogenic activities but little is known about the effect of micropropagation on these beneficial effects. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of flavonoid-enriched extracts (FEE) from the leaves of wild (WT), in vitro (IN), and ex vitro (EX) grown oregano plants in colon cancer cells HT-29 and the non-cancer cells CCD-18Co. Cell proliferation of HT-29 cells was reduced to 50 % by WT, IN, and EX at concentrations of 4.01, 1.32, and 4.84 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/L, respectively. In contrast, in CCD-18Co cells, higher concentrations were required for the same cytotoxic effect. At 6 mg GAE/L, WT and IN reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated control cells to 59.89 and 59.43 %, respectively, and EX to 73.89 %. The mRNA of Caspase-3 was increased 1.53-fold when cells were treated with 4 mg GAE/L of IN extract, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6 (FAS), and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) mRNA increased 2.55 and 1.53 fold, respectively. Results on protein expression corroborated the apoptotic effects with a significant decrease of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression for all treatments but more remarkable for EX that also showed the most intense signal of BAX. Overall, FEE extracts derived from micropropagation had increased pro-apoptotic effects, however extracts from the in vitro plants produced more efficacy at the transcriptional level while extracts from the ex vitro plant were superior at the traductional level. PMID:23435631

  9. Experiences of low dose exposure mammography on the cancer mass screening of breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes experiences in the use of the mammograph for the mass screening of breast cancer. The exposure dose per experience was only 1/8.4 (0.21 mSv) that of conventional mammography. Application to 243 persons resulted in 95.6% (43/45 patients) of TPR, 57.1% (113/198 patients) of TNR and 1.7% (2/115 patients) of false negative. Although the authors consider that the mammograph has a bright future, a few points for improvement follow herein. To increase the accuracy of mass screening of breast cancer, photography techniques and decipherment of X-rays should be considered. (author)

  10. Treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: Experience from a tertiary Indian cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sirohi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to look at the outcome of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer treated at a tertiary cancer center in India. Patients And Methods: A total of 101 patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer diagnosed between May 2012 and July 2013 were identified from a prospectively maintained database at the tertiary cancer center. Overall survival (OS was computed using the Kaplan–Meir product limit method and compared across groups using the log-rank statistics. Cox proportional hazards model, adjusted for a number of patient and tumor characteristics, was then used to determine factors prognostic for OS. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 55 years (range: 21–81 years. 57.4% (n = 58 of patients were male, 22% (n = 22 had performance status (PS of <2 at diagnosis and 89% received first-line chemotherapy, while the rest received best supportive care. For the whole cohort, 6 month and 1-year OS was 57% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 46–66% and 47% (95% CI: 35–57%, respectively. In a multivariable model, PS <2 and oligometastatic disease were associated with a significantly decreased risk of death. Conclusion: Results from our analysis indicate that the prognostic outcome among Indian patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer is poor with survival outcomes similar to those reported in North America and Europe.

  11. Work stress and cancer researchers: an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, F; Hicks, B.; Yarker, J

    2014-01-01

    Work stress is a significant issue for many UK healthcare professionals, in particular those working in the field of oncology. However, there have been very few attempts to explore the challenges, experiences or training needs of researchers working in cancer research. In doing so, we will be better positioned to support and develop these researchers. 18 UK oncology researchers from a variety of backgrounds took part in a semi-structured interview. Interviews were transcribed and analysed...

  12. Physiological, morphological and biochemical studies of glyphosate tolerance in Mexican Cologania (Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara de la Cruz, Ricardo; Barro, Francisco; Domínguez-Valenzuela, José Alfredo; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, glyphosate-tolerant legumes have been used as cover crops for weed management in tropical areas of Mexico. Mexican cologania (Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC.) is an innate glyphosate-tolerant legume with a potential as a cover crop in temperate areas of the country. In this work, glyphosate tolerance was characterized in two Mexican cologania (a treated (T) and an untreated (UT)) populations as being representatives of the species, compared in turn to a glyphosate-susceptible hairy fleabane (S) (Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronq.) population. Experiments revealed that T and UT Mexican cologania populations had a higher tolerance index (TI), and a lower shikimic acid accumulation and foliar retention than the hairy fleabane S population. Absorption and translocation, leaf morphology and metabolism studies were only carried out in the Mexican cologania T population and the hairy fleabane S population. The latter absorbed 37% more (14)C-glyphosate compared to the Mexican cologania T at 96 h after treatment (HAT). Mexican cologania T translocated less herbicide from the treated leaf to the remainder of the plant than hairy fleabane S. The Mexican cologania T presented a greater epicuticular wax coverage percentage than the hairy fleabane S. This morphological characteristic contributed to the low glyphosate absorption observed in the Mexican cologania. In addition, the Mexican cologania T metabolized glyphosate mainly into AMPA, formaldehyde and sarcosine. These results indicate that the high glyphosate tolerance observed in Mexican cologania is mainly due to the poor penetration and translocation of glyphosate into the active site, and the high glyphosate degradation into non-toxic substances.

  13. Sentinel lymphnode in breast cancer: an experience with 53 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Benedita Andrade Leal de; Melo, Nayana Alves de Brito; Abreu, Evandro Leal de; Vieira, Carlos Sabas; Abreu, Everardo Leal de [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Maranhao, PI (Brazil). Centro Bionuclear de Diagnostico; Universidade Federal do Piaui, Maranhao, PI (Brazil). Hospital Sao Marco; E-mail: bionuclear@uol.com.br

    2007-09-15

    The value of sentinel lymphnode biopsy or selective linfadenectomy in assessing axillary status in breast carcinoma is well established in medical literature. This work presents a brief study from our preliminary experience with 53 patients submitted to pre-surgical lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperatory detection of sentinel lymphnode and compares our records with those of current medical literature. (author)

  14. Self evaluation of communication experiences after laryngeal cancer – A longitudinal questionnaire study in patients with laryngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finizia Caterina

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the sensitivity to change of the Swedish Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer questionnaire (the S-SECEL, addressing communication dysfunction in patients treated for laryngeal cancer. Previous studies have highlighted the need for more specific questionnaires for this purpose. Methods 100 patients with Tis-T4 laryngeal cancer were included prior to treatment onset. Patients answered four questionnaires at six occasions during one year; the S-SECEL, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Core Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (QLQ-C30 supplemented by the Head and Neck cancer module (QLQ-H&N35 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD scale. In addition, performance status was assessed. Differences within groups were tested with the Wilcoxon paired signed ranks test and between-group analyses were carried out using the Mann-Whitney U test. Magnitude of group differences was analyzed by means of effect sizes. Results The S-SECEL was well accepted with a response rate of 76%. Communication dysfunction increased at 1 month, followed by a continuous decrease throughout the year. Changes were statistically significant at most measurement, demonstrating the sensitivity of the S-SECEL to changes in communication over time. The S-SECEL and the EORTC QLQ-C30 with the QLQ-H&N35 demonstrated similar results; however the S-SECEL was more sensitive regarding communication dysfunction. The largest changes were found in the most diagnose specific items concerning voice and speech. Conclusion The S-SECEL was investigated in the largest Scandinavian longitudinal study concerning health-related quality of life (HRQL in laryngeal cancer patients. The questionnaire was responsive to change and showed convergent results when compared to established HRQL questionnaires. Our findings also indicate that the S-SECEL could be a more

  15. Mexican-American Cultural Assumptions and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, E. Lou

    The search for presuppositions of a people's thought is not new. Octavio Paz and Samuel Ramos have both attempted to describe the assumptions underlying the Mexican character. Paz described Mexicans as private, defensive, and stoic, characteristics taken to the extreme in the "pachuco." Ramos, on the other hand, described Mexicans as being…

  16. El Arte Culinario Mexicano (Mexican Culinary Art).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Michelle

    This unit in Mexican cooking can be used in Junior High School home economics classes to introduce students to Mexican culture or as a mini-course in Spanish at almost any level. It is divided into two parts. Part One provides historical background and information on basic foods, the Mexican market, shopping tips, regional cooking and customs.…

  17. Experience on breast cancer with brain metastasis in Kanagawa Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the relationship between clinicopathologic findings and effect of adjuvant therapy on brain metastasis in breast cancer in order to clarify risk factors for brain metastasis in breast cancer patients. We divided patients into a group treated up until December 1999 (Group 1) and a group treated after January 2000 (Group 2), in whom adjuvant therapy was not generalized. Estrogen receptor-negative patients and cases more advanced than T2 showed a high risk of brain metastasis. The time interval to brain metastasis in Group 1 and 2 were 25 and 49.6 months, respectively, showing a significant difference. Taxan derivatives were used in 1.6% of Group 1 and 76% of Group 2. Estrogen receptor negativity, cancer more advanced than T2, and adjuvant therapy are risk factors for brain metastasis. (author)

  18. Invited review: Artisanal Mexican cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Córdova, Aarón F; Yescas, Carlos; Ortiz-Estrada, Ángel Martín; De la Rosa-Alcaraz, María de Los Ángeles; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this review is to present an overview of some of the most commonly consumed artisanal Mexican cheeses, as well as those cheeses that show potential for a protected designation of origin. A description is given for each of these cheeses, including information on their distinguishing characteristics that makes some of them potential candidates for achieving a protected designation of origin status. This distinction could help to expand their frontiers and allow them to become better known and appreciated in other parts of the world. Due to the scarcity of scientific studies concerning artisanal Mexican cheeses, which would ultimately aid in the standardization of manufacturing processes and in the establishment of regulations related to their production, more than 40 varieties of artisanal cheese are in danger of disappearing. To preserve these cheeses, it is necessary to address this challenge by working jointly with government, artisanal cheesemaking organizations, industry, academics, and commercial partners on the implementation of strategies to protect and preserve their artisanal means of production. With sufficient information, official Mexican regulations could be established that would encompass and regulate the manufacture of Mexican artisanal cheeses. Finally, as many Mexican artisanal cheeses are produced from raw milk, more scientific studies are required to show the role of the lactic acid bacteria and their antagonistic effect on pathogenic microorganisms during aging following cheese making. PMID:26830738

  19. HDR intralumenal brachytherapy in bronchial cancer: review of our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main indications for brachytherapy in the treatment of endobronchial cancer are dyspnea. postobstructive pneumonia and atelectasis, cough and hemoptysis resulting from broncus obstruction by exophytic intralumenal tumor growth. High Dose Rate intralumenal brachytherapy (HDRBT) may be combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in particular as almost all tumors are too large for HDRBT alone. From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 268 patients affected by bronchial cancer, with EBRT combined with HDRBT. All patients were staged as IIIa-IIIb-IV but KPS was >60 and expectancy of life > than 3 months. After bronchoscopy and Tc simulation we found that almost 10% of patients were downstaged. Treatment was always realized delivering 60 Gy to the tumour volume and 50 Gy to the mediastinal structures with EBRT. Brachytherapy was performed during the radiotherapy course. In 38 patients HDRBT was realized just one time, at the beginning of EBRT, with a dose of 10 Gy calculated at 1cm from the central axis of the catheter. In 47 HDRBT was performed twice (at the beginning and at the end of EBRT) with a dose of 7 Gy calculated at 1 cm from the central axis. From 1994 we started a 3 fractions protocol (Timing: days 1.15.30) with a dose of 5 Gy calculated at 0.5 cm from the axis. Of the 183 patients introduced in the protocol 170 received the three fractions of HDRBT and 13 were excluded from the study for personal or clinical reasons. In 97% of cases the application did not need general anesthesia; local anesthesia has been sufficient supplemented by some drug for sedation and coughing. Anyway both bronchoscopy and HDRBT (with anterior-posterior and lateral chest X-ray) are performed in the same shielded room without the necessity of displacing the patient. In almost 60% of treatments we used just one endobronchial applicator. In case of tumor involvement of the carina, two applicators were introduced. By this a larger tumor volume can be treated with adequate

  20. The lived experience of physically active older prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright-St Clair, Valerie A; Malcolm, Wanda; Keogh, Justin W L

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to explore the lived experiences of physically active prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), who exercise individually. Three older men (74-88 years old) with prostate cancer, using ADT continuously for at least 12 months and regularly exercising for at least 6 months, participated in this qualitative pilot study, informed by interpretive phenomenology. Data were gathered using individual semi-structured interviews, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Coherent stories were drawn from each transcript and analyzed using iterative and interpretive methods. van Manen's lifeworld existentials provided a framework for interpreting across the research text. Three notions emerged: Getting started, Having a routine and Being with music. Together they reveal what drew the participants to exercising regularly despite the challenges associated with their cancer and treatments. This study provides insights into the benefits of, and what it means for, older men with prostate cancer to regularly exercise individually. These findings may assist cancer clinicians and other allied health professionals to be more attuned to prostate cancer survivors' lived experiences when undergoing ADT, allowing clinicians to better promote regular exercise to their patients as a foundational component of living well. PMID:23862577

  1. Adverse childhood experiences are associated with the risk of lung cancer: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Valerie J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strong relationships between exposure to childhood traumatic stressors and smoking behaviours inspire the question whether these adverse childhood experiences (ACEs are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer during adulthood. Methods Baseline survey data on health behaviours, health status and exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs were collected from 17,337 adults during 1995-1997. ACEs included abuse (emotional, physical, sexual, witnessing domestic violence, parental separation or divorce, or growing up in a household where members with mentally ill, substance abusers, or sent to prison. We used the ACE score (an integer count of the 8 categories of ACEs as a measure of cumulative exposure to traumatic stress during childhood. Two methods of case ascertainment were used to identify incident lung cancer through 2005 follow-up: 1 hospital discharge records and 2 mortality records obtained from the National Death Index. Results The ACE score showed a graded relationship to smoking behaviors. We identified 64 cases of lung cancer through hospital discharge records (age-standardized risk = 201 × 100,000-1 population and 111 cases of lung cancer through mortality records (age-standardized mortality rate = 31.1 × 100,000-1 person-years. The ACE score also showed a graded relationship to the incidence of lung cancer for cases identified through hospital discharge (P = 0.0004, mortality (P = 0.025, and both methods combined (P = 0.001. Compared to persons without ACEs, the risk of lung cancer for those with ≥ 6 ACEs was increased approximately 3-fold (hospital records: RR = 3.18, 95%CI = 0.71-14.15; mortality records: RR = 3.55, 95%CI = 1.25-10.09; hospital or mortality records: RR = 2.70, 95%CI = 0.94-7.72. After a priori consideration of a causal pathway (i.e., ACEs → smoking → lung cancer, risk ratios were attenuated toward the null, although not completely. For lung cancer identified through hospital

  2. Adolescents’ Experiences When Living With a Parent With Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Mehrdad; Malekian, Azadeh; Taleghani, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cancer affects not only the patient but also their entire family, especially adolescents. Adolescents whose parents are ill may manifest their distress through changes in school performance, physical complaints of pain and discomfort, as well as changes in social and interpersonal relations. There has been very little research about the effects of cancer on adolescents in Iran. Objectives: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the Iranian adolescents’ experiences when living with a parent with cancer. Patients and Methods: In this research, the descriptive-explorative approach was used. There were a total of 27 participants. Purposeful sampling was used and data collection methods were semi-structured deep interviews. Constant comparative analysis was used to study the data. Results: The findings of this study showed that the main experiences of these adolescents were categorized into seven themes: 1- psychological problems of adolescents; 2- supportive-educative needs; 3- cancer as a two edged sword in family relationships; 4- stages of confrontation with the parent’s cancer; 5- effect of cancer on social dimensions; 6- affective and helpful supportive agents; 7- Need of support for education under special conditions. Conclusions: This research showed that Iranian adolescents had the same experiences as other adolescents in other countries in many aspects yet in some issues, such as religious strategy, they had strong religious beliefs that would help them cope with their parents’ cancer. Also it was shown that we must plan a program in which education and support should be provided to enable adolescents to cope with this detrimental situation with minimal disruption. PMID:26889396

  3. Experience with breast cancer, pre-screening perceived susceptibility and the psychological impact of screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Absetz, Pilvikki; Aro, Arja R; Sutton, Stephen R

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study examined whether the psychological impact of organized mammography screening is influenced by women's pre-existing experience with breast cancer and perceived susceptibility (PS) to the disease. From a target population of 16,886, a random sample of women with a normal...... responded to the follow-ups. Psychological impact was measured as anxiety (STAI-S), depression (BDI), health-related concerns (IAS), and breast cancer-specific beliefs and concerns. Data was analyzed with repeated measures analyses of variance, with estimates of effect size based on Eta-squared. Women...... normal mammograms. Experience and PS did not influence responses to different screening findings. Of the finding groups, false positives experienced most adverse effects: their risk perception increased and they reported most post-screening breast cancer-specific concerns. Furthermore, they became more...

  4. Risk factors of breast cancer in Mexican women Factores de riesco de cáncer de mama en mujeres mexicanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between family history (FH of neoplasia, gyneco-obstetric factors and breast cancer (BC in a case--control study. In cases, to analyze those variables in relation with early onset of BC, the manner of detection (self-examination, prompted by pain, or casual, the size of tumor, and the elapsed time to seek medical attention. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from 151 prevalent BC cases and 235 age-matched controls were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, to assess the influence of BC risk factors. RESULTS: Ten per cent of patients and 1% of controls had first-degree relatives (FDR with BC. Family history of FDR with BC (OR, 11.2; 95% CI 2.42-51.92 or with gastric or pancreatic cancer (OR, 17.7; 95% CI 2.2-142.6 was associated with BC risk. Breastfeeding at or under 25 years of age was protective against BC (OR, 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.66. The manner of tumor detection did not influence its size at the time of diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that FH of BC and/or of gastric or pancreatic carcinoma are risk factors for BC, while lactation at 25 years of age or earlier is protective.OBJETIVO: Investigar la asociación entre la historia familiar de neoplasias, factores ginecobstétricos y cáncer mamario (CM en un estudio de casos y controles. Además, en los casos, estudiar estas variables en relación con inicio temprano del cáncer, forma de detección (autoexamen, exploración individual por dolor o casual, tamaño del tumor. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Entre enero y marzo de 1997 se estudiaron 151 casos prevalentes de CM y 235 controles pareados por edad provenientes del Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico del Noreste, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, o del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, ambos localizados en Monterrey, México. Los factores de riesgo se analizaron con regresión logística múltiple. RESULTADOS: Diez por ciento de casos y 1% de controles

  5. Characteristics of breast cancer patients who experience menopausal transition due to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F.A. Duijts; A.C. Stolk-Vos; H.S.A. Oldenburg; M. van Beurden; N.K. Aaronson

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify patient-related and treatment-related factors associated significantly with climacteric symptoms in young patients who experience menopausal transition due to adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Methods This cross-sectional study used questionnaire data collected to screen br

  6. Cancer patients’ experiences with and perceived outcomes of yoga: results from focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden-Kraan, van C.F.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Drossaert, C.H.C.; Verdonck- de Leeuw, I.M.; Buffart, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Yoga is a “mind–body” exercise, a combination of physical poses with breathing and meditation, and may have beneficial effects on physical and psychosocial symptoms. We aimed to explore cancer patients’ motives for practicing yoga, experiences of practicing yoga, and perceived physical and

  7. Abortion legislation, maternal healthcare, fertility, female literacy, sanitation, violence against women and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in 32 Mexican states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Chireau, Monique; Pliego, Fernando; Stanford, Joseph; Haddad, Sebastian; Calhoun, Byron; Aracena, Paula; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Thorp, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether there is an association between abortion legislation and maternal mortality outcomes after controlling for other factors thought to influence maternal health. Design Population-based natural experiment. Setting and data sources Official maternal mortality data from 32 federal states of Mexico between 2002 and 2011. Main outcomes Maternal mortality ratio (MMR), MMR with any abortive outcome (MMRAO) and induced abortion mortality ratio (iAMR). Independent variables Abortion legislation grouped as less (n=18) or more permissive (n=14); constitutional amendment protecting the unborn (n=17); skilled attendance at birth; all-abortion hospitalisation ratio; low birth weight rate; contraceptive use; total fertility rates (TFR); clean water; sanitation; female literacy rate and intimate-partner violence. Main results Over the 10-year period, states with less permissive abortion legislation exhibited lower MMR (38.3 vs 49.6; p<0.001), MMRAO (2.7 vs 3.7; p<0.001) and iAMR (0.9 vs 1.7; p<0.001) than more permissive states. Multivariate regression models estimating effect sizes (β-coefficients) for mortality outcomes showed independent associations (p values between 0.001 and 0.055) with female literacy (β=−0.061 to −1.100), skilled attendance at birth (β=−0.032 to −0.427), low birth weight (β=0.149 to 2.166), all-abortion hospitalisation ratio (β=−0.566 to −0.962), clean water (β=−0.048 to −0.730), sanitation (β=−0.052 to −0.758) and intimate-partner violence (β=0.085 to 0.755). TFR showed an inverse association with MMR (β=−14.329) and MMRAO (β=−1.750) and a direct association with iAMR (β=1.383). Altogether, these factors accounted for (R2) 51–88% of the variance among states in overall mortality rates. No statistically independent effect was observed for abortion legislation, constitutional amendment or other covariates. Conclusions Although less permissive states exhibited consistently lower maternal mortality

  8. Mexican agencies reach teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Lemus, R; Beamish, J

    1992-08-01

    The Gente Joven project of the Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) trains young volunteers in 19 cities to spread messages about sexually transmitted diseases and population growth to their peers. They also distribute condoms and spermicides. It also uses films and materials to spread its messages. The project would like to influence young men's behavior, but the Latin image of machismo poses a big challenge. It would like to become more responsible toward pregnancy prevention. About 50% of adolescents have sexual intercourse, but few use contraceptives resulting in a high adolescent pregnancy rate. Many of these pregnant teenagers choose not to marry. Adolescent pregnancy leads to girls leaving school, few marketable skills, and rearing children alone. Besides women who began childbearing as a teenager have 1.5 times more children than other women. Male involvement in pregnancy prevention should improve these statistics. As late as 1973, the Health Code banned promotion and sales of contraceptives, but by 1992 about 50% of women of reproductive age use contraceptives. The Center for the Orientation of Adolescents has organized 8 Young Men's Clubs in Mexico City to involve male teenagers more in family planning and to develop self-confidence. It uses a holistic approach to their development through discussions with their peers. A MEXFAM study shows that young men are not close with their fathers who tend to exude a machismo attitude, thus the young men do not have a role model for responsible sexual behavior. MEXFAM's work is cut out for them, however, since the same study indicates that 50% of the young men believe it is fine to have 1 girlfriend and 33% think women should earn more than men. A teenager volunteer reports, however, that more boys have been coming to him for contraception and information than girls in 1992 while in other years girls outnumbered the boys. PMID:12317721

  9. Radical cystectomy for the treatment of T1 bladder cancer: the Canadian Bladder Cancer Network experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Venu; Kassouf, Wassim; Chin, Joseph L.; Fradet, Yves; Aprikian, Armen G.; Fairey, Adrian S.; Estey, Eric; Lacombe, Louis; Rendon, Ricardo; Bell, David; Cagiannos, Ilias; Drachenberg, Darrell; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Izawa, Jonathan I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Radical cystectomy may provide optimal survival outcomes in the management of clinical T1 bladder cancer. We present our data from a large, multi-institutional, contemporary Canadian series of patients who underwent radical cystectomy for clinical T1 bladder cancer in a single-payer health care system. Methods: We collected a pooled database of 2287 patients who underwent radical cystectomy between 1993 and 2008 in 8 different centres across Canada; 306 of these patients had clinical T1 bladder cancer. Survival data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis. Results: The median age of patients was 67 years with a mean follow-up time of 35 months. The 5-year overall, disease-specific and disease-free survival was 71%, 77% and 59%, respectively. The 10-year overall and disease-specific survival were 60% and 67%, respectively. Pathologic stage distribution was p0: 32 (11%), pT1: 78 (26%), pT2: 55 (19%), pT3: 60 (20%), pT4: 27 (9%), pTa: 16 (5%), pTis: 28 (10%), pN0: 215 (74%) and pN1-3: 78 (26%). Only 12% of patients were given adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, only margin status and pN stage were independently associated with overall, disease-specific and disease-free survival. Interpretation: These results indicate that clinical T1 bladder cancer may be significantly understaged. Identifying factors associated with understaged and/or disease destined to progress (despite any prior intravesical or repeat transurethral therapies prior to radical cystectomy) will be critical to improve survival outcomes without over-treating clinical T1 disease that can be successfully managed with bladder preservation strategies. PMID:21470529

  10. One-Year Experience Managing a Cancer Survivorship Clinic Using a Shared-Care Model for Gastric Cancer Survivors in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyejin; Son, Ki Young; Kim, Warrick Junsuk; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Kong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Cho, Belong; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Given the rapid growth of the population of cancer survivors, increased attention has been paid to their health problems. Although gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, empirical evidence of survivorship care is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the health care status of gastric cancer survivors and to report the experience of using the shared-care model during a one-year experience at the cancer survivorship clinic in Seoul National University Hospital. This is a descriptive, single-center study of 250 long-term gastric cancer survivors who were referred to the survivorship clinic. The status of their health behaviors, comorbid conditions, secondary cancer screenings, and survivorship care status were investigated through questionnaires and examining the medical records. Among the survivors, 7.2% were current smokers, 8.8% were at-risk drinkers, and 32.4% were physically inactive. Among the patients who did not know their bone density status, the majority were in the osteopenic (37.1%) or osteoporotic range (24.1%). Screening among the eligible population within the recommended time intervals were 76.3% for colorectal cancer, but only 13.6% for lung cancer. All of the survivors were provided with counseling and medical management at the survivorship clinic, as appropriate. In conclusion, Long-term gastric cancer survivors have various unmet needs. Shared-care through survivorship clinics can be an effective solution for providing comprehensive care to cancer survivors.

  11. Feasibility of capecitabine monotherapy in a taxane refractory metastatic breast cancer patient: A rural cancer hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Tiwari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To manage a metastatic cancer patient in a rural setting is a daunting task owing to the lack of resources and infrastructure. Intravenous chemotherapy (CT, with its debilitating side effects often causes a decrease in the quality of life (QOL of the patient. When the treatment is of palliative intent, efforts should be made to provide maximum symptom relief to the patient striking a balance between the patient’s wishes and a sound scientific rationale. We describe our experience with a patient with extensively metastatic breast cancer treated in our rural center with single agent oral capecitabine, without development of any severe toxicity and with a significant improvement in disease process and patient’s performance status (PS

  12. Feasibility of capecitabine immunotherapy in a taxane-refractory metastatic breast cancer patient: A rural cancer hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Tiwari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To manage a metastatic cancer patient in a rural setting is a daunting task owing to the lack of resources and infrastructure. Intravenous chemotherapy (CT, with its debilitating side effects, often causes a decrease in the quality of life (QOL of the patient. When the treatment is of palliative intent, efforts should be made to provide maximum symptom relief to the patient, striking a balance between the patient’s wishes and a sound scientific rationale. We describe our experience with a patient with extensively metastatic breast cancer treated in our rural center with single-agent oral capecitabine, without development of any severe toxicity and with a significant improvement in disease process and patient’s performance status (PS.

  13. Experience of Initial Symptoms of Breast Cancer and Triggers for Action in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D. Dye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study assessed the initial experiences, symptoms, and actions of patients in Ethiopia ultimately determined to have breast cancer. Methods. 69 participants in a comprehensive breast cancer treatment program at the main national cancer hospital in Ethiopia were interviewed using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches. Participants’ narratives of their initial cancer experience were coded and analyzed for themes around their symptoms, time to seeking advice, triggers for action, and contextual factors. The assessment was approved by the Addis Ababa University Faculty of Medicine Institutional Review Board. Results. Nearly all women first noticed lumps, though few sought medical advice within the first year (average time to action: 1.5 years. Eventually, changes in their symptoms motivated most participants to seek advice. Most participants did not think the initial lump would be cancer, nor was a lump of any particular concern until symptoms changed. Conclusion. Given the frequency with which lumps are the first symptom noticed, raising awareness among participants that lumps should trigger medical consultation could contribute significantly to more rapid medical advice-seeking among women in Ethiopia. Primary care sites should be trained and equipped to offer evaluation of lumps so that women can be referred appropriately for assessment if needed.

  14. Experience of Initial Symptoms of Breast Cancer and Triggers for Action in Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. This study assessed the initial experiences, symptoms, and actions of patients in Ethiopia ultimately determined to have breast cancer. Methods. 69 participants in a comprehensive breast cancer treatment program at the main national cancer hospital in Ethiopia were interviewed using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches. Participants narratives of their initial cancer experience were coded and analyzed for themes around their symptoms, time to seeking advice, triggers for action, and contextual factors. The assessment was approved by the Addis Ababa University Faculty of Medicine Institutional Review Board. Results. Nearly all women first noticed lumps, though few sought medical advice within the first year (average time to action: 1.5 years). Eventually, changes in their symptoms motivated most participants to seek advice. Most participants did not think the initial lump would be cancer, nor was a lump of any particular concern until symptoms changed. Conclusion. Given the frequency with which lumps are the first symptom noticed, raising awareness among participants that lumps should trigger medical consultation could contribute significantly to more rapid medical advice-seeking among women in Ethiopia. Primary care sites should be trained and equipped to offer evaluation of lumps so that women can be referred appropriately for assessment if needed

  15. Adjustment to cancer: exploring patients' experiences of participating in a psychodramatic group intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, J; Giusti, L; Fossati, I; Vegni, E

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to understand the subjective experience of patients adjusting to cancer by focusing on how that experience might be affected by participating in a psychodramatic group intervention. In-depth interviews using an interpretative-phenomenological approach were conducted with eight cancer patients involved in a psychodrama group. Four key themes were identified: (1) outside and inside relationships; (2) identities: nurturing other selves; (3) a feelings' gym: performing the internal world; and (4) many ends: mourning death and dying. Participation in cancer group using a psychodramatic approach provided positive results. In detail, the group setting: (1) favoured relationships in which it was possible to freely express oneself and (2) empowered patients in their feelings of being able to give and receive help; the psychodramatic approach: (1) supported the physical mobilisation of sense of agency and (2) permitted to deal with the grieving process. Cancer healthcare pathways would benefit from psychotherapeutic programmes using a similar approach, since psychodrama by actively involving body seems to works on areas that are often underwhelmed by other approaches, such as (i.e., physical mobilisation, body engagement, grieving adjustment). Psychodrama supports patients to achieve insights into their own possibilities to actively participate in their own life situations despite having cancer and undergoing treatment for it.

  16. Adjustment to cancer: exploring patients' experiences of participating in a psychodramatic group intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, J; Giusti, L; Fossati, I; Vegni, E

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to understand the subjective experience of patients adjusting to cancer by focusing on how that experience might be affected by participating in a psychodramatic group intervention. In-depth interviews using an interpretative-phenomenological approach were conducted with eight cancer patients involved in a psychodrama group. Four key themes were identified: (1) outside and inside relationships; (2) identities: nurturing other selves; (3) a feelings' gym: performing the internal world; and (4) many ends: mourning death and dying. Participation in cancer group using a psychodramatic approach provided positive results. In detail, the group setting: (1) favoured relationships in which it was possible to freely express oneself and (2) empowered patients in their feelings of being able to give and receive help; the psychodramatic approach: (1) supported the physical mobilisation of sense of agency and (2) permitted to deal with the grieving process. Cancer healthcare pathways would benefit from psychotherapeutic programmes using a similar approach, since psychodrama by actively involving body seems to works on areas that are often underwhelmed by other approaches, such as (i.e., physical mobilisation, body engagement, grieving adjustment). Psychodrama supports patients to achieve insights into their own possibilities to actively participate in their own life situations despite having cancer and undergoing treatment for it. PMID:26515989

  17. Patient experiences and outcomes following facial skin cancer surgery: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erica H; Klassen, Anne F; Lawson, Jessica L; Cano, Stefan J; Scott, Amie M; Pusic, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    Early melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer of the facial area are primarily treated with surgery. Little is known about the outcomes of treatment for facial skin cancer patients. The objective of the study was to identify concerns about aesthetics, procedures and health from the patients' perspective after facial skin surgery. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 participants. Line-by-line coding was used to establish categories and develop themes. We identified five major themes on the impact of skin cancer surgery: appearance-related concerns; psychological (e.g., fear of new cancers or recurrence); social (e.g. impact on social activities and interaction); physical (e.g. pain and swelling) concerns and satisfaction with the experience of care (e.g., satisfaction with surgeon). The priority of participants was the removal of the facial skin cancer, as this reduced their overall worry. The aesthetic outcome was secondary but important, as it had important implications on the participants' social and psychological functioning. The participants' experience with the care provided by the surgeon and staff also contributed to their satisfaction with their treatment. This conceptual framework provides the basis for the development of a new patient-reported outcome instrument. PMID:25833383

  18. First-Year Movements by Juvenile Mexican Spotted Owls in the Canyonlands of Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Willey, D. W.; Van Riper, C.

    2000-01-01

    We studied first-year movements of Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) during natal dispersal in canyonlands of southern Utah. Thirty-one juvenile Mexican Spotted Owls were captured and radiotracked during 1992-95 to examine behavior and conduct experiments related to the onset of natal dispersal. Juvenile Spotted Owls dispersed from their nest areas during September to October each year, with 85% leaving in September. The onset of movements was sudden and juveniles dispersed in ...

  19. Economic assimilation of Mexican and Chinese immigrants in the United States: is there wage convergence?

    OpenAIRE

    Yujie Wu; Michael C Seeborg

    2012-01-01

    This research determines the economic assimilation experience of Mexican immigrants and Chinese immigrants towards natives level over time after controlling for human capital and demographic characteristics. Using Census data from multiple years, this research follows cohorts of Mexican and Chinese immigrants who migrated to the U.S. prior to 1994 to investigate the impact of assimilation on the level of earnings for these immigrants. Multiple regression and simulation techniques are used to ...

  20. Experience in screening for cervical cancer in rural areas of Barsi Tehsil (Maharashtra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nene, B M; Jayant, K; Malvi, S G; Dale, P S; Deshpande, R

    1994-03-01

    The organization of cancer detection camps is gaining popularity in our country and it is therefore necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer. This to our knowledge has not been done. This report analyses an experience in screening for cervical cancer in rural areas of Barsi Tehsil (Maharashtra). The Barsi Tehsil consists of 134 villages with a population of 34,080 women above the age of 30 years (1982-1987). Of these 2,846 were screened through a series of cancer detection camps between 1982 and 1987. The results of the cytological screening in these women have been presented. An evaluation of the camp approach was carried out by the Population based Cancer Registry set up under the National Cancer Registry Programme (Indian Council of Medical Research) in Barsi, Paranda and Bhum tehsils. It was shown that acceptance of cytological screening was poor, thereby indicating that the mere holding of camps was not in itself sufficient to motivate the people, to subject themselves to the Pap smear. Certain suggestions which would appreciably increase the acceptance of cytological screening have been put forward.

  1. Talking about sex with health professionals: the experience of people with cancer and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, E; Perz, J; Ussher, J M

    2016-03-01

    Changes to sexuality can be one of the most difficult aspects of life following cancer. This study examines the experience of discussing sexuality post cancer with health care professionals (HCPs), from the perspective of women and men with cancer (PWC), and their partners (PPWC), across a range of cancer types. A total of 657 PWC (535 women, 122 men) and 148 PPWC (87 women, 61 men) completed a survey containing closed and open-ended items, analysed by analysis of variance and thematic analysis. Discussions about sexuality with a HCP were more likely to be reported by men (68%) compared to women PWC (43%), and by women (47%) compared to men PPWC (28%), as well as by those with a sexual or reproductive cancer. Men PWC and women PPWC were most likely to want to discuss sexuality with a HCP, with men PWC and PPWC reporting highest levels of satisfaction with such discussions. Open-ended responses revealed dissatisfaction with the unwillingness of HCPs to discuss sexuality, unhappiness with the nature of such discussion, and positive accounts of discussions about sexuality with HCPs. These findings lend support to the notion that people with cancer and their partners may have unmet sexual information and support needs. PMID:25040442

  2. The Impacts of Emigration on the Mexican Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Allen R.

    1982-01-01

    The assumption that Mexican emigration to the United States provides benefits to Mexico in the form of jobs for unemployed Mexicans and wage remittances has kept Mexican officials from discouraging illegal emigration. In fact, emigration drains the Mexican economy and should be a cause for Mexican government concern. (Author/MJL)

  3. Fertility sparing treatments in young patients with gynecological cancers: Iranian experience and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi Zarchi, Mojgan; Mousavi, Azamsadat; Gilani, Mitra Modares; Barooti, Esmat; Amini Rad, Omid; Ghaemmaghami, Fatemeh; Teimoori, Soraya; Behtas, Nadereh

    2011-01-01

    With increase in the marriage age some women experience gynecological cancers before giving birth. Thus fertility sparing in these patients is an important point and much work has been done on conservative management. We here report our experience on fertility sparing with cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers and include a review of the literature. With cervical cancer, radical trachelectomy with para-aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy can be performed in patients with early stage IA1-IB cancers, because they have low recurrence rates. The complications are fewer than with radical hysterectomy. For endometrial cancer, the accepted treatment is total abdominal hysterectomy+bilateral salpango-oopherectomy (TAH+BSO), but in young patients with early stage 1 lesions, we can suggest use of hormonal therapy in place of radical surgery if we evaluate with MRI and the result is early stage disease without the other site involvement and the grade of tumor is well differentiated. GNRH analog, oral medroxyprogestrone acetate (MPA), 100-800 mg/day, megestrol acetate 40-160 mg/day and combination of tamoxifen and a progestin have been applied, but we must remember, they should underwent repeated curettage for investigating medical outcome after 3 months. With normal pathology we follow medical therapy for 3 months and can evaluate for infertility treatment. The best option for patients who treated by medical therapy is TAH+BSO after normal term pregnancy. With ovarian cancer, there is much experience on fertility sparing surgery and in Iran conservative surgical management in young patients with stage I (grade 1,2) of epithelial ovarian tumor and sex cord-stromal tumor and patients with borderline and germ cell ovarian tumors is being successfully performed. PMID:22292620

  4. The Experience of Caregivers Living with Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSeure, Peeranuch; Chongkham-ang, Supaporn

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this meta-synthesis were to: (1) explore the experience of caregivers who were caring for cancer patients, including their perceptions and responses to the situation; and (2) describe the context and the phenomena relevant to the experience. Five databases were used: CINAHL, MEDLINE, Academic Search, Science Direct, and a Thai database known as the Thai Library Integrated System (ThaiLIS). Three sets of the context of the experience and the phenomena relevant to the experience were described. The contexts were (1) having a hard time dealing with emotional devastation; (2) knowing that the caregiving job was laborious; and (3) knowing that I was not alone. The phenomenon showed the progress of the caregivers’ thoughts and actions. A general phenomenon of the experience—balancing my emotion—applied to most of the caregivers; whereas, more specific phenomenon—keeping life as normal as possible and lifting life above the illness—were experienced by a lesser number of the caregivers. This review added a more thorough explanation of the issues involved in caregiving for cancer patients. A more comprehensive description of the experience of caregiving was described. The findings of this review can be used to guide clinical practice and policy formation in cancer patient care. PMID:26610573

  5. The breast cancer patient's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have many decisions to make during the course of their treatment. The aims of this paper are to describe the women's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer and to explore how women feel about receiving radiation therapy. An in-depth understanding of the women's experience was developed using a qualitative research approach underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 women who had completed treatment for early breast cancer. The themes that emerged from the data were: being challenged, getting ready, beyond control, regaining a sense of control and getting through it. This study provides health professionals with an initial understanding of the women's perspective of the experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer. This study concludes by suggesting that further research needs to be conducted to gain an understanding of how other patients feel about treatment decision making and radiation therapy. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  6. The pain experience and its management in cancer patients during hospitalisation (in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L F Small

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of information on the management of pain in cancer patients in Namibia. For this reason a survey was done to determine the pain experience of cancer patients during hospitalisation and their evaluation of the treatment thereof by nurses

    Opsomming
    Weens ‘n gebrek aan inligting oor die hantering van pyn by pasiente met kanker, is 'n opname gedoen na die pyn belewenis van pasiente met karsinoom tydens hospitalisasie. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  7. Experiences of Cervical Cancer Survivors in Rural Eastern North Carolina: a Qualitative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Alice R; Troutman, Jamie L; Torres, Essie

    2016-06-01

    Little qualitative research has been conducted with cervical cancer survivors. We sought to understand the experiences of survivors in rural Eastern North Carolina and identify any barriers which may have kept women from receiving preventive Papanicolaou screenings or follow-up care. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 15 low-income and underserved cervical cancer survivors living in Eastern North Carolina. Participants included English-speaking women who attended a large cancer center for care between March 2012 and March 2013. Participants ranged from being recently diagnosed with cervical cancer to being 15 years post-diagnosis. Interviews lasted approximately 1 h and were audio-tape-recorded. On average, women were 55 years old (range 35-85) and were diagnosed with cervical cancer 3 years prior to the interview (range 0.2 to 180 months). A good proportion was uninsured or Medicaid-insured (60 %). Half reported an annual household income of less than $20,000, and 13 % reported having a college degree. The majority of survivors had limited understanding of cervical cancer, experienced persistent symptoms related to their cancer before seeking care, and were nonadherent to Papanicolaou screening recommendations. The main barriers to care reported by participants was lack of money and health insurance, followed by the perception of overall health (which equated to the belief that medical care was not needed), transportation issues, and discomfort with provider. Health professionals should focus educational efforts on the benefits of Papanicolaou screenings, the symptoms sometimes associated with cervical cancer, and the free or low-cost services available to low-income women. PMID:25778774

  8. Factores de riesgo de cáncer cervicouterino invasor en mujeres mexicanas Risk factors in invasive cervical cancer among Mexican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Leticia Tirado-Gómez

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Evaluar la asociación entre cáncer cervicouterino (CaCu invasor y el virus del papiloma humano de alto riesgo (VPH-AR (carga viral/tipo 16, así como con factores ginecológicos y socioeconómicos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio de casos y controles pareado individualmente (215 casos con CaCu invasor y 420 controles. La población de estudio se reclutó entre los años 2000 y 2001. Se evaluaron variables tradicionalmente asociadas con CaCu (ginecológicas y socioeconómicas y dos variables asociadas con la presencia de VPH (carga viral y el tipo 16. La presencia de VPH-AR se determinó mediante Captura de Híbridos II. La carga viral se midió a través de unidades relativas de luz y picogramos por ml (1 RLU=1 pg/ml, divididas en cuatro categorías: negativa (499 pg/ml. El análisis estimó razones de momios (RM ajustadas a través de modelos de regresión logística condicionada. RESULTADOS: La presencia de VPH-AR incrementa en 78 veces la probabilidad de presentar CaCu invasor; cuando el VPH es tipo 16, el incremento es mayor (RM= 429.7 comparado con otros tipos (RM=64.1. Se observó una tendencia importante en la RM al elevarse la carga viral (RM=46.6 carga baja; RM=250.7 intermedia y RM=612.9 alta. Finalmente, los factores demográficos y obstétricos conocidos, incrementaron la probabilidad de CaCu invasor. No se observó asociación entre CaCu invasor y tabaquismo en la población de estudio. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio contribuye a la identificación de las mujeres con alto riesgo de desarrollar CaCu invasor, entre las pacientes infectadas con VPH-AR. Por otra parte, confirma la importancia de la infección de VPH-AR y refleja la carga viral del VPH-AR como cofactor y posible promotor en el desarrollo de la enfermedad. Por último, este biomarcador puede contribuir a mejorar la prevención y la detección temprana de esta enfermedad.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between invasive Cervical Cancer (CC and high risk Human

  9. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  10. La Artesania Mexicana (Mexican Handicrafts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Bettina

    This booklet contains instructions in English and Spanish for making eleven typical Mexican craft articles. The instructions are accompanied by pen-and-ink drawings. The objects are (1) "La Rosa" (The Rose); (2) "El Crisantemo" (The Chrysanthemum); (3) "La Amapola" (The Poppy); (4) "Ojos de Dios" (God's Eyes); (5) "Ojitos con dos caras" (Two-Sided…

  11. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology. PMID:27117799

  12. Faculty-Librarian Collaboration: A Mexican Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jesus

    2001-01-01

    Describes the user education program developed at the Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez (Mexico). Topics include the faculty-librarian partnership; information needs of library users, both faculty and students; library facilities; electronic classrooms; faculty training; and educational models and learning processes. (LRW)

  13. [The experience of women after breast cancer mastectomy: objectification theory perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Su-Ying; Chiu, Shing-Charn; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2011-08-01

    The female breast is intimately tied to social values that define the ideal body standard for women. As such, women's bodies are regarded as objects to be evaluated and judged. This paper analyzed the experience of women with breast cancer after mastectomy from the perspective of objectification theory. The authors found that not only medical technology but women themselves objectified the female body. The process of patient-physician communication also strengthened the objectification phenomenon for post-mastectomy women. We found that women with breast cancer worried about facing critical evaluation from the public after losing their breasts and needed to cope with the stress of losing a part of their physical self. Social and cultural antecedents that regard breasts as "objects" strongly influence the perspectives of women facing breast cancer. We hope this analysis may assist healthcare professionals to understand how women's bodies are objectified after mastectomy and consider how to care for this population more appropriately. PMID:21809290

  14. Women's experiences of making healthcare decisions about their breast cancer: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mo; Stone, Teresa E; Turale, Sue; Petrini, Marcia A

    2016-09-01

    There are few studies about how healthcare decisions are made for women with breast cancer in China and this knowledge is vital, both to further develop person-centered health care and to ensure that women have a voice in their healthcare decisions. This phenomenological study explored the meaning of women's lived experiences of making healthcare decisions about their breast cancer in China. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of eight women with breast cancer. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological analytic method. The results of this study identified four themes: authority and expertise, lack of knowledge, family support, and Chinese cultural and social influences. Women were deferential to medical authority and perceived expertise, but they wanted to be involved to a greater degree in healthcare decisions. It is important for health professionals to optimize women's participation in decision-making by removing barriers and advocating on their behalf. PMID:26817836

  15. Mothers’ Experiences of Participating in the Medical Care of their Child with Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korning Lund, Line; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    Background: Only a few research studies have addressed parents’ experiences of participating in the medical care and treatment of their child diagnosed with cancer. Objective: To explore how mothers of children diagnosed with cancer experienced participating in the medical care of their child both...... at hospital and at home. Design and methods: A qualitative study with a hermeneutical approach. The empirical data consisted of three semi-structured interviews with mothers of children diagnosed with cancer within the last three months. The interviews were analysed in accordance with Kvale and Brinkmann...... at home to prevent hospitalisation" and "Good training in the medical care is significant". Conclusion: In general, mothers experienced participating in the medical care as positive. However, in several aspects of the medical care, the mothers lacked support and guidance from the health professionals...

  16. Modesty and recognition--a qualitative study of the lived experience of recovery from anal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Julie; Hansen, Mette Juel; Grandjean, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    survivors of anal cancer to resist and to manage potentially complex stressors encountered in the recovery from the disease. DESIGN: A qualitative, salutogenetic-oriented, phenomenological study was conducted based on audio-taped, semi-structured interviews. METHODS: Interviewee selection was carried out...... through purposeful sampling. Sixteen individuals (11 women and five men; average age 52 years), who had completed therapy for anal cancer (average 31 months ago), participated in the study. Transcripts from the audio-taped interviews were used for qualitative text condensation analysis, inspired by Giorgi......'s phenomenological methodology. FINDINGS: The analysis revealed two concepts, modesty and recognition, which describe the essence of the lived experience of anal cancer, and which each appear to be important resistance resources. While modesty is regarded as an enforced and necessary competence developed...

  17. Head and neck cancer patients' experiences of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding: a Q-methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, S; Farrell, D

    2012-07-01

    Head and neck cancer patients are at high risk of malnutrition and its complications and therefore often undergo non-oral nasogastric or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) nutrition support. However, there is little evidence that either approach is effective in this group. While one possible explanation for these findings relates to the relationship between artificial tube feeding and poor quality of life, there is little research that examines the patient's subjective experience of nutrition support. This study investigated the experiences of PEG tube feeding in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radical treatment. Conventional Q-methodology was used with 15 head and neck cancer patients, who rank-ordered 36 statements according to the extent to which these reflected their experiences of PEG tube feeding. The sorted statements were factor-analysed case-wise to provide clusters of similar experiences. Three perspectives emerged. Factor 1, labelled 'Constructive cognitive appraisal', focused around positive adaptation to, and acceptance of, PEG feeding. Factor 2, labelled 'Cognitive-affective dissonance', reflected ambivalence between cognitive acceptance and affective rejection of the PEG tube. Factor 3, labelled 'Emotion-focused appraisal', was characterised by tube-focused anxiety and fear. The findings broadly confirm Levanthal et al.'s Self-Regulatory Model of coping and support the need for genuine and individualised patient-centred nutritional care. PMID:22329827

  18. Understanding the experiences and quality of life issues of Bahraini women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Ghufran A; Whitford, David L

    2014-04-01

    We explored the experiences of Bahraini women who have survived breast cancer and their perception of quality of life after diagnosis. We conducted in depth, semi-structured face-to-face interviews with twelve women diagnosed with breast cancer. A qualitative method using semi-structured interviews on a purposive sample of 12 Bahraini women with breast cancer was conducted. Similarities and differences in women's experience were identified through thematic analysis of interview transcripts using a constant comparative approach. The themes identified were meaning of cancer and quality of life, spirituality and beliefs about causes of breast cancer, coping mechanisms, impact of illness and change in relationships. Quality of life was framed in terms of the ability to perform daily duties with emphasis on the physical component of quality of life. Themes that differed from previous western studies included a heavy emphasis on spiritual practices for comfort; the use of traditional clothing (hijab and abaya) to hide hair and body changes; the important role played by the family and husband in treatment decisions and concerns regarding satisfying the sexual needs of the husband, which were related to a fear of losing the husband to a second wife. Evil eye, stress and God's punishment were believed to be fundamental causes of the disease. The emotional shock of the initial diagnosis, concerns about whether to reveal the diagnosis and a desire to live a normal life were consistent with previous studies. However, cultural and religious issues such as role of the husband and impact of prayers were also important here. These themes are important to healthcare professionals for ensuring an individualized approach to the treatment of women with breast cancer. PMID:24631996

  19. A necessary evil: The experiences of men with prostate cancer undergoing imaging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathers, Sandra A., E-mail: s.mathers@rgu.ac.uk [Robert Gordon University, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7QG (United Kingdom); McKenzie, Graham A.; Robertson, Elizabeth M. [Robert Gordon University, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7QG (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: This study sought to explore the experience of people with a diagnosis of cancer while attending for imaging procedures. The diversity and complexity of the issues described within individual interviews made it impossible to include all cancer groups in one paper. This paper focuses on the cohort of men with prostate cancer. Method: An opportunistic sample of men (n = 8) were recruited from Cancer Support Groups throughout the North-east of Scotland. A qualitative, exploratory and retrospective study design was employed using semi-structured interviews. All interviews were audio taped and full transcripts produced. These were analysed following the recommendations of Miles and Huberman (1994). Main findings: Men were keen to take part in the study, and described experiences from pre-diagnosis to the date of interview. Participants reported different routes to diagnosis, then having a range of diagnostic procedures indicating a very personal journey with no standardised approach. Imaging was not seen as a separate event but part of the whole story. The provision of radiology patient information material was haphazard. Participants could explain why they were having these procedures, and saw them as a 'necessary evil'. The provision of results of their tests was complex and chaotic, and was described as an anxious time. Conclusion: This study provides a unique insight into the experiences of men with prostate cancer relating to their attendance for imaging. Health professionals need to listen to their patients and learn, in order to provide a high quality, patient-centred imaging service.

  20. Protective factors for HIV infection among Mexican American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mark A; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2010-01-01

    Latinos in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify potential themes for inclusion in effective HIV prevention interventions for Mexican American men who have sex with men (MSM). The authors used a phenomenological design to explore the lived experiences of Mexican American MSM who had grown up in Dallas, Texas, regarding protective factors for HIV infection. A total of 20 30- to 60-year-old Mexican American MSM participated in semistructured interviews. During data analysis, the following themes concerning protective behaviors for HIV emerged: (a) accepting one's sexuality; (b) machismo; (c) being in love; (d) respect for family, self, and life; and (e) having HIV-living now. Strategies for potential inclusion in HIV prevention interventions geared toward Mexican American MSM were identified based on these themes. The recommendations encompass modification of behavioral interventions and related social policies.

  1. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences. PMID:25846573

  2. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  3. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer at Okayama University Hospital: A Review of 10 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Takao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer by our group at Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences began in June 2001, and in the present report, we review our 10-year experience with this treatment modality at Okayama University Hospital. The local efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer depends on tumor size and the type of electrode used, but not on tumor type. An important factor for the prevention of local failure may be the acquisition of an adequate ablative margin. The combination of embolization and radiation therapy enhances the local efficacy. Local failure may be salvaged by repeating the radiofrequency ablation, particularly in small tumors. Survival rates after radiofrequency ablation are quite promising for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastasis from colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. The complications caused by radiofrequency ablation can be treated conservatively in the majority of cases. However, attention should be paid to rare but serious complications. This review shows that radiofrequency ablation is a promising treatment for patients with lung cancer.

  5. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Admi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines care transition experiences of cancer patients and assesses barriers to effective transitions.Methods: Participants were adult Hebrew, Arabic, or Russian speaking oncology patients and health care providers from hospital and community settings. Qualitative (n=77 and quantitative (n=422 methods such as focus groups, interviews and self-administered questionnaires were used. Qualitative analysis showed that patients faced difficulties navigating a complex and fragmented healthcare system.Results: Mechanisms to overcome barriers included informal routes such as personal relationships, coordinating roles by nurse coordinators and the patients' general practitioners (GPs. The most significant variable was GPs involvement, which affected transition process quality as rated on the CTM (p<0.001. Our findings point to the important interpersonal role of oncology nurses to coordinate and facilitate the care transition process.Conclusion: Interventions targeted towards supporting the care transition process should emphasize ongoing counseling throughout a patient’s care, during and after hospitalization.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Admi H, Muller E, Shadmi E. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34011.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  6. [The Nutritional Care Experience of a Post-Operative Periampullary Cancer Patient With Cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yan-Ting; Chiang, Pin-Yi; Shun, Shiow-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Cachexia is one of the most widely overlooked of the syndromes that are experienced by cancer patients. This syndrome is especially prevalent among patients with gastroenterology tract cancer. Although the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) issued palliative-care practice guidelines for cachexia in 2015, guidelines have yet to be issued for the clinical setting. The authors reviewed the literature and applied their clinical experience to create an approach for identifying the degree of cachexia in a post-operative patient with periampullary cancer. This approach assesses the nutritional status, physical status, laboratory results, and gastrointestinal system functions of the patient using the Cachexia Assessment Scale (CAS) and NCCN Practice Guidelines for Cachexia. The patient improved under nursing care with an increase in nutritional intake and physical activity facilitating their process of post-surgical physical recovery. The authors hope that this experience using the combined CAS-NCCN Practice Guidelines will help clinical caregivers better understand how to apply the relevant guidelines in clinical settings. The developed approach may help nurses assess the comprehensive nutrition status of patients and related factors in order to provide interventions that will decrease the progression of cachexia effectively and promote quality of life. PMID:27026565

  7. 'It stays with me': the experiences of second- and third-year student nurses when caring for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Okoye, M; Arber, A

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about student nurses experiences of nursing patients with cancer in the UK. With the increasing survival of people with cancer and with cancer no longer seen as a terminal illness it is useful to understand student nurses clinical experience when nursing those with cancer. This study takes a phenomenological approach involving three focus group interviews with 20 student nurses from the second and third year of their course in one centre in the UK. All the students had experience of caring for patients with cancer. The key themes emerging from the study were: Communication, Impact on Self, Lack of Support and End-of-Life-Care. Students emphasised the need to have more knowledge and support in relation to cancer care. They describe how they lack communication skills and found it difficult to handle their emotions. A number of students found the whole experience of caring for patients with cancer emotionally distressing and draining and they describe avoiding contact with these patients by using distancing and avoidance strategies. Student nurses need additional support through demystifying cancer, using reflective practice and good mentoring in the clinical area to enable students to feel supported, and develop confidence in their capacity for care for people with cancer. PMID:24134475

  8. Bowel symptom experiences and management following sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer: A qualitative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Landers, Margaret; McCarthy, Geraldine; Savage, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore participants’ qualitative perspectives on bowel symptom experiences and management strategies following sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and sample The data presented in this paper were gleaned from a semi-structured question that formed part of a larger multi-site quantitative correlational study. From a sample of 143 participants, a total of 77 (62.6%) males and 46 (37.3%) females provided qualitative comments. Participants were age...

  9. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  10. Outcome of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer: A tertiary care centre experience

    OpenAIRE

    Tapesh Bhattacharyya; Suresh C Sharma; Budhi Singh Yadav; Rajinder Singh; Gurpreet Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Introduction of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has dramatically changed the management of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). However, very few randomized trials of NACT have been carried out specifically in LABC patients in our country. In this retrospective analysis, we presented our experience with NACT in LABC patients. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 148 patients of stage III LABC patients treated with NACT, followed by surgery and radiotherapy from January 2006...

  11. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    OpenAIRE

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older) experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n9, aged 74 years and older) were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of ...

  12. Experiences of the family caregiver of a person with intestinal ostomy due to colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gláucia Sousa Oliveira; Marina Bavaresco; Cibelle Barcelos Fillipini; Sara Rodrigues Rosado; Eliza Maria Rezende Dázio; Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava

    2014-01-01

    This is a study with the objective to know the experiences of the family caregiver of a person with intestinal ostomy due to colorectal cancer. A qualitative research, grounded on the humanization referential, made in 2013, through serialized semi-structured interviews and inductive analysis. It was approved by the Ethics and Research Committee under legal opinion no. 237,771. Seven family caregivers participated in this study in a county of southern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Three categori...

  13. Mexican and Mexican-American Literature for the Junior High School. Short Story, Novel, Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose Unified School District, CA.

    Mexican and Mexican American literature for use with existing literature programs is presented in this curriculum guide for junior high school instruction. Purposes of the guide are to improve instruction for both Mexican American students and those of other ethnic backgrounds and to emphasize that American history and literature should be…

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE BREAST CANCER EXPERIENCE OF WOMEN: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN, ASIAN AMERICAN, LATINA AND CAUCASIAN CANCER SURVIVORS

    OpenAIRE

    Ashing-Giwa, Kimlin Tam; PADILLA, GERALDINE; TEJERO, JUDITH; KRAEMER, JANET; Wright, Karen; Coscarelli, Anne; Clayton, Sheila; WILLIAMS, IMANI; HILLS, DAWN

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in American women across most ethnic groups. Although the psychosocial impact of breast cancer is being studied, there is little information on women from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds.

  15. Mexican-Origin Parents’ Work Conditions and Adolescents’ Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Lorey A.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Crouter, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Mexican-origin parents’ work experiences are a distal extra-familial context for adolescents’ adjustment. This two-wave multi-informant study examined the prospective mechanisms linking parents’ work conditions (i.e., self-direction, work pressure, workplace discrimination) to adolescents’ adjustment (i.e., educational expectations, depressive symptoms, risky behavior) across the transition to high school drawing on work socialization and spillover models. We examined the indirect effects of ...

  16. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  17. Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst: The lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibæk, L.; Petersen, L.; Blaakaer, J.;

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery were explored, aiming to provide a patient perspective on being newly diagnosed and starting treatment for ovarian cancer. The study period ran from the first visit in the outpatient clinic, till 8 weeks later, when t....... By offering targeted family counselling and taking good care of the women's general health and well-being, hope could be sustained and early cancer rehabilitation initiated....

  18. Can personal experience of cancer in a spouse, relative or close friend impact on the professional practice of a nurse?

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a relevant topic at this time as there have been many structural and policy changes in the NHS regarding this area. Personal experience of nurses outside of practice is a concept that has received little investigation, although the small amount of literature available does talk about it in the cancer context. There is a large amount of literature regarding carers of cancer patients but does not acknowledge that these carers may also be nurses. Aim: To find out how per...

  19. New tariffs confuse Mexican market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indelpro - the Grupo Alfa/Himont joint venture 150,000-m.t./year polypropylene (PP) plant in Altamira, Mexico - has been working to find its place in the Mexican market since coming onstream in March. At the same time, that market has been complicated by the imposition of import and export tariffs by the U.S. Department of Commerce early this fall. Commerce's accession to a 10% ad valorem tax on US PP exports to Mexico surprised some industry observers. The tariff is scheduled to be phased out within 10 years and is partly countermanded by a 5% tariff over a five-year period on Mexican PP exports to the US. But some market analysts say the arrangement is baffling

  20. The Influence of Educational Experience on the Development of Cognitive Skills as Measured in Formal Tests and Experiments: A Case Study from the Mexican States of Yucatan and Quintana Roo. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Donald W.; Cole, Michael

    The major purpose of the research reported was to assess whether developmental changes in performance on standard psychological tests may be more a reflection of educational experience than maturation or traditional socialization practices. The investigation was reported in three phases: 1) description of the general and specific experimental…

  1. Women Treated for Breast Cancer Experiences of Chemotherapy-Induced Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstedt-Börjesson, Susanne; Nordin, Karin; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise; Holmström, Inger K.; Arving, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer survivors make up a growing population facing treatment that poses long-standing adverse effects including chemotherapy-related body function changes and/or pain. There is limited knowledge of patients’ lived experiences of chemotherapy-induced pain (CHIP). Objective: The aim of this study was to explore CHIP and any long-standing pain experiences in the lifeworld of breast cancer survivors. Methods: Fifteen women participated in a follow-up interview a year after having experienced CHIP. They were interviewed from a lifeworld perspective; the interviews were analyzed through guided phenomenology reflection. Results: A past perspective: CHIP is often described in metaphors, leads to changes in a patient’s lifeworld, and impacts lived time. The women become entirely dependent on others but at the same time feel isolated and alone. Existential pain was experienced as increased vulnerability. Present perspective: Pain engages same parts of the body, but at a lower intensity than during CHIP. The pain creates time awareness. Expected normality in relationships/daily life has not yet been achieved, and a painful existence emerges in-between health and illness. Future perspective: There are expectations of pain continuing, and there is insecurity regarding whom to turn to in such cases. A painful awareness emerges about one’s own and others’ fragile existence. Conclusions: Experiencing CHIP can impact the lifeworld of women with a history of breast cancer. After CHIP, there are continued experiences of pain that trigger insecurity about whether one is healthy. Implications for Practice: Cancer survivors would likely benefit from communication and information about and evaluation of CHIP. PMID:26632880

  2. Mexican doctors serve rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, J

    1991-02-01

    The Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) worked to solve the unemployment problems of physicians and to increase health services to underserved rural areas. In Mexico, 75% of practicing physicians were located in 16 urban areas. Mexico had a large population of 83 million, of whom many in rural areas have been deprived of family planning and medical services. MEXFAM initiated the Community Doctors Project in 1986. The aim was to help Mexican doctors set up a medical practice in marginal urban towns and small towns with low income residents. Funding to physicians was provided for conducting a market survey of the proposed region and for advertising the new medical services. Loans of furniture and medical supplies were provided, and options were provided for purchase of equipment at a later date. During the promotion, services for maternal and child health care were provided for a small fee, while family planning was provided for free. Doctors usually become self-sufficient after about two years. The MEXFAM project established 170 community doctor's offices in 30 out of 32 states. Services were provided for at least 2500 families per office. In 1990, 13 offices were opened to serve an estimated 182,000 clients. A new effort is being directed to owners of Mexican factories. MEXFAM will set up a medical and family planning clinic very close to factories for a company contribution of only $12,000. The clinic promotion is being marketed through videos. MEXFAM found two companies that agreed to support a clinic. PMID:12288711

  3. “My experience has been a terrible one, something I could not run away from”: Zambian women’s experiences of advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna E. Maree

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and the second most common cancer in women treated at the Cancer Diseases Hospital in Zambia. Unfortunately most women present with advanced disease, too late to be cured. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of Zambian women living with advanced breast cancer. We used a descriptive qualitative design and purposive sampling to select the participants. Ten in depth interviews were conducted and thematic analyses analysed the data. Data saturation determined the sample size. The average age of the participants was 48.2 years and most (7 of 10 had Stage IV breast cancer. Four themes arose from the data: experiencing the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, learning about the diagnosis and treatment, undergoing the treatment and living with advanced breast cancer. The study has shown that living with advanced breast cancer comprises severe suffering which started before diagnosis with the inability to recognise the signs. In addition, participants experienced various losses such as femininity, physical strength and appearance, roles and support which changed the lives they had lived before becoming ill. They battled through the chemotherapy and feared stigmatisation, yet receiving treatment and care brought hope.

  4. The first experience in using abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Rapoport

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Even in the mid-twentieth century, Huggins and Hodges proved the susceptibility of prostate cancer cells to hormonal manipulations, by using surgical castration as an example. An average of 18–36 months after initiation of first-line hormonal therapy, patients develop the castration resistance in prostate cancer, one of the causes of which was hyperproduction of the tumor receptors of prostate cancer cells and their hypersusceptibility to the castration levels of testosterone. Long-term treatment in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer was extremely symptomatic and quality of life and overall survival were low. In the 2000s, investigations aimed at designing drugs to treat this category of patients were underway, which have culminated in the advent of three drugs (two of which belong to chemotherapy that are now used in the Russian Federation. The second-line hormonal agent abiraterone acetate (Zytiga is one of these drugs, which was officially registered in 2011. Its mechanism of action is due to inhibition of the enzyme CYP17, leading to the blocked synthesis of testosterone at all levels, including at the intracrine level, and achieving testosterone levels below the postcastration ones. The paper reviews the literature regarding abiraterone acetate and the first experience in using second-line hormonal therapy in three patients.

  5. Experience of parental cancer in childhood is a risk factor for psychological distress during genetic cancer susceptibility testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, I.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Brocker-Vriends, A. H. J. T.; van Asperen, C. J.; Sijmons, R. H.; Seynaeve, C.; Van Gool, A. R.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Tibben, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study explores the effect of age at the time of parental cancer diagnosis or death on psychological distress and cancer risk perception in individuals undergoing genetic testing for a specific cancer susceptibility. Patients and methods: Cancer-related distress, worry and risk perce

  6. Laparoscopy Versus Robotic Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Center Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Scheiterle, Maximilian; Di Mare, Giulio; Gnoni, Pasquale; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco

    2016-08-01

    Background Minimally invasive approach has gained interest in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences between laparoscopy and robotics for colorectal cancer in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes in an initial experience of a single center. Materials and Methods Clinico-pathological data of 100 patients surgically treated for colorectal cancer from March 2008 to April 2014 with laparoscopy and robotics were analyzed. The procedures were right colonic, left colonic, and rectal resections. A comparison between the laparoscopic and robotic resections was made and an analysis of the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups was performed. Results Forty-two patients underwent robotic resection and 58 underwent laparoscopic resection. The postoperative mortality was 1%. The number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in robotics. The conversion rate was 7.1% for robotics and 3.4% for laparoscopy. The operative time was lower in laparoscopy for all the procedures. No differences were found between the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups. Conclusions This initial experience has shown that robotic surgery for the treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma is a feasible and safe procedure in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes, although an appropriate learning curve is necessary. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate real advantages of robotics over laparoscopy. PMID:26721500

  7. Experiences and perceived needs of children and teenagers with cancer and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar González Carrión

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:- To know the experiencies and perceived needs of children and teenagers with cancer and their care givers regarding the received care and their oncological process. - To identify proposals for improving care.Methodology: A qualitative study based on individual semistructured interviews and focus interviews with children and teenagers diagnosed of cancer was designed. Results: Hospitalization, therapeutic and diagnose procedures, side effects and isolation when neutropenia, were identified as the main traumatic experiencies suffered by children and relatives. These issues were related to physic, psycologic, social and educational problems. Mothers showed sad and other depression feelings, although those feelings changed as the process of the illness evolved. Some improvement proposals were made by relatives, including the need of a better correlation between health resources and patient/relatives needs. The proffesional support and the care received were given great value.Conclusions: The illness was associated to physic, psycologic and social consequencies for both patients and relatives. Taking their opinion into account is very useful to improve the quality of the health servicies offered to children with cancer and their family.

  8. [Laboratory animals and official Mexican norms (NOM-062-ZOO-1999)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aluja, Aline S

    2002-01-01

    This article concerns animal experimentation and official Mexican norm Nom 0062-Zoo-1999 entitled Technical specifications for the production, care and use of laboratory animals. The history of animal experimentation is briefly resumed. During the nineteenth century, doubts arose as to the right to expose animals to experimental procedures that frequently cause pain and suffering. The first law which protected animals against cruelty was passed in Great Britain in 1876; subsequently, other nations approved similar legislation. During the second part of the twentieth century, opposition to animal experimentation grew. Other groups, mainly scientists and pharmaceutical concerns, defended the right to use animals in research. New knowledge concerning the neurophysiology, cognitive capacity, and the animal faculty to experience pain is briefly mentioned. Guidelines on care and use of animals used in research published in several countries are listed. Finally, the recently published Mexican legislation (Norm) referring to production, care and use of laboratory animals is discussed and its benefits are stressed. PMID:12096401

  9. Mexican-origin parents' work conditions and adolescents' adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorey A; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Crouter, Ann

    2015-06-01

    Mexican-origin parents' work experiences are a distal extrafamilial context for adolescents' adjustment. This 2-wave multiinformant study examined the prospective mechanisms linking parents' work conditions (i.e., self-direction, work pressure, workplace discrimination) to adolescents' adjustment (i.e., educational expectations, depressive symptoms, risky behavior) across the transition to high school drawing on work socialization and spillover models. We examined the indirect effects of parental work conditions on adolescent adjustment through parents' psychological functioning (i.e., depressive symptoms, role overload) and aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship (i.e., parental solicitation, parent-adolescent conflict), as well as moderation by adolescent gender. Participants were 246 predominantly immigrant, Mexican-origin, 2-parent families who participated in home interviews when adolescents were approximately 13 and 15 years of age. Results supported the positive impact of fathers' occupational self-direction on all 3 aspects of adolescents' adjustment through decreased father-adolescent conflict, after controlling for family socioeconomic status and earner status, and underemployment. Parental work pressure and discrimination were indirectly linked to adolescents' adjustment, with different mechanisms emerging for mothers and fathers. Adolescents' gender moderated the associations between fathers' self-direction and girls' depressive symptoms, and fathers' experiences of discrimination and boys' risk behavior. Results suggest that Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' perceptions of work conditions have important implications for multiple domains of adolescents' adjustment across the transition to high school. PMID:25938710

  10. Sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer: five years experience from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Balslev, E.; Jensen, D.;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Danish experience from the first five years with sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) as a routine staging procedure in early breast cancer is reported. METHODS: During the period January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006, 14 923 patients were diagnosed at Danish breast surgical centers...... often hormone receptor positive, and had lower grade, than patients staged with lymph node dissection (ALND). Blue dye and radio colloid were used in combination in 82%. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed in 61%, and frozen section was performed in 87%. Originally, peritumoral injection of tracer was most...... recurrence among node negative patients was observed more often after staging by SLNB (0.5%) than after ALND (0.2%, p =0.04). CONCLUSION: Two thirds of breast cancer patients can be safely staged with the sentinel node technique, half of these will need no further axillary surgery. The loco-regional control...

  11. Contemporary Management of Penile Cancer: Greater than 15-Year MSKCC Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Kelvin A.; Winer, Andrew; Sfakianos, John P.; Poon, Stephen A.; Kent, Matthew; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul; Dalbagni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Penile cancer is a rare malignancy, and few guidelines are available to define treatment paradigms. For greater understanding of the natural history of surgically treated penile cancer, we analyzed experience at our institution. Materials and Methods Using an institutional database, we identified 127 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis from 1995 – 2011. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival data were compared using the log-rank test. The difference in risk of cancer-specific death by lymph node status and histological grade was determined by univariate Cox regression analysis. Results Five-year CSS for pTis, pT1, pT2, and pT3/4 was 100%, 84% (95% CI 58%-95%), 54% (95% CI 33%-71%), and 54% (95% CI 25%-76%), respectively (P ≤ .005). Three-year CSS for patients with N0, N+, and Nx disease was 90% (95% CI 47%-99%), 65% (95% CI 47%-79%), and 86% (95% CI 73%-93%), respectively (P = .03). The receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not change per 5 year period over the 16 years of our study. Median follow-up was 2.8 years. Conclusions Penile cancer patients with advanced disease had poor survival. Tumor stage and nodal status were significant predictors of CSS. Penis-sparing approaches may be considered for most patients; however, pathological stage and grade dictate the management and ultimate outcome. Further studies are necessary to clarify the benefits of chemotherapy in this disease. PMID:24775572

  12. A Turnover Model for the Mexican Maquiladoras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertz, Carl P.; Stevens, Michael J.; Campion, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    From interviews with 47 Mexican maquiladora workers, a model of voluntary turnover was created and compared with models from the United States, Canada, England, and Australia. Despite similarities, the cultural and economic environment affected the precise content of antecedents in the Mexican model. (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  13. Mexican Managers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2001-01-01

    Global managers in Mexico identified what their U.S. counterparts should know about Mexican culture to do business effectively. Suggested Mexican and U.S.cultures are exact opposites in many respects. Discussed differences in building business relationships, attitudes toward time, family and religious values, communication patterns, and…

  14. Clinical trends and outcomes of male breast cancer: Experience of a tertiary oncology centre in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Mukherjee

    2014-08-01

    outcomes of Male Breast Cancer: experience of a tertiary oncology centre in India. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:02035. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0203.5

  15. Children of the Harvest: The Schooling of Dust Bowl and Mexican Migrants during the Depression Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Paul; Donato, Ruben

    1990-01-01

    Chronicles experiences of depression era "Okies," juxtaposes them against experiences of Mexican Americans, and illuminates the diminution of agricultural labor in an industrializing society. Schooling for those groups was legitimized by their low occupational status. When economic circumstances improved, whites escaped from migrant labor, but…

  16. Recognizing Writers and Illustrators of Mexican American Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Jennifer; Menchaca, Velma D.

    Contemporary books about Mexican Americans are rare and frequently stereotypical in nature. Until recently, the very few children's books about Mexican Americans were usually written from an outsider's perspective and often displayed negative images and messages about traditional Mexican sex roles, Mexican living conditions, and the Spanish…

  17. Cancer survivors’ perspectives and experience on western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine treatment and rehabilitation: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Wei; Yang, Zhi-Qi; Liu, Cong; Chen, Si-Jia; Shen, Qian; Zhang, Tian-Rui; Partike, Nancy S; Yuan, Zheng-Ping; Yu, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background In the People’s Republic of China, both western medicine (WM) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are the main treatment and rehabilitation options for cancer patients. This study aimed to explore cancer survivors’ perspectives and experience of treatment and rehabilitation, in order to promote patient-centered activities of treatment and rehabilitation. Methods Using a qualitative research approach, 68 cancer survivors were recruited from eight community cancer rehabilitation organizations in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. Eight focus group interviews were conducted. All these interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the data were analyzed by theme analysis. Results WM was the main choice in treatment phase though study participants noted more side effects. TCM was primarily used in the recovery phase. The lack of communication between doctors and cancer patients appears to affect treatment adherence and impair the doctor–patient relationship. WM was expensive for diagnostic procedures and treatment, while the cumulative costs of frequent use of TCM in the long rehabilitation period were also high. Both treatment options created significant perceived economic burden on patients. Conflicting information about dietary supplements tended to make cancer survivors confused. Conclusion Improving the communication between doctors and cancer patients helps to ameliorate cancer patient adherence and the effect of treatments. It is essential to educate cancer patients about the effect and cost of both WM and traditional TCM. Meanwhile, marketing management and guidance to consumers regarding use of dietary supplements in the cancer rehabilitation field are also necessary. PMID:25565779

  18. Clinical experience with hyperthermia in cancer radiotherapy: Special reference to in vivo thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined use of heat and ionizing radiation is a promising treatment of radioresistant tumors, because the two modalities act complementary for cell killing in vitro. Cells in S phase and chronically hypoxic cells, which as a consequence have a low pH, are vulnerable to heat. This chapter describes the authors' clinical experiences of combined localized hypethermia in cancer radiotherapy and discusses mainly problems associated with temperature measurement and its evaluation, including the effects of electromagnetic waves on the thermometer system, the difference of temperature distribution in static phantom and in vivo, and the method for evaluating the heat dose, administered under conditions of various temperatures

  19. Helping Mexican and Mexican-American Students in the Schools of the East Side Union High School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert

    This document provides information about schools in Mexico and suggests ways that U.S. schools can use this information to improve education for Mexican and Mexican American students. Chapter 1 describes the Mexican educational system as a vantage point for understanding the expectations of Mexican parents in the United States. This chapter covers…

  20. Characterization of Mexican zeolite minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    50% of the Mexican territory is formed by volcanic sequences of the Pliocene type, which appear extensively in the northwest states (Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Durango) and west of Mexico (Jalisco and Nayarit), in central Mexico (Zacatecas, Guanajuato, San Luis Potosi, Queretaro, Hidalgo) and south of Mexico (Guerrero, Oaxaca); therefore, it is to be expected that in our country big locations of natural zeolites exist in its majority of the clinoptilolite type. The present study was focused toward the characterization of two Mexican natural zeolite rocks presumably of the clinoptilolite and filipsite types, one of them comes from the state of Chihuahua and the other of a trader company of non metallic minerals, due that these materials are not characterized, its are not known their properties completely and therefore, the uses that can be given to these materials. In this investigation work it was carried out the characterization of two Mexican zeolite rocks, one coming from the Arroyo zone, municipality of La Haciendita, in the state of Chihuahua; and the other one was bought to a trader company of non metallic minerals. The two zeolites so much in their natural form as conditioned with sodium; they were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum and elementary microanalysis (EDS), surface area analysis (BET), thermal gravimetric analysis. To differentiate the heulandite crystalline phase of the other clinoptilolite rock, its were carried out thermal treatments. The quantification of Al, Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe was carried out in solution, by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy and the quantity of Si was determined by gravimetry. The zeolite rocks presented for the major part the crystalline heulandite and clinoptilolite phases for the most part, and it was found that the zeolite coming from the state of Chihuahua possesses a bigger content of heulandite and the denominated filipsite it is really a zeolite

  1. Clinical experience of SIB-IMRT in anal cancer and selective literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate feasibility and outcome of our institutional SIB-IMRT schedule in patients with anal cancer and to selectively review the literature on different SIB-IMRT schedules. Between 01/08-06/13 25 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell anal cancer were treated in our institution with IMRT. Radiotherapy was delivered in two series using a SIB-IMRT schedule of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and adjacent pelvic lymph nodes and 38 Gy/1.52 Gy to elective nodes followed by an IMRT boost of 7×2 Gy = 14 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes (cumulative prescription dose: 59 Gy). Mean follow-up was 20 months (range: 4-68). The 2-year-local control, colostomy-free survival, distant metastases-free survival and overall survival rates were 92%, 92%, 92%, and 88%, respectively. Grade 3 acute skin toxicity was observed in 6 patients (24%). No high grade gastrointestinal or urinary acute toxicity occurred. Four patients required more than one day of treatment interruption due to acute toxicity. No grade 3 or higher late sequelae were observed. We present our institutional SIB-IMRT experience treating patients with anal cancer in two series using moderate single doses from 1.5-2.0 Gy. Our results, in terms of loco-regional outcome and toxicity, were comparable to other studies. The incidence of treatment interruptions was very low. Therefore this schedule appears to be safe for clinical use

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment Experience of 14 Cases of Breast Cancer Associated with Pregnancy or Lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhixiang; WU Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnosis and treatment experience of breast cancer associated with pregnancy or lactation. Methods: From January 1990 to December 2005, 14 cases with breast cancer associated with pregnancy or lactation were analyzed retrospectively (TNM stage Ⅱ, 2 cases; stage Ⅲ, 11 cases; stage Ⅳ, 1 case). Diagnosis was established by fine needle aspiration biopsy primarily or routine pathological method if necessary. Abortion was used for discontinuation of pregnancy in 1 case with early pregnancy and 1 case with meddle pregnancy. 2 patients with late pregnancy received cesarean section,10patients of breast cancer associated with lactation received multidisciplinary and-tumor treatment after discontinuation of lactation. Results: Diagnosis was confirmed by fine noodle aspiration biopsy in 9 cases and by secondary routine pathological method in the other 5 cases, 12 cases were followed up, 1 case of stage Ⅳ died of metastasis 5 months after diagnosis. 3-, 5-year survival rates in 10 cases of stage Ⅲ were 66% and 30% respectively. One case remained alive without recurrence for 8 years up to now. Conclusion: A thorough breast examination is necessary at the first antenatal visit physicians should aggressively pursue work-up in women with a palpable breast tass. In the patients during the second and third trimness,the various modalities available for treatment inholding abortion and their risks and beneath modalities available for treatment including abortion and their risks and benefits must be discussed openly with patients and their families.

  3. Clinical Experience on Colorectal Cancer%大肠癌临证心悟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程剑华

    2014-01-01

    This article would summarize the author's experience in treating colorectal cancer from aspects of the main points of colorectal cancer's syndrome differentiation, using the principle of syndrome differentiation to guide individualized treatment, make full use of the drugs' attributive channel theory and use classical prescriptions and paired herbs, advanced colorectal cancer patients should focus on conditioning and improving symptoms, develop route of administration to play advantages of Chinese medicine, pay attention to life care and match with diet therapy, psychother-apy and medication, in order to provide some references to clinical treatment.%本文将从大肠癌的辨证要点、运用辨证论治原则指导个体化治疗、充分利用药物归经理论,运用经方,使用对药、晚期肠癌患者重在调理和改善症状、拓展给药途径,发挥中医优势、重视生活调养,食疗、心理治疗与药物治疗相配合等方面对笔者治疗大肠癌的心得体会进行总结,以供临床参考。

  4. Researching experiences of terminal cancer: a systematic review of methodological issues and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, F M; Kendall, M; Bentley, A; Maguire, R; Worth, A; Murray, S; Boyd, K; Brown, D; Kearney, N; Sheikh, A

    2008-07-01

    The objectives of this review were to assess the methods and approaches applied to end-of-life cancer research based on papers focusing on approaches or methodological issues related to seeking the views of people affected by terminal cancer. A comprehensive search of 10 databases (January 1980-February 2004) was undertaken. References were screened, quality assessed and data extracted by two reviewers. Analysis followed a meta-narrative approach. Fifteen papers were included. They discussed 'traditional' approaches, such as focus groups, interviews, surveys, as well as innovative approaches allied to the arts. They reveal that mixed methods are gaining popularity. The emotional demands placed on researchers and the ethical issues involved in this research area were also discussed. We concluded that researchers should embrace innovative approaches from other areas of social science, such as the use of arts-based techniques. This may facilitate recruitment of the hard-to-reach groups and engage with experiences that may be otherwise difficult to verbalize. Although researching the needs of the dying carries challenges, these are not the exclusive domain of the cancer field. This study reveals that diverse methods, from research-based drama to postal questionnaires, can enhance end-of-life research. However, this review reveals the need for more methodological work to be undertaken and disseminated. PMID:18485015

  5. Aloneness: the lived experience of women with cancer of the vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, H; Clifford, C

    2011-11-01

    Cancer of the vulva is a rare condition that has been subject to limited research with a paucity of studies into the impact of this disease. Although the physical effects may readily be described, little is known about the psychological, emotional and social impact of this condition. To increase insights, a qualitative research study was undertaken to explore the experiences of women with vulval cancer living in the UK. An interpretive phenomenological approach based on the work of Heidegger and Van Manen was used to frame the study in which 13 women under 50 years of age were interviewed between 6 months and 5 years after their surgery. Data were analysed using framework analysis described by Ritchie and Spencer. This article describes the concept of aloneness which emerged from the data. This includes consideration of the women's sense of isolation due to the geographical distance between the woman's home and the hospital, and a sense of separation as they described their loss of sexual function and ability to enjoy the sexual relationship they had previously, following the onset of their symptoms of vulval cancer and subsequent treatment. The women's sense of aloneness was also manifest in their perception that there was a lack of knowledge and understanding about this condition both in their social world and the healthcare system in which they received treatment. PMID:21481049

  6. Women's experiences of the breast cancer diagnostic process: A thematic evaluation of the literature; Recall and biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to use relevant literature to understand women's experiences of diagnostic breast cancer procedures; in this case their experiences of being recalled and of having a biopsy. Method: A structured literature search was performed to locate relevant research. Research articles published between 2002 and 2013 were identified in CINAHL, MEDLINE and Science Direct. The quality of the research was assessed using an appropriate critical appraisal tool to enable a systematic and consistent assessment. Results: Thematic analysis of the literature identified five themes: fear, pain and discomfort, waiting, the physical environment and staff interactions. Women's experiences are unique and diverse; however, literature suggests that these themes do summarise women's experiences. Conclusion: Women's experiences of diagnostic breast cancer procedures are not limited to the examinations alone but encompass the entire experience. These themes influence women's experiences and their perception of care

  7. Acculturation and Enculturation Trajectories Among Mexican-American Adolescent Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, George P.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino; Losoya, Sandra H.; Cota-Robles, Sonia; Chassin, Laurie; Lee, Joanna M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines changes over time in ethnic affirmation/belonging and ethnic identity achievement, Spanish language use, English language use, Mexican/Mexican-American affiliation/identification and Anglo affiliation/identification in a sample of Mexican-American adolescents participating in a longitudinal study of juvenile offenders. The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II were completed by the Mexican-American adolescents 7 time...

  8. Effectiveness and adverse effects of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: Japanese experience and perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Satoru Ueno; Yasuhide Kitagawa; Takashi Fukagai; Hideyuki Akaza

    2012-01-01

    Recently,novel anti-androgens and inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis have been developed through the elucidation of mechanisms of castration resistance of prostate cancer.We believe that these new developments will improve hormonal therapy.On the other hand,there has been an increase in criticism of hormonal therapy,because hormonal therapy is supposed to induce adverse effects such as cardiovascular disease.In this review,we have introduced the Japanese experience of hormonal therapy,because we believe that there may be ethnic differences between Caucasians and Asian people in the efficacy and adverse effects of hormonal therapy.First,we showed that primary hormonal therapy can achieve long-term control of localized prostate cancer in some cases and that quality of life of patients receiving hormonal therapy is rather better than previously thought.Neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in cases undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very useful for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer.Further clinical trials are required to confirm the efficacy of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy.We showed that the death from cardiovascular diseases in Japanese patients receiving hormonal therapy was not higher than that in the general population.However,efforts should be made to decrease the adverse effects of hormonal therapy,because life-style change may increase the susceptibility to adverse effects by hormonal therapy even in Japan.Managements of endocrine and metabolic dysfunction,such as diabetes mellitus,are essential.New hormonal compounds such as selective androgen receptor modulators capable of specifically targeting prostate cancer are expected to be developed.

  9. Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection in Patients With Nonseminomatous Testicular Cancer: A Single Center Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowroozi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Testicular cancer accounts for about 1 - 1.5% of all malignancies in men. Radical orchiectomy is curative in 75% of patients with stage I disease, but advance stage with retroperitoneal lymph node involvement needs chemotherapy. All patients who have residual masses ≥ 1 cm after chemotherapy should undergo postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND. Objectives Treatment of advanced nonseminomatous testicular cancer is usually a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. We described our experience about postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND in our center. Patients and Methods In a retrospective cross-sectional study between 2006 and 2011, patients with a history of postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND in Imam Khomeini hospital were evaluated. All patients had normal postchemotherapy serum tumor markers and primary nonseminomatous cancer. We reviewed retrospectively clinical, pathological, and surgical parameters associated with PC-RPLND in our center. Results Twenty-one patients underwent bilateral PC-RPLND. Mean age was 26.3 years (ranged 16 - 47. Mean size of retroperitoneal mass after chemotherapy was 7.6 cm. Mean operative time was 198 minutes (120 - 246 minutes. Mean follow-up time was 38.6 months. Pathologic review showed presence of fibrosis/necrosis, viable germ cell tumor and teratoma in 8 (38.1%, 10 (47.6% and 3 (14.28% patients, respectively. One patient in postoperative period of surgery and three patients in two first years after surgery were expired. Of 17 alive patients, only two (11.8% had not retrograde ejaculation. Conclusions PC-RPLND is one the major operations in the field of urology, which is associated with significant adjunctive surgeries. In appropriate cases, PC-RPLND was associated with good cancer specific survival in tertiary oncology center.

  10. Locally advanced cervix cancer: chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery or radiotherapy. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary or neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy has potential advantages for locally advanced cervix cancer. It can down stage a cancer and allow definitive local therapy to be technically possible (surgery), or potentially more effective (radiotherapy). It can also eradicate subclinical systemic metastases. This report reviews a single institution's experience of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy for cervix cancer over a 13-year period. One hundred and six patients were treated with this intent. The patients were analysed for their response to chemotherapy, treatment received, survival, relapse and toxicity. The chemotherapy was feasible and the majority of patients had a complete or partial response (58.5%). Eight patients did not proceed to local treatment. Forty-six patients had definitive surgery and 52 had definitive radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival was 27% and the majority of patients died with disease. The first site of relapse was usually in the pelvis (46.2%). Late complications that required ongoing medical therapy (n = 6) or surgical intervention (n = 2) were recorded in eight patients (7.5%). On univariate analysis stage (P= 0.04), tumour size (P = 0.01), lymph node status (P=0.003), response to chemotherapy (P = 0.045) and treatment (P = 0.003) were all significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, tumour size (P < 0.0001) and nodal status (P = 0.02) were significant predictors of survival. Despite the impressive responses to chemotherapy of advanced cervix cancer, there is evidence from randomized trials that it does not improve or compromise survival prior to radiotherapy. As its role prior to surgery remains unclear, it should not be used in this setting outside a prospective randomized trial. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Parent Discrimination Predicts Mexican-American Adolescent Psychological Adjustment 1 Year Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Guadalupe; Gonzales, Nancy A; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    This study examined whether Mexican-American parents' experiences with discrimination are related to adolescent psychological adjustment over time. The extent to which associations between parent discrimination and adolescent adjustment vary as a function of parents' ethnic socialization of their children was also examined. Participants included 344 high school students from Mexican or Mexican-American backgrounds (primarily second generation; ages 14-16 at Wave 1) and their primary caregivers who completed surveys in a 2-year longitudinal study. Results revealed that parent discrimination predicted internalizing symptoms and self-esteem among adolescents 1 year later. Additionally, adolescents were more likely to report low self-esteem in relation to parents' increased experiences of discrimination when parents conveyed ethnic socialization messages to them. PMID:27224903

  12. Experiences of women with breast cancer: exchanging social support over the CHESS computer network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, B R; McTavish, F; Hawkins, R; Gustafson, D H; Pingree, S

    2000-01-01

    Using an existential-phenomenological approach, this paper describes how women with breast cancer experience the giving and receiving of social support in a computer-mediated context. Women viewed their experiences with the computer-mediated support group as an additional and unique source of support in facing their illness. Anonymity within the support group fostered equalized participation and allowed women to communicate in ways that would have been more difficult in a face-to-face context. The asynchronous communication was a frustration to some participants, but some indicated that the format allowed for more thoughtful interaction. Motivations for seeking social support appeared to be a dynamic process, with a consistent progression from a position of receiving support to that of giving support. The primary benefits women received from participation in the group were communicating with other people who shared similar problems and helping others, which allowed them to change their focus from a preoccupation with their own sickness to thinking of others. Consistent with past research is the finding that women in this study expressed that social support is a multidimensional phenomenon and that their computer-mediated support group provided abundant emotional support, encouragement, and informational support. Excerpts from the phenomenological interviews are used to review and highlight key theoretical concepts from the research literatures on computer-mediated communication, social support, and the psychosocial needs of women with breast cancer. PMID:11010346

  13. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer.

  14. Concepts within the Chinese culture that influence the cancer pain experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Mih; Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; Pantilat, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe some of the concepts within the Chinese culture that influence the sociocultural dimension of the cancer pain experience. The major concepts that influence Chinese patients' perspectives on cancer pain and its management include Taoism/energy, Buddhism, and Confucianism. Within the beliefs of Taoism/energy, pain occurs if Qi, or blood circulation, is blocked. To relieve pain, the blockage of Qi/blood must be removed and the person needs to maintain harmony with the universe. Within the beliefs of Buddhism, pain/suffering is a power, unwanted but existent, that comes from a barrier in the last life; from the objective world; from a person's own sensation; or from other people, animals, and materials. Only by following the 8 right ways (ie, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration) can an individual end the path of pain/suffering. A Confucian believes that pain is an essential element of life, a "trial" or a "sacrifice." Therefore, when a person suffers with pain, he or she would rather endure the pain and not report it to a clinician until the pain becomes unbearable. Oncology nurses who care for Chinese patients need to understand the fundamental beliefs that influence the sociocultural dimension of the pain experience for these patients. This information will assist the oncology nurse in developing a more effective pain management plan. PMID:18490884

  15. Mexican national pyronometer network calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAldes, M.; Villarreal, L.; Estevez, H.; Riveros, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to take advantage of the solar radiation as an alternate energy source it is necessary to evaluate the spatial and temporal availability. The Mexican National Meterological Service (SMN) has a network with 136 meteorological stations, each coupled with a pyronometer for measuring the global solar radiation. Some of these stations had not been calibrated in several years. The Mexican Department of Energy (SENER) in order to count on a reliable evaluation of the solar resource funded this project to calibrate the SMN pyrometer network and validate the data. The calibration of the 136 pyronometers by the intercomparison method recommended by the World Meterological Organization (WMO) requires lengthy observations and specific environmental conditions such as clear skies and a stable atmosphere, circumstances that determine the site and season of the calibration. The Solar Radiation Section of the Instituto de Geofísica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México is a Regional Center of the WMO and is certified to carry out the calibration procedures and emit certificates. We are responsible for the recalibration of the pyronometer network of the SMN. A continuous emission solar simulator with exposed areas with 30cm diameters was acquired to reduce the calibration time and not depend on atmospheric conditions. We present the results of the calibration of 10 thermopile pyronometers and one photovoltaic cell by the intercomparison method with more than 10000 observations each and those obtained with the solar simulator.

  16. The ethnic context of Mexican American fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, J C; Krivo, L J

    1991-01-01

    Researchers analyzed 1980 data on 9954 ever married Mexican American 20-44 year old women living in metropolitan statistical areas (MSA) in the US with at least 50 Mexican Americans to test a multilevel model of Mexican American fertility. The model included percent Mexican American and measures of ethnic cultural integration and constraints in labor market opportunities. The index of ethnic cultural context consisted of percent of Mexican Americans in the MSA who were born in Mexico, immigrated to the US since 1970, and did not speak English well or not at all. Overall it did not have any effect on recent births (at least 1 birth in past 3 years). Yet it did increase the probability of other births among =or30 year old women who already had at least 4 children (p.05). Nevertheless only 13.4% of =or30 year old women with at least 4 children had another child in the last 3 years, thus the effect on overall Mexican American fertility was minimal. Limited economic opportunities had a significant positive effect on fertility for 30 year old women (p.05) as indicated by the unemployment ratio (unemployment rate of Mexican American females/unemployment rate of White females). The greatest effect of limited economic opportunities was that they induced these women to have a 3rd child. Further percent Mexican American also influenced recent births for 30 year old women even after the researchers included the direct measures of cultural and economic context in their analyses (p.05). Like the measure of economic context, the pattern of significance of percent Mexican American held true across age and parity. Thus economic limitations were more likely to explain the effect of group size on fertility than were cultural patterns. PMID:12317290

  17. “It stays with me”: The experiences of second- and third-year Student Nurses when caring for patients with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    King-Okoye, M; Arber, A

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about student nurses experiences of nursing patients with cancer in the UK. With the increasing survival of people with cancer and with cancer no longer seen as a terminal illness it is useful to understand student nurses clinical experience when nursing those with cancer. This study takes a phenomenological approach involving three focus group interviews with twenty student nurses from the second and third year of their course in one centre in the UK. All the students had exp...

  18. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  19. Mexican and Mexican-American children's funds of knowledge as interventions into deficit thinking: opportunities for praxis in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Miguel M.

    2013-12-01

    In this case study, I use an ethnographic-style approach to understand the funds of knowledge of immigrant families living in colonias on both sides of the US/Mexico border. I focus on how these "knowledges" and concomitant experiences impact the ways we perceive and treat immigrant students who have all too often been viewed through deficit lenses that relegate them to the lowest expectations and outcomes in the classroom. I find that Mexican and Mexican-American families hold unusually sophisticated and relevant "knowledges" to mitigate their everyday lives. In this paper, I will refer to citizens of Mexico, whether they reside in Mexico or have crossed to the United States legally or without documentation for purposes of work, as Mexican. People who have crossed the border and are living in the US as legal residents or have gained citizenship are referred to as Mexican-Americans. They live a hybrid identity that is varied and dynamic, an issue that adds to the complexity of the content and contexts of this study. These families know and use these "knowledges" on a daily basis, yet they are not recognized by teachers in the US as a starting point to affirm and support immigrant children. Instead, immigrant children are relegated to the non-gifted and lower track classes where science is taught from an abstract and non-contextual and therefore less engaged basis. The approach I outline here, based on insights from my case study, can greatly improve teachers' abilities to prepare their curricula for diversity in science education and science literacy as well as for broad expectations for student success.

  20. Mexican labour market performance and emigration

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Pederzini

    2012-01-01

    During the last three decades, the Mexican economy has not generated enough jobs for the expanding labour force. Unemployment rate in Mexico is low, but almost one third of the labour force works in the informal sector. Migration flows from Mexico to the US have been significant in the last decade. Even though the number of Mexicans in the US has remained stable, Mexican immigration to the US dropped from 2006 to 2009. Emigration is a key employment channel for the enlarged working-age Mexica...

  1. Mutation Profiling of Clinically Advanced Cancers Using Next-Generation Sequencing for Targeted Therapy: A Lifespan Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kenneth; Resnick, Murray B; Safran, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The application of modern molecular tests such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) to human malignancies has led to better understanding of tumor biology and the design of targeted molecular therapies. In the research setting, important genomic alterations in tumors have been discovered with potential therapeutic implications but data regarding the impact of this technology in a real world oncology practice is limited. As a result, we decided to review the results of NGS in 144 advanced-stage cancer patients referred to the oncology practices of Lifespan-affiliated centers in Rhode Island. Most cancers revealed genomic alterations in genes commonly mutated in cancer. However, several unexpected genomic alterations were discovered in certain cancers with potential therapeutic intervention. Most cancers contained "actionable" genomic alterations despite being of advanced stage. Our experience demonstrates that application of NGS in the clinical setting contributes both to increasing the therapeutic armamentarium as well as our understanding of tumor biology.

  2. Mutation Profiling of Clinically Advanced Cancers Using Next-Generation Sequencing for Targeted Therapy: A Lifespan Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kenneth; Resnick, Murray B; Safran, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The application of modern molecular tests such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) to human malignancies has led to better understanding of tumor biology and the design of targeted molecular therapies. In the research setting, important genomic alterations in tumors have been discovered with potential therapeutic implications but data regarding the impact of this technology in a real world oncology practice is limited. As a result, we decided to review the results of NGS in 144 advanced-stage cancer patients referred to the oncology practices of Lifespan-affiliated centers in Rhode Island. Most cancers revealed genomic alterations in genes commonly mutated in cancer. However, several unexpected genomic alterations were discovered in certain cancers with potential therapeutic intervention. Most cancers contained "actionable" genomic alterations despite being of advanced stage. Our experience demonstrates that application of NGS in the clinical setting contributes both to increasing the therapeutic armamentarium as well as our understanding of tumor biology. PMID:26422540

  3. Effects of High Temperature and Water Stress on Seed Germination of the Invasive Species Mexican Sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Mexican sunflower is native to Mexico and Central America and was introduced into China early last century. Now it has widely naturalized and is exhibiting increasing invasiveness in South China. As this species often dominates bare ground, a habitat characterized by extreme fluctuation in temperature and water, it is reasonable to hypothesize that it has special adaptations to high temperature and water stress. Using laboratory experiments to simulate these stresses, this study investigated the response of Mexican sunflower seed germination to temperature and water stress, and compared these responses with those previously reported for another invasive, bamboo piper, which is confined to relatively cool and moist habitats in Xishuangbanna. As expected, Mexican sunflower seeds exhibited higher tolerance to these stresses than bamboo piper. Germination of Mexican sunflower seeds was highest at 15-30°C, but significant numbers of seeds germinated and formed seedlings at 10°C and 35°C, at which no bamboo piper seeds formed seedlings, indicating a wider temperature range for germination than the latter. Roughly half the seeds survived 240 h continuous heat treatment and up to 15 h daily periodical heat treatment at 40°C, while bamboo piper seeds were mostly killed by these treatments. About 20% of Mexican sunflower but no bamboo piper seeds germinated after heat treatment for 30 min at 80°C. Germination was completely inhibited in bamboo piper seeds at -0.6 mPa, while 20-60% of Mexican sunflower seeds germinated depending on PEG or NaCl as osmoticum. This higher tolerance in Mexican sunflower seeds accords with its stronger invasiveness in this area. This comparison between two plant invaders demonstrates that invasiveness is not an all-or-nothing situation, and that adaptation to local habitats is a critical determinant of successful invasiveness for an alien plant.

  4. Initial Experience with Magnetic Resonance-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Biopsy in Korean Women with Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Hye Na; Han, Boo-Kyung; Ko, Eun Young; Shin, Jung Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to describe our initial experience with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsy and to determine the malignancy rate of additional lesions identified by MR only in Korean women with breast cancer. Methods A retrospective review identified 22 consecutive patients with breast cancer who had undergone MR-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (VAB) of MR-only identified lesions from May 2009 to October 2011.We evaluated the rate of compliance, the technical success for MR...

  5. Children's very low food security is associated with increased dietary intakes in energy, fat, and added sugar among Mexican-origin children (6-11 y) in Texas border Colonias

    OpenAIRE

    Sharkey Joseph R; Nalty Courtney; Johnson Cassandra M; Dean Wesley R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Food insecurity among Mexican-origin and Hispanic households is a critical nutritional health issue of national importance. At the same time, nutrition-related health conditions, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are increasing in Mexican-origin youth. Risk factors for obesity and type 2 diabetes are more common in Mexican-origin children and include increased intakes of energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods. This study assessed the relationship between children's experi...

  6. Suggested revision for west mexican archeological sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S V; Taylor, R E

    1966-12-16

    A review of the radiocarbon dates and published and unpublished archeological data from the West Mexican states of Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima has resulted in a revised tentative chronology for West Mexico.

  7. Mexican Mid-winter Waterfowl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mexican Mid-winter Waterfowl Survey is a continuation of the annual winter waterfowl survey which is conducted in the United States and Mexico. Since the...

  8. Mexican Fan Palm - Orange Co. [ds350

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset provides the known distribution of Mexican fan palm (Washingtonia robusta) in southern Orange County. The surveys were conducted from May to June, 2007...

  9. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer: Single center experience after 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the Department of Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery of the Hospital for Digestive Surgery in Belgrade, hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (hMIE has been a standard of care for patients with resectable esophageal cancer since 2009. As a next and final step in the change management, from January 2015 we utilized total minimally invasive esophagectomy (tMIE as a standard of care. Objective. The aim of the study was to report initial experiences in hMIE (laparoscopic approach for cancer and analyze surgical technique, major morbidity and 30-day mortality. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 44 patients who underwent elective hMIE for esophageal cancer at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Hospital for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2009 to December 2014. Results. There were 16 (36% middle thoracic esophagus tumors and 28 (64% tumors of distal thoracic esophagus. Mean duration of the operation was 319 minutes (approximately five hours and 20 minutes. The average blood loss was 173.6 ml. A total of 12 (27% of patients had postoperative complications and mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 days. Mean hospital stay after surgery was 16 days. The average number of harvested lymph nodes during surgery was 31.9. The overall 30-day mortality rate within 30 days after surgery was 2%. Conclusion. As long as MIE is an oncological equivalent to open esophagectomy (OE, better relation between cost savings and potentially increased effectiveness will make MIE the preferred approach in high-volume esophageal centers that are experienced in minimally invasive procedures.

  10. Oral cancer from a health promotion perspective: experience of a diagnosis network in Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Bitu SOUSA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to share the experience of implementing a network for the diagnosis of oral cancer by integrating primary, secondary, and tertiary oral health care centers and identifying the possible weaknesses of the process. The study also investigated the risks of exposure to the main risk factors for oral and lip cancer and their most common potentially malignant lesions (PML. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted in two different regions, with patients seen at a primary health care facility from August 2010 to July 2011. Patients with oral lesions were referred to dental specialty centers for biopsy. Patients with PML were treated in dental specialty centers, and patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC were referred to tertiary health care facilities. The dentists' knowledge of PML and SCC was assessed by an objective questionnaire. A total of 3,965 individuals were examined, 296 lesions were found, and 73 biopsies were performed, of which 13.7% were diagnosed as PML and 9.6% as SCC. Tobacco use and sunlight exposure were associated with SCC (85.7% and PML (80%, respectively. In total, 55 dentists were assessed. The lesions most commonly recognized as PML were leukoplakia (74%, erythroplakia (57%, and actinic cheilosis (56%. Most dentists (74% felt incapable of performing biopsies, most likely because of an anxiety towards oral cancer, and 57% had never performed one. The integration of primary and secondary health care enables the diagnosis of PML and SCC and establishes a diagnosis network. However, the inability of most primary care dentists to identify PML and perform biopsies is a weakness of the diagnostic process.

  11. Innovation strategies of Mexican pharmaceutical firms

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Solleiro; Roberto E. López Martínez; Gabriela Sánchez; Yissel Inurrueta; Ana L. Sánchez; Antonia Terán; Jorge I. Castillo

    2010-01-01

    Mexican pharmaceutical market is the most important in Latin America and a significant number of global firms have different business activities in this country: production, licensing of patents, alliances with Mexican firms, distribution facilities or partnerships, etc. In terms of innovation, global pharmaceutical industry has passed through structural changes mainly of technological and institutional nature. These changes have been influential along the whole value chain and have triggered...

  12. Mexican Libraries, Archives and Museums: A Snapshot

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a general introduction to the different types of Mexican libraries, museums and archives, with an emphasis on libraries and related subjects such as serials, book production, and library schools. Literature was consulted and direct data was gathered from websites and through telephone interviews of knowledgeable library professionals. Data used in this essay is not all recent. Therefore it is used mainly as an indicator of the general status of Mexican information development.

  13. The Mexican commom property forestry sector

    OpenAIRE

    Antinori, Camille M.; Rausser, Gordon C.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes preliminary findings of the Mexican National Database and Community Survey Project which examines linkages between institutional characteristics in Mexico’s common property forestry sector and economic and environmental outcomes. Framing the Mexican agrarian community as a unit of analysis characterized by its history, individual members, resources, civic structure and property rights, we use institutional economic analysis to motivate project design and research on thr...

  14. Testosterone therapy in men with prostate cancer: literature review, clinical experience, and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For several decades any diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa has been considered an absolute contraindication to the use of testosterone (T therapy in men. Yet this prohibition against T therapy has undergone recent re-examination with refinement of our understanding of the biology of androgens and PCa, and increased appreciation of the benefits of T therapy. A reassuringly low rate of negative outcomes has been reported with T therapy after radical prostatectomy (RP, radiation treatments, and in men on active surveillance. Although the number of these published reports are few and the total number of treated men is low, these experiences do provide a basis for consideration of T therapy in selected men with PCa. For clinicians considering offering this treatment, we recommend first selecting patients with low grade cancers and undetectable prostate-specific antigen following RP. Further research is required to define the safety of T therapy in men with PCa. However, many patients symptomatic from T deficiency are willing to accept the potential risk of PCa progression or recurrence in return for the opportunity to live a fuller and happier life with T therapy.

  15. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Mayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality.

  16. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Paul C.; Lele, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality. PMID:27669307

  17. Mexican gems as thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using naturally ocurring mexican gems as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) was investigated. Twelve types of gems were irradiated with X and gamma rays in order to determinate their dosimetric properties. Three of these gems showed favorable thermoluminescent characteristics compared with commercial thermoluminescent dosimeters. The plots of their thermoluminescent response as a function of gamma dose are straight lines on full log paper in the dose range 10-2 to 102 Gy. The energy dependence is very strong to low energies of the radiation. Their fading was found to be about 5%/yr. and they may be annealed as reused without loss in sensitivity. Therefore, these gems can be used as X and gamma radiation dosimeters. (author)

  18. The Mexican national satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Ruiz, M. E.; Briskman, R. D.

    1983-10-01

    The satellites, tracking, telemetry, command, and monitoring facilities, and the earth station complex for the Mexican national satellite system, Morelos, are described. The spacecraft are intended to provide educational television, rural telephony, data transmission, and business and industrial services. Scheduled for 1985 launch, the satellites will be placed in GEO and use the C and Ku bands with 12 narrow band and six wideband transponders. Spin-stabilized and solar cell powered, the functional mass will be 666 kg, including propellant. The solar panels will provide 940 W of power and 830 W will be available from NiCd batteries during eclipse conditions. The earth station will be located at Iztapalapa, which will have a 12 m antenna, redundant uplink and downlink radios, and command and ranging equipment. Back-up capability will be provided by a station at Tulancingo. Ku band and C band stations are in planning.

  19. Experiences of the family caregiver of a person with intestinal ostomy due to colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Sousa Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a study with the objective to know the experiences of the family caregiver of a person with intestinal ostomy due to colorectal cancer. A qualitative research, grounded on the humanization referential, made in 2013, through serialized semi-structured interviews and inductive analysis. It was approved by the Ethics and Research Committee under legal opinion no. 237,771. Seven family caregivers participated in this study in a county of southern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Three categories emerged from the data: Relation with the disease and its treatments; Impact facing treatment and rehabilitation and Nets of support. The representation of the disease associated to finitude is reaffirmed. In order to lessen anguish and suffering, the family caregivers search support, mainly in spirituality. The impact resulting from the illness and the rehabilitation process imposes a new order to the caregivers, with personal and social renouncing, which provides a closer and more dedicated relation with the patient.

  20. Family caregiver perspective-taking and accuracy in estimating cancer patient symptom experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobchuk, Michelle M; Vorauer, Jacquie D

    2003-12-01

    As family caregivers assume more prominent roles in the provision of home care to persons with serious illness, investigators must test the effectiveness of novel interventions to facilitate family caring for cancer patients. This article is based on results derived from a larger study carried out in Canada that was designed to compare 98 advanced cancer patient and family caregiver perceptions of 32 patient symptom experiences as captured by the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. We examined two main questions: (1) whether "natural" family caregivers' perceptions of patient lack of energy and worrying are more closely related to a self- or patient-oriented viewpoint and (2) whether induced "imagine-patient" perspective-taking can assist caregivers to achieve better perceptual accuracy. The caregiver's natural responses to neutral instructions that neither encouraged nor discouraged perspective-taking served as the baseline comparison with three other instructional sets, in which caregivers were prompted to: (1) provide a self-report on their own symptom experiences, (2) imagine how they would feel in the patient's situation (imagine-self), or (3) imagine how the patient would respond to his or her symptom situation (imagine-patient). Findings suggested that the family caregivers' natural judgments correspond most closely to what they do under an imagine-patient set than to what they do under any other set. Findings with respect to accuracy indicated that instructions to imagine the patient's perspective helped to prompt adjustments down from a self-oriented viewpoint, although definitive conclusions were precluded by difficulties with order effects.

  1. Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery for early lung cancer: initial experience in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Shingo; Usuda, Jitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (SPVATS) emerged several years ago as a new, minimally invasive surgery for diseases in the field of respiratory surgery, and is increasingly becoming a subject of interest for some thoracic surgeons in Europe and Asia. However, the adoption rate of this procedure in the United States and Japan remains low. We herein reviewed our experience of SPVATS for early lung cancer in our center, and evaluated the safety and minimal invasiveness of this technique. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients who had undergone SPVATS for pathological stage I lung cancer in Nippon Medical School Chiba Hokusoh Hospital between September 2012 and October 2015. In SPVATS, an approximately 4-cm incision was made at the 4th or 5th intercostal space between the anterior and posterior axillary lines. A rib spreader was not used at the incision site, and surgical manipulation was performed very carefully in order to avoid contact between surgical instruments and the intercostal nerves. The same surgeon performed surgery on all patients, and analyzed laboratory data before and after surgery. Results Eighty-four patients underwent anatomical lung resection for postoperative pathological stage I lung cancer. The mean wound length was 4.2 cm. Eighty-four patients underwent lobectomy and segmentectomy, respectively. The mean preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) was 1.85%±0.36%. Our patients consisted of 49 men (58.3%) and 35 women (41.7%), with 64, 18, 1, and 1 having adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, and small-cell lung cancer, respectively. The mean operative time was 175±21 min, operative blood loss 92±18 mL, and duration of drain placement 1.9±0.6 days. The duration of the postoperative hospital stay was 7.1±1.7 days, numeric rating scale (NRS) 1 week after surgery 2.8±0.6, and occurrence rate of allodynia 1 month after surgery 10.7%. No patient developed serious

  2. A Biliteracy Dialogue Approach to One-on-One Writing Instruction with Bilingual, Mexican, Immigrant Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemoller, W. Jason

    2013-01-01

    This interpretive study explores the writing and writing experiences of 2 bilingual, Mexican, immigrant undergraduates at a US university. Hornberger and Skilton-Sylvester's (2003) continua model of biliteracy situates writing interactions to understand how students explore and draw on their bilingual and bicultural resources as they develop…

  3. Adjusting Limit Setting in Play Therapy with First-Generation Mexican-American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Roxanna; Ramirez, Sylvia Z.; Kranz, Peter L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on limit setting in play therapy with first-generation Mexican-American children in two important therapeutic environments that include the traditional indoor playroom and a proposed outdoor play area. The paper is based on a review of the literature and the authors' clinical experiences with this population. They concluded…

  4. Forging a Mestiza Rhetoric: Mexican Women Journalists' Role in the Construction of a National Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Cristina D.

    2009-01-01

    This author investigates Mexican women journalists' writing during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. These women were at the center of the Latin American transnational experience--as female pioneers in the creation of a new mestiza rhetoric that reflected writing from the standpoint of inclusion that was resistant to oppressive ideologies. A…

  5. Learning Objects in Theory and Practice: A Vision from Mexican University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Videgaray, MariCarmen; Hernandez-Zamora, Gregorio; del-Rio-Martinez, Jesus H.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of development and use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) at a public Mexican university, this article explores the tension between the most common definitions and attributes of learning object (LO) in the mainstream literature, and the teacher's practices around the creation and incorporation of LOs in the VLE. This…

  6. Mexican American Women's Reflections from Public High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kay Ann; Fernandez-Bergersen, Sandra Luz

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study examined 5 Mexican American women's experiences at the intersection of race and gender in public high school. Critical race theory provided the analysis and interpretation. The significant findings of this research included the following: (a) Racism is endemic and pervasive in public education; (b) many educational…

  7. Unidad: Las influencias culturales en el arte mexicana (Unit: Cultural Influences in Mexican Art). Dos semanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finere, Neal

    This two-week unit, appropriate for bilingual education settings as well as foreign language programs, deals with the three primary cultural influences found in Mexican contemporary art. The multisensory materials, pragmatic focus, and direct creative student involvement are designed to make it a microcosmic, real-life experience. The first part…

  8. Mexican Education: An Analysis. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Tamara

    This study addresses the basic question: What are the factors that influence the academic experience of Mexican children, and, to what extent do these factors result in deficits in student learning and achievement? The study was conducted over the course of 5 weeks throughout Mexico in the regions of Juarez, Chihuahua, Michoacan, Mexico, D.F.,…

  9. Pazopanib in metastatic renal cancer: a “real-world” experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Chiara Cecere

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a real-world study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS and the overall survival (OS were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included Objective Response Rate (ORR, Disease Control Rate (DCR, and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.5 months. The median OS (mOS was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6-39.9 months; the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3% and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (3, gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR=0.05 [95% CI, 0.05-055], p=0.01; HR=0.10 [95% CI, 0.02-0.43], p=0.002 respectively. A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p= 0.2 and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites 6 (p= 0.08. Worst OS was observed in patients age >70 years old (HR=6.91 [95% CI, 1.49-31.91], p=0.01. The treatment was well tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR=0.22 [95% CI, 0.05-0.8], p=0.03 and thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR=0.12 [95% CI, 0.02-0.78], p=0.02. Our results are consistent with those reported in prospective phase III trials and the published retrospective

  10. Undergraduate nursing students caring for cancer patients: hermeneutic phenomenological insights of their experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambous Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of patients suffering from cancer and especially those facing the death trajectory appears to be complex and demanding not only for student nurses but for professional nurses as well. The educational models often used in nursing require students to face challenging care scenarios, sometimes with minimal or no supervision and guidance. These “worst case scenarios” can be traumatic experiences that can leave the student hopeless and disappointed of themselves and in many cases can “scar” their subsequent professional career. The literature demonstrates that this can be the result of the students’ ill-preparation to care for cancer patients and deal with death and dying. The purpose of this study was to interpret the students’ experiences of coming face-to-face with cancer care during their clinical placements. Methods This is a hermeneutic phenomenological study influenced by the ideas of the French Philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Based on this philosophical enquiry the interpretation process included three stages: 1 naïve reading, 2 structural analysis and 3 comprehensive understanding. Data were collected through reflective/narrative diaries from the 4th grade undergraduate (pre-registration nursing students practicing at oncology, hematology, pediatric oncology departments and hospices. Diaries of twelve students met the inclusion criteria and were included in the interpretation process. The study took place during January and May 2011. Results The interpretation yielded the following themes: a Being part of the center’s life, b Being sympathetic, c Being confronted by others, d Being self-reflective, e Being trapped in the system, f Being caring towards the family and g Being better in clinical practice. Conclusions The students emphasized the need for appropriate preparation both at a theoretical and at a clinical level, as to better confront situations involving death and dying as well as learning

  11. Mexican and Mexican-American Literature for the Senior High School. Poetry, Essay, Drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose Unified School District, CA.

    Four poems, 4 essays, and 1 play are reproduced in full in this curriculum guide designed to supplement traditional literature programs with Mexican and Mexican American literature at the senior high school level. Content descriptions, reference materials, and suggested activities relating to the literary works are included. Concepts which have…

  12. Mexican and Mexican-American Literature for the Junior High School. Poetry, Essay, Drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose Unified School District, CA.

    Three poems, 3 essays, and 1 play are reproduced in full in this curriculum guide designed to supplement traditional literature programs with Mexican and Mexican American literature at the junior high school level. Content descriptions, reference materials, and suggested activities relating to the literary works are included. Concepts which have…

  13. Mexican and Mexican-American Literature for the Senior High School. Short Story, Novel, Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose Unified School District, CA.

    Lesson plans for Mexican and Mexican American short stories, novels, and biographies are contained in this curriculum guides designed to supplement traditional literature programs at the senior high school level. Four short stories are reproduced in full, with related lesson plans providing background information, vocabulary terms, reference…

  14. Fair Start Program: Outreach to Mexican and Mexican American Farmworker Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters-Smith, Carol; Larner, Mary

    This presentation describes a home visiting health education program serving Mexican and Mexican-American migrant farmworkers in Florida. The purposes of the program were to educate farmworker families about pregnancy, childbirth, nutrition, and child development, and to encourage the use of preventive health care services. Home visitors were…

  15. Political Participation and Social Capital among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Central Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Julia; Valeva, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the influence of bridging and bonding social capital in political participation while controlling for sociodemographic and psychological factors among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Illinois. Bridging social capital significantly predicted two types of participation. Participants who felt their lives were linked to those of…

  16. Acculturation and metabolic syndrome risk factors in young Mexican and Mexican-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Chantal A; Ontiveros, Diana; Zubia, Raul Y; Bader, Julia O

    2011-02-01

    Little is known about effects of acculturation on disease risk in young Mexican and Mexican-American women living in a border community. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between acculturation and features of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Mexican and Mexican-American women (n = 60) living in the largest US-Mexico border community. Acculturation was measured by the short acculturation scale for Hispanics and birthplace. Body composition was measured by Bod Pod and daily physical activity was measured by questionnaire and accelerometer. Increased acculturation was related to individual features of MetS and increased risk of MetS. These relationships were mediated by fat mass rather than inactivity. Fat mass mediates the relationships between acculturation and individual features of MetS in young Mexican and Mexican-American women. These findings suggest that fat mass, rather than inactivity, is an important contributor to disease risk in young Mexican and Mexican-American women living in a large US/Mexico border community.

  17. Concordance of Chronic Conditions in Older Mexican American Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim P. Stimpson, PhD

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There is substantial evidence that marriage is beneficial to health, but evidence on whether the health status of one spouse is similar, or concordant, with the other spouse is limited. This study assessed whether a chronic condition of one spouse is a risk factor for the same chronic condition in the other spouse. Methods The study used baseline data from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly on 553 couples (1106 individuals who are representative of approximately 500,000 older (≥65 years Mexican Americans living in the southwestern United States. Logistic regression was used to predict six chronic conditions among couples: heart condition, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, and cancer. Analyses were adjusted for age, education, U.S. nativity, blood pressure, body mass index, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results The wife’s history of hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, and cancer was associated with higher odds that the husband would have these conditions. A history of hypertension, arthritis, and cancer in the husband was associated with higher odds that the wife would have these conditions. Conclusion These results provide preliminary evidence that chronic conditions in one spouse are associated with an increased risk of developing like conditions in the other spouse among older Mexican American couples. We propose that the reciprocal influence that marital partners have on each other may be caused by shared living arrangements and shared health risks. Health promotion activities should target family systems. In particular, health providers should gather health histories not only from patients and their genetic family members but also from spouses.

  18. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (X2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns

  19. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Sanabria-Mondragón, Mónica; Hernández-Beltrán, Lourdes; López-Amador, Noé; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (χ2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns. PMID:23346398

  20. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast density (BD is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate ( and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170, fibroglandular 29% (87, heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17, and dense pattern 8.6% (26. Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117 and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183. Patterns of high breast density (BD (dense + heterogeneously dense were observed in 25.6% (30/117 of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183 of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300. Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300 of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300 of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%, and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%. Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns.

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Current Status, Own Body Perception and Positive Experience From Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornitza Ganeva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of the current status, own body perception and positive experience within a period of up to 1 year from diagnosing ofwomen with breast cancer (N = 41; mean age 35.25 in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd stages of the disease progress, of Bulgarian origin, was made.Reliability and validity of the scales were described. They were analysed with respect to: 1 medical characteristics (partial or total surgery,surgical removal of lymph nodes, presence or absence of metastases in them, 2 classical therapies (chemotherapy, radiation therapy andhormonal therapy administered or not and 3 application or not of alternative therapies (herbal medicine, physical load, administration ofmassage, lymph drainage, use of nutritional supplements, observance of diet. The results showed that the more therapies the personssurveyed were undergone the more unsatisfactory they assessed their current general status. The bigger the size of the surgery performedto remove the tumour the more positive idea of their own bodies they had. The more time after the surgical treatment passed the more thepositive experience accumulated from the oncologic diagnosis grew.

  2. Stakeholder engagement for comparative effectiveness research in cancer care: experience of the DEcIDE Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Caprice C; Wind, Jennifer K; Chang, George J; Chen, Ronald C; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    Stakeholder input is a critical component of comparative effectiveness research. To ensure that the research activities of the Developing Evidence to Inform Decisions about Effectiveness (DEcIDE) Network, supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, translate into the greatest impact for everyday practice and policy-making in cancer, we were tasked with soliciting stakeholder input regarding priority areas in cancer-related comparative effectiveness research for the DEcIDE Cancer Consortium. Given the increasing emphasis on stakeholder engagement in research, many investigators are facing a similar task, yet there is limited literature to guide such efforts, particularly in cancer care. To help fill this gap, we present our approach to operationalizing stakeholder engagement and discuss it in the context of other recent developments in the area. We describe challenges encountered in convening stakeholders from multiple vantage points to prioritize topics and strategies used to mitigate these barriers. We offer several recommendations regarding how to best solicit stakeholder input to inform comparative effectiveness research in cancer care. These recommendations can inform other initiatives currently facing the challenges of engaging stakeholders in priority setting for cancer.

  3. Being needy versus being needed : The role of self-regulatory focus in the experience of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frieswijk, N.; Hagedoorn, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Individual differences may exist in the psychological distress that women with breast cancer experience as a result of disease-related changes in both their own needs and the needs of their social environment. In the current study, we investigated whether the negative impact of one's per

  4. Methods to recognize work-related cancer in workplaces, the general population, and by experts in the clinic, a Norwegian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Lukas; Langård Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In most countries, the numbers of work-related cancer identified are much lower than are the estimated total burden of cancer caused by exposure at work. Therefore, there is a great need to use all available practical as well as epidemiological methods for identification as well as to develop new methods of recognizing cases of work-related cancers. Methods Primarily based on practical experiences from Norway, methods to identify cases of possible work-related cancers in t...

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: initial experience; Espectroscopia por ressonancia magnetica no diagnostico do cancer de prostata: experiencia inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Homero Jose de Farias e [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Ciencias Radiologicas]. E-mail: homero.ddi@epm.br; Szejnfeld, Denis [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sp (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem. Setor de Ressonancia Magnetica; Paiva, Cristiano Silveira [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Abdala, Nitamar [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem. Setor de Neuroradiologia; Arruda, Homero Oliveira de [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual de Sao Paulo (IAMSPE), SP (Brazil); Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sp (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2009-01-15

    Objective: to report an experiment involving the introduction of a protocol utilizing commercially available three-dimensional 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (3D 1H MRSI) method in patients diagnosed with prostatic tumors under suspicion of neoplasm. Materials and methods: forty-one patients in the age range between 51 and 80 years (mean, 67 years) were prospectively evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with one or more biopsies negative for cancer and high specific-prostatic antigen levels (group A), and patients with cancer confirmed by biopsy (group B). The determination of the target area (group A) or the known cancer extent (group B) was based on magnetic resonance imaging and MRSI studies. Results: the specificity of MRSI in the diagnosis of prostate cancer was lower than the specificity reported in the literature (about 47%). On the other hand, for tumor staging, it corresponded to the specificity reported in the literature. Conclusion: the introduction and standardization of 3D 1H MRSI has allowed the obtention of a presumable diagnosis of prostate cancer, by a combined analysis of magnetic resonance imaging and metabolic data from 3D 1H MRSI. (author)

  6. Clinical follow up of Mexican women with early onset of breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes Estudio de seguimiento clínico de mujeres mexicanas con cáncer de mama de inicio temprano y mutaciones en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study describes the presence of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a group of Mexican women and the clinical evolution of early onset breast cancer (EOBC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective hospital-based study was performed in a sample of 22 women with EOBC (7 in clinical stage IIA, 8 in IIB, and 7 in IIIA. The patients attended a tertiary care hospital in northeastern Mexico in 1997 and were followed up over a 5-year period. Molecular analysis included: 1 a mutation screening by heteroduplex analysis (HA of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and 2 a sequence analysis. RESULTS: Of 22 patients, 14 (63.6% showed a variant band detected by heteroduplex analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes: 8 polymorphisms, 4 mutations of uncertain significance, and 2 novel truncated protein mutations, one in BRCA1 (exon 11, 3587delT and the other in the BRCA2 gene (exon 11, 2664InsA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support future studies to determine the significance and impact of the genetic factor in this Mexican women population.OBJETIVO: Describir la presencia de mutaciones en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2 y la evolución clínica de un grupo de mujeres con carcinoma mamario de inicio temprano (CMIT. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio hospitalario, prospectivo, en una muestra de 22 pacientes con CMIT (siete en etapa clínica IIA, ocho en la IIB y siete en etapa IIIA. Las pacientes fueron atendidas en un hospital del noreste de México en 1997 y se realizó un seguimiento clínico durante cinco años. El análisis molecular incluyó: 1 análisis heterodúplex (AH para detectar bandas variantes en la secuencia de ADN de los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2, y 2 análisis de secuenciación. RESULTADOS: De 22 pacientes, 14 (63.6% mostraron banda variante por AH en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2: ocho polimorfismos, cuatro mutaciones de significado incierto y dos mutaciones noveles con proteína truncada, una en BRCA1 (exón 11, 3587delT y otra en BRCA2 (exón 11, 2664Ins

  7. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  8. Conceptualizing Parent Involvement: Low-Income Mexican Immigrant Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the conceptualization of low-income Mexican immigrant parents about their parental involvement and the family-school connection, (b) identify the influences on low-income Mexican immigrant parents' approach to parent involvement, and (c) identify the ways that Mexican immigrant parents…

  9. Green Medicine: Traditional Mexican-American Herbal Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Eliseo

    Traditional Mexican American herbal potions and remedies and their history are explained in an introductory book for the general reader. The importance of curanderismo, or green medicine, in Mexican and Mexican American cultures is explored. A brief history traces the herbal aspects of curanderismo through Mayan and Aztec cultures, the Spanish…

  10. Acculturation and Enculturation Trajectories among Mexican-American Adolescent Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino; Losoya, Sandra H.; Cota-Robles, Sonia; Chassin, Laurie; Lee, Joanna M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines changes over time in ethnic affirmation/belonging and ethnic identity achievement, Spanish language use, English language use, Mexican/Mexican-American affiliation/identification and Anglo affiliation/identification in a sample of Mexican-American adolescents participating in a longitudinal study of juvenile offenders. The…

  11. The Representation of "Curanderismo" in Selected Mexican American Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    "Curanderismo," a Mexican folk practice, is a prevalent subject in Mexican American literature. Because much of the presence of "curanderismo" in Mexican American literature is only explored in ethnographic studies, the purpose of this study is to examine the artistic representation of "curanderismo" in the novels "Bless Me, Ultima" by Rudolfo…

  12. Mexican forest fires and their decadal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, Graciela

    2016-11-01

    A high forest fire season of two to three years is regularly observed each decade in Mexican forests. This seems to be related to the presence of the El Niño phenomenon and to the amount of total solar irradiance. In this study, the results of a multi-cross wavelet analysis are reported based on the occurrence of Mexican forest fires, El Niño and the total solar irradiance for the period 1970-2014. The analysis shows that Mexican forest fires and the strongest El Niño phenomena occur mostly around the minima of the solar cycle. This suggests that the total solar irradiance minima provide the appropriate climatological conditions for the occurrence of these forest fires. The next high season for Mexican forest fires could start in the next solar minimum, which will take place between the years 2017 and 2019. A complementary space analysis based on MODIS active fire data for Mexican forest fires from 2005 to 2014 shows that most of these fires occur in cedar and pine forests, on savannas and pasturelands, and in the central jungles of the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

  13. Challenges in the Management of Childhood Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Experience in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in children is a challenge because of its unique nature of presentation, biological behavior and prognosis. Treatment pattern varies and there is no uniform management strategy. Objective: The aim of the present paper is to summarize the experience gained in the treatment of children with DTC in Bangladesh and to propose a work plan for optimal management of childhood DTC which is yet to be determined. Results: In a review of mixed population of patients with DTC treated for over 20 years at a referral center in Dhaka, 8.7 % were children aged between 9 to 15 years. The sex distribution shows that DTC is more common in girls than boys and this difference became greater as children reached puberty. Papillary thyroid cancer was the most common histological subtype (89% cases). At the time of diagnosis, 61% children had disease confined to the neck, 34% had metastasis to the cervical nodes and 5% had pulmonary metastasis. Treatment strategy consisted of near total thyroidectomy with or without lymph node dissection followed by radioiodine treatment and TSH suppression therapy (THST) with levothyroxine. Follow-up examinations included the estimations of thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and interval whole body survey after withdrawal of thyroxine. Follow up showed a high recurrence rate of the disease in children with lymph node and pulmonary involvement. Even after multiple doses of radioiodine therapy, 20% of these patients showed evidence of persistent disease. In patients who initially presented with disease confined to the neck, persistent disease was found in 8% cases. The survival rate at 5 and 15 years was higher in children without metastasis (92%) compared to 82% in children with lymph node involvement and 67% in those who presented with pulmonary metastasis. There were no cause specific deaths. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that management of childhood DTC is best, when done with the consensus of a

  14. Teresa Urrea: Mexican mystic, healer, and apocalyptic revolutionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Alex

    2005-01-01

    This article is a study of the mystical and apocalyptic dimensions of Teresa Urrea. As explained in this article, Urrea’s mystical experiences and visions are unique for their connection with a propheticapocalyptic and political worldview. This apocalyptic dimension is more than a communication of a hidden message or spiritual world; it also includes a reading of history that is catastrophic and discontinuous. The crisis and terror of history are given expression in Urrea’s mystical and apocalyptic pronouncements. In particular, the chaotic and oppressive circumstances of Mexican society during the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz was confronted and denounced in Urrea’s mystical and apocalyptic ministry. This apocalyptic healer castigated those culpable or even complicit with the injustices affecting the indigenous communities of Mexico during the late nineteenth century. In the case of Urrea, the transformation and healing of Church and society was an important aspect of her spiritual, healing powers. Because Urrea possessed neither arms nor the weapon of the pen, her sole weapon became her mystical experiences and the insight and healing powers that flowed from them. People of Mexico—especially indigenous groups—began to flock to her hoping that she would bring God’s presence to the troubled and chaotic circumstances of their lives. Her compassion and tenderness for the afflicted as well as the apocalyptic expectations that she stirred up among the indigenous groups of Northern Mexico were enough to get this mystical-political Mexican mestiza exiled from her homeland.

  15. An Auto-Ethnographic Study of the Disembodied Experience of a Novice Researcher Doing Qualitative Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoot, Charlotte; Bilsen, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Qualitative health researchers who explore individuals' experiences of illness are exposed to an emotionally demanding work environment. After doing 49 interviews with cancer patients living alone, I was confronted with serious emotional distress that kept me from my work for almost 6 months. Because there is a need for discussion within academia about the emotional risks encountered by researchers, I used auto-ethnography to explore what I call the "three disembodied experiences" I encountered during the research: disembodiment linked with suppression of emotions, disembodiment linked with distal traumatization, and disembodiment linked with overidentification with the participant. I illustrate these concepts with personal stories of doing research with cancer patients living alone. I conclude that writing down experiences of doing qualitative research in an embodied and reflexive way holds two advantages: It can protect the researcher and enhance the quality of research. PMID:26612885

  16. Radiotherapy alone for medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: The Duke experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review our experience treating clinical Stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma with radiotherapy alone using modern techniques and staging. The effect of dose and volume on outcome is to be analyzed. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 1995, 156 patients with Stage I medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer were irradiated at Duke University Medical Center and the Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center. Fifteen patients were excluded from analysis (7 treated with palliative intent, and 8 lost to follow-up immediately following radiation). Characteristics of the 141 evaluable patients were as follows: Median age 70 years (range 46-95); gender: male 83%, female 17%; institution: DUMC 65%, DVAMC 35%; T1N0 54%, T2N0 46%; median size 3 cm (range 0.5 to 8); pathology: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 18%, large cell carcinoma 19%, not otherwise specified 11%; presenting symptoms: weight loss 26%, cough 23%, none (incidental diagnosis) 57%. All patients underwent simulation prior to radiotherapy using linear accelerators of ≥4 MV. No patients received surgery or chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. The median dose of radiotherapy (not reflecting lung inhomogeneity corrections) was 64 Gy (50 to 80 Gy) given in 1.2 bid to 3 Gy qid fractionation. The majority of cases included some prophylactic nodal regions (73%). Results: Of the 141 patients, 108 have died; 33% of intercurrent death, 35% of cancer, and 7% of unknown causes. At last follow-up, 33 patients were alive (median 24 months, range 7-132 months). The 2- and 5-year overall survival was 39% and 13%, respectively (median 18 months). The corresponding cause-specific survival was 60%, and 32% (median 30 months). On multivariate analysis, significant factors influencing overall and/or cause-specific survival were age, squamous cell histology, incidental diagnosis, and pack-years of smoking. There was a nonsignificant trend towards improved cause-specific survival

  17. Ethnic Diversity and Latino/a College Access: A Comparison of Mexican American and Puerto Rican Beginning College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has indicated that there are differences among the diverse Latino/a ethnic groups in their K-12 educational experiences, but little is known about variations in their postsecondary experiences. Drawing on a conceptual framework informed by the theory of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this research examined Mexican American and…

  18. Mexican American women's adherence to hemodialysis treatment: a social constructivist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijerina, Mary S

    2009-07-01

    Mexican Americans have as much as a six-times greater risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than non-Hispanic white Americans, and women show a faster rate of decline in diabetic renal functioning. The leading treatment for ESRD is hemodialysis, an intensive, complex treatment regimen associated with high levels of patient nonadherence. Previous studies of patient adherence have adopted a biomedical, practitioner-oriented approach focused on performance of fixed behaviors and ignoring contextual and motivational factors. The author describes a social constructivist approach to understanding how female Mexican American dialysis patients experience their disease, the treatment regimen, and the consequences of that experience. Mexican American women's perceptions and psychosocial factors were examined to understand what these women viewed as important to their realities as dialysis patients. Poverty, longer treatment history, and immigrant status emerged as factors that appeared to influence treatment nonadherence. Perceived identity losses, heightened awareness of mortality and family dysfunction emerged as themes that participants viewed as preeminent in their day-to-day lives. A social constructivist perspective is highly compatible with social work principles of person-in-environment and starting where the client is. This perspective provides a valuable framework for informing social work practice with this special population of Mexican American dialysis patients.

  19. Recruitment of ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials: experience from the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, R P; Lord, K; Mitchell, A J; Raghavan, D

    2012-09-25

    Throughout the world there are problems recruiting ethnic minority patients into cancer clinical trials. A major barrier to trial entry may be distrust of research and the medical system. This may be compounded by the regulatory framework governing research with an emphasis on written consent, closed questions and consent documentation, as well as fiscal issues. The Leicester UK experience is that trial accrual is better if British South Asian patients are approached by a senior doctor rather than someone of perceived lesser hierarchical status and a greater partnership between the hospital and General Practitioner may increase trial participation of this particular ethnic minority. In Los Angeles, USA, trial recruitment was improved by a greater utilisation of Hispanic staff and a Spanish language-based education programme. Involvement of community leaders is essential. While adhering to national, legal and ethnical standards, information sheets and consent, it helps if forms can be tailored towards the local ethnic minority population. Written translations are often of limited value in the recruitment of patients with no or limited knowledge of English. In some cultural settings, tape-recorded verbal consent (following approval presentations) may be an acceptable substitute for written consent, and appropriate legislative changes should be considered to facilitate this option. Approaches should be tailored to specific minority populations, taking consideration of their unique characteristics and with input from their community leadership. PMID:23011540

  20. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: A Single Institution Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Nace

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We sought to evaluate our experience using yttrium-90 (90Y resin microsphere hepatic radioembolization as salvage therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Methods. A retrospective review of consecutive patients with unresectable mCRC who were treated with 90Y after failing first and second line systemic chemotherapy. Demographics, treatment dose, biochemical and radiographic response, toxicities, and survival were examined. Results. Fifty-one patients underwent 90Y treatments of which 69% were male. All patients had previously undergone extensive chemotherapy, 31% had undergone previous liver-directed therapy and 24% had a prior liver resection. Using RECIST criteria, either stable disease or a partial response was seen in 77% of patients. Overall median survival from the time of first 90Y treatment was 10.2 months (95% CI = 7.5–13.0. The absence of extrahepatic disease at the time of treatment with 90Y was associated with an improved survival, median survival of 17.0 months (95% CI = 6.4–27.6, compared to those with extrahepatic disease at the time of treatment with 90Y, 6.7 months (95% CI = 2.7–10.6 Conclusion: 90Y therapy is a safe locoregional therapy that provides an important therapeutic option to patients who have failed first and second line chemotherapy and have adequate liver function and performance status.

  1. The Caregiving Experience in a Racially Diverse Sample of Cancer Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Mary Lou; Williams, Anna-leila; Dowd, Michael F.; Chappel-Aiken, Lolita; McCorkle, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The literature supports a variety of predictor variables to account for the psychological and stress burden experienced by cancer family caregivers. Missing among the predictor variables are the differences by or influence of race/ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to describe the sample, explore differences in outcomes by patient and family caregiver characteristics, and determine if any of the patient and family characteristics, including race/ethnicity, predicted outcomes. Cross-sectional surveys were used to determine sociodemographics, psychological and physical health, and burdens of caregiving among 54 caregivers. The analysis consisted of descriptive methods, including frequencies and t tests, and regression modeling. The sample was 35% African American or Hispanic. African American and Hispanic caregivers were younger than white caregivers and more often women, were rarely the spouse of the patient, and frequently had other dependents, including children and older parents. African American and Hispanic caregivers reported lower incomes and more burden related to finances and employment than did white caregivers. When controlling for sociodemographic factors, there was no difference by race/ethnicity on the outcome measures. The experience of caregiving may supersede race/ethnicity and may be its own cultural entity. Areas of concern include the interrelationship between socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity, the absence of cultural frameworks to direct caregiver research, and the question of cultural relevance of measurement tools. PMID:18772665

  2. Pollination of Greenhouse Tomatoes by the Mexican bumblebee Bombus ephippiatus (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Hernan Vergara; Paula Fonseca-Buendía

    2012-01-01

    The Mexican native bumblebee Bombus ephippiatus Say was evaluated as a potential pollinator of greenhouse tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicon L.). The experiments were performed at San Andrés Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, from June to December 2004 in two 1 000 m2 greenhouses planted with tomatoes of the cultivar Mallory (Hazera ®). For the experiments, we used two colonies of Bombus ephippiatus, reared in the laboratory from queens captured in the field. Four treatments were applied to 20 study plant...

  3. The Mexican Drug War and the Consequent Population Exodus: Transnational Movement at the U.S.-Mexican Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frontline of México’s “war on drugs” is the Mexican-U.S. border city of Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, which has become internationally known as the “murder capital of the world.” In Juárez, which neighbors El Paso, Texas, United States, estimates of the murders in Juárez are as high as 7,643 between 2006 and 2011, leaving approximately 10,000 orphans. Juárez has also experienced an exodus of approximately 124,000 people seeking safety, some migrating to the Mexican interior and others to the U.S., particularly along the U.S.-México border. Based on 63 in-depth interviews with Juárez-El Paso border residents, along with ethnographic observations, we examine the implications of the “war on drugs” on transnational movements and on the initial settlement of those escaping the violence. In particular, we construct a typology of international migrants who are represented in the Juárez exodus: the Mexican business elite, the “Refugees without Status,” and those who resided in México but who are U.S. born or have legal permanent residency in the U.S. This article highlights the role of transnational capital in the form of assets and income, social networks in the U.S., and documentation to cross the port of entry into the U.S. legally, in easing migration and initial settlement experiences in the U.S.

  4. Mexican oil industry: Shifting to difficult oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazan G., Gerardo; Gonzalez, Cristobal J.

    2010-09-15

    Mexico has stepped into an important transition of declining oil fields and new challenging oil projects. The aim of this paper is to show a new perspective of the oil resources that have been exploited throughout the Mexican territory, as well as the remaining resources yet to be exploited. We have developed a resources/production-costs chart that illustrates the historical and future development of the Mexican oil industry, showing the shift that the industry will face in the coming years; this chart was taken from a model already in use by the most prestige energy agencies in the world.

  5. Employers mexican migrants in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernández Guzmán

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available You might think that by definition the migrant labor plays in less profitable niches and meager social mobility. However, a large group of migrants in different economically developed countries have successfully launched businesses of diverse nature and volume. This is why entrepreneurship of migrants is an issue that has received increasing attention in recent years. Compared to other immigrant groups in the United States, Mexicans show low levels of entrepreneurial activity. The aim of this paper is to, through a general literature review of official statistical data, a preliminary analysis of mexican migrant entrepreneurship in the United States, that is to say in recent years has been growing in importance.

  6. The first experience in using abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Rapoport; E. A. Bezrukov; A. V. Kondrashina

    2015-01-01

    Even in the mid-twentieth century, Huggins and Hodges proved the susceptibility of prostate cancer cells to hormonal manipulations, by using surgical castration as an example. An average of 18–36 months after initiation of first-line hormonal therapy, patients develop the castration resistance in prostate cancer, one of the causes of which was hyperproduction of the tumor receptors of prostate cancer cells and their hypersusceptibility to the castration levels of testosterone. Long-term treat...

  7. African American Women’s Limited Knowledge and Experiences with Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Graves, Kristi D.; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n=13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n= 8). A content analysis approach was employe...

  8. Early experience in MRI-guided therapies of prostate cancer: HIFU, laser and photodynamic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Da Rosa, M.R.; Trachtenberg, J; R Chopra; Haider, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer screening has resulted in earlier diagnosis with lower-grade disease, leading to over-detection and over-treatment in a significant number of patients. Current whole-gland radical treatments are associated with significant rates of morbidity. The high prevalence of low-risk disease together with an inability to accurately identify those men harboring more aggressive cancers has led to tremendous research in low-morbidity focal therapies for prostate cancer. This revie...

  9. An Experience with Managing Cancer Patients Reportedly Previously Informed of the Absence of Additional Available Antineoplastic Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George River

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 5 years, a small group of cancer patients who stated their physicians had determined there were no additional available antineoplastic therapeutic options (including potential investigational strategies were seen for a ‘second opinion' in a cancer hospital-based oncology program and subsequently experienced what can reasonably be characterized as having achieved meaningful ‘clinical benefit' (functioning at a fairly high level for a minimum 1 year in the work, home, and/or family environments following the further delivery of a variety of treatment approaches. While recognized to be limited (or even simply ‘anecdotal', this experience emphasizes several clinically relevant conclusions, including the overall utility of a ‘second-opinion' strategy and the potential that the reported statement of an individual practitioner or cancer program that all rational options have been attempted may be inaccurate.

  10. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  11. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  12. Outcome and treatment strategy in female lung cancer: a single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate of female lung cancer treated at the Institute of Oncology of the Vilnius University, Lithuania during the period between 1996-2005. Materials and Methods: During the period between 1996-2005, 471 women diagnosed with lung cancer were treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery and Oncology of the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. Data on morphology, stage and treatment was collected from the medical records. All lung cancer cases by histology were classified in two groups: non-small cell lung cancer (includes squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and other less common types) and small cell lung cancer. The vital status of the study group was assessed as of December 31, 2007, by passive follow-up, using data from the population registry. It was found that 411 (87.3%) of the patients had died. Survival was estimated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median survival of female lung cancer diagnosed during 1996-2005 in Lithuania show to be 8.7 months (8.4 (95% CI 7.2-10.8) months with non-small cell lung cancer and 9.3 (95% CI 6.3-13.0) months with small-cell lung cancer). Survival was more than 20 months in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (stages I, II, IIIA). Non-small cell lung cancer survival in advanced stages was less than 7 months. Small-cell lung cancer patients median survival at limited and extended stages of the disease were 9.5 (95% CI 2.9-18.4) compared to 9.2 (95% CI 6.2-13.7) months. Non-small cell lung cancer patients most frequently were treated by surgery (27.0%), surgery and chemotherapy or radiotherapy (19.6%). Small cell lung cancer patient treatment included chemo and radiotherapy (27.0%), chemotherapy (19.0%), radiotherapy (17.5%), surgery (27.9%). Conclusions: The single center study of female lung cancer diagnosed during 1996-2005 in Lithuania show a significantly better chance of survival in resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Advanced stages of

  13. Young Adult Cancer Survivors’ Experience with Cancer Treatment and Follow-Up Care and Perceptions of Barriers to Engaging in Recommended Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We examined correlates of low engagement in the healthcare system, experiences with survivorship care, barriers to follow-up care, and potential resources for promoting follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancers. We conducted a mixed-method study involving surveys of 106 survivors of childhood cancer aged 18–34 recruited from a university-affiliated children’s hospital and an NCI-designated cancer center in the Southeastern USA. Phone-based semistructured interviews were then conducted in a subset of 26. Assessments included health factors, psychosocial factors, healthcare system interaction, and interest in resources to promote engagement in healthcare. Survey participants were on average 22.14(SD=3.16) years old, 50.0 % female, and 77.4 % White. Overall, 46.0 % had attended survivorship clinic, 47.2 % reported receiving a treatment summary, 68.9 % had a primary care provider, and 17.0 % reported no interaction with healthcare in the past 2 years. Correlates of less than annual healthcare provider visits included being older (p=0.003), being male (pneed for educational and psychosocial resources, particularly technology-based resources. Multilevel interventions are needed to increase engagement in survivor-ship care among young adult cancer survivors. Technology-based resources addressing social support and mental well-being are intervention possibilities. PMID:25948413

  14. Young Adult Cancer Survivors' Experience with Cancer Treatment and Follow-Up Care and Perceptions of Barriers to Engaging in Recommended Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann

    2016-09-01

    We examined correlates of low engagement in the healthcare system, experiences with survivorship care, barriers to follow-up care, and potential resources for promoting follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancers. We conducted a mixed-method study involving surveys of 106 survivors of childhood cancer aged 18-34 recruited from a university-affiliated children's hospital and an NCI-designated cancer center in the Southeastern USA. Phone-based semistructured interviews were then conducted in a subset of 26. Assessments included health factors, psychosocial factors, healthcare system interaction, and interest in resources to promote engagement in healthcare. Survey participants were on average 22.14 (SD = 3.16) years old, 50.0 % female, and 77.4 % White. Overall, 46.0 % had attended survivorship clinic, 47.2 % reported receiving a treatment summary, 68.9 % had a primary care provider, and 17.0 % reported no interaction with healthcare in the past 2 years. Correlates of less than annual healthcare provider visits included being older (p = 0.003), being male (p adult care. Participants highlighted the need for educational and psychosocial resources, particularly technology-based resources. Multilevel interventions are needed to increase engagement in survivorship care among young adult cancer survivors. Technology-based resources addressing social support and mental well-being are intervention possibilities. PMID:25948413

  15. Auditing the diagnosis of cancer in primary care: the experience in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughan, P; O'Neill, B; Fletcher, E

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on an ongoing primary care audit of cancer referrals undertaken in Scotland in 2006–2007 and 2007–2008. Methods: General practitioners (GPs) in Scotland were asked to review all new cancer diagnoses within their practice during the preceding year. Results: 4181 patients were identified in year 1 and 12 294 in year 2. The pathway taken for patients to present to, and be referred from, their GP has been analysed for 7430 of the 12 294 patients identified within year 2 across five separate health boards. The time from first symptoms to presentation to a GP varied between tumour types, being the longest (median 30 days) for head and neck cancers and the shortest (median 2 days) for bladder cancer. In all, 25% of patients within the following tumour groups waited longer than 2 months to present to their GP following first symptoms: prostate, colorectal, melanoma and head and neck cancers. Once patients had presented to their GP, those with prostate and lung cancer were referred later (median time 11 days) than those with breast cancer (median time 2 days). The priority with which GPs referred patients varied considerably between tumour groups (breast cancer 77.5% ‘urgent' compared with prostate cancer 44.7% ‘urgent'). In one health board the proportion of cancer patients being referred urgently increased from 46% to 58% between the first and second audit. Conclusion: Our data show that there are very different patterns of presentation and referral for patients with cancer, with some tumour groups being more likely to be associated with a delayed diagnosis than others. PMID:19956170

  16. Understanding the Breast Cancer Experience of Survivors: a Qualitative Study of African American Women in Rural Eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Essie; Dixon, Crystal; Richman, Alice R

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of African American breast cancer survivors' experiences, barriers and facilitators in accessing breast cancer treatment, and challenges in adherence to follow-up care. We conducted seven focus groups with 32 African American women with breast cancer in three rural counties in eastern North Carolina during August-November 2013. Surveys were also utilized to gather basic demographic and breast health history information. Thematic analysis was performed using the immersion crystallization approach. Several common areas of life affected by breast cancer included faith and support networks, psychosocial well-being, and quality of care issues. Faith in God was an important coping mechanism essential to all women in the study and a critical facilitator in survivorship. Support networks consisted of family, church-family, friends, and co-workers. The concept of fear included the discovery of breast cancer and fear of death, negative side effects of treatment, and social stigma of having breast cancer. Factors that influenced provider-patient relationship were age of provider, perceived lack of empathy, and providers leaving during treatment. Participants also expressed their lack of knowledge regarding a number of the side effects they were experiencing during and after their treatment. Results of this study contribute to the assessment of potential coping mechanisms used by African American breast cancer survivors (i.e., spirituality, positive attitudes, and support networks) that can potentially be effective and have a positive impact on the adjustment of life for survivors. PMID:25877467

  17. Effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in population-based breast cancer screening programmes. We evaluated 1,440,384 single-read screening mammograms, corresponding to 471,112 women aged 45-69 years participating in four Spanish programmes between 1990 and 2006. The mammograms were interpreted by 72 radiologists. The overall percentage of false-positive results was 5.85% and that for false-positives resulting in an invasive procedure was 0.38%. Both the risk of false-positives overall and of false-positives leading to an invasive procedure significantly decreased (p 14,999 mammograms with respect to the reference category (<500). The risk of both categories of false-positives was also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) as radiologists' years of experience increased: OR 0.96 and OR 0.84, respectively, for 1 year's experience and OR 0.72 and OR 0.73, respectively, for more than 4 years' experience with regard to the category of <1 year's experience. Radiologist experience is a determining factor in the risk of a false-positive result in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  18. Cancer patients' and health care professionals' perceptions and experiences of cancer treatment and care in South Africa / Mariska Venter

    OpenAIRE

    Venter, Mariska

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a potentially life-threatening disease, which affects millions of people worldwide. It is multifaceted in nature and can lead to impairment in a person‟s physical, social and emotional functioning (Beatty, Oxlad, Koczwara, & Wade, 2008). Multidimensional treatment, with highly specialised professionals, equipment and services is thus needed for the effective treatment thereof (Mathews, West, & Buehler, 2009). Patients treated within the private and public healthcare sectors of So...

  19. Predictors of Routine Medical Care Use among Mexican Immigrants/Mexican-Americans Varying in Legal Status

    OpenAIRE

    Garcini, Luz M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Molina, Marisa; Quintanar, Elena; Johansen, Christopher; Hector, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Immigration has been the focus of intense political debate, with a recurrent theme being the use of public services, including healthcare. Although Latinos are the largest and fastest growing ethnic group in the United States (U.S.), evidence suggests they underutilize healthcare, with Mexican Immigrants and Mexican Americans (MI-MA) living on the U.S.-Mexico border exhibiting the greatest disparities. Objective: This study explored the association of predisposing, enabling and ne...

  20. 3D radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer: the Shanghai Cancer Hospital experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the outcomes of irradiation by using three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer. Between 2007 and 2010, 50 patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were treated using 3D-RT or IMRT. The median time interval between the initial treatment and the start of irradiation was 12 (6-51 months. Salvage surgery was performed before irradiation in 5 patients, and 38 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent 3D-RT, and 34 patients received IMRT. Median follow-up for all the patients was 18.3 months. Three-year overall survival and locoregional control were 56.1% and 59.7%, respectively. Three-year progression-free survival and disease-free survival were 65.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Nine patients developed grade 3 leukopenia. Grade 5 acute toxicity was not observed in any of the patients; however, 2 patients developed Grade 3 late toxicity. 3D-RT or IMRT is effective for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer, with the 3-year overall survival of 56.1%, and its complications are acceptable. Long-term follow-up and further studies are needed to confirm the role of 3D-RT or IMRT in the multimodality management of the disease.

  1. Análisis de los premios a la investigación en gastroenterología: Experiencia en México Critical analysis of awards in gastroenterology research: The Mexican experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto C. Chávez-Tapia

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available El impacto internacional de la investigación gastroenterológica mexicana es limitado. Se desconoce cuál ha sido el resultado final de los trabajos de mejor calidad a nivel nacional de acuerdo a la Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (AMG. El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar el patrón de publicación e impacto en las publicaciones periódicas internacionales de los trabajos premiados por la AMG. Se revisaron las memorias del congreso anual de la AMG, período 1998-2006. Se seleccionaron resúmenes donde se indicara premiación o presentación en sesión plenaria. Los trabajos identificados fueron buscados en bases de datos electrónicas, o bien se contactó alguno de los autores para solicitar la información relacionada. De aquellos trabajos publicados en revistas con factor de impacto se buscaron las citas relacionadas. Se localizaron 35 premios, 57.1% fueron en el área de gastroenterología y 34.3% en hepatología. Las instituciones con los premios son Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (48.6%, Instituciones de Educación Superior (31.4%, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (8.6%, Fundación Clínica Médica Sur (5.7%, Hospital Juárez (2.9%, Hospital privado (2.9%. De estos se han publicado 19 (54.8%, la mayoría antes de un año (73.7%. Unicamente dos de los trabajos publicados tienen registradas The impact of Mexican gastrointestinal research worldwide is limited and the outcome of the best research papers awarded by the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (AMG is unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the publication pattern of the research work, awarded by the AMG and their impact in international journals. The abstracts accepted for the annual meeting of the AMG from 1998 to 2006 were reviewed. Those presented in a plenary session or awarded were included. Their abstracts were searched in electronic databases. When not found, the main author was contacted by e

  2. The Effects of Experienced Uncertainty and Patients' Assessments of Cancer-Related Information-Seeking Experiences on Fatalistic Beliefs and Trust in Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo Jung; You, Kyung Han

    2016-12-01

    Using the 2013 HINTS 4 Cycle 2 data representing a general population sample, this study investigates the effects of patients' experiences of uncertainty about prostate cancer during doctor-patient communication, as well as patients' positive assessments of their cancer-related information-seeking experiences, on their fatalistic beliefs regarding cancer and their trust in physicians. Our tests show significant differences in trust in physicians among men who do and do not experience uncertainty about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test during doctor-patient communication. The analysis also indicates that individuals with experiences of uncertainty about the PSA test are more likely than those without such experiences of uncertainty to place their trust in doctors. However, no apparent difference or association exists when there are uncertainties relating to treatment choices regarding slow-growing cancer or treatment side effects. Nevertheless, as hypothesized, individuals who positively evaluate their cancer-related information-seeking experiences are less likely to have fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Furthermore, patients' positive assessments are highly predictive of their levels of trust in their physicians. Additionally, tests of interaction effects show that individuals' levels of education moderate the association between uncertainty experiences about the PSA test and both cancer fatalism and trust in physicians. Further implications and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:27092867

  3. [About the origin, evolution and irradiation of Mexican cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican cardioangiology started in the nineteen century thanks to first endeavors of surgeons and physicians related to local academies and to School of Medicine, established in 1833 by Dr. Valentin Gómez Farías. Dr. Manuel Carpio, the future first head of department of physiology in this school, translated to Spanish language and published, in 1823, the article On pectoriloquo of the French physician Marat and later performed some experiments on the heart' motion. During the Secont Empire (1864-1867), the physician Samuel von Basch performed studies to define the arterial hypertension, called by him "latent atherosclerosis", i.e. the "essential hypertension". Once he had returned to his country, he invented in 1880, a sphygmomanometer of mercury column, that was the model for the instrument constructed by the Italian physician Scipione Riva-Rocci and presented in 1896. In our time, Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares systematized a metabolic therapy called "polarizing therapy", i.e. capable of repolarizing the heart's cells partly depolarized due to hypoxia or direct aggressions. These were the first steps in Mexico on the way to a promising medicine starting and the great adventure of Mexican cardiology. PMID:25260577

  4. Laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: a single-centre experience of 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Good, Daniel W

    2011-10-01

    For colorectal surgeons, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery poses a new challenge. The defence of the questionable oncological safety tempered by the impracticality of the long learning curve is rapidly fading. As a unit specialising in minimally invasive surgery, we have routinely undertaken rectal cancer surgery laparoscopically since 2005.

  5. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary...... care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...... improvement and attention should be drawn to the "professionalization" of the relatives and the need to strike a balance between their needs, wishes and resources in end-of-life care and bereavement....

  6. Hoping for the best - preparing for the worst. The lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibæk, Lene; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery were explored, aiming to provide a patient perspective on being newly diagnosed and starting treatment for ovarian cancer. The study period ran from the first visit in the outpatient clinic, till 8 weeks later, when...... the women had either begun chemotherapy or completed their recovery. Ten women participated in two qualitative research interviews each, before and after surgery. By applying a phenomenological-hermeneutic text interpretation methodology, the findings were systematically identified, put into meaning...... and treatment. However, the ability to prepare was influenced by personal lifestyle, social conditions, coping strategies, and experiences of hope. The ability to prepare could be strengthened by providing adjusted information, psychosocial support and physical optimisation during the perioperative period...

  7. Masculinity and the body: how African American and White men experience cancer screening exams involving the rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterich, Julie A; Quandt, Sara A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Clark, Peter E; Miller, David P; Acuña, Joshua; Arcury, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Past research on prostate and colorectal cancer disparities finds that barriers to screening, such as embarrassment and offensiveness, are often reported. Yet none of this literature investigates why. This study uses masculinity and health theory to examine how men experience two common screenings: digital rectal exams (DREs) and colonoscopies. In-depth interviews were conducted with 64 African American and White men from diverse backgrounds, aged 40 to 64, from North Carolina. Regardless of race or education, men experienced DREs more negatively than colonoscopies because penetration with a finger was associated with a gay sexual act. Some men disliked colonoscopies, however, because they associated any penetration as an affront to their masculinity. Because beliefs did not differ by race, future research should focus on structural issues to examine why disparities persist with prostate and colorectal cancer. Recommendations are provided for educational programs and physicians to improve men's experiences with exams that involve the rectum.

  8. Integrated oncology and palliative care: five years experience at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Pérez, Silvia; Verástegui-Avilés, Emma; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Meneses-García, Abelardo; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Under the national plan for addressing cancer, prevention and detection play important roles. However, the cost of treatments and late diagnosis represent a significant burden on health services. At the National Cancer Institute, more than half of patients present with tumors in advanced stages, and approximately 10% of patients seen for the first time exhibit terminal-stage malignancies, where there are no feasible cancer treatment options, and the patients are instead admitted to the hospital exclusively for palliative symptomatic management. In 2010, the National Cancer Plan began implementing a model of integrative management of palliative care in oncology that has gradually come to include symptomatic palliative care, involving ambulatory, distant and hospitalized management of patients with cancer, in its final stages and, more recently, in earlier stages. PMID:27557392

  9. Young female cancer patients' experiences with fertility counselling and fertility preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeg, Didde; Schmidt, Lone; Tryde Macklon, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Fertility counselling for young women newly diagnosed with cancer is an important field of preconceptional counselling. This qualitative, small-scale study explored how young women newly diagnosed with cancer experienced specialized fertility preservation counselling and treatment...... in the public Danish health care system. Methods: Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with five women below 40 years recently diagnosed with cancer. All women received fertility counselling by a fertility specialist at the Fertility Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark before...... were aware that chemotherapy could destroy their eggs. The participants described how specialized fertility counselling and fertility preservation contributed to a belief in life after cancer, which gave them hope that they would survive their cancer disease. Further, the women described how...

  10. Clinical experience of intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer is an intractable and serious pathosis, which directly aggravates patients' Quality of Life (QOL) and prognosis. We first select the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. From April 2009 to May 2012, we encountered 5 patients who developed secondary pneumothorax during treatment for advanced lung cancer. Their average age was 60.8 years old, and 4 of them had squamous cell carcinoma, 1 had adenocarcinoma, and all had unresectable advanced lung cancer. In 4 of them, the point of air leakage could be detected by pleurography, and leakage could be stopped by the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue. All of them could receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy after treatment for secondary pneumothorax. The intrapleural administration of fibrin glue may be an effective and valid treatment for intractable secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  11. Screening for breast cancer with MRI: recent experience from the Australian Capital Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The American Cancer Society now recommends annual MRI screening for women at 20-25% or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer. The role of MRI screening in other risk subgroups is unproved because of insufficient data. Our study comprised 209 breast MRI scans carried out in 171 asymptomatic patients (age range 22-67 years, mean 46 years), referred between January 2005 and June 2008. Targeted ultrasound was carried out in 32 episodes (15%) and biopsies were taken in 23 patients (13%). In four patients, MR-guided procedures were required to establish a diagnosis, two using hook-wire localization and two by means of vacuum-assisted biopsy. Seven cancers were detected by MRI in the 171 patients, with a yield of 4.1%. Only one of the seven cancers was also shown by x-ray mammography. Four patients had invasive ductal cancer (all axillary node negative) and three had high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ or pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ. The three women with in situ disease were all potentially high risk, based on the National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre (NBOCC) criteria. Three women with invasive breast cancer were at only average risk based on NBOCC criteria, but two of these had extremely dense breasts. A fourth patient, found to have multifocal invasive cancer, had a personal history of contralateral breast cancer, but no relevant family history. Our findings suggest that breast MRI could be used to screen a larger Australian population at increased risk of developing breast cancer.

  12. Retrospective analysis of the patients with gynecological cancer: 11-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaş Alabalık

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We planned this study with the aim of obtainingknowledge about epidemiological characteristics of gynecologicalmalignancies followed up in our hospital.Materials and methods: In our study we analyzed 231patients that were operated with the appraisal diagnosis ofgynecological cancer in Gynecology and Obstetrics Departmentof Dicle University Medical Faculty between the datesof 2001, January and 2011, November.Results: The mostly diagnosed gynecological malignancywas ovarian cancers among the gynecological cancersseen in the first group compassing the period between theyear 2001 and the first half-term of the year 2006. In thesecond group compassing the period from the second halftermof the year 2006 to the end of the year 2011, ovariancancers were again the most frequently seen gynecologicalcancers. On the other hand it was found that there was anincrease in the percentage of endometrial cancers. Whilecases with advanced staged constituting the major part ofthe patients with ovarian cancer, it was seen that the majorityof the patients with endometrium cancer were consistingof stage 1 cases. In the 4 of 6 cases having endometriumcancer and applying with the complaint of pain, the diseasewas noticed in the advanced stage. Being the most frequentlyseen gynecological cancer all over the world andespecially in the societies with lower socio-economic status,the cervix cancer was taking place in the 3rd order afterendometrium cancer in terms of frequency in our region.Conclusion: Consequently, in the recent years the gynecologicalcancer showing the most frequent increase wasendometrium cancer in our region. The increase in the frequencyof obesity, relating with the reasons like the impropernutrition behavior, the increase in the socio-economic status,may be associated with the increase in the frequencyof endometrium cancer. The healthcare personals and thepublic body must be instructed to diagnose the gynecologicalcancer cases especially the

  13. Early experience after developing a pathology laboratory in Malawi, with emphasis on cancer diagnoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Gopal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite increasing cancer burden in Malawi, pathology services are limited. We describe operations during the first 20 months of a new pathology laboratory in Lilongwe, with emphasis on cancer diagnoses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a cross-sectional study of specimens from the Kamuzu Central Hospital pathology laboratory between July 1, 2011 and February 28, 2013. Patient and specimen characteristics, and final diagnoses are summarized. Diagnoses were categorized as malignant, premalignant, infectious, other pathology, normal or benign, or nondiagnostic. Patient characteristics associated with premalignancy and malignancy were assessed using logistic regression. Of 2772 specimens, 2758 (99% with a recorded final diagnosis were included, drawn from 2639 unique patients. Mean age was 38 years and 63% were female. Of those with documented HIV status, 51% had unknown status, and 36% with known status were infected. Histologic specimens comprised 91% of cases, and cytologic specimens 9%. Malignant diagnoses were most common overall (n = 861, 31%. Among cancers, cervical cancer was most common (n = 117, 14%, followed by lymphoma (n = 91, 11%, esophageal cancer (n = 86, 10%, sarcoma excluding Kaposi sarcoma (n = 75, 9%, and breast cancer (n = 61, 7%. HIV status was known for 95 (11% of malignancies, with HIV prevalence ranging from 9% for breast cancer to 81% for cervical cancer. Increasing age was consistently associated with malignancy [bivariable odds ratio 1.24 per decade increase (95% CI 1.19-1.29 among 2685 patients with known age; multivariable odds ratio 1.33 per decade increase (95% CI 1.14-1.56 among 317 patients with known age, gender, and HIV status], while HIV infection and gender were not. CONCLUSIONS: Despite selection and referral bias inherent in these data, a new pathology laboratory in Lilongwe has created a robust platform for cancer care and research. Strategies to effectively capture clinical information for

  14. Open Access to Mexican Academic Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Silvia I.; Llorens, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the metadata harvester software development. This system provides access to reliable and quality educational resources, shared by Mexican Universities through their repositories, to anyone with Internet Access. We present the conceptual and contextual framework, followed by the technical basis, the results and…

  15. Institutions and Economic Performance in Mexican States

    OpenAIRE

    Sonora, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between institutional quality and economic performance the 32 Mexican states over the period 2003 -- 2010. Using dynamic panel GMM estimation and the Fraser Institutes index of economic freedom, I find that freedom has an ambiguous impact on economic growth and improvements undermines employment. These results are corroborated with dynamic OLS model and panel fixed and random effects models.

  16. Innovation strategies of Mexican pharmaceutical firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Solleiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexican pharmaceutical market is the most important in Latin America and a significant number of global firms have different business activities in this country: production, licensing of patents, alliances with Mexican firms, distribution facilities or partnerships, etc. In terms of innovation, global pharmaceutical industry has passed through structural changes mainly of technological and institutional nature. These changes have been influential along the whole value chain and have triggered transformations in firm's organization, market structure and sector's investments. Mexico's industry, in spite of having a very attractive domestic market, has serious limitations for technology development. Very little resources are invested in R&D and lack of articulation between research labs and industry provoke that Mexico has only exceptional innovation achievements and a high technological dependence. At the same time, some Mexican companies have developed new strategies to be competitive in open markets and have shown that a combination of competitive intelligence, rapid adoption of technologies, collaboration with advanced firms and research institutes, permanent training and continuous improvement are key factors for success. This paper deals with the results of a piece of research aimed at developing a model for the effective transfer of technology for Mexican pharmaceutical firms, with a strong component of knowledge and skills to manage the flows of information, people and technologies among firms, research labs, universities and other health organizations.

  17. New offshore platform in the Mexican Gulf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beisel, T.

    1982-04-01

    After a construction period of only 10 months, the second steel Offshore platform was recently completed in the Mexican Gulf. The pattern for this structure was the Cognac platform. The erection of the new platform, called the 'Cerveza' platform, is described in the article.

  18. Cultural Challenges Faced by Mexican Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugel, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This purpose of this investigation is to explore the cultural challenges faced by Mexican immigrant students through the study of current literature. Four themes emerged as a result of the investigation: dominant pedagogy, educational skills, deficit model, and student identities. The themes are discussed and suggestions are made as to how these…

  19. Feminism and Mexican American Adolescent Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Carrubba, Maria D.; Good, Glenn E.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Feminist Identity Development Scale (FIDS) and the Attitudes Toward Feminism and the Womens Movement Scale (FWM) with 389 Mexican American 11th-grade and 12th-grade women. Results indicated internal consistency coefficients of .61, .62, .76, and .77 for the FIDS Passive Acceptance, Revelation,…

  20. The Mexican American Heritage: With Writing Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Carlos M.

    Written by a Los Angeles history teacher frustrated by the lack of culturally relevant materials, this book covers some of the most interesting events in the history of Mexico and the heritage of Mexican Americans. Chapters are: (1) Indian Mexico (Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs); (2) La Conquista (Cortes and Moctezuma, conquest…

  1. Siblings' Differential Treatment in Mexican American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Susan M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Shanahan, Lilly; Crouter, Ann C.; Killoren, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the patterns and correlates of parents differential treatment of adolescent siblings in 246 two-parent Mexican American families. In home interviews, siblings rated 7 domains of differential treatment (e.g., privileges, chores, warmth) as well as their adjustment and perceptions of parental acceptance and fairness, and both parents…

  2. Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

    2007-01-01

    There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

  3. The Mexican-Americans: An Awakening Minority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Manuel P.

    An anthology, the book attempts to trace and analyze the various aspects of the life and society of the Mexican American. It is not a mere collection of previously published papers or articles but includes selections from 6 new historical studies by trained historians and graduate students from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.…

  4. International migration, sex ratios, and the socioeconomic outcomes of nonmigrant Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Steven

    2013-06-01

    This article assesses whether international migration from Mexico affects the marital, fertility, schooling, and employment outcomes of the Mexican women who remain behind by exploiting variation over time as well as across Mexican states in the demographic imbalance between men and women. I construct a gauge of the relative supply of men for women of different age groups based on state-level male and female population counts and the empirically observed propensity of men of specific ages to marry women of specific ages. Using Mexican census data from 1960 through 2000, I estimate a series of models in which the dependent variable is the intercensus change in an average outcome for Mexican women measured by state and for specific age groups, and the key explanatory variable is the change in the relative supply of men to women in that state/age group. I find that the declining relative supply of males positively and significantly affects the proportion of women who have never been married as well as the proportion of women who have never had a child. In addition, states experiencing the largest declines in the relative supply of men also experience relatively large increases in female educational attainment and female employment rates. However, I find little evidence that women who do marry match to men who are younger or less educated than themselves. PMID:23329201

  5. Distant Neighbours: Different Visions about Mexican Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gómez Gastélum

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1972, Mexican archaeology experienced a major transformation due to the enactment of a Federal Law about archaeological, artistic, and historical monuments and zones, which changed the Mexican Government’s administration of Mexican archaeological heritage. In 1972, in West Mexico, an active group of archaeologists from the U.S.A. was working. They came from several universities and were also members of an academic association, the West Mexican Society for Advanced Study, that was based in Ajijic, Mexico, and comprised both U.S. and Mexican archaeologists. This group wrote to the government about their views of the new laws, and the government department concerned with their implementation, the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH – Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, then responded with the Mexican Government’s official standpoint. In this paper, we analyze the positions of the West Mexican Society for Advanced Study, and INAH. We observe the sociopolitical and academic contexts from both U.S. and Mexican perspectives, and we offer explanations about their opposing views. We consider this episode to be a manifestation of the ideas circulating between U.S. and Mexican archaeologies.En 1972 la arqueología mexicana tuvo un cambio radical. En ese año fue promulgada la Ley Federal de Monumentos y Zonas Arqueológicos, Artísticos e Históricos. Esta ley cambió la manera en que el gobierno mexicano administraba el patrimonio arqueológico nacional. En dicho año, en el occidente de México, estuvo trabajando un grupo muy activo de arqueólogos estadounidenses, que si bien procedían de diversas universidades, también fueron miembros de una institución académica. La Sociedad de Estudios Avanzados del Occidente de México, con sede en Ajijic, México, reunió tanto a arquéologos estadounidenses como mexicanos. Los primeros escribieron un documento que contenía sus opiniones sobre la nueva ley y lo

  6. A review of repeat prostate biopsies and the influence of technique on cancer detection: our experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinlan, M R

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients with an initial negative prostate biopsy, but surrounding whom a suspicion of prostate cancer persists, is difficult. In addition, debate exists as to the optimal technique for repeat prostate biopsy. AIMS: To assess the cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsy. METHODS: We reviewed patients who underwent prostate biopsy in our department in 2005 who had >or=1 previous biopsy within the preceding 5 years. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy and the influence of the number of biopsy cores were recorded. RESULTS: Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy was 15.4%, with approximately 60% detected on the first repeat biopsy, but approximately 10% not confirmed until the fourth repeat biopsy. Gleason score was similar regardless of the time of diagnosis (6.1-6.5). Mean interval between first biopsy and cancer diagnosis (range 18-55 months) depended on the number of repeat procedures. There was an association between the number of biopsy cores and cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the practice of increasing the number of cores taken on initial and first repeat biopsy to maximise prostate cancer detection and reduce the overall number of biopsies needed.

  7. Trends of cancer incidence and mortality in Cali, Colombia. 50 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Bravo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: The Population-based Cancer Registry of Cali aims to report all new cases in permanent residents within the limits of the city of Cali. Time trends of cancer incidence and mortality are described. The registry has been in continuous operation for 50 years. Methods: Cancer cases reports are obtained actively by visiting all sources of information: hospitals, pathology departments, hematology laboratories, radiotherapy centers, government offices where death certificates are processed and physician’s offices. It is estimated that the reporting is at least 95% complete. Results: Drastic decreases are documented in rates for tumors causally related to infectious agents, especially cancers of the uterine cervix and the stomach. Gradual increases are documented in rates of tumors linked to affluence and the metabolic syndrome, especially cancers of the colon and the female breast. An unexpected increase in the incidence of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland in women is reported. Tobacco-related cancers, especially cancer of the lung, showed marked increase in incidence rates around 1970, apparently the beginning of an epidemic similar to the one reported in Western societies. But the increase in incidence stopped around 1980, resulting from a strong anti-smoking campaign launched in Colombia in the 1970s. Conclusions: The findings have influenced prevention strategies implemented by public health authorities, specially the establishment of a city-wide program to prevent cervix cancer via widespread use of vaginal cytology and anti-smoking campaigns. Also, new population-based cancer registries have been established in other Colombian cities as well as in Ecuador.

  8. Trends of cancer incidence and mortality in Cali, Colombia. 50 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose :The Population-based Cancer Registry of Cali aims to report all new cases in permanent residents within the limits of the city of Cali. Time trends of cancer incidence and mortality are described. The registry has been in continuous operation for 50 years. Methods: Cancer cases reports are obtained actively by visiting all sources of information: hospitals, pathology departments, hematology laboratories, radiotherapy centers, government offices where death certificates are processed and physician’s offices. It is estimated that the reporting is at least 95% complete. Results: Drastic decreases are documented in rates for tumors causally related to infectious agents, especially cancers of the uterine cervix and the stomach. Gradual increases are documented in rates of tumors linked to affluence and the metabolic syndrome, especially cancers of the colon and the female breast. An unexpected increase in the incidence of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland in women is reported. Tobacco-related cancers, especially cancer of the lung, showed marked increase in incidence rates around 1970, apparently the beginning of an epidemic similar to the one reported in Western societies. But the increase in incidence stopped around 1980, resulting from a strong anti-smoking campaign launched in Colombia in the 1970s. Conclusions: The findings have influenced prevention strategies implemented by public health authorities, specially the establishment of a city-wide program to prevent cervix cancer via widespread use of vaginal cytology and anti-smoking campaigns. Also, new population-based cancer registries have been established in other Colombian cities as well as in Ecuador.

  9. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  10. Cigarette smoking: knowledge and attitudes among Mexican physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAPIA-CONYER ROBERTO

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence of the smoking habit among Mexican physicians as well as some of their attitudes and information on specific issues concerning smoking. Material and methods. In 1993, a survey was carried out among 3 568 physicians of the three major official health care institutions in Mexico City. A questionnaire designed for The Mexican National Survey of Addictions (ENA 1993 was used. Prevalence of cigarette smoking, age of onset, number of cigarettes per day; also information and attitudes concerning smoking were assessed. Results. The mean age was 37, 66% were males. Of the 3,488 (98% surveyed, 26.9% were smokers (62% daily, 20.6% were ex-smokers and 52.5% non-smokers. There were differences related to age and sex (p< 0.05. Of daily smokers, 36% smoked between 1 and 5 cigarettes. There was a significant trend among ex-smokers that linked the time they had ceased smoking with the fear to start smoking again. Physicians were well informed of the relationship between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Over 80% considered tobacco an addictive drug but only 65% were in favor of banning smoking from their workplaces and over 10% were not aware that it is forbidden to smoke inside health care facilities. Conclusions. These results differ from other studies that find the prevalence of smoking among physicians lower than in the general population. Our study revealed a greater prevalence of the smoking habit among female physicians and the number of cigarettes smoked per day was greater than in the general population regardless of sex.

  11. A qualitative study exploring male cancer patients' experiences with percutaneous nephrostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigum, Lene Hyldgaard; Spielmann, Marlène Elisabeth; Juhl, Gitte;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Obstructive uropathy due to advanced cancer can be efficiently treated with a percutaneous nephrostomy. The treatment is associated with complications and frequent readmissions. How the patients' quality of life is affected by a nephrostomy remains uncertain. The aim of this...... nephrostomy for a minimum of 1 month. All interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Ten male patients were interviewed, eight with prostate cancer and two with bladder cancer. Results. Treatment with nephrostomy influenced the physical activity level and...... study was to describe how a nephrostomy is perceived by patients and its effects on their everyday lives. Material and methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the patients' home using a mind map. The inclusion criteria were locally advanced or metastatic urological cancer treated with a...

  12. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ocvirk Janja; Moltara Maja Ebert; Mesti Tanja; Boc Marko; Rebersek Martina; Volk Neva; Benedik Jernej; Hlebanja Zvezdana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

  13. Reduction of cancer risk by optimization of Computed Tomography head protocols: far eastern Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer risk estimation constitutes one way for the evaluation of the public health, regarding computed tomography (CT) exposures. Starting from the hypothesis that the optimization of CT protocols would reduce significantly the added cancer risk, the purpose of this research was the application of optimization strategies regarding head CT protocols, in order to reduce the factors affecting the risk of induced cancer. The applied systemic approach included technological and human components, represented by quantitative physical factors. the volumetric kerma indexes, compared with respect to standard, optimized and reference values, were evaluated with multiple means comparison method. The added cancer risk resulted from the application of the methodology for biological effects evaluation, at low doses with low Linear Energy Transfer. Human observers in all scenarios evaluated the image quality. the reduced dose was significantly lower than for standard head protocols and reference levels, where: (1) for pediatric patients, by using an Automatic Exposure Control system, a reduction of 31% compared with standard protocol and ages range of 10-14, and (2) adults, using a Bilateral Filter for images obtained at low doses of 62% from those of standard head protocol. The risk reduction was higher than 25%. The systemic approach used allows the effective identification of factors involved on cancer risk related with exposures to CT. The combination of dose modulation and image restoration with Bilateral Filter, provide a significantly reduction of cancer risk, with acceptable diagnostic image quality. (Author)

  14. El costo de la atención médica del cáncer mamario: el caso del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social The health care costs of breast cancer: the case of the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Marie Knaul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Calcular el costo de atención de las pacientes con cáncer de mama tratadas en el Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: A través del Sistema de Información Médico Operativa del IMSS, se conformó una cohorte de pacientes con diagnóstico reciente en 2002 que recibió seguimiento hasta finales de 2006. Se identificó el uso de recursos y se le adjudicó el costo de atención del IMSS. RESULTADOS: Sólo 14% se diagnosticó en fase I y 48% en las fases III-IV. El costo de atención promedio por año-paciente se estimó en 110 459 pesos y para las mujeres diagnosticadas en 2002 la etapa I tuvo un costo de 74 522 pesos, comparado con 102 042 en la etapa II, 154 018 en la etapa III y 199 274 en la IV. CONCLUSIONES: El cáncer mamario representa un presupuesto significativo en el IMSS y entre más tardía es la etapa de detección, más altos resultan los costos económicos por año-paciente y más baja la probabilidad de sobrevida a cinco años.OBJECTIVE: We studied the cost of health care for women with breast cancer treated at the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, per its abbreviation in Spanish. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using the Medical and Operative Information Systems of the IMSS, we constructed a cohort of patients diagnosed in 2002 and followed these patients to the end of 2006, identifying the use of resources and imputing the IMSS-specific cost structure. RESULTS: Only 14% of women were diagnosed in stage 1 and 48% were diagnosed in stages III-IV. The average cost of their medical care per patient-year was $MX110,459. Costs for stage 1 were $MX74,522 compared to $102,042 for stage II, and were $MX154,018 for stage III and $MX199,274 for stage IV. CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer accounts for a significant part of the IMSS health budget. Later stage at diagnosis is associated with higher economic costs per patient-year of treatment and lower probability of five-year survival.

  15. Life Satisfaction and Psychological Well-Being of Older Adults With Cancer Experience: The Role of Optimism and Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jinmoo; Chun, Sanghee; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Junhyoung

    2016-09-01

    Promoting health and well-being among individuals of advancing age is a significant issue due to increased incidence of cancer among older adults. This study demonstrates the benefits of expecting positive outcomes and participating in volunteer activities among older adults with cancer. We used a nationally representative sample of 2,670 individuals who have experienced cancer from the 2008 wave of the Health and Retirement Study. We constructed a structural equation model to explore the associations of optimism, volunteerism, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being. The level of optimism was a significant predictor of volunteerism, which in turn affected life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The level of engagement in volunteer activities was found to have significant path coefficients toward both life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Our study provides evidence that older adults who have experienced cancer and maintained a positive outlook on their lives and engaged in personally meaningful activities tended to experience psychological well-being and life satisfaction.

  16. The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients:the SYSUCC experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Peng Yang; Yu-Xiang Ma; Yan Huang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Fei Xu; Ying Tian; Ben-Yan Zou; Rui-Zhen Gao; Li Zhang

    2014-01-01

    To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%,P< 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261,P< 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future.

  17. Cancer patients' experience of positive and negative changes due to the illness : relationships with psychological well-being, coping, and goal reengagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroevers, Maya J.; Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Most studies in cancer patients on psychological changes focused on positive changes (so-called 'posttraumatic growth'), with surprisingly little attention on the possibility that patients may experience both positive and negative changes. This study investigated the relationship between

  18. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer: Assessing an array of women's treatment experiences and perceptions, their perceived self-efficacy and nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Maatman, Gemma A.; Van Geffen, Erica C.G.; Vree, Robbert; Nortier, Johan W.; Van Dijk, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Background Although adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents breast cancer recurrence, nonadherence rates are substantial. We therefore examined associations of women's experiences and perceptions regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of endocrine therapy with nonadhere

  19. Quality Improvement in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program: The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert D.; Castro, Kathleen M.; Eisenstein, Jana; Stallings, Holley; Hegedus, Patricia D.; Bryant, Donna M.; Kadlubek, Pam J.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007; it is a network of community-based hospitals funded by the NCI. Quality of care is an NCCCP priority, with participation in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) playing a fundamental role in quality assessment and quality improvement (QI) projects. Using QOPI methodology, performance on quality measures was analyzed two times per year over a 3-year period to enhance our implementation of quality standards at NCCCP hospitals. Methods: A data-sharing agreement allowed individual-practice QOPI data to be electronically sent to the NCI. Aggregated data with the other NCCCP QOPI participants were presented to the network via Webinars. The NCCCP Quality of Care Subcommittee selected areas in which to focus subsequent QI efforts, and high-performing practices shared voluntarily their QI best practices with the network. Results: QOPI results were compiled semiannually between fall 2010 and fall 2013. The network concentrated on measures with a quality score of ≤ 0.75 and planned voluntary group-wide QI interventions. We identified 13 measures in which the NCCCP fell at or below the designated quality score in fall 2010. After implementing a variety of QI initiatives, the network registered improvements in all parameters except one (use of treatment summaries). Conclusion: Using the NCCCP as a paradigm, QOPI metrics provide a useful platform for group-wide measurement of quality performance. In addition, these measurements can be used to assess the effectiveness of QI initiatives. PMID:25538082

  20. Habaneros and shwarma: Jewish Mexicans in Israel as a transnational community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulette Kershenovich Schuster

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Food is the cultural expression of society food as a marker of class, ethnic, and religious identity. What happens when the location changes? Does food continue to play such an important role or do other cultural nodes take over? Do layers of traditions, adaptation and cultural blends emerge? This seems to be the case with third and fourth generation Mexican Jews who have moved to Israel. Not only have they brought their spiritual and cultural connections from Mexico, their birth country; they have also brought the food experiences of their great-grandparents and grandparents who were they themselves immigrants. Jewish Mexicans have transplanted their sense of community to Israel and in doing so they have also brought overlooked cultural interactions and unique food experiences. Are these simply by-products of religious and migration patterns? Or are there other elements that have affected this cultural hybridity?

  1. Visual inspection with acetic acid (via screening program: 7 years experience in early detection of cervical cancer and pre-cancers in rural South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Rani Poli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer continues to be a major public health problem in India in the absence of wide spread organised cervical screening programs. Visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA is an effective, inexpensive screening test that can be combined with simple treatment procedures for early cervical lesions, provided by trained health workers. We report 7 years experience in early detection of cervical cancer and pre-cancers using the VIA test in a community-based program in rural Andhra Pradesh, India where there are no existing organised cervical screening programs. Materials and Methods: Eligible women aged between 26 and 60 were opportunistically screened by trained health wor kers using the VIA test. Women who tested positive were further evaluated and those with cervical lesions were treated either by cryotherapy in the screening clinic or referred to a higher center. Results: A total of 18,869 women were screened by a single round of VIA testing with a positive rate of 10.75%. Biopsy proven high-grade squamous intraepithelials (HSILs were 90 (0.48% and low-grade squamous intraepithelials (LSILs were 43 (0.28%. The overall prevalence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+ lesion rate is 1.05%. A total of 312 (1.65% cryotherapies were done and 49 women underwent hysterectomy. Conclusions: VIA by trained female health workers is a safe, acceptable, and effective test that can save lives from cervical cancer even in remote areas with few resources. These results have important implications for efficient service delivery in cervical screening programs in low-resourced settings.

  2. Clinical outcome of parotidectomy with reconstruction: Experience of a regional head and neck cancer unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyituoyo Okoturo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salivary gland pathologies represent a histologically diverse group of benign and malignant neoplasms. Currently, World Health Organization recognizes 13 benign and 24 malignant variants of all salivary gland neoplasms. Surgery continues to remain the main-stay for treatment of parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study was to document our experiences of the patients treated for parotid tumors and find out if any compelling variable predicted the relative clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study, from records of parotidectomies performed at the operating theatre by the head and neck cancer division of the study institution between 2010 and 2013. Eligibility for study inclusion included cases with benign or malignant parotid neoplasms requiring surgical management with or without adjunct radiotherapy. The predictors of postoperative complications, overall survival (OS, and disease-free survival (DFS were analyzed. Results: A total of 20 patients underwent parotidectomy. The mean age was 42 years. Tumors were located on the left parotid in 13 cases (65% and the right parotid in 7 cases (35%. The surgical procedures comprised 16 superficial parotidectomies, 1 total parotidectomy, and 3 radical parotidectomy (inclusive of facial nerve sacrifice and 2 neck dissections levels II–V. The reconstructive procedures were 2 facial nerve branch cable grafts, 1 end-to-end facial-facial nerve branch anastomoses, and 2 facial re-animation surgeries (temporalis muscle suspensions. A total of five cases (33.3% had postoperative complications. 2 variables (length of surgery and neck dissection were found to have an impact on postoperative complications that were statistically significant. Additionally, length of surgery was a significant predictor on the 2 years OS and DFS. Conclusion: The result of this study showed good clinical outcome, especially in the benign cases. The comprehensive clinical outcome of the

  3. Early clinical experience of radiotherapy of prostate cancer with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli Mariacarla

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial clinical experience in radiation treatment of carcinoma of prostate with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc (RA technology. Methods Forty-five patients with a median age of 72 ± 3, affected by prostate carcinoma (T1c: 22 patients, T2a-b: 17 patients, T3a-b: 6 patients. N0: 43 patients, N1-Nx: 2 patients, all M0, with initial PSA of 10.0 ± 3.0 ng/mL, were treated with RapidArc in a feasibility study. All patients were treated with single arc using 6MV photons. Dose prescription ranged between 76 (7 patients and 78 Gy (38 patients in 2Gy/fraction. Plan quality was assessed by means of Dose Volume Histogram (DVH analysis. Technical parameters of arcs and pre-treatment quality assurance results (Gamma Agreement Index, GAI are reported to describe delivery features. Early toxicity was scored (according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Effects scale, CTCAE, scale at the end of treatment together with biochemical outcome (PSA. Results From DVH data, target coverage was fulfilling planning objectives: V95% was in average higher than 98% and V107%~0.0% (D2%~104.0% in average. Homogeneity D5%-D95% ranged between 6.2 ± 1.0% to 6.7 ± 1.3%. For rectum, all planning objectives were largely met (e.g. V70Gy = 10.7 ± 5.5% against an objective of 2% = 79.4 ± 1.2Gy against an objective of 80.0Gy. Maximum dose to femurs was D2% = 36.7 ± 5.4Gy against an objective of 47Gy. Monitor Units resulted: MU/Gy = 239 ± 37. Average beam on time was 1.24 ± 0.0 minutes. Pre-treatment GAI resulted in 98.1 ± 1.1%. Clinical data were recorded as PSA at 6 weeks after RT, with median values of 0.4 ± 0.4 ng/mL. Concerning acute toxicity, no patient showed grade 2-3 rectal toxicity; 5/42 (12% patients experienced grade 2 dysuria; 18/41 (44% patients preserved complete or partial erectile function. Conclusion RapidArc proved to be a safe, qualitative and advantageous treatment modality for prostate cancer.

  4. Undocumented Migration and the Residential Segregation of Mexicans in New Destinations1

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Matthew; Stringfield, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This study uses data from the 2000 Census and 2005–2009 American Community Survey to examine the impact of undocumented Mexican migration to new destinations on residential segregation between Mexican immigrants and native-born whites and native-born blacks. We find that Mexican-white and Mexican-black segregation is higher in new Mexican gateways than in established areas and that, for Mexican-immigrant segregation from whites, this heightened level of residential segregation in new destinat...

  5. Palliative patients’ and significant others’ experiences of transitions concerning organizational, psychosocial and existential issues during the course of incurable cancer: A systematic review protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rikke; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Review question/objective The objective of this review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence exploring palliative patients’ or their significant others’ experiences of transitions during the course of incurable cancer. In this review, transitions are concept...... exploring euthanasia will be excluded because euthanasia is not included in the WHO definition of palliation. KEYWORDS Lived experience; incurable cancer; patient; significant other; transition; organizational; psychosocial; existential...

  6. De novo cancers following liver transplantation: a single center experience in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songfeng Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: De novo cancers are a growing problem that has become one of the leading causes of late mortality after liver transplantation. The incidences and risk factors varied among literatures and fewer concerned the Eastern population. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and clinical features of de novo cancers after liver transplantation in a single Chinese center. METHODS: 569 patients who received liver transplantation and survived for more than 3 months in a single Chinese center were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 18 de novo cancers were diagnosed in 17 recipients (13 male and 4 female after a mean of 41 ± 26 months, with an overall incidence of 3.2%, which was lower than that in Western people. Of these, 8 (3.32% cases were from 241 recipients with malignant liver diseases before transplant, while 10 (3.05% cases were from 328 recipients with benign diseases. The incidence rates were comparable, p = 0.86. Furthermore, 2 cases developed in 1 year, 5 cases in 3 years and 11 cases over 3 years. The most frequent cancers developed after liver transplantation were similar to those in the general Chinese population but had much higher incidence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplant recipients were at increased risk for developing de novo cancers. The incidence rates and pattern of de novo cancers in Chinese population are different from Western people due to racial and social factors. Pre-transplant malignant condition had no relationship to de novo cancer. Exact risk factors need further studies.

  7. The relevance of "Nonsmoking-associated lung cancer" in India: A single-centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Krishnamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer cause. Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical profile and the epidemiological trends in lung cancer patients from a single centre with an emphasis on the smoking practices. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 258 consecutive hospital in-patients with a proven diagnosis of lung cancer at a tertiary care oncology centre between 2003 and 2007. Results: The median age of patients in our study was 56 years; the male to female ratio was approximately 3.5:1. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC was the predominant histology in 224 patients; the histology in the remaining 34 patients was small-cell carcinoma. Within NSCLC, the most common histology was adenocarcinoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma. One hundred and two patients were never-smokers as compared to 156 patients who were ever-smokers. Among the smokers, the majority of them were found to be cigarette smokers compared to 28.2% bidi smokers. There was a very significant correlation found with adenocarcinoma among nonsmokers, and with squamous cell carcinoma among the smokers compared to non-smokers. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the epidemiology of lung cancer in India is possibly changing, with close to 40% of our lung cancer patients being nonsmokers. More importantly, our study reflects the global trend of rise in adenocarcinoma histology. These observations need to be substantiated in similar studies of larger magnitude, preferably population-based.

  8. OUR EXPERIENCE OF HYPERTHERMIC INTRAPERITONEAL CHEMOTHERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Improvement of the results of treatment of patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. Material and methods. From the 2010–2014 we performed 30 surgeries using techniques HICT. Among patients there were 17 men and 13 women. The median of age was 50 years. Locally advanced gastric cancer (T4a-T4b was observed in 22 cases, including 4 patients in the emergency immunocytochemical study with peritoneal lavage detected cancer-free (Cyt + cells in the abdominal cavity. The group of patients with metastatic gastric cancer accounted for 8 patients. Narrow carcinomatosis (P1 was 4 cases, carcinomatosis (P2-P3 — 4. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in the study group was not carried out. In the control group No 1 (n = 51 performed surgery alone, without additional anticancer therapy. In the control group No 2 (n = 66, a combined treatment (surgery + chemotherapy. Results. Follow-up median was 25 months. Overall 1-year survival rate for all three groups was 55%, 39% and 52%, respectively. Median survival in the intervention group versus 21.4 months in the 8 and 12 months, respectively. The most effective HICT is shown for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. In the study group, median overall survival was 29 months. The survival rate of 1-, 2-, 3-year-old was equal to 68%, 61% and 42%. In the first control group, 1-year survival of 45%. None of the patients did not survive 2 years. In the second control group, one-year survival rate was 60%, 2-year survival is not. Results of treatment of metastatic gastric cancer proved to be more modest. In the main group the median survival was 10 months, compared with 6 and 7 months of the two control groups. There were no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. 1. Availability of limited dissemination, free cancer cells in the abdominal cavity, as well as a massive defeat of serous membrane of the stomach can be seen as indications for HICT in gastric cancer. 2. In

  9. Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Ghanaian Women: The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Edmund M; Gyasi, Richard K; Tettey, Yao; Edusei, Lawrence; Bayor, Marcel T; Jiagge, Evelyn; Gyakobo, Mawuli; Merajver, Sofia D; Newman, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers that have negative or extremely low expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and non-amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)/neu are termed triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The majority of TNBC tumors belong to the biologically aggressive basal subtype, and they cannot be managed with targeted endocrine or anti-HER2/neu agents. In western, high resource environments, risk factors for TNBC include younger age at diagnosis and hereditary susceptibility. Women of African ancestry in the United States and in continental Africa have higher frequencies of TNBC, prompting speculation that this risk may have an inherited basis and may at least partially explain breast cancer survival disparities related to racial/ethnic identity. Efforts to document and confirm the breast cancer burden of continental Africa have been hampered by the limited availability of registry and immunohistochemistry resources. Our goal was to evaluate the breast cancers diagnosed in one of the largest health care facilities in western Africa, and to compare the frequencies as well as risk factors for TNBC versus non-TNBC in this large referral tertiary hospital. The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital is affiliated with the University of Ghana and is located in Accra, the capital of Ghana. We conducted an institutional, Department of Pathology-based review of the breast cancer cases seen at this facility for the 2010 calendar year, and for which histopathologic specimens were available. The overall study population of 223 breast cancer cases had a median age of 52.4 years, and most had palpable tumors larger than 5 cm in diameter. More than half were TNBC (130; 58.3%). We observed similar age-specific frequencies, distribution of stage at diagnosis and tumor grade among cases of TNBC compared to cases of non-TNBC. Ghanaian breast cancer patients tend to have an advanced stage distribution and relatively younger age at diagnosis compared to

  10. Independent Mexican cinema and the dream of a national cinema in 1970s Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez Vargas, Erika Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This thesis analyzes film production during the Echeverría sexenio (1970-1976) where Mexican cinema would undergo both an infrastructural as well as developmental change. The Echeverría sexenio followed one of the most traumatic moments in Mexico City's history where politicized thought would be violently repressed. As a result of political and cultural changes post the 1968 student movements many students would begin to experiment and create independent film under the newly developed cinemat...

  11. Examining the Effects of Mexican Serial Migration and Family Separations on Acculturative Stress, Depression, and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Dana; Reyes, Karina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role of parent-child separations during serial migration to the United States in predicting individual- and family-level outcomes in Mexican immigrant families. We assessed parents' subjective appraisals of their family's separation and reunion experiences to explore associations with self-reported acculturative stress,…

  12. Comparison of torula yeast and various grape juice products as attractants for Mexican fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Robert L; Thomas, Donald B

    2014-04-01

    Early research investigating attractants for the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew, during the 1930s indicated that fermentation products were effective attractants for Mexican fruit flies and other tropical Tephritidae, but that attraction to fruit components was only of academic interest. Tests reported here were carried out on populations of Mexican fruit flies from 2004 to 2011. Trapping experiments carried out at sites in the states Nuevo Leon and San Luis Potosi compared grape juice, reconstituted grape concentrate and powdered grape mixes, and torula yeast extract in orchards at each site. The Nuevo Leon orchard was mixed with alternate rows of pears and surrounded by alternate hosts. The San Luis Potosi site was surrounded by other orange orchards or nonhosts. Each test was run for at least 10 mo and included highest and lowest trapping periods. Results showed that grape juice captured the most total flies and had the fewest samples with zero flies. However, in the series of experiments, each product had the most captures in at least one experiment. Hydrolyzed torula was superior in one of the six experiments. In five of the tests, polyethylene glycol was tested as an additive to the grape products but never improved capture rate compared with the product without the additive. These results indicate that grape juice is superior to grape concentrate or powder and grape juice is at least equal to torula yeast hydrolysate for trapping pest populations of Mexican fruit flies in commercial citrus orchards. PMID:24772538

  13. Consequences of Arizona's Immigration Policy on Social Capital among Mexican Mothers with Unauthorized Immigration Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Padilla, Brian; Valentine, Jessa Lewis

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the consequences of increasingly restrictive immigration policies on social capital among Mexican mothers with unauthorized immigrant status in Arizona. Three focus groups conducted in Arizona explore how mothers' experiences with immigration policies have affected their neighborhood, community, and family ties. Focus…

  14. "Este Libro Es Mi Historia": Mother-Child Interactions during Storybook Reading in a Mexican-American Household.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyak, Patrick

    A study explored the storybook reading experiences between Ms. Garza and her children. A broad conception of the zone of proximal development, involving use, adaptation, and transformation of culturally shaped tools in the process of shared activity, provides the framework for examining this particular Mexican-American family's reading behavior.…

  15. Clinical experience of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiromichiMaeda; TakehrioOkabayashi; KazuhiroHanazaki; MichiyaKobayashi

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome caused by ovarian metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer, which was accompanied by peritoneal dissemination. A 58-year-old female patient presented with massive right pleural effusion, ascites and a huge pelvic mass. Under the diagnosis of an advanced ovarian tumor, bilateral oophorectomy was performed and sigmoidectomy was also carried out after intraoperative diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination involving the sigmoid colon. How- ever, immunohistochemical staining revealed that the ovarian lesions were metastasis from the primary advanced colon cancer. Postoperatively, ascites and pleural effusion subsided, and the diagnosis of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastatic ovarian tumor from colon cancer was determined. The patient is now undergoing a regimen of chemotherapy for colon cancer without recurrence of ascites or hydrothorax 10 mo after the surgery. Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastaticovarian tumor from colon cancer is rare but clinically important because long-term alleviation of symptoms can be achieved by surgical resection. This case report suggests that selected patients, even with peritoneal dissemination, may obtain palliation from surgical resection of metastatic ovarian tumors.

  16. Social comparison processes, narrative mapping and their shaping of the cancer experience: a case study of an elite athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Andrew C; Pérez-Samaniego, Víctor; Smith, Brett

    2012-09-01

    Drawing on data generated by life history interviews and fieldwork observations we illuminate the ways in which a young elite athlete named David (a pseudonym) gave meaning to his experiences of cancer that eventually led to his death. Central to this process were the ways in which David utilized both social comparisons and a narrative map provided by the published autobiography of Lance Armstrong (2000). Our analysis reveals the selective manner in which social comparison processes operated around the following key dimensions: mental attitude to treatment; the sporting body; the ageing body; and physical appearance. The manner in which different comparison targets were chosen, the ways in which these were framed by Armstrong's autobiography, and the work that the restitution narrative as an actor did in this process are also examined. Some reflections are offered regarding the experiential consequences of the social comparison processes utilized by David when these are shaped by specific forms of embodiment and selective narrative maps of cancer survival.

  17. 陈治平治疗乳腺癌经验%CHEN Zhiping's Experience in Treatment of Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭为; 付婷婷; 王昌俊

    2013-01-01

    陈治平为广东省首批名老中医,擅治白癜风、荨麻疹、银屑病、泌尿系结石、慢性肾炎、脉管炎、癌证等病证.文章从病因病机、治则、用药特色、典型病案等方面总结了陈治平老中医在乳腺癌治疗上的临床经验.%CHEN Zhiping was one of the famous TCM doctors in Guangdong province.He was expert in the treatment of vitiligo,urticaria,psoriasis,urolithiasis,chronic nephritis,angiitis,and cancer.This article summarized the clinical experience on treatment of breast cancer of CHEN Zhiping from etiology and pathogenesis,therapeutical principle,medication characteristics and typical case.

  18. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: a public health priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-04-28

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  19. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: A public health priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  20. Guidelines for information about therapy experiments: a proposal on best practice for recording experimental data on cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Beltrán Alejandra N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biology, biomedicine and healthcare have become data-driven enterprises, where scientists and clinicians need to generate, access, validate, interpret and integrate different kinds of experimental and patient-related data. Thus, recording and reporting of data in a systematic and unambiguous fashion is crucial to allow aggregation and re-use of data. This paper reviews the benefits of existing biomedical data standards and focuses on key elements to record experiments for therapy development. Specifically, we describe the experiments performed in molecular, cellular, animal and clinical models. We also provide an example set of elements for a therapy tested in a phase I clinical trial. Findings We introduce the Guidelines for Information About Therapy Experiments (GIATE, a minimum information checklist creating a consistent framework to transparently report the purpose, methods and results of the therapeutic experiments. A discussion on the scope, design and structure of the guidelines is presented, together with a description of the intended audience. We also present complementary resources such as a classification scheme, and two alternative ways of creating GIATE information: an electronic lab notebook and a simple spreadsheet-based format. Finally, we use GIATE to record the details of the phase I clinical trial of CHT-25 for patients with refractory lymphomas. The benefits of using GIATE for this experiment are discussed. Conclusions While data standards are being developed to facilitate data sharing and integration in various aspects of experimental medicine, such as genomics and clinical data, no previous work focused on therapy development. We propose a checklist for therapy experiments and demonstrate its use in the 131Iodine labeled CHT-25 chimeric antibody cancer therapy. As future work, we will expand the set of GIATE tools to continue to encourage its use by cancer researchers, and we will engineer an ontology to

  1. Effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubizarreta Alberdi, Raquel [Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Edificio Administrativo da Conselleria de Sanidade, Servicio de Programas Poboacionais de Cribado, Direccion Xeral de Saude Publica e Planificacion, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Llanes, Ana B.F.; Ortega, Raquel Almazan [Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Exposito, Ruben Roman; Collado, Jose M.V.; Oliveres, Xavier Castells [Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Parc de Salut Mar. CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Queiro Verdes, Teresa [Galician Agency for Health Technology Assessment, Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galicia (Spain); Natal Ramos, Carmen [Principality of Asturias Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Principality of Asturias (Spain); Sanz, Maria Ederra [Public Health Institute, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Salas Trejo, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    To evaluate the effect of radiologist experience on the risk of false-positive results in population-based breast cancer screening programmes. We evaluated 1,440,384 single-read screening mammograms, corresponding to 471,112 women aged 45-69 years participating in four Spanish programmes between 1990 and 2006. The mammograms were interpreted by 72 radiologists. The overall percentage of false-positive results was 5.85% and that for false-positives resulting in an invasive procedure was 0.38%. Both the risk of false-positives overall and of false-positives leading to an invasive procedure significantly decreased (p < 0.001) with greater reading volume in the previous year: OR 0.77 and OR 0.78, respectively, for a reading volume 500-1,999 mammograms and OR 0.59 and OR 0.60 for a reading volume of >14,999 mammograms with respect to the reference category (<500). The risk of both categories of false-positives was also significantly reduced (p < 0.001) as radiologists' years of experience increased: OR 0.96 and OR 0.84, respectively, for 1 year's experience and OR 0.72 and OR 0.73, respectively, for more than 4 years' experience with regard to the category of <1 year's experience. Radiologist experience is a determining factor in the risk of a false-positive result in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  2. First experiences with MR mammography in aftercare following plastic surgery of cancer of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate typical MR mammographic findings after plastic surgery of breast cancer. Postoperative (7-38 months, median 13) MR mammographic examinations of 25 patients operated for breast cancer (11 latissimus dorsiflaps (LAT)), 14 rectus abdominis myocutaneous-flaps (TRAM) were reevaluated. The examinations were performed with a breast coil at 1 T. The sequences applied were a fat-suppressed 2-D turbo IR-sequence protonweighted and a T1-weighted FLASH 3-D sequence as dynamic series. Scars between the myocutaneous flap and the remaining breast tissue always appeared in form of a ligament or septum. Signal and perfusion characteristics of scar tissue and muscle stalk in this investigation were clearly different from fat necrosis was found and rectified by biopsy. MR mammography is a very valuable diagnostic method for postoperative evaluation of myocutaneous flap-based therapy of breast cancer. (orig.)

  3. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  4. Animal experiments and clinical trials of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan for various cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; Kim, E. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Park, S. Y.; Son, Y. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, C. H. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    {sup 166}Ho is a good therapeutic radionuclide because of its suitable half-life (26.8 hours), high beta energy and 6% gamma ray for imaging. Chitosan is a kind of N-glucosamine with 400 to 500 kD MW, which chelates metal ions and degrades slowly in vivo. As a preclinical studies, we performed cytotoxic effect of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in a variety of cancer cell lines derived from stomach or ovarian cancer based on MTT assay and HTCA method. To evaluated the absorbed dose to the cavitary wall from {sup 166}Ho-chitosan, intraperitoneal administration of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in the rat and simulation of energy transfer from the beta particles to the cavity wall using the Monte Carlo code EGS4 was done, and used as a standard for the planning therapy. Intracavitary {sup 166}Ho-chitosan therapy were tried in peritoneal metastatic ovarian and stomach cancers and cystic brain tumors. Intraarterial injection in inoperable primary liver cancer was also tried. As a radiation synovectomy agent, biocompatibility study in the knee joints of rabbits were performed. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan showed synergistic effects with 5-FU or cisplatin in vitro. 97-99% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan was localized within the peritoneal cavity, and more than 90% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan was attached to the peritoneal wall. Partial response were observed in 4 among 5 patients with ovarian cancer without severe toxicity. In the cystic brain tumor, 5 of 8 cysts were shrunken in size with thinning of the wall, 2 out of 8 showed growth retardation. In the primary liver cancer, radioactivity was distributed in the teritory of selected hepatic arterial branch, and partial responses were observed in 2 cases. In the knee joints of the rabbits, more than 98% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan remained in the joint cavity and was stable upto 1 week. 49 refs., 22 tabs. (author)

  5. Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer by percutaneous and intraoperative irreversible electroporation: general hospital cancer center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, L; Horejs, J; Krska, Z; Hoskovec, D; Petruzelka, L; Krechler, T; Kriz, P; Briza, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of irreversible electroporation (IRE) and the outcome of patients undergoing IRE of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Twenty-one patients with unresectable PC underwent open (n=19) or percutaneous (n=2) IRE of the tumor using the Nanoknife system with two electrodes that were repositioned several times to affect the whole mass. The size of the tumor was 39±10mm with a range from 21 to 65mm. Five patients underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and seven patients were treated with chemotherapy after IRE. Complications occurred in five patients, which resulted in prolongation of the average hospital stay from 10 to 34 days. There was no mortality in the first postoperative month. Median survival after IRE was 10.2 months compared to 9.3 months in a matched cohort (hazard ratio = .54, p = .053). The quality of life was declining slowly. 81% of time after IRE the Karnofsky performance status was ≥70 and sharp decline occurred approximately 8 weeks before death.In conclusion, IRE is a safe palliative treatment option for a percentage of patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. The patients treated with open IRE lived a decent life until 8 weeks before their death. We believe that IRE of pancreatic carcinoma can be regarded as an option, if imaging or explorative laparotomy show that R0 resection in not possible. PMID:26774149

  6. Patterns of failure in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for limited small cell lung cancer: Southeastern Cancer Study Group experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this analysis, we compare the patterns of failure in the first 12 months for 660 eligible patients randomized to two Southeastern Cancer Study Group (SECSG) protocols for limited extent, small cell carcinoma of the lung between 1978 and 1985. In each protocol, a different schedule of radiotherapy was given in conjunction with combination chemotherapy and was compared with combination chemotherapy alone. In protocol 78 LUN 328, radiotherapy was given between courses of chemotherapy, and in protocol LUN 81343, it was given simultaneously. The rates of local failure, either as an initial or subsequent site, in the first 12 months were significantly lower when thoracic irradiation was given than when it was not (P less than .01). When the 2 radiotherapy arms were compared, there were no significant differences in the rates of local failure alone, but a smaller proportion of patients developed both local failure and distant metastases (P less than .01) when simultaneous radiotherapy was administered. Survival on all 4 arms was similar during the first 2 years of patient study. After 2 years, both radiotherapy regimens showed a trend toward improved survival compared with the combination drug alone (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) arms. On both protocols, survival from 12 months was significantly longer for those with local control at 12 months than for those who did not show local control

  7. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer--the Aarhus experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M C; Garne, J P; Hessov, I;

    2000-01-01

    Eighty patients, with newly diagnosed unifocal breast cancer and with no axillary metastases verified by ultrasonography, underwent sentinel lymph node (SLN) and subsequent axillary lymph node dissection. To identify the SLN, we used a combination of Tc-99m labelled colloid (Albures) and blue dye...... as SLNs that tested negative but with higher nodes that tested positive. If SLN biopsy is accepted as a routine procedure and when the exact indications are defined, the method described probably could be offered to the majority of breast cancer patients....

  8. A Mexican perspective on learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, T V; Kaufman de Lopez, C K

    1995-11-01

    Given the worldwide trend toward the integration of children with special needs into the general school system, and the Program for Educational Modernization (1989-1994) in Mexico, Mexican educators have had to reassess the politics of special education, focusing on different service delivery models. One model, Integrated Groups, which has been functioning since the 1970s and is primarily for children with learning and language disabilities, is described. New legislation recently enacted recognizes and encourages the collaboration of general education and special education to meet the needs of all children. During the school year 1994-1995, the Secretariat of Public Education (SEP; the Mexican centralized public school system) is piloting, in Mexico City, a proposal for the integration of children into the general classroom. This new model of service delivery is designed to provide greater site-based approaches to the education of individuals with learning disabilities.

  9. Second Mexican School of Nuclear Physics: Notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The II Mexican School of Nuclear Physics which is directed to those last semesters students of the Physics career or post-graduate was organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Mexican Physics Society, carrying out at April 16-27, 2001 in the installations of the Institute of Physics and the Institute of Nuclear Sciences, both in the UNAM, and the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). A first school of a similar level in Nuclear Physics, was carried out in Mexico at 1977 as Latin american School of Physics. This book treats about the following themes: Interactions of radiation with matter, Evaluation of uncertainty in experimental data, Particle accelerators, Notions of radiological protection and dosimetry, Cosmic rays, Basis radiation (environmental), Measurement of excitation functions with thick targets and inverse kinematics, Gamma ray technique for to measure the nuclear fusion, Neutron detection with Bonner spectrometer, Energy losses of alpha particles in nickel. It was held the practice Radiation detectors. (Author)

  10. Energy-urban transition: The Mexican case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, Armando, E-mail: aaopz@yahoo.co [Freelance, 33 Oriente 1617, Puebla, 72530 Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    In this paper I present a study regarding the institutional conditions of Mexican cities based on a post-petroleum urban model that considers transport, architecture, urban planning and land use, renewable energy sources, energy saving and efficiency, and urban metabolism issues. The model was constructed with recommendations of authors and organizations that have analysed the energy dimension of cities under an energy-availability, environmental or petroleum-independent view. To make the study I sent a questionnaire to some local governments of all the country. The information indicates that Mexican cities do not have institutional conditions to manage the urban-energy transition that signify the end of cheap oil and the peak of world oil production.

  11. Energy-urban transition. The Mexican case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, Armando [Freelance, 33 Oriente 1617, Puebla, 72530 Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    In this paper I present a study regarding the institutional conditions of Mexican cities based on a post-petroleum urban model that considers transport, architecture, urban planning and land use, renewable energy sources, energy saving and efficiency, and urban metabolism issues. The model was constructed with recommendations of authors and organizations that have analysed the energy dimension of cities under an energy-availability, environmental or petroleum-independent view. To make the study I sent a questionnaire to some local governments of all the country. The information indicates that Mexican cities do not have institutional conditions to manage the urban-energy transition that signify the end of cheap oil and the peak of world oil production. (author)

  12. 3. Mexican school of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The III Mexican School of Nuclear Physics which is directed to those post graduate in Sciences and those of last semesters students of the Physics career or some adjacent career was organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Mexican Physics Society, carrying out at November 18-29, 2002 in the installations of the Institute of Physics and the Institute of Nuclear Sciences both in the UNAM, and the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). In this as well as the last version its were offered 17 courses, 9 of them including laboratory practices and the rest were of theoretical character only. This book treats about the following themes: Nuclear physics, Electrostatic accelerators, Cyclotrons, Thermonuclear reactions, Surface barrier detectors, Radiation detection, Neutron detection, Bonner sphere spectrometers, Radiation protection, Biological radiation effects, Particle kinematics, Nucleosynthesis, Plastics, Muons, Quadrupoles, Harmonic oscillators, Quantum mechanics among many other matters. (Author)

  13. Energy-urban transition: The Mexican case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper I present a study regarding the institutional conditions of Mexican cities based on a post-petroleum urban model that considers transport, architecture, urban planning and land use, renewable energy sources, energy saving and efficiency, and urban metabolism issues. The model was constructed with recommendations of authors and organizations that have analysed the energy dimension of cities under an energy-availability, environmental or petroleum-independent view. To make the study I sent a questionnaire to some local governments of all the country. The information indicates that Mexican cities do not have institutional conditions to manage the urban-energy transition that signify the end of cheap oil and the peak of world oil production.

  14. Older Cancer Patients’ User Experiences With Web-Based Health Information Tools: A Think-Aloud Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romijn, Geke; Smets, Ellen M A; Loos, Eugene F; Kunneman, Marleen; van Weert, Julia C M

    2016-01-01

    Background Health information is increasingly presented on the Internet. Several Web design guidelines for older Web users have been proposed; however, these guidelines are often not applied in website development. Furthermore, although we know that older individuals use the Internet to search for health information, we lack knowledge on how they use and evaluate Web-based health information. Objective This study evaluates user experiences with existing Web-based health information tools among older (≥ 65 years) cancer patients and survivors and their partners. The aim was to gain insight into usability issues and the perceived usefulness of cancer-related Web-based health information tools. Methods We conducted video-recorded think-aloud observations for 7 Web-based health information tools, specifically 3 websites providing cancer-related information, 3 Web-based question prompt lists (QPLs), and 1 values clarification tool, with colorectal cancer patients or survivors (n=15) and their partners (n=8) (median age: 73; interquartile range 70-79). Participants were asked to think aloud while performing search, evaluation, and application tasks using the Web-based health information tools. Results Overall, participants perceived Web-based health information tools as highly useful and indicated a willingness to use such tools. However, they experienced problems in terms of usability and perceived usefulness due to difficulties in using navigational elements, shortcomings in the layout, a lack of instructions on how to use the tools, difficulties with comprehensibility, and a large amount of variety in terms of the preferred amount of information. Although participants frequently commented that it was easy for them to find requested information, we observed that the large majority of the participants were not able to find it. Conclusions Overall, older cancer patients appreciate and are able to use cancer information websites. However, this study shows the importance

  15. Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Bailey, Zinzi; Krieger, Nancy; Austin, S Bryn; Gottlieb, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the health and health care of U.S. black lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women. To understand the facilitators of and barriers to cervical cancer screening in this population, focus group discussions were conducted in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts between November and December 2012. Using purposive sampling methods, the authors enrolled 18 black LBQ women who participated in one of four focus groups. Using thematic analysis, patient-provider communication was identified, which consisted of four sub-themes--health care provider communication style and demeanor; heteronormative provider assumptions; heterosexism, racism, and classism; and provider professional and sociodemographic background--as the most salient theme. Participants reported fears and experiences of multiple forms of discrimination and preferred receiving care from providers who were knowledgeable about same-sex sexual health and shared their life experiences at the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The cervical cancer screening experiences of black LBQ women would be improved by training all health care providers in same-sex sexual health, offering opportunities for clinicians to learn about the effects of various forms of discrimination on women's health care, and increasing the presence of LBQ women of color in health care settings. PMID:25909663

  16. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting: Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results Three main categories of experience were identified: 1 The health professionals' management, where a need to optimize was found. 2 Shared care, which was lacking. 3 The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs improvement and attention should be drawn to the "professionalization" of the relatives and the need to strike a balance between their needs, wishes and resources in end-of-life care and bereavement.

  17. The Long-Run Effect of Mexican Immigration on Crime in US Cities: Evidence from Variation in Mexican Fertility Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron Chalfin

    2015-01-01

    Using historical data on the size of state-specific Mexican birth cohorts and geographic migration networks between Mexican states and US metropolitan areas, I construct an instrumental variable that predicts decadal migration from Mexico to the United States. The intuition behind this identification strategy is that larger historical birth cohorts in Mexico yield more potential migrants once each birth cohort reaches prime migration age. I report evidence that Mexican immigration is associat...

  18. 4. Mexican School of Nuclear Physics. Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IV Mexican School of Nuclear Physics, organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Mexican Physics Society, takes place from June 27 to July 8, 2005 in the Nuclear Sciences and of Physics Institutes of the UNAM and in the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). This school, as the previous ones, it was guided the students of the last semesters of the career of Physics, of the Post grade of the same specialty, and of other adjacent careers. To give the students a current vision of some of the topics more important of the nuclear physics and their relationship with other near areas of the physics it was the objective of this School. The School covered a wide range of theoretical and experimental courses, imparted in its majority by Mexican expert professor-investigators in the matter to who we thank them the one effort and the quality of their presentations, reflected in the content of this document. The answer of the students to the convocation was excellent, 31 students presented application for admission coming from the following institutions: Meritorious Autonomous University de Puebla, National Institute of Nuclear Research, Technological Institute of Orizaba, National Polytechnic Institute, The University of Texas at Brownsville, Autonomous University of the State de Mexico, Autonomous University of the State of Morelos, Autonomous University of Baja California, Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi, University of Guadalajara, University of Guanajuato, National Autonomous University of Mexico, University of Texas, at El Paso and University Veracruzana. They were admitted to the 22 students with the higher averages qualifications of the list of applicants. The organizers of this school thank the financial support granted by the following sponsor institutions: Nuclear Sciences Institute, UNAM, Physics Institute of UNAM, Coordination of the Scientific Research UNAM, National Institute of Nuclear Research, Nuclear Physics Division of the Mexican

  19. Cultural And Environmental Factors Impacting Mexican Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will be an overview of cultural and organizational factors that influence the way libraries operate and provide services in Mexico. Culture is an underlying factor that influences the way librarians do business, and environmental factors determine, on the other hand, how a library organization operates and communicates with the outside world. These two factors are crucial for those who come from abroad and want to do business with Mexican libraries.

  20. How to tap Mexican Business Information Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Jesús

    1993-01-01

    Publication of business information sources in Mexico is growing fast. This growth is probably faster than the one of traditional academic-oriented sources. However, despite this growth, Mexican companies and international corporations demand greater and better information sources to monitor their environments due to the free trade agreement with The US and Canada. An evaluation of the most important sources and organizations devoted to the publication of business information are included...

  1. Trafficking Networks and the Mexican Drug War

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Drug trade-related violence has escalated dramatically in Mexico since 2007, and recent years have also witnessed large-scale efforts to combat trafficking, spearheaded by Mexico's conservative PAN party. This study examines the direct and spillover effects of Mexican policy toward the drug trade. Regression discontinuity estimates show that drug-related violence increases substantially after close elections of PAN mayors. Empirical evidence suggests that the violence reflects rival trafficke...

  2. The Mexican electricity industry - cogeneration potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief history of Mexico's electric power industry is given. Diagrams show (i) the increase in primary energy production from 1990-1998; (ii) energy consumption by sector and (iii) the change in capacity between 1990 and 1998. The projected energy development for 1998-2007 is discussed. The Mexican government has chosen cogeneration to be an important contributor to future energy-efficient power production. Data on installed cogeneration capacity for years 2000 and 2001 are given according to sector

  3. The Mexican sugar industry : problems and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Borrell, Brent

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican sugar industry operates under strict government controls. The sugar parastatal, AZUCAR, and other state agencies govern virturally all aspects of pricing and, until recently, AZUCAR controlled virtually all aspects of marketing. The purpose of this study is to make transparent the main economic effects of existing sugar policies. Three broad measures are used to estimate the resource misallocation effects of intervention: the nominal rate of protection, the effective rate of assis...

  4. Experience of Southern Chinese: new challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age--a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie Tsz-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Compared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues. PMID:22994790

  5. The United Mexican States: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkert, R; Aguirre, E J

    1988-09-01

    Although the popular North American opinion of Mexico is one that paints a picture of a poor, disadvantaged country, South America sees Mexico has a richer more prosperous nation. It is observed that only in the Latin American countries of Venezuela, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago do consumers have higher incomes than Mexican consumers. Moreover, while millions of Mexicans migrate to the United States to seek a better standard of living, several thousand Central American refugees illegally migrate to Mexico in search of a better life. This better life includes an increased age of lie expectancy from 51 years in the 1950s to 64 years in the late 1970s. There have also been improvements in health care and school enrollments and in the low cost availability of education. Tourism and the prospect of the manufacturing of energy are significant, positive factors working in favor of an improved Mexican economy and a higher overall quality of life. However, Mexico faces serious problems such as a mounting foreign debt. Also rising is Mexico's population which has doubled since 1964 and which continues to grow at a rate of 1.9%. Economic programs and reforms and family development planning have been instituted in response to the countries' current recession and population growth and have begun to show positive results. PMID:12315795

  6. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR) axis is a prerequisite for growth in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a potent inhibitor of extracellular and intracellular androgen synthesis by inhibition of the CYP-17 enzyme system, which...

  7. [How children who's siblings are diagnosed with cancer experience and regulate the disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juen, Florian; Guggemos, Andreas; Engelmann, Lina; Diesselhorst, Viola; Di Gallo, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate behaviour problems and emotional regulation of children who's siblings are diagnosed with cancer. Participants were assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the MacArthur Story Stem Battery (MSSB). Both instruments were administered twice (shortly after diagnosis and at the end of treatment). Brothers and sisters of 14 children suffering from cancer were compared with 18 siblings of healthy individuals. In the SDQ no differences between the two groups were found. At time 1 the MSSB showed significant differences in number and quality of displayed contents, representation of parents and the way of performing the narrative. At time 2 narratives changed particularly in the treatment group, but some differences still remained. Overall siblings of children suffering from cancer showed more intrapsychic reaction to the disease than became obvious in their behaviour. This fosters the conclusion that there may be a need for specific support for siblings of children with cancer in order to prevent them from psychic disorders and pathological mourning reactions. PMID:24032314

  8. Oncogenetics service and the Brazilian public health system: the experience of a reference Cancer Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir I. Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of families at-risk for hereditary cancer is extremely important due to the prevention potential in those families. However, the number of Brazilian genetic services providing oncogenetic care is extremely low for the continental dimension of the country and its population. Therefore, at-risk patients do not receive appropriate assistance. This report describes the creation, structure and management of a cancer genetics service in a reference center for cancer prevention and treatment, the Barretos Cancer Hospital (BCH. The Oncogenetics Department (OD of BCH offers, free of charge, to all patients/relatives with clinical criteria, the possibility to perform i genetic counseling, ii preventive examinations and iii genetic testing with the best quality standards. The OD has a multidisciplinary team and is integrated with all specialties. The genetic counseling process consists (mostly of two visits. In 2014, 614 individuals (371 families were seen by the OD. To date, over 800 families were referred by the OD for genetic testing. The support provided by the Oncogenetics team is crucial to identify at-risk individuals and to develop preventive and personalized behaviors for each situation, not only to the upper-middle class population, but also to the people whose only possibility is the public health system.

  9. Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Cancer: A Pilot Study on Experiences of Patients and Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiker, E. M. A.; Aaronson, N. K.; Menko, F. H.; Hahn, D. E. E.; van Asperen, C. J.; Rutgers, E. J. T.; ten Kate, L. P.; Leschot, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    Individuals who received genetic counseling for cancer (N=36) provided feedback on the quality of services and identified areas for improvement. Reasons for counseling and need for psychosocial support are also considered. Generally high levels of satisfaction with care provided were found. Four areas for improvement are identified and discussed.…

  10. Own Experience in Treatment of Patients with Penile Cancer Using Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Filonenko

    2015-01-01

    radachlorine. All patients had no complications. Complete regression was achieved in 9 patients, and partial regression in 2. Thus, the results showed that photodynamic therapy for penile cancer stage Tis-1N0M0 permits performing organ-preserving treatment with satisfactory oncological results and no impairment of patient’s quality of life.

  11. Evolution of Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer – The Sunnybrook Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hima Bindu Musunuru

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR is a newer method of ultra hypo fractionated radiotherapy that uses combination of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT or volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT, to deliver high doses of radiation in a few fractions to a target, at the same time sparing the surrounding organs at risk(OAR.SABR is ideal for treating small volumes of disease and has been introduced in a number of disease sites including brain, lung, liver, spine and prostate. Given the radiobiological advantages of treating prostate cancer with high doses per fraction, SABR is becoming a standard of care for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer patients based upon the results from Sunny Brook and also the US-based prostate SABR consortium. This review examines the development of moderate and ultra hypo fractionation schedules at the Odette Cancer centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences. Moderate hypo fractionation protocol was first developed in 2001 for intermediate risk prostate cancer and from there on different treatment schedules including SABR evolved for all risk groups.

  12. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... emotions, making decisions, and enabling self-management and patient navigation through the care continuum... standardized instrument to measure patient assessment of cancer care. The ultimate goal of this process is to... care providers can be compared by consumers and others. Organizations that field CAHPS Surveys with...

  13. Pathotropic nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy Rexin-G IV: three-year clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Lopez, Francisco F; Cornelio, Gerardo H; Lorenzo, Conrado C; Levy, John P; Reed, Rebecca A; Liu, Liqiong; Bruckner, Howard W; Hall, Frederick L

    2006-11-01

    Metastatic cancer is a life-threatening illness with a predictably fatal outcome, thereby representing a major unmet medical need. In 2003, Rexin-G became the world's first targeted injectable vector approved for clinical trials in the treatment of intractable metastatic disease. Uniquely suited, by design, to function within the context of the human circulatory system, Rexin-G is a pathotropic (disease-seeking) gene delivery system bearing a designer killer gene; in essence, a targeted nanoparticle that seeks out and selectively accumulates in metastatic sites upon intravenous infusion. The targeted delivery of the cytocidal gene to primary tumors and metastatic foci, in effective local concentrations, compels both cancer cells and tumor-associated neovasculature to self-destruct, without causing untoward collateral damage to non-target organs. In this study: i) we report the results of three distinctive clinical studies which demonstrate the initial proofs of concept, safety, and efficacy of Rexin-G when used as a single agent for advanced or metastatic cancer, ii) we introduce the quantitative foundations of an innovative personalized treatment regimen, designated the 'Calculus of Parity', based on a patient's calculated tumor burden, iii) we propose a refinement of surrogate end-points commonly used for defining success in cancer therapy, and iv) we map out a strategic plan for the accelerated approval of Rexin-G based on the oncologic Threshold of Credibility paradigm being developed by the Food and Drug Administration. PMID:17016635

  14. The UICC/WHO-CCCE cancer education project : an Indian experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapoor, Neelkamal; Haagedoorn, E Milly L; de Vries, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although India has a long history of providing excellent allopathic medical education, the knowledge about oncology is scattered all over the curriculum, losing focus, impact, and usefulness. METHOD: The World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Cancer Education at the Universit

  15. The UICC/WHO-CCCE cancer education project : An Indian experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapoor, Neelkamal; Haagedoorn, E. Milly L.; de Vries, J

    2006-01-01

    Background. Although India has a long history of providing excellent allopathic medical education, the knowledge about oncology is scattered all over the curriculum, losing focus, impact, and usefulness. Method. The World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Cancer Education at the Universit

  16. Phantom experiments with a microwave imaging system for breast-cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging is emerging as a promising technique for breast-cancer detection. In this paper, the microwave imaging system currently being developed at the Technical University of Denmark is introduced. This system consists of 32 antennas positioned in a cylindrical setup, each equipped...

  17. Development and testing of a text-mining approach to analyse patients’ comments on their experiences of colorectal cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Wagland, Richard; Recio Saucedo, Alejandra; Simon, Michael; Bracher, Michael; Hunt, Katherine; Foster, Claire; Downing, Amy; Glaser, Adam W; Corner, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of cancer care may greatly impact upon patients’ health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Free-text responses to patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) provide rich data but analysis is time and resource-intensive. This study developed and tested a learning-based text-mining approach to facilitate analysis of patients’ experiences of care and develop an explanatory model illustrating impact upon HRQoL. Methods: Respondents to a population-based survey of colorectal c...

  18. Using patients’ experiences to identify priorities for quality improvement in breast cancer care: patient narratives, surveys or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsianakas Vicki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients’ experiences have become central to assessing the performance of healthcare systems worldwide and are increasingly being used to inform quality improvement processes. This paper explores the relative value of surveys and detailed patient narratives in identifying priorities for improving breast cancer services as part of a quality improvement process. Methods One dataset was collected using a narrative interview approach, (n = 13 and the other using a postal survey (n = 82. Datasets were analyzed separately and then compared to determine whether similar priorities for improving patient experiences were identified. Results There were both similarities and differences in the improvement priorities arising from each approach. Day surgery was specifically identified as a priority in the narrative dataset but included in the survey recommendations only as part of a broader priority around improving inpatient experience. Both datasets identified appointment systems, patients spending enough time with staff, information about treatment and side effects and more information at the end of treatment as priorities. The specific priorities identified by the narrative interviews commonly related to ‘relational’ aspects of patient experience. Those identified by the survey typically related to more ‘functional’ aspects and were not always sufficiently detailed to identify specific improvement actions. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that whilst local survey data may act as a screening tool to identify potential problems within the breast cancer service, they do not always provide sufficient detail of what to do to improve that service. These findings may have wider applicability in other services. We recommend using an initial preliminary survey, with better use of survey open comments, followed by an in-depth qualitative analysis to help deliver improvements to relational and functional aspects of patient

  19. Development of the mammography beliefs and attitudes questionnaire for low-health-literacy Mexican-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-McKee, Gloria

    2010-11-24

    Low-income, low-health-literacy Mexican-American women exhibit poor mammography screening participation and are being diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer than are non-Hispanic white women. No instrument has been available to measure the impact of cultural and psycho-social factors on the intent to seek mammography screening participation in this population. In this article the author describes the development process of the English Mammography Beliefs and Attitudes Questionnaire (MBAQ) and the Spanish Mammography Beliefs and Attitudes Questionnaire (SMBAQ). The Theory of Planned Behavior is the theoretical framework underlying these instruments designed to measure intent to seek mammography screening in low-health-literacy Mexican-American women. The process of developing the MBAQ utilized input from low-health-literacy Mexican-American women and an expert committee. The MBAQ was translated into Spanish and assessed for content validity and reading level. In the discussion, the author explains why the MBAQ and SMBAQ are appropriate tools for use with low-health-literacy Mexican-American women to measure their intentions to seek mammography screening. Limitations of the study and implications for practice and research are presented.

  20. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong Province (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Song, Yong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Stomatology, Liu Zhou People' s Hospital, Guangxi (China); Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ke, E-mail: liuke.1999@aliyun.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  1. Near-infrared fluorescence sentinel lymph node mapping in breast cancer: a multicenter experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Troyan, Susan L.; Mieog, J. Sven D.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Moffitt, Lorissa A.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Hirshfield-Bartek, Judith; Gioux, Sylvain; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Frangioni, John V.

    2014-01-01

    NIR fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) has the potential to improve the SLN procedure by facilitating percutaneous and intraoperative identification of lymphatic channels and SLNs. Previous studies suggested that a dose of 0.62 mg (1.6 ml of 0.5 mM) ICG is optimal for SLN mapping in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence for sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in breast cancer patients when used in conjunction with conventional techniques. Study subjects were 95 breast cancer patients planning to undergo SLN procedure at either the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (Boston, MA, USA) or the Leiden University Medical Center (Leiden, the Netherlands) between July 2010 and January 2013. Subjects underwent the standard-of-care SLN procedure at each institution using 99Technetium-colloid in all subjects and patent blue in 27 (28%) of the subjects. NIR fluorescence-guided SLN detection was performed using the Mini-FLARE imaging system. SLN identification was successful in 94 of 95 subjects (99%) using NIR fluorescence imaging or a combination of both NIR fluorescence imaging and radioactive guidance. In 2 of 95 subjects, radioactive guidance was necessary for initial in vivo identification of SLNs. In 1 of 95 subjects, NIR fluorescence was necessary for initial in vivo identification of SLNs. A total of 177 SLNs (mean = 1.9, range = 1–5) were resected: 100% NIR fluorescent, 88% radioactive, and 78% (of 40 nodes) blue. In 2 of 95 subjects (2.1%), SLNs containing macrometastases were found only by NIR fluorescence, and in 1 patient this led to upstaging to N1. This study demonstrates the safe and accurate application of NIR fluorescence imaging for the identification of SLNs in breast cancer patients, but calls into question what technique should be used as the gold standard in future studies. PMID:24337507

  2. Initial experience with sodium iodine FDG-PET in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Previous studies of FDG-PET in pancreatic cancer have used Bismuth Germinate detector systems. The purpose of this preliminary study was to confirm the accuracy of FDG-PET in pancreatic cancer using a dedicated sodium iodine (Nal) PET system. Fifteen consecutive patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer underwent FDG-PET using a GE QUEST dedicated Nal PET scanner (GE Medical, Milwaukee). The indications were characterisation of a pancreatic mass seen on CT or US imaging (9 cases), diagnosis or exclusion of recurrent disease following surgery and adjuvant therapy (4 cases), and pre-surgical staging of primary pancreatic cancer (2 cases). Patients were fasted for 6 hours prior to their scan with estimation of blood sugar level (BSL) performed prior to intravenous administration of 74-200 MBq F-18 FDG. Whole-body imaging with and without attenuation correction was performed 45 minutes after injection. Focal accumulation of FDG greater than background uptake was regarded as a sign of malignancy. The final diagnosis was determined from histology or, when no histology was available, by radiological and clinical follow-up of at least 8 months. FDG-PET accurately characterised 8/9 pancreatic masses, of these seven were true negative, one was true positive and one was false positive. Of the four cases performed to determine recurrent disease, three were accurately diagnosed (2 true negatives and one true positive). In the fourth case, PET accurately detected a liver metastasis but did not detect the local recurrence. Results in the two cases where PET was performed for pre-operative staging comprised one true positive and one false negative. Only one patient had a BSL of greater than 8 mmol/1 (11.2mmol/l), but with no effect on diagnostic accuracy. Nal FDG-PET is useful in pancreatic cancer, particularly in the presence of a previously detected mass. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo

  4. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP

  5. [Migration of Mexicans to the United States: patterns of continuity and change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuiran, R

    1997-01-01

    Mexican migration to the US has been a constant feature since the past century, and it is currently one of the most contentious issues on the bilateral agenda. The forces behind the migratory system include the inability of the Mexican economy to absorb all available labor; the demand for Mexican workers in the US agricultural, industrial, and service sectors; the wage differential; the tradition of migration to the US; and the operation of complex social and family networks linking places of origin and of destination. The predominant migratory pattern in the 1960s was a largely circular flow of rural Mexicans originating in a relatively small number of communities in a few states to work temporarily in US agriculture. The flow has become increasingly complex and heterogeneous, with regional, occupational, and sectorial diversification, a much greater presence of migrants of urban origin, and a greater tendency toward long or permanent stays. Recent surveys showed that 95% of short-term migrants crossing the border to the US were male and 70% were aged 12-34 years. The average educational level was 6.2 years, and two-thirds had previous work experience in Mexico. Only about 52% were from traditional places of origin, and 55% were urban. About half were bound for California, but the importance of Texas as a destination was increasing due to stepped-up border patrols in California. 75% hoped to stay in the US longer than 6 months. Two-thirds had previous migratory experience in the US, and two-thirds had no travel or work documents. The annual net migration to the US increased from about 26,000-29,000 in the 1960s to around 300,000 in the first half of the 1990s. 55% of Mexicans residing in the US are male and 70% are aged 15-44 years. 75% of Mexicans over age 25 residing in the US had a high school education or less, and two-thirds aged 16 or over are economically active, with 11% unemployed, 80% earning less than $20,000/year, and 35% living in poverty. A

  6. Pluralismo jurídico y derechos humanos en la experiencia indígena mexicana de los últimos años / Legal Pluralism and Humans Rights in Mexican indigenous experience in last two years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Antonio de la Torre Rangel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O tema é a relação entre o pluralismo jurídico e a eficácia dos direitos humanos que sustentam uma vida com dignidade. As experiências indígenas, no México, nas décadas de 1990 a 2000, são apresentadas como a concretização dos direitos humanos no seu exercício do pluralismo jurídico, com base em uma práxis de libertação. Na zona zapatista de Chiapas e na Costa-Montaña de Guerrero foi concretizado o direito que nasce do povo: o direito à autonomia ou livre determinação, o direito a se autogerir por seus próprios sistemas normativos, o direito a distribuir justiça de acordo com suas normas e sentido de equidade, entre outros.Palavras-chaves: Pluralismo jurídico; Direitos humanos; Direito que nasce do povo. Abstract: This article is about the relation between pluralism and effectiveness of Humans Rights that sustain a life with dignity. In Mexico, from 1990 to 2000, indigenous experiences are presented as a consolidation of Humans Rights in the exercise of legal pluralism based on a praxis of liberation. In Chiapas Zapatista’ zone and in Costa-Montaña de Guerrero a Right which rises from people was reinforced: the Right of Autonomy or Self-determination, the Right of self-manage properly legal systems, the Right to distribute justice according to own rules and the sense of equity.Keywords: Legal Pluralism, Human Rights, Right from people

  7. What am I going to say here? The experiences of doctors and nurses communicating with patients in a cancer unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret eMcLean

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study investigating the provider-patient communication perceptions, experiences, needs and strategies of doctors and nurses working together in a UK cancer setting. This was a qualitative study using individual interviews and focus group discussions. Interpretative Phenomenological analysis (IPA was used to underpin data collection and analysis. Twenty-six staff participated in the project (18 nurses and 8 doctors. Both professional groups identified an inherent emotional strain in their daily interactions with patients. The strategies they adopted to reduce this strain fell into two main categories: 1 Handling or managing the patient to keep negative emotion at bay; and 2 Managing self to keep negative emotion at bay. These strategies allowed staff to maintain a sense of control in an emotionally-stressful environment. Most believed that their communication skills were sufficient. In conclusion, communicating with and caring for cancer patients causes considerable psycho-social burden for doctors and nurses. Managing this burden influences their communication with patients. Without recognition of the need for staff to protect their own emotional well-being, communication skills training programmes, emphasised in current UK cancer care guidelines, may have little impact on practice.

  8. Hypofractionated palliative radiotherapy in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer: CMC vellore experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A novel, short duration, palliative radiotherapy schedule for inoperable head and neck cancer was evaluated in terms of palliation of cancer-related symptoms and acute toxicities. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with inoperable head and neck cancer were included in the study (2010-2012. All patients received 40 Gy in 10 fractions (equivalent dose: 49.8 Gy in conventional fractionation with 2 fractions per week. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (Head and Neck, FACT H and N quality of life (QOL tool was administered before starting and at the completion of radiotherapy. Mean value before and after treatment was compared (paired t-test, P = 0.05, two-tailed for significance. Results: Thirty-three patients (male: 29, female: 4, mean age: 57.8 ± 9.7 years were included in the analysis (three patients discontinued treatment due to socioeconomic reasons. All patients had advanced inoperable head and neck cancers (27% IVA, 61% IVB, 9% IVC, TNM stage and 3% recurrent disease. Distressing pain at primary site (42%, dysphagia (18%, neck swelling (30%, and hoarseness (10% were common presentations. Incidence of grade III mucositis and dermatitis and pain was 18%, 3%, and 24%, respectively. Planned radiotherapy without any interruptions was completed by 73% patients. QOL assessment showed improvement in social well-being (17.4 vs. 20.01, P = 0.03, but no significant change was observed in head and neck specific score (25.1 vs. 25.0, P = NS after treatment. Reduction of pain was observed in 88% patients and 60% patients had improvement of performance status. Median overall survival of the cohort was 7 months. Conclusions: The study shows that this short duration palliative radiotherapy schedule is a clinically viable option for advanced inoperable head and neck cancer to achieve significant palliation of the main presenting symptoms like

  9. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy in Cuba: experiences with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment (1993-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Yamilé; Perera, Alejandro; Batista, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The availability of monoclonal antibodies in Cuba has facilitated development and application of innovative techniques (immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy) for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Objective Review immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy techniques and analyze their use in Cuba, based on the published literature. In this context, we describe the experience of Havana's Clinical Research Center with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment during the period 1993-2013. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION Basic concepts concerning cancer and monoclonal antibodies were reviewed, as well as relevant international and Cuban data. Forty-nine documents were reviewed, among them 2 textbooks, 34 articles by Cuban authors and 13 by international authors. All works published by the Clinical Research Center from 1993 through 2013 were included. Bibliography was obtained from the library of the Clinical Research Center and Infomed, Cuba's national health telematics network, using the following keywords: monoclonal antibodies, immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. RESULTS Labeling the antibodies (ior t3, ior t1, ior cea 1, ior egf/r3, ior c5, h-R3, 14F7 and rituximab) with radioactive isotopes was a basic line of research in Cuba and has fostered their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The studies conducted demonstrated the good sensitivity and diagnostic precision of immunoscintigraphy for detecting various types of tumors (head and neck, ovarian, colon, breast, lymphoma, brain). Obtaining different radioimmune conjugates with radioactive isotopes such as 99mTc and 188Re made it possible to administer radioimmunotherapy to patients with several types of cancer (brain, lymphoma, breast). The objective of 60% of the clinical trials was to determine pharmacokinetics, internal dosimetry and adverse effects of monoclonal antibodies, as well as tumor response; there were few adverse effects, no damage to vital organs, and a positive

  10. Younger women's experiences of deciding against delayed breast reconstruction post-mastectomy following breast cancer: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Fiona; Archer, Stephanie; Montague, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Most women do not reconstruct their breast(s) post-mastectomy. The experiences of younger women who maintain this decision, although important to understand, are largely absent in the research literature. This interview-based study uses interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the experiences of six women, diagnosed with primary breast cancer in their 30s/40s, who decided against delayed reconstruction. Findings reported here focus on one superordinate theme (decision-making) from a larger analysis, illustrating that the women's drive to survive clearly influenced their initial decision-making process. Their tenacity in maintaining their decision is highlighted, despite non-reconstruction sometimes being presented negatively by medical teams. Patient-centred support recommendations are made. PMID:25516557

  11. Younger women's experiences of deciding against delayed breast reconstruction post-mastectomy following breast cancer: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Fiona; Archer, Stephanie; Montague, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Most women do not reconstruct their breast(s) post-mastectomy. The experiences of younger women who maintain this decision, although important to understand, are largely absent in the research literature. This interview-based study uses interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the experiences of six women, diagnosed with primary breast cancer in their 30s/40s, who decided against delayed reconstruction. Findings reported here focus on one superordinate theme (decision-making) from a larger analysis, illustrating that the women's drive to survive clearly influenced their initial decision-making process. Their tenacity in maintaining their decision is highlighted, despite non-reconstruction sometimes being presented negatively by medical teams. Patient-centred support recommendations are made.

  12. Telling their stories, telling our stories: physicians' experiences with patients who decide to forgo or stop treatment for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjar, Irena; Kacen, Lea; Ariad, Samuel; Denham, Jim

    2007-04-01

    There is currently very little research on how physicians respond to patients with cancer who decide to forgo or stop medically recommended "curative" therapy. The purpose of this article is to report on a qualitative study with 12 oncology specialists in Israel and Australia that addresses this question. The findings indicate that physicians tend to construct patients and their decisions in terms of mutually exclusive categories that focus on curability of the disease, rationality of the patient's decision, and patients' personal attributes. Physicians' constructions of their experience focus on uncertainty and concern. Although contextual factors play a role in how physicians act in this situation, Israeli and Australian oncologists are remarkably similar in how they describe their own and their patients' experiences.

  13. THE CHALLENGES OF REACHING AND HOLDING OFFICE. MEXICAN WOMEN IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Suárez San Román

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of achieving and exercising a political position: Mexican women at the dawn of the 21st Century. The purpose of this article is to motivate reflection about the challenges of achieving and exercising a political position faced by Mexican women, in the context of a political culture in which authoritarism prevails along with antidemocratic leaderships, both of which handicap women´s rights to exercise full citizenship. In this regard, the present article aims to generate concern about two determining moments for women in their way to exercise political positions: on first account, the challenges to achieve a political position of popular election within the local government (mayor, síndico, regidor. On second account, those challenges emerged on the exercising of such position. An interesting portion of the present article is composed of testimonies given by various women in such positions about their experiences in local politics, from various states and political parties.

  14. Loneliness as a Sexual Risk Factor for Male Mexican Migrant Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jennifer S.; Quispe-Lazaro, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDs risk among migrant workers is often examined through individual determinants with limited consideration of social context. We used data from systematic ethnographic observations, structured interviews (n = 50), and life history interviews (n = 10) to examine the relationship between loneliness and HIV/AIDS risk for recently arrived (within the last 3 years) male Mexican migrant workers in New York City. Higher levels of loneliness were strongly associated with frequency of sexual risk behavior (r = 0.64; P = .008). From our ethnographic observations, we found that loneliness was a dominant element in workers' migration experience and that 2 different kinds of social spaces served as supportive environments for dealing with loneliness: bars or dance clubs and Catholic churches. Loneliness should be addressed as a critical factor in reducing HIV/AIDS risk among Mexican male migrant workers. PMID:19299684

  15. Program of active aging in a rural Mexican community: a qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza-Núñez Víctor

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Education is one of the key elements in the promotion of a thorough paradigm for active aging. The aim of this study is to analyze factors that contribute the empowerment of older adults in a rural Mexican community and, thus, promote active aging. Methods The study was conducted in a rural Mexican community (Valle del Mezquital, based on an action-research paradigm. One hundred and fifty-five elderly subjects with elementary school education participated in a formal training program promoting gerontological development and health education. Participants in turn became coordinators of mutual-help groups (gerontological nucleus in Mexico. In-depth interviews were carried out to assess the empowerment after training for active aging. Results It was found that there was an increasing feeling of empowerment, creativity and self-fulfillment among participants. Among the main factors that positively influenced training of the elderly toward active aging were the teaching of gerontology topics themselves; besides, their motivation, the self-esteem, the increased undertaking of responsibility, the feeling of belonging to the group, and the sharing of information based on personal experience and on gerontological knowledge. Conclusion The main factors that contribute to empowerment of older adults in a rural Mexican community for participate in active aging programs are the training and teaching of gerontology topics themselves; besides, their interest, experience and involvement.

  16. Primary breast cancer: The experience of the joint center for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While radiation therapy began to be administered in the treatment of breast cancer shortly after the discovery of X rays in 1895, the efficacious use of external beam radiation for early breast cancer required supervoltage radiation in order to get effective doses to the tumor, as well as the skin sparing, required for satisfactory cosmetic results. The use of interstitial radiation began shortly after the discovery of radium by the Curies. The first systematic report of such an approach was presented by Goeffrey Keynes, who reported equivalent results with radium implants as compared to those with mastectomy. These two techniques, supervoltage and interstitial radiation, have been used in the modern era of radiotherapy and reported by a number of centers, some of which are presented in this symposium

  17. Quality of Life and Symptom Experience of Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Zümrüt Akgün; Tan, Mehtap

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of educational interventions on breast cancer patients during chemotherapy, with a secondary aim of focusing on describing symptoms in patients during chemotherapy and their effects on the quality of life of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The study was quasi-experimental. A sample of 120 patients participated, of which 60 were in the experimental group and 60 were in the control group. Pre/posttest quality-of-life subgroups were compared in terms of their mean scores. In the posttest in the experimental group, mean scores of the Family subscale, Health and Functioning subscale, Psychological/Spiritual subscale, and Social and Economic subscale correlated negatively and the difference was statistically significant (P < .05). PMID:27309408

  18. Mapping patients' experiences from initial change in health to cancer diagnosis: a qualitative exploration of patient and system factors mediating this process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, A; Wilson, B; Brunton, L; Chandler, C

    2010-01-01

    Delays in the diagnosis of cancer are common, and they are attributed to both patient and healthcare system factors. Minimizing such delays and improving early detection rates is a key goal of the new cancer reform strategy in England, in light of recent data showing that survival rates in the UK are low. The aim of this study was to explore the pathway from initial persistent change in health to diagnosis of cancer in a sample of patients from seven diagnostic groups in the UK and the factors mediating this process. Qualitative interviews with patients diagnosed with cancer were carried out. Seventy-five cancer patients discussed their pre-diagnosis experience as part of a broader exploration of their symptom experience for a larger study. Data were analysed by using content analysis and chart events. A broader range of mediating factors affecting and extending the patient pathway to diagnosis were reported in relation to lung, gastrointestinal and head and neck cancers and lymphoma, compared with breast, gynaecological and brain cancer patients. Many of the mediating factors were patient-related (e.g. misattribution of symptoms to common ailments, underestimation of the seriousness of the symptoms, self-medication or monitoring of symptoms, etc.). Primary care practitioner-factors were also prominent, including the exploration of firstly more common possibilities for treating the presenting symptoms without follow-up of persisting symptoms. Public health education about common cancer signs and symptoms, educational approaches in primary care to improve early diagnoses of cancer and updated guidelines for referral of suspected cancers should be enhanced before we can see any improvements in survival rates from cancer in the UK. PMID:19552730

  19. Breast Conserving Surgery and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Sezer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with locally advanced breast cancer may undergo breast conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the results of locally advanced breast cancer patients who underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection and sentinel lymph node biopsy in a single center. Material and Methods: 12 patients with locally advanced breast cancer stage IIIA/IIIB were included in the study between 2002-2009. The patients were given anthracycline-based regimen before surgery. Patients underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection, and sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by radiotherapy. Results: There were five patients in stage IIIA, six in stage IIIB, and one in stage IIIC. Patients had received 3-6 regimen of FAC/FEC. Eight had partial and four had complete response. Five positive axilla were detected. The median value of the lymph nodes was 12 (n:8-19. Five patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. The biopsy has failed in one patient and the median value of dissected sentinel node was 3.5 (n:3-4. Locoregional recurrence was not observed in any patients. The mean follow-up of the patients was 29.8 months and median time was 16 (n:2-80 months.Of the 12 patients 10 are alive and 2 were deceased. Conclusion: In selected locally advanced patients, breast conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy may be applied by a multidisciplinary approach, and excellent success may be achieved in those patients as in early breast cancer patients.

  20. Clinical experience in using lenvatinib in patients with progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Isaev; D. Yu. Semin; P O Rumyantsev; A. A. Il’in; V. V. Pol’kin; T. A. Agababyan; S. V. Vasil’kov; V.S. Medvedev; N. V. Zhelonkina

    2016-01-01

    None of the variants of therapy currently available for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTС) refracted to therapy with radioactive iodine 131I (RAI) is not radical and does not allow to obtain full complete recovery including this is related to traditional chemotherapy regimens increasing toxicity of treatment contribute to improvement of the clinical effect. With the introduction of multicinase inhibitors into clinical practice made it possible to increase improve therapeutic ou...