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Sample records for cancer metastatic colonization

  1. Chemotherapy of metastatic colon cancer

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    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer incidence and mortality. In 2008 inRussian Federation55 719 new cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed and 37 911 patients died of this disease. A significant progress was achieved in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment during the last decades. A lot of treatment options became available: from 5-fluoruracil monotherapy to combined treatment treatment schemes including surgery. A group of patients with isolated liver metastases was distinguished, who can achieve 5-year survival rate of 40 % after systemic treatment and surgery. Today, based on clinical data and molecular analysis, we come close to individualized treatment of this patient group. In this literature review results of metastatic colorectal cancer chemotherapy are being analyzed and rational treatment tactic is proposed based on therapy goals. 

  2. Disrupting Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization: Insights from Metastasis Suppressor Studies

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    Shaheena Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer affects approximately 25,000 women in the United States each year and remains one of the most lethal female malignancies. A standard approach to therapy is surgical cytoreduction, after which the remaining microscopic residual disease is treated with chemotherapy. The vast majority of patients have disease recurrence, underscoring the crucial need for approaches to control the regrowth, or colonization, of tissues after local treatment. Improved therapies require mechanistic information about the process of metastatic colonization, the final step in metastasis, in which cancer cells undergo progressive growth at secondary sites. Studies of metastasis suppressors are providing insights into events controlling metastatic colonization. This paper reviews our laboratory's approach to the identification, characterization, and functional testing of the JNKK1/MKK4 metastasis suppressor in ovarian cancer metastatic colonization. Specifically, we demonstrate that interaction of ovarian caner cells with the omental microenvironment activates JNKK1/MKK4 resulting in decreased proliferation without affecting apoptosis. The potential role of the omental microenvironment, specifically milky spot structures, is also described. It is our goal to provide this work as a usable paradigm that will enable others to study metastasis suppressors in clinical and experimental ovarian cancer metastases.

  3. Increased expression and aberrant localization of mucin 13 in metastatic colon cancer.

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    Gupta, Brij K; Maher, Diane M; Ebeling, Mara C; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D; Lynch, Douglas W; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-11-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (pcolon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (pcolon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer.

  4. Liver acid sphingomyelinase inhibits growth of metastatic colon cancer.

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    Osawa, Yosuke; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Yasuda, Ichiro; Saibara, Toshiji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru; Kozawa, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These sphingolipids regulate carcinogenesis and proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the role of ASM in host defense against liver metastasis remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of ASM in liver metastasis of colon cancer was examined using Asm-/- and Asm+/+ mice that were inoculated with SL4 colon cancer cells to produce metastatic liver tumors. Asm-/- mice demonstrated enhanced tumor growth and reduced macrophage accumulation in the tumor, accompanied by decreased numbers of hepatic myofibroblasts (hMFs), which express tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), around the tumor margin. Tumor growth was increased by macrophage depletion or by Timp1 deficiency, but was decreased by hepatocyte-specific ASM overexpression, which was associated with increased S1P production. S1P stimulated macrophage migration and TIMP1 expression in hMFs in vitro. These findings indicate that ASM in the liver inhibits tumor growth through cytotoxic macrophage accumulation and TIMP1 production by hMFs in response to S1P. Targeting ASM may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating liver metastasis of colon cancer.

  5. [A case of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer].

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    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic gastric cancer is uncommon, and metastasis of colorectal cancer to the stomach is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic gastric cancer that originated from transverse colon cancer. A 52-year-old woman underwent a left hemicolectomy and D3 lymph node dissection based on a diagnosis of transverse colon cancer. The pathology results were as follows: mucinous adenocarcinoma, type 2, 6 × 11 cm, ss, ly1 v1, pm (-), dm (-), n1 (+), P0, H0, M0, Stage IIIa. The patient received XELOX as postoperative adjuvant therapy for 6 months. One year and 3 months after the left hemicolectomy, gastroscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach and an incipient cancer in the cardia of the stomach, and a colonoscopy revealed an incipient cancer in the transverse colon. An endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration biopsy of the submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach was performed. Histology showed that this tumor was a mucinous adenocarcinoma similar to the primary transverse colon cancer, which led to a diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer. Distant metastasis was not detected. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the incipient gastric cancer was performed, as were distal gastrectomy and partial colectomy. Peritoneal dissemination and para-aortic lymph node recurrence were detected 7 months after the second surgery.

  6. Metastatic colon cancer from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as painless jaundice: case report and literature review.

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    Vabi, Benjamin W; Carter, Jeffrey; Rong, Rong; Wang, Minhua; Corasanti, James G; Gibbs, John F

    2016-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare cancer of the biliary epithelium comprising only about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. It is a highly aggressive malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis with majority of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Metastatic CCA to the colon is extremely rare with only few cases reported in the literature. We present a 61-year-old patient with incidental synchronous metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from extra-hepatic CCA. Laboratory data revealed significant indirect hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. Imaging study showed intrahepatic bile ducts prominence without mass lesions. Incidentally, there was diffuse colonic thickening without mass lesions or obstruction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed a common bile duct stricture. Brushings were consistent with CCA. Screening colonoscopy identified nodularity and biopsy and immunostaining were consistent with CCA metastasis to colon. The patient elected for palliative and comfort care. Metastatic CCA to the colon is a rare pattern of distant spread that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Some salient characteristics may assist in the differentiation of primary colon cancer and metastatic colon cancer from CCA. Little remains known about the pathogenic behavior of metastatic secondary colorectal cancer. And more so, the management approach to such metastatic cancer still remains to be defined. Screening colonoscopy in patients presenting with resectable CCA may alter management. Furthermore, whether patients with history of resected CCA may benefit from a more frequent screening colonoscopy remains to be validated.

  7. A Stochastic Model for Cancer Stem Cell Origin in Metastatic Colon Cancer

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    Odoux, Christine; Fohrer, Helene; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Lewis, Dale W.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Gamblin, T. Clark; Geller, David A.; Lagasse, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Human cancers have been found to include transformed stem cells that may drive cancer progression to metastasis. Here we report that metastatic colon cancer contains clonally derived tumor cells with all of the critical properties expected of stem cells, including self-renewal and to the ability to differentiate into mature colon cells. Additionally, when injected into mice, these cells initiated tumors that closely resemble human cancer. Karyotype analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells expressed many consistent (clonal), along with unique chromosomal aberrations, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in the cancer stem cells. Thus, this new model for cancer origin and metastatic progression includes features of both the hierarchical model for cancerous stem cells and the stochastic model, driven by the observation of chromosomal instability. PMID:18757407

  8. Invasive ductal breast cancer metastatic to the sigmoid colon

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    Zhou Xiao-cong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The most common sites of breast cancer metastasis are the bone, lung, liver and brain. However, colonic metastases from breast cancer are very rare in the clinic. We describe an unusual case of sigmoid colonic metastasis from invasive ductal breast cancer. With this report, we should increase the clinical awareness that any patient with a colorectal lesion and a history of malignancy should be considered to have a metastasis until proven otherwise. Early diagnosis is very important, which enables prompt initiation of systemic treatment, such as chemotherapy, endocrine therapy or both, thus avoiding unnecessary radical surgical resection and improving the prognosis.

  9. Treatment cost of metastatic colon cancer in Turkey

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    Guvenc Kockaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Colon cancer is the third most common in the top cancer incidence list in Europe. In Europe 212,000 patients die every year due to colon cancer. In Turkey 120,000-130,000 new cancer patients are diagnosed every year, 7.1% of whom are diagnosed to have developed colon cancer. Metastases will occur in up to 50% of the patients who are newly diagnosed. Survival appears to be further prolonged to more than 20 months with new pharmaceuticals; however, these new pharmaceuticals increase the total cost of care. The aim of this study is to estimate the cost implications of new colon cancer treatment options for Turkey.METHODS: Gazi University Hospital treatment protocols for colon cancer treatment were used. Cost of FUFA (5 FU/LV, FOLFIRI, FOLFOX, bevacizumab/FUFA, bevacizumab/FOLFIRI, bevacizumab/FOLFOX, irinotecan and irinotecan/cetixumab protocols were calculated. The cost of combination of protocols were calculated depending on a Markov analysis. The exchange rate was US$ 1 for TL 1.5.RESULTS: Depending on the life expectancy the lowest total cost was established by FUVA (US$ 5,359. It was followed by FOLFIRI then FOLFOX and FOLFOX, US$ 14,144 and US$ 16,553, respectively. The lowest cost for each week of life expectancy was established by FUVA with US$ 98.CONCLUSIONS: Only FUFA, FOLFIRI followed by FOLFIX, FOLFIRI/bevacizumab then FOLFOX then cetuximab, FOLFOX/bevacizumab then irinotecan then cetuximab/irinotecan and FOLFIRI/bevacizumab then FOLFOX then cetuximab/irinotecan were under the cost effectiveness curve. In addition no treatments ICER was under the WHO`s threshold for Turkey, except FOLFIRI then FOLFOX compared with FUVA.

  10. Low Number of Detectable Circulating Tumor Cells in Non-metastatic Colon Cancer

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    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Söletormos, György; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with non-metastatic colon cancer and to evaluate whether there is a diurnal variation in the CTC counts. Furthermore, the study aimed to examine the correlation between CTCs and TNM stage...

  11. Two-stage laparoscopic resection of colon cancer and metastatic liver tumour

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    Yukio Iwashita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report herein the case of 70-year-old woman in whom colon cancer and a synchronous metastatic liver tumour were successfully resected laparoscopically. The tumours were treated in two stages. Both post-operative courses were uneventful, and there has been no recurrence during the 8 months since the second procedure.

  12. Two-stage laparoscopic resection of colon cancer and metastatic liver tumour

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    Iwashita Yukio

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report herein the case of 70-year-old woman in whom colon cancer and a synchronous metastatic liver tumour were successfully resected laparoscopically. The tumours were treated in two stages. Both postoperative courses were uneventful, and there has been no recurrence during the 8 months since the second procedure.

  13. Mesenchymal Cancer Cell-Stroma Crosstalk Promotes Niche Activation, Epithelial Reversion, and Metastatic Colonization

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    Yaiza del Pozo Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During metastatic colonization, tumor cells must establish a favorable microenvironment or niche that will sustain their growth. However, both the temporal and molecular details of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we found that metastatic initiating cells (MICs exhibit a high capacity for lung fibroblast activation as a result of Thrombospondin 2 (THBS2 expression. Importantly, inhibiting the mesenchymal phenotype of MICs by blocking the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT-associated kinase AXL reduces THBS2 secretion, niche-activating ability, and, consequently, metastatic competence. Subsequently, disseminated metastatic cells revert to an AXL-negative, more epithelial phenotype to proliferate and decrease the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β-dependent SMAD2-3 in favor of BMP/SMAD1-5 signaling. Remarkably, newly activated fibroblasts promote this transition. In summary, our data reveal a crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment whereby the EMT status initially triggers and then is regulated by niche activation during metastatic colonization.

  14. Gender-Related Survival Differences Associated With Polymorphic Variants of Estrogen Receptor Beta (ERβ) in Patients with Metastatic Colon Cancer

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    Press, Oliver A.; Zhang, Wu; Gordon, Michael A.; Yang, Dongyun; Haiman, Christopher A; Azuma, Mizutomo; Iqbal, Syma; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy in women has demonstrated a protective effect in the development of colonic carcinomas. Gender-related differences in the development of colonic carcinomas have also been reported. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is expressed in colon carcinomas and has demonstrated prognostic value in colon cancer patients. This study investigated an ERβ 3’ non-coding polymorphism associated with transcriptional activity to determine clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colo...

  15. PROX1 Promotes Metabolic Adaptation and Fuels Outgrowth of Wnthigh Metastatic Colon Cancer Cells

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    Simone Ragusa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt pathway is abnormally activated in the majority of colorectal cancers, and significant knowledge has been gained in understanding its role in tumor initiation. However, the mechanisms of metastatic outgrowth in colorectal cancer remain a major challenge. We report that autophagy-dependent metabolic adaptation and survival of metastatic colorectal cancer cells is regulated by the target of oncogenic Wnt signaling, homeobox transcription factor PROX1, expressed by a subpopulation of colon cancer progenitor/stem cells. We identify direct PROX1 target genes and show that repression of a pro-apoptotic member of the BCL2 family, BCL2L15, is important for survival of PROX1+ cells under metabolic stress. PROX1 inactivation after the establishment of metastases prevented further growth of lesions. Furthermore, autophagy inhibition efficiently targeted metastatic PROX1+ cells, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach. These data identify PROX1 as a key regulator of the transcriptional network contributing to metastases outgrowth in colorectal cancer.

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF CLINICAL COURSE OF METASTATIC AND PRIMARY OVARIAN TUMORS IN COLON CANCER

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    I. A. Dzhanyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate clinical pecuiliarities of ovarian tumors in colon cancer patients and determination of complex diagnostic methods.Subject and methods. Russian N.N.  Blokhin Cancer Research Center archives were used for retrospective study, patients, who underwent treatment during 1989–2013  were included. Colon cancer patients with ovarian metastases and with synchronous or metachronous tumors were included.Results. 141 patients were included: 91 patients had colon cancer with ovarian metastases (group 1 and 50 patients had synchronous or metachronous ovarian tumours (group 2. Ovarian tumors were diagnosed during the 1 year in 74 (81.3 % patients in group 1 and in 23 (46 % in group 2. Patients in group 2 less frequently had children (9 (18.0 % vs 5 (5.5 + 2.3 %, р < 0.05, family history of cancer (3 (6 % vs 16 (17.6 %, р < 0.05 and concomitant diseases. Median CA 125 level in group 1 was 64.96 ng/ml and 180 ng/ml in group 2. Ovarian tumors had solid and cystic structure during US examination in 66 (73 % patients in group 1 and 31 (62 % patients in group 2 had solid ovarian tumors on US examination.Conclusions. The differential diagnostics of primary and metastatic ovarian tumors must include CEA, CA 19–9 and CA 125 serum levels and pelvic US.

  17. ERCC1 and TS Expression as Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Metastatic Colon Cancer.

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    Michel B Choueiri

    Full Text Available In patients with metastatic colon cancer, response to first line chemotherapy is a strong predictor of overall survival (OS. Currently, oncologists lack diagnostic tests to determine which chemotherapy regimen offers the greatest chance for response in an individual patient. Here we present the results of gene expression analysis for two genes, ERCC1 and TS, measured with the commercially available ResponseDX: Colon assay (Response Genetics, Los Angeles, CA in 41 patients with de novo metastatic colon cancer diagnosed between July 2008 and August 2013 at the University of California, San Diego. In addition ERCC1 and TS expression levels as determined by RNAseq and survival data for patients in TCGA were downloaded from the TCGA data portal. We found that patients with low expression of ERCC1 (n = 33 had significantly longer median OS (36.0 vs. 10.1 mo, HR 0.29, 95% CI .095 to .84, log-rank p = 9.0x10-6 and median time to treatment to failure (TTF following first line chemotherapy (14.1 vs. 2.4 mo, HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.048 to 0.58, log-rank p = 5.3x10-4 relative to those with high expression (n = 4. After accounting for the covariates age, sex, tumor grade and ECOG performance status in a Cox proportional hazard model the association of low ERCC1 with longer OS (HR 0.18, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.26, p = 0.0448 and TTF (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.21, p = 0.0053 remained significant. Patients with low TS expression (n = 29 had significantly longer median OS (36.0 vs. 14.8 mo, HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.074 to 0.82, log-rank p = 0.022 relative to those with high expression (n = 12. The combined low expression of ERCC1/TS was predictive of response in patients treated with FOLFOX (40% vs. 91%, RR 2.3, Fisher's exact test p = 0.03, n = 27, but not with FOLFIRI (71% vs. 71%, RR 1.0, Fisher's exact test p = 1, n = 14. Overall, these findings suggest that measurement of ERCC1 and TS expression has potential clinical utility in managing patients with metastatic colorectal

  18. Cigarette smoke extracts induced the colon cancer migration via regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition and metastatic genes in human colon cancer cells.

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    Kim, Cho-Won; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Lee, Hae-Miru; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2017-02-01

    There was considerable evidence that exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the relationship between cigarette smoking and colon cancer remains unclear. Moreover, there were only a few studies on effects of complexing substance contained in cigarette smoke on colon cancer. Thus, we further investigated whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affects the cell cycle, apoptosis and migration of human metastatic colon cancer cells, SW-620. MTT assay revealed that SW-620 cell proliferation was significantly inhibited following treatments with all CSEs, 3R4F, and two-domestic cigarettes, for 9 days in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, CSE treatments decreased cyclin D1 and E1, and increased p21 and p27 proteins by Western blot analysis in SW-620 cells. Additionally, the treatment of the cells with CSE contributed to these effects expressing by apoptosis-related proteins. An increased migration or invasion ability of SW-620 cells following CSE treatment was also confirmed by a scratch or fibronectin invasion assay in vitro. In addition, the protein levels of E-cadherin as an epithelial maker were down-regulated, while the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin, snail, and slug, were up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. A metastatic marker, cathepsin D, was also down-regulated by CSE treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that CSE exposure in colon cancer cells may deregulate the cell growth by altering the expression of cell cycle-related proteins and pro-apoptotic protein, and stimulate cell metastatic ability by altering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and cathepsin D expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 690-704, 2017.

  19. Colon cancer

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    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  20. Models of Human Metastatic Colon Cancer in Nude Mice Orthotopically Constructed by Using Histologically Intact Patient Specimens

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    Fu, Xinyu; Besterman, Jeffrey M.; Monosov, Ann; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1991-10-01

    There is an important need for clinically relevant animal models for human cancers. Toward this goal, histologically intact human colon-cancer specimens derived surgically from patients were implanted orthotopically to the colon or cecum of nude mice. We have observed extensive orthotopic growth in 13 of 20 cases of implanted patient colon tumors. These showed various growth patterns with subsequent regional, lymph-node, and liver metastasis, as well as general abdominal carcinomatosis. Thus, models for human colon cancer have been developed that show (i) local growth, (ii) abdominal metastasis, (iii) general abdominal carcinomatosis with extensive peritoneal seeding, (iv) lymph-node metastasis, (v) liver metastasis, and (vi) colonic obstruction. These models permit the passage of the tumors to form large cohorts. They will facilitate research into the biology of colon cancer metastatic capability and the development of new drugs active against metastatic cancer. These models may also predict the clinical course and the in vivo response to drugs of the cancer of individual patients.

  1. Exosomes secreted from human colon cancer cells influence the adhesion of neighboring metastatic cells: Role of microRNA-210

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    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Guasti, Daniele; Cinci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer-secreted exosomes influence tumor microenvironment and support cancer growth and metastasis. MiR-210 is frequently up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues and correlates with metastatic disease. We investigated whether exosomes are actively released by HCT-8 colon cancer cells, the role of exosomal miR-210 in the cross-talk between primary cancer cells and neighboring metastatic cells and its contribution in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). After 7 d of culture, a subpopulation of viable HCT-8 cells detached the monolayer and started to grow in suspension, suggesting anoikis resistance and a metastatic potential. The expression of key proteins of EMT revealed that these cells were E-cadherin negative and vimentin positive further confirming their metastatic phenotype and the acquisition of anoikis resistance. Metastatic cells, in the presence of adherently growing HCT-8, continued to grow in suspension whereas only if seeded in cell-free wells, were able to adhere again and to form E-cadherin positive and vimentin negative new colonies, suggesting the occurrence of MET. The chemosensitivity to 5 fluorouracil and to FOLFOX-like treatment of metastatic cells was significantly diminished compared to adherent HCT-8 cells. Of note, adherent new colonies undergoing MET, were insensitive to both chemotherapeutic strategies. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that adherently growing HCT-8, actually secreted exosomes and that exosomes in turn were taken up by metastatic cells. When exosomes secreted by adherently growing HCT-8 were administered to metastatic cells, MET was significantly inhibited. miR-210 was significantly upregulated in exosomes compared to its intracellular levels in adherently growing HCT-8 cells and correlated to anoikis resistance and EMT markers. Exosomes containing miR-210 might be considered as EMT promoting signals that preserve the local cancer

  2. Cardiac Recurrence in a Patient with Long-Term Survival from Metastatic Colon Cancer

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    Annabelle Butler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic colorectal cancer represents a major health problem in the US and worldwide. Forty percent of patients undergoing resection of the primary tumor will experience relapse. In this brief review, we describe a case of a woman with metastatic disease and long-term survival culminating with an unusual myocardial recurrence. Over three decades, a multimodality approach has evolved to allow for long-term survival in selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. In this case report, the role of multiple aggressive surgical resections is emphasized.

  3. Focal peliosis hepatis in a colon cancer patient resembling metastatic liver tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Jun Xiong; Li-Juan Hu; Yi-Cheng Jian; Yi He; Wei Zhou; Xin-Lai Guo; Ya-Xin Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Peliosis hepatis (PH) is a rare benign condition characterized by the presence of multiple,randomly distributed,blood filled cystic areas of variable size within the liver parenchyma.PH is difficult to recognize and may be mistaken for neoplasm,metastases or multiple abscesses.A 75-year-old female with a previous history of colon cancer was admitted when a liver mass in the right liver lobe was found 11 mo after surgery during the follow-up period.Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan of the abdomen were performed.The initial possible diagnosis was metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.The patient underwent excision of the hepatic segment where the nodule was located.The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was PH.PH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of new liver lesions in patients whose clinical settings do not clearly favor metastasization.Clinicians and radiologists must recognize these lesions to minimize the probability of misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.

  4. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  5. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and biomarkers for early treatment response evaluation in metastatic colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil E.; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for metastatic colon cancer (mCC) are widening. We prospectively evaluated serial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measurements of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), carcinoembryonic antigen...... evaluated by PET/CT before treatment, after one and four treatment series. Morphological and metabolic response was independently assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer PET criteria. Plasma TIMP-1, plasma u...

  6. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  7. Pulmonary metastatic microangiopathy of colon cancer presenting as a "tree in bud" pattern.

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    Bosmans, S; Weynand, B; Coche, E

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of a "tree in bud" pattern of vascular origin caused by colon cancer metastases. A 60-year-old man presented for routine follow-up of a colon tumour resected surgically 15 years previously. Clinical examination, laboratory tests, including carcino-embryonic antigen and inflammatory parameters, and chest radiograph were normal. Multislice CT of the lungs revealed the presence of several "tree in bud" opacities. The connection to the pulmonary arteries was well depicted by reformatted maximal intensity projection images. Biopsy of some of the nodules was characterized by mucinous material and neoplastic cells within the small vessels, consistent with metastases from the known colon adenocarcinoma.

  8. Can we consider metastatic colon cancer in the ambit of chronic disease in present scenario? Experience of a tertiary care centre from India

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    Rakesh Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and it is ranked the third most common globally. Nearly, one fourth of the CRC patients have metastasis at diagnosis and overall survival (OS was not more than 6 months to 1 year. With availability of plethora of new chemotherapeutic drugs, biological agents and advent of newer techniques like radiofrequency ablation or hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, it is possible to achieve OS of more than 2 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 105 case files of colon cancer was done, who were treated in our institute between January 2006 and December 2010. Patients with carcinoma colon were evaluated by a team of surgeons and radiation oncologists and underwent treatment according to the protocol designed by the same team. Only the histologically proven adenocarcinomas of colon were included. Out of 105 patients, 61 (58% patients had metastatic disease either synchronous or metachronous and those patients were taken up for analysis. Various treatment modalities used in this group of patients in our setting were analyzed and correlated with progression-free survival (PFS and OS. Results: This heterogeneous group of metastatic colon cancer patients, which had been given various modalities of treatment, could be able to achieve a median survival of around 18 months and 2 year PFS of 28%. Conclusion: So metastatic colon cancer is no longer an acutely fatal disease, rather it is in the ambit of chronic disease.

  9. Metastatic Colon Cancer in an 18-Year-Old without Predisposing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Mirchandani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While colorectal carcinoma is a common gastrointestinal cancer in adults, it is rare in pediatrics with an incidence of 1 : 1,000,000 and represents a fraction of neoplasms encountered in children. Malignant neoplasms represent a major cause of mortality in the pediatric age group. While presenting with weight loss, iron deficiency, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habits, or symptoms similar to acute appendicitis, the working diagnosis may be considered to be anorexia. This case illustrates the importance of considering colon cancer among other disease entities as a cause of unintentional weight loss in adolescents. While this is a rare occurrence in the pediatric population, significant unintentional weight loss with altered bowel habits should prompt a search for underlying malignancy—even in the absence of a positive family history or predisposing cancer syndromes.

  10. Metastatic Colon Cancer in an 18-Year-Old without Predisposing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirchandani, Divya; Kulpa, Jolanta; Khawar, Nayaab; Kochin, Israel; Narula, Pramod; Sundaram, Revathy

    2016-01-01

    While colorectal carcinoma is a common gastrointestinal cancer in adults, it is rare in pediatrics with an incidence of 1 : 1,000,000 and represents a fraction of neoplasms encountered in children. Malignant neoplasms represent a major cause of mortality in the pediatric age group. While presenting with weight loss, iron deficiency, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habits, or symptoms similar to acute appendicitis, the working diagnosis may be considered to be anorexia. This case illustrates the importance of considering colon cancer among other disease entities as a cause of unintentional weight loss in adolescents. While this is a rare occurrence in the pediatric population, significant unintentional weight loss with altered bowel habits should prompt a search for underlying malignancy-even in the absence of a positive family history or predisposing cancer syndromes.

  11. A mechanically-induced colon cancer cell population shows increased metastatic potential

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xin

    2014-05-29

    Background: Metastasis accounts for the majority of deaths from cancer. Although tumor microenvironment has been shown to have a significant impact on the initiation and/or promotion of metastasis, the mechanism remains elusive. We previously reported that HCT-8 colon cancer cells underwent a phenotypic transition from an adhesive epithelial type (E-cell) to a rounded dissociated type (R-cell) via soft substrate culture, which resembled the initiation of metastasis. The objective of current study was to investigate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms of the E-R transition.Methods: Global gene expressions of HCT-8 E and R cells were measured by RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq); and the results were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), anoikis resistance, enzyme activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1), and in vitro invasion assay were tested on both E and R cells. The deformability of HCT-8 E and R cells was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To study the in vivo invasiveness of two cell types, athymic nude mice were intra-splenically injected with HCT-8 E or R cells and sacrificed after 9 weeks. Incidences of tumor development and metastasis were histologically evaluated and analyzed with Fisher\\'s exact test.Results: Besides HCT-8, E-R transition on soft substrates was also seen in three other cancer cell lines (HCT116, SW480 colon and DU145 prostate cancer). The expression of some genes, such as ALDH3A1, TNS4, CLDN2, and AKR1B10, which are known to play important roles in cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and apoptosis, were increased in HCT-8 R cells. R cells also showed higher ALDH3A1 enzyme activity, higher ROS, higher anoikis resistance, and higher softness than E cells. More importantly, in vitro assay and in vivo animal models revealed that HCT-8 R cells were more invasive than E cells.Conclusions: Our comprehensive comparison of HCT-8 E and R cells revealed differences of molecular

  12. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Learning about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do we know about heredity and colon cancer? Colon cancer, a malignant tumor of the large intestine, ... page Additional Resources for Information on Hereditary Colon Cancer Colon and Rectal Cancer Information [cancer.gov] The most ...

  14. Expression of DIAPH1 is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and its down-regulation strongly reduces the metastatic capacity of colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Na; Izbicki, Jakob R; König, Alexandra; Habermann, Jens K; Blechner, Christine; Lange, Tobias; Schumacher, Udo; Windhorst, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    In most cases, metastatic colorectal cancer is not curable, thus new approaches are necessary to identify novel targets for colorectal cancer therapy. Actin-binding-proteins (ABPs) directly regulate motility of metastasising tumor cells, and for cortactin an association with colon cancer metastasis has been already shown. However, as its depletion only incompletely inhibits metastasis, additional, more suitable cellular targets have to be identified. Here we analyzed expression of the ABPs, DIAPH1, VASP, N-WASP, and fascin in comparison with cortactin and found that, besides cortactin, DIAPH1 was expressed with the highest frequency (63%) in colorectal cancer. As well as cortactin, DIAPH1 was not detectable in normal colon tissue and expression of both proteins was positively correlated with metastasis of colorectal cancer. To analyse the mechanistic role of DIAPH1 for metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in comparison with cortactin, expression of the proteins was stably down-regulated in the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29, HROC-24 and HCT-116. Analysis of metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in SCID mice revealed that depletion of DIAPH1 reduced metastasis 60-fold and depletion of cortactin 16-fold as compared with control cells. Most likely the stronger effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon cancer metastasis is due to the fact that in vitro knock down of DIAPH1 impaired all steps of metastasis; adhesion, invasion and migration while down-regulation of cortactin only reduced adhesion and invasion. This very strong reducing effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon carcinoma cell metastasis makes the protein a promising therapeutic target for individualized colorectal cancer therapy.

  15. Colon Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-05

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses colon cancer and the importance of early detection.  Created: 11/5/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  16. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Matias Riihimäki; Akseli Hemminki; Jan Sundquist; Kari Hemminki

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR ...

  17. Successful twin pregnancy outcome after in utero exposure to FOLFOX for metastatic colon cancer: a case report and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne Bakker; Østerlind, Kell

    2011-01-01

    many dilemmas and concerns for the physician and patient. A delay in treatment may compromise maternal survival; however, therapy for the cancer may be harmful to the fetus. We present a case of a 26-year-old woman pregnant with twins who was diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer and treated with 5......There is limited experience in treating advanced colorectal cancer diagnosed during pregnancy because it is a rare occurrence; however, the incidence of colorectal cancer complicating pregnancy is expected to increase in the future. The combination of cancer and pregnancy is complicated and causes......-fluorouracil, leukovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) from 13 weeks gestational age to birth. The patient gave birth to healthy twins without malformations at 33 weeks gestational age. At follow-up examination, the 2-year-old twins are developing normally. The patient herself died 1 year after the initial cancer...

  18. Metastatic signet ring colon cancer in a Caribbean young adult and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczka, Charles Philip; Goodman, Adam

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common neoplasm diagnosed in the USA, with less than 3% of patients younger than 40 years. Although most of the literature indicates that younger patients present with a higher stage and grade of cancer, mortality is not clearly correlated. Furthermore, the literature pertaining to colorectal cancer in the nonwhite youth is limited. In this case report, we report a case of aggressive colorectal cancer metastasizing in a young Afro-Caribbean woman with no known risk factors. The aim of this report is to raise awareness of this entity in the younger population, particularly in Afro-Caribbeans, which remains a highly understudied group compared with the rest of the US population.

  19. The Role of the Omental Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    allowed us to rule out a requirement for B cells, T cells, or NK cells for ovarian cancer cell lodging within milky spots, confirming and expanding...Anatomy, embryology , and surgical applications. Surg Clin North Am 2000, 80:275–93–xii. 9. Collins D, Hogan AM, O’Shea D, Winter DC: The omentum

  20. The Role of the Omental Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Archives 26: 36. 6. Recklinghausen F (1863) Uber Eiter und Bindegewebskorperchen. Virchow’s Archives 28: 40. 7. Hagiwara A, Takahashi T, Sawai K...cells. Br J Cancer 89(2):374–384 32. Recklinghausen FTv (1863) Uber Eiter und Bindegewebskor- perchen. Virchow’s Arch 28:157–197 33. Recklinghausen FTv

  1. Circulating plasma MiR-141 is a novel biomarker for metastatic colon cancer and predicts poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyin Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains one of the major cancer types and cancer related death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers that can facilitate disease detection, staging and prediction of therapeutic outcome are highly desirable to improve survival rate and help to determine optimized treatment for CRC. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, have recently been identified as critical regulators for various diseases including cancer and may represent a novel class of cancer biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate circulating microRNAs in human plasma for use as such biomarkers in colon cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we found that circulating miR-141 was significantly associated with stage IV colon cancer in a cohort of 102 plasma samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of candidate plasma microRNA markers. We observed that combination of miR-141 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a widely used marker for CRC, further improved the accuracy of detection. These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 156 plasma samples collected at Tianjin, China. Furthermore, our analysis showed that high levels of plasma miR-141 predicted poor survival in both cohorts and that miR-141 was an independent prognostic factor for advanced colon cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that plasma miR-141 may represent a novel biomarker that complements CEA in detecting colon cancer with distant metastasis and that high levels of miR-141 in plasma were associated with poor prognosis.

  2. Circulating Plasma MiR-141 Is a Novel Biomarker for Metastatic Colon Cancer and Predicts Poor Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, David E.; Zheng, Hong; Schetter, Aaron J.; Nykter, Matti; Harris, Curtis C.; Chen, Kexin; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major cancer types and cancer related death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers that can facilitate disease detection, staging and prediction of therapeutic outcome are highly desirable to improve survival rate and help to determine optimized treatment for CRC. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), have recently been identified as critical regulators for various diseases including cancer and may represent a novel class of cancer biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate circulating microRNAs in human plasma for use as such biomarkers in colon cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings By using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we found that circulating miR-141 was significantly associated with stage IV colon cancer in a cohort of 102 plasma samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of candidate plasma microRNA markers. We observed that combination of miR-141 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a widely used marker for CRC, further improved the accuracy of detection. These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 156 plasma samples collected at Tianjin, China. Furthermore, our analysis showed that high levels of plasma miR-141 predicted poor survival in both cohorts and that miR-141 was an independent prognostic factor for advanced colon cancer. Conclusions/Significance We propose that plasma miR-141 may represent a novel biomarker that complements CEA in detecting colon cancer with distant metastasis and that high levels of miR-141 in plasma were associated with poor prognosis. PMID:21445232

  3. Tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic colon cancer after treatment with oxaliplatin and 5-Fu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruo-Han Tseng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome in solid tumors is a rare occurrence, with a poor prognosis. We present the case of a patient of recurrent colon cancer who received chemotherapy with FOLFOX regimen (lencovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin with subsequent tumor lysis. We present a recurrent rectal cancer patient suffered from tumor lysis syndrome after salvage FOLFOX regimen. After treat with CVVH with improved conscious status. In this case report, we had review the tumor lysis in solid tumor.

  4. Off-label use of cetuximab plus sorafenib and panitumumab plus regorafenib to personalize therapy for a patient with V600E BRAF-mutant metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Marrawi, Mhd Yaser; Saroya, Bikramajit Singh; Brennan, Matthew C; Yang, Zhaohai; Dykes, Thomas M; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2013-08-01

    Sorafenib, the first agent developed to target BRAF mutant melanoma, is a multi-kinase inhibitor that was approved by the FDA for therapy of kidney and subsequently liver cancer, and is currently in clinical trials for thyroid, lung and brain cancer. Colorectal cancer with V600E BRAF mutation has shown relative resistance to standard chemotherapy regimens, as well as lack of efficacy to vemurafenib in clinical trials. New treatments are needed for BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer. We report a case of a patient with BRAF-mutant metastatic colon cancer whose disease had progressed on FOLFOX plus bevacizumab and subsequent FOLFIRI plus cetuximab. Based on preclinical data published in Nature in 2012 suggesting that successful therapeutic targeting of BRAF in colorectal cancer may require concomitant targeting of the EGFR, we offered this patient without other attractive options the combination of sorafenib plus cetuximab, in off-label use with informed consent. Sorafenib and cetuximab therapy led to a mixed radiographic response with some areas showing dramatic improvement and other areas showing stable disease over a 7-month period which is a notably long period of progression-free survival for V600E BRAF mutated colon cancer. The cetuximab plus sorafenib therapy was very well-tolerated by the patient who remained on it long enough until another therapy option, regorafenib, was approved in September 2012. The patient was offered single agent regorafenib at the time of progression. At the time of progression on single agent regorafenib, panitumumab was combined with regorafenib and this was also well-tolerated and appeared to slow disease progression. Further study of these approaches in the clinic as personalized treatment of BRAF-mutant advanced colorectal cancer is warranted.

  5. Metastatic Small Bowel Tumor from Descending Colon Cancer with Extensive Hematogenous or Lymphogenous Spread: Survey of the Japanese Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kojima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 68-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with cancer of the descending colon in July 1994 and underwent partial resection of the colon (type 2, moderately to well differentiated adenocarcinoma, se, ly1, v1, n(–. In April 1996, she was admitted to a nearby hospital for symptoms of ileus, which improved at the hospital. However, she was referred to our hospital for melena. In blood test, Hb was 8.7 g/dl, showing anemia, and carcinoembryonic antigen level was elevated to 50.7 ng/ml. Abdominal CT and small bowel series showed only mild expansion of the small bowel, suggesting no obvious occlusion. Abdominal surgery was performed in May 1995 for repeated development of ileus symptoms and suspicion of bleeding from the small bowel. Since the findings of the abdominal surgery showed a circular tumor in the lower ileum, partial resection of the small bowel was performed. Histopathological examination showed type 3, moderately to well differentiated adnocarcinoma, se, ly2, v0, n = 1/13. The principal tumor was located within the subserosa and grew up exclusively through the muscularis propria and the submucosa, into the mucous layer. The mucosa remained slightly on the surface layer. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with metastasis of descending colon cancer to the small bowel. Her prognosis was good, and neither metastasis nor redevelopment of the cancer have been confirmed to date, 11 years and 7 months since the surgery.

  6. Colon cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  7. Metastatic clostridial myonecrosis secondary to perforated metastatic bowel cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Mohammed Amer; John Karayanis

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous metastatic clostridial myonecrosis is a rare condition caused byClostridium septicum. The underlying lesion is usually either a colonic neoplasm or leukemia. The authors reported a 67-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen secondary to a perforated sigmoid cancer and who developed gas gangrene in her right leg. Unfortunately, despite all resuscitative measures, she died. The authors reviewed the literature; the diagnosis of metastatic myonecrosis was based on a high index of suspicion, development of bullae containing gram-positive rods, and subcutaneous crepitus (although this was a late sign). Treatment involves aggressive lfuid replacement, high doses of intravenous penicillin, high concentration of oxygen, and surgical debridement, and/or amputation. The mortality remains very high, despite all the above measures.

  8. The ethanolic extract of bark from Salix aegyptiaca L. inhibits the metastatic potential and epithelial to mesenchymal transition of colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enayat, Shabnam; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2014-01-01

    Willow bark extracts have been used for centuries as a natural pain killer. Recently their potential as anticancer agents has been reported. We have shown the high antioxidant activity, phenolic and flavonoid content in the ethanolic extract of bark (EEB) from Salix aegyptiaca, a species endogenous to the Middle East. We have also reported that incubation with EEB resulted in a reduction in cell proliferation through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via the inhibition of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/Protein kinase B and mitogen activated protein kinases signaling pathways as strongly as commercial inhibitors. The current study demonstrates the robust inhibition of anchorage-independent growth, motility, migration, and adhesion of colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HT-29 by EEB. These in vitro functional changes were accompanied by a restoration of E-cadherin expression, a reduction in EGFR, SNAI1, SNAI2, and Twist1 and the matrix metalloproteases MMP9 and MMP2. Many of these proteins are involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which is considered as a critical step in the progression of noninvasive tumor cells into malignant, metastatic carcinomas. We therefore propose that EEB from Salix aegyptiaca is a potent nutraceutical causing cancer chemoprevention by inhibiting epithelial to mesenchymal transition and can be consumed for its health promoting effects.

  9. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  10. Lower Extremity Cutaneous Lesions as the Initial Presentation of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhyan Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from colorectal cancers are rare and are usually present on the abdominal wall or previous surgical incision sites. Remote cutaneous lesions have been reported, however, often occur in the setting of widespread metastatic disease including other visceral secondaries. We present a case of lower extremity cutaneous metastases as the first sign of metastatic disease in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the colon. This case illustrates that new skin lesions may be the initial presentation of metastatic disease in a patient with a history of cancer.

  11. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases ...

  12. CCAT2, a novel noncoding RNA mapping to 8q24, underlies metastatic progression and chromosomal instability in colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Ling (Hui); R. Spizzo (Riccardo); Y. Atlasi (Yaser); M. Nicoloso (Milena); M. Shimizu (Masayoshi); R.S. Redis (Roxana); T. Nishida; R. Gafà (Roberta); J. Song (Jian); Z. Guo (Zhiyi); C. Ivan (Cristina); E. Barbarotto (Elisa); I. de Vries (Ingrid); X. Zhang (Xinna); M. Ferracin (Manuela); M. Churchman (Mike); J.F. van Galen (Janneke ); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); M. Shariati (Maryam); F. Haderk (Franziska); M.R. Estecio (Marcos); G. Garcia-Manero (Guillermo); G.A. Patijn (Gijs); D.C. Gotley (David); V. Bhardwaj (Vikas); I. Shureiqi (Imad); S. Sen (Semi); A.S. Multani (Asha); J. Welsh; K. Yamamoto (Ken); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); M.-A. Song (Min-Ae); S. Gallinger (Steve); G. Casey (Graham); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); L. Le Marchand (Loic); M. Tiirikainen (Maarit); A.R. Mani (Ali); W. Zhang (Wei); R.V. Davuluri (Ramana); K. Mimori (Koshi); M. Mori (Mayra); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J.W.M. Martens (John); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); J.F. Negrini (Jean-François); I. Berindan-Neagoe (Ioana); J.A. Foekens (John); S.R. Hamilton (Stanley); G. Lanza (Giovanni); S. Kopetz (Scott); R. Fodde (Riccardo); G.A. Calin (George)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe functional roles of SNPs within the 8q24 gene desert in the cancer phenotype are not yet well understood. Here, we report that CCAT2, a novel long noncoding RNA transcript (lncRNA) encompassing the rs6983267 SNP, is highly overexpressed in microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer and

  13. CCAT2, a novel noncoding RNA mapping to 8q24, underlies metastatic progression and chromosomal instability in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hui; Spizzo, Riccardo; Atlasi, Yaser; Nicoloso, Milena; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Redis, Roxana S; Nishida, Naohiro; Gafà, Roberta; Song, Jian; Guo, Zhiyi; Ivan, Cristina; Barbarotto, Elisa; De Vries, Ingrid; Zhang, Xinna; Ferracin, Manuela; Churchman, Mike; van Galen, Janneke F; Beverloo, Berna H; Shariati, Maryam; Haderk, Franziska; Estecio, Marcos R; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Patijn, Gijs A; Gotley, David C; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Shureiqi, Imad; Sen, Subrata; Multani, Asha S; Welsh, James; Yamamoto, Ken; Taniguchi, Itsuki; Song, Min-Ae; Gallinger, Steven; Casey, Graham; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Le Marchand, Loïc; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Mani, Sendurai A; Zhang, Wei; Davuluri, Ramana V; Mimori, Koshi; Mori, Masaki; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Martens, John W M; Tomlinson, Ian; Negrini, Massimo; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Foekens, John A; Hamilton, Stanley R; Lanza, Giovanni; Kopetz, Scott; Fodde, Riccardo; Calin, George A

    2013-09-01

    The functional roles of SNPs within the 8q24 gene desert in the cancer phenotype are not yet well understood. Here, we report that CCAT2, a novel long noncoding RNA transcript (lncRNA) encompassing the rs6983267 SNP, is highly overexpressed in microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer and promotes tumor growth, metastasis, and chromosomal instability. We demonstrate that MYC, miR-17-5p, and miR-20a are up-regulated by CCAT2 through TCF7L2-mediated transcriptional regulation. We further identify the physical interaction between CCAT2 and TCF7L2 resulting in an enhancement of WNT signaling activity. We show that CCAT2 is itself a WNT downstream target, which suggests the existence of a feedback loop. Finally, we demonstrate that the SNP status affects CCAT2 expression and the risk allele G produces more CCAT2 transcript. Our results support a new mechanism of MYC and WNT regulation by the novel lncRNA CCAT2 in colorectal cancer pathogenesis, and provide an alternative explanation of the SNP-conferred cancer risk.

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  15. Colon cancer - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 5 Go to slide 2 out of ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  16. Cutaneous metastasis of colon cancer: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Nicholas; Powers, Jeremy; Richmond, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous metastases arising from an internal malignancy are a rare phenomenon, occurring in 0.001% of all skin biopsies performed. Of these, 6.5% originate from the a primary colon cancer. Colon cancer, when metastatic to the skin, typically appears as a painless flesh-colored nodule or as a mass with occasional ulceration. We report a case of a large cutaneous metastasis to the suprascapular region as the initial presenting symptom of an underlying colon cancer.

  17. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH. Purpose of This Summary This PDQ cancer information summary has current information about the treatment of colon cancer. It is meant to inform and help ...

  18. Inflammation and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzić, Janos; Grivennikov, Sergei; Karin, Eliad; Karin, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established and in the last decade has received a great deal of supporting evidence from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological data. Inflammatory bowel disease is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and could differ between colitis-associated and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has elucidated the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators in virtually all steps of colon tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. These mechanisms, as well as new approaches to prevention and therapy, are discussed in this review.

  19. Colon resection for ovarian cancer: intraoperative decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Zervose, Emmanuel

    2008-11-01

    To discuss the benefits and morbidity of and indications for colon resection during cytoreductive operations for ovarian cancer. The history of cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is discussed, with special attention to the incorporation of colon resection. Literature regarding cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is then reviewed, again with attention to the role of colon resection. The focus of the review is directed at broad technical considerations and rationales, for both primary and secondary cytoreduction. Over the past 15 to 20 years the standard cytoreductive operation for ovarian cancer has shifted from an abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and omentectomy to an en bloc radical resection of the pelvic tumor and an omentectomy, and more recently to include increasing use of extensive upper abdominal surgery. En bloc pelvic resection frequently includes rectosigmoid resection, almost always accompanied by a primary anastomosis. Other portions of the colon are at risk for metastatic involvement and sometimes require resection in order to achieve optimal cytoreduction. The data regarding colon resection for the purpose of surgical cytoreduction of ovarian cancer are conflicting (in terms of benefit) and all retrospective. However, the preponderance of information supports a benefit in terms of survival when cytoreduction is clearly optimal. Similar to primary surgery, benefit from secondary cytoreduction of ovarian cancer occurs when only a small volume of disease is left behind. The preponderance of data suggests that colon resection to achieve optimal cytoreduction has a positive impact on survival. In order to better understand the role of colon resection as well as other extensive cytoreductive procedures for ovarian cancer, it will be important to continue to improve our understanding of prognostic variables such as the nuances of metastatic bowel involvement in order to better guide appropriate surgical management.

  20. Colonic Lipomas Mimicking Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna AYTAÇ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Colonic lipomas are uncommon tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Most of these tumors are asymptomatic and usually detected incidentally during colonoscopy or laparotomy and do not require treatment. Large lipomas are usually symptomatic and may mimic clinic manifestations of colonic carcinoma. Here we studied seven cases of submucosal and intramuscular colonic lipomas to evaluate the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of this disease.Material and Method: Seven patients who were diagnosed with colonic lipoma between 1999 and 2006 were evaluated as regards age, gender, size of tumor, anatomic site, symptoms, location and treatment modality.Result: The mean age was 57.8± 14.7 years. Five patients were male and two were female. The size of the lipomas ranged from 1 to 5.5 cm and all were symptomatic except one patient. Five of the gastrointestinal lipomas were located submucosally and 2 intramurally. Five lipomas arose from the ascending colon, 1 from the hepatic flexure and 1 from the splenic flexure. Four large GI lipomas were removed by subtotal resection and one case underwent hemicolectomy while two pedunculated lipomas were resected by polypectomy. No recurrence was found after at least one year follow-up with endoscopic examination.Conclusion: Colonic lipomas may mimic malignancy with their clinical manifestations. Appropriate radiological and colonoscopic evaluation is essential to avoid unnecessary wide resections.

  1. Metastatic breast carcinoma uncovered in an otherwise unremarkable “random colon biopsy”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Black

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most devastating cancers afflicting women, being a main cause of cancer related death. Approximately 50% of these patients have developed regional or distant metastases at the time of diagnosis; hence, an early diagnosis and surgery with indicated neoadjuvant therapy are crucial in eradicating this disease and improving patient survival. A significant percentage of patients, even after initial satisfactory tumor removal, still face the threat of metastatic diseases which could plague a wide spectrum of body sites such as bones, lungs, central nervous system, liver and gastrointestinal tract (mostly upper gastrointestinal locations. Colonic and anorectal involvement by metastatic breast cancer has been less frequently reported in disseminated diseases. Typically, metastatic disease presents as a mass, enteric stenosis, or obstruction. Rare cases, however, may not form an endoscopically or radiologically recognizable lesion, and thus could be overlooked. Here we report a unique case of random colon biopsies in a patient presenting with epigastric pain, whose stomach biopsy showed Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic active gastritis. No colonoscopic lesion was present; however, microscopic examination of the “random biopsy” revealed scattered single and small clusters of tumor cells involving the lamina propria of the colonic mucosa, morphologically and immunophenotypically consistent with metastatic disease from breast carcinoma. The clinical presentation and histopathology of the case were reviewed and compared with limited cases reported in the literature. We conclude that high levels of suspicion and alertness are essential to identify occult microscopic gastrointestinal metastatic breast cancer in the absence of a grossly appreciable lesion.

  2. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... collection below explain colon cancer risk factors, screening tests, and treatments. There are also personal stories from ... Colon Cancer Risk Play Play Colon Cancer: Screening Tests Play Play Colon Cancer Screening Tests: Colonoscopy Play ...

  3. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  4. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Category Cancer A-Z Colorectal Cancer Colon Cancer Videos Thanks to improvements in prevention, early detection, ... also personal stories from colon cancer survivors. Colon Cancer Prevention & Risk Reduction Play Play Colorectal Cancer: A ...

  5. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-07-15

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis.

  6. Clinical application of biomarkers in colon cancer : studies on apoptosis, proliferation and the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeestraten, Eliane Cornelia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major contributor to can- cer-related mortality worldwide. Death from colon cancer occurs in the majority of cases from widespread metastatic disease. Only 15% of stage II colon cancer patients that develop metastasis will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, all of them will suffer

  7. Cancer and the metastatic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Seventy percent of cancer patients have detectable metastases when they receive a diagnosis and 90% of cancer deaths result from metastases. These two facts emphasise the urgency for research to study the mechanisms and processes that enable metastasis. We need to develop a greater understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that cause metastasis and also we need to do more. We must also consider the micro- and macro-environmental factors that influence this disease. Studying this environmental context has led us to update the ‘seed and soil’ hypothesis which dates back to the 19th century. This theory describes cancerous cells as seeds and the substrate as the soil in target organs though this may seem antiquated. Nonetheless, the tissue specificity that researchers have recently observed in metastatic colonisation supports the validity of the seed and soil theory. We now know that the metastatic potential of a tumour cell depends on multiple, reciprocal interactions between the primary tumour and distant sites. These interactions determine tumour progression. Studies of metastasis have allowed us to develop treatments that focus on therapeutic effectiveness. These new treatments account for the frequent metastasis of some tumours to target organs such as bones, lungs, brain, and liver. The purpose of this review is first to describe interactions between the cellular and molecular entities and the target organ tumour environment that enables metastasis. A second aim is to describe the complex mechanisms that mediate these interactions. PMID:28105072

  8. Metastatic Colonic Adenocarcinoma in Breast: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiten P. Kothadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic adenocarcinoma to the breast from an extramammary site is extremely rare. In the literature, the most current estimate is that extramammary metastases account for only 0.43% of all breast malignancies and that, of these extramammary sites, colon cancer metastases form a very small subset. Most commonly seen metastasis in breast is from a contralateral breast carcinoma, followed by metastasis from hematopoietic neoplasms, malignant melanoma, sarcoma, lung, prostate, and ovary and gastric neoplasms. Here we present two rare cases, in which colonic adenocarcinomas were found to metastasize to the breast. In both cases, core biopsies were obtained from the suspicious areas identified on mammogram. Histopathology revealed neoplastic proliferation of atypical glandular components within benign breast parenchyma which were morphologically consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemical staining, it was confirmed that the neoplastic components were immunoreactive to colonic markers and nonreactive to breast markers, thus further supporting the morphologic findings. It is extremely important to make this distinction between primary breast cancer and a metastatic process, in order to provide the most effective and appropriate treatment for the patient and to avoid any harmful or unnecessary surgical procedures.

  9. Three components of cigarette smoke altered the growth and apoptosis of metastatic colon cancer cells via inducing the synthesis of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Miru; Kim, Cho-Won; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Dal-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a well-known risk factor for carcinogenesis and has been found to be related to the occurrence and development of colon cancer. In this study, the effect of formaldehyde (FA), benzene (Bz), and isoprene (IP), which are included in main components of CS, on cell viability and apoptosis of SW620 colorectal cancer cells was examined to identify the connection between CS components and colon cancer. In cell viability assay, FA, Bz, and IP decreased cell viability of SW620 cells in a dose dependent manner. In Western blot assay, the protein expression of cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 & E1, was decreased by FA, Bz, and IP, which corresponded to their inhibitory effect on cell viability. In addition, FA, Bz, and IP increased the protein expression of pro-apoptotic genes, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and Bax, and reduced the protein expression of anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2. In reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), FA, Bz, and IP increased the ROS production in SW620 cells. In the measurement of apoptotic cells, the numbers of apoptotic cells were increased by the treatment of FA, Bz, and IP. As CHOP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related apoptosis marker of which production is induced by ROS, it was considered that these CS components induce apoptosis of SW620 cells by increasing ROS synthesis and ER-stress. Taken together, these results showed that CS components, i.e., FA, Bz, and IP, inhibited the cell viability of SW620 cells by down-regulating the protein expression of cyclin D1 & E1 and induced apoptosis of SW620 cells by increasing ROS production and simultaneously activating ER-stress.

  10. Targeting bone physiology for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Karen A; Morris, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer has a unique predilection for bone that can lead to significant clinical sequelae, such as fracture and cord compression. This tropism for bone yields not only clinical challenges, but also opportunities to understand the tumor biology in bone and to develop relevant therapeutic strategies. The process by which tumor cells migrate to bone, remain dormant, and then colonize and expand is based on complex interactions between prostate cancer tumor cells and the host microenvironment. This review will provide an overview of these interactions as well as therapies targeting osseous metastases in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  11. CT findings of colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  12. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  13. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Local Offices Close + - Text Size Get Tested for Colon Cancer [Video] This free video explains the most commonly ... re like most people, the thought of getting colon cancer or even going for a colon cancer test ...

  14. CT imaging of metastatic liver cancer with calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Susumu; Kido, Choichiro (Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan). Hospital)

    1983-05-01

    In 15 out of 20 cases of hepatic metastases with calcication, the primary focal lesion was found to be colonic cancer (10 of which were rectal cancer). The rate of calcification of metastatic liver lesions from colorectal cancer was as high as 17.9%. According to pathological classification, the primary lesion was a differentiated adenocarcinoma in 16 cases. Calcification was found to be large and to have a tendency to occur more easily in a person with multiple metastatic liver lesions. The forms of calcification from ''disperse punctate''- ''collective punctate''-''central mass''-to'' vermicular'' were inferred to represent the changes in development of the calcification.

  15. Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0021 TITLE: Targeting Neuronal -like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain ...functional importance of key neuronal -like changes during metastatic evolution and target metastatic colonization of the brain with BBB-permeable...DATES COVERED 1 Mar 2015 - 28 Feb 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Neuronal -like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast

  16. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... personal stories from colon cancer survivors. Colon Cancer Prevention & Risk Reduction Play Play Colorectal Cancer: A Resource ... Cancer About Colorectal Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treatment After Treatment ...

  17. Familial adenomatous polyposis with synchronous invasive colonic carcinomas and metastatic jejunal adenocarcinoma in a Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka Blessius Kesieme

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Familial adenomatous polyposis is rare. Three cases were previously reported in Nigeria. An intriguing feature of this case is an ulcerated jejunal carcinoma which was metastatic rather than synchronous carcinoma. This patient presented with partial large bowel obstruction and the pathological analysis revealed 4 invasive adenocarcinomas, 3 in the colon and 1 in the jejunum (Dukes stage D. Palliative pancolectomy and jejunal tumour resection with chemotherapy was offered to him. He died eight months after surgery from disease progression. The challenges of managing a hereditary cancer syndrome in a resource poor country are highlighted.

  18. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  19. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  20. VEGF and colon cancer growth beyond angiogenesis: does VEGF directly mediate colon cancer growth via a non-angiogenic mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in colon cancer growth and the underlying mechanisms. Angiogenesis, the growth of new capillary blood vessels in the body, is critical for tissue injury healing and cancer growth. In 1971, Judah Folkman proposed the concept that tumor growth beyond 2 mm is critically dependent on angiogenesis. Tumors including colon cancers release angiogenic growth factors that stimulate blood vessels to grow into the tumors thus providing oxygen and nutrients that enable exponential growth. VEGF is the most potent angiogenic growth factor. Several studies have highlighted the role of VEGF in colon cancer, specifically in the stimulation of angiogenesis. This role of VEGF is strongly supported by studies showing that inhibition of VEGF using the blocking antibody, bevacizumab, results in decreased angiogenesis and abrogation of cancer growth. In the United States, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy is FDA approved for the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, the source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue, the mechanisms of VEGF generation in colon cancer cells and the molecular pathways involved in VEGF mediated angiogenesis in colon cancer are not fully known. The possibility that VEGF directly stimulates cancer cell growth in an autocrine manner has not been explored in depth.

  1. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely oc...

  2. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon presenting as a monarthritis of the hip in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobiella Carlos

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant arthritis is a rare manifestation of metastatic disease. We describe the case of a previously well 28 year old man in whom hip pain was the presenting symptom of disease. We describe the case and discuss the aetiology of colorectal cancer in young patients. We then review the literature and discuss the investigation and management of malignant joint arthritis. Case presentation We present the case of a 28 year old man who presented to the emergency department with an acute monoarthritis of the hip. He had an unremarkable past medical history and was systemically well. A diagnosis of malignant joint effusion was reached after a heightened index of clinical suspicion, magnetic resonance imaging and cytological evaluation of the synovial fluid. Computed tomography and bone scan confirmed widespread metastatic disease from a primary colonic adenocarcinoma. The patient tolerated three cycles of oxaliplatin and capecitabine but died 4 months after presentation. Conclusion The metastatic spread of cancer to the joint and the synovium is one of the rarest manifestations of malignant disease and has not been previously reported as the presenting symptom of disease. The diagnosis is a difficult one to reach and is associated with a poor prognosis. This case illustrates the importance of thorough investigation in reaching this diagnosis and entertaining the possibility in individuals who do not respond to conventional management of acute monoarthritis, even in young patients and individuals who do not display any other symptoms of disease.

  3. Use of Bevacizumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser-Sierra, Juan W.; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Saúl; Villalobos-Valencia, Ricardo; Ramírez-Márquez, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and although associated mortality rates in South American countries are generally among the lowest in the world, they are on the rise. The prognosis of patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer has improved markedly over the last 12 years, increasing from 5 months with best supportive care to almost 2 years with combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. New prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been identified to g...

  4. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... factors, screening tests, and treatments. There are also personal stories from colon cancer survivors. Colon Cancer Prevention & ... Cancer: Don't Ignore Your Symptoms Play Play Personal Story: Lex Gilbert Play Play Personal Story: Karen ...

  5. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have not rece......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... not received chemotherapy, in whom the disease has progressed despite androgen-deprivation therapy. METHODS: In this double-blind, phase 3 study, we randomly assigned 1717 patients to receive either enzalutamide (at a dose of 160 mg) or placebo once daily. The coprimary end points were radiographic progression...... at the data-cutoff date (29% reduction in the risk of death; hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84; Pchemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.35), the time until the first...

  6. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  7. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  8. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH. Purpose of This Summary This PDQ cancer information summary has current information about the treatment of colon cancer. It is meant to inform and help ...

  9. An Unusual Course of Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting on a case of a 41-year-old woman who presented with metastatic gastroesophageal junction cancer and who achieved prolonged survival with a multimodal treatment approach. After initially experiencing robust response to chemotherapy, she was treated for distant recurrence with palliative radiation to the gastrohepatic and supraclavicular lymph nodes and subsequently, given her unusual near-complete response, with reirradiation to the abdomen with curative intent for residual disease. The case presented is unique due to the patient’s atypical treatment course, including technically difficult reirradiation to the abdomen, and the resulting prolonged survival despite metastatic presentation.

  10. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  11. Vitamin D and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lidija; Klampfer

    2014-01-01

    Calcitriol, 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3(1,25(OH)2D3), the most active form of vitamin D, is a pleotropic hormone with a wide range of biological activities. Due to its ability to regulate calcium and phosphate metabolism, 1,25D3 plays a major role in bone health. In addition, 1,25D3 binds to the vitamin D receptor and thereby regulates the expression of a number of genes which control growth, differentiation and survival of cancer cells. In agreement, the levels of vitamin D3 appear to be an essential determinant for the development and progression of colon cancer and supplementation with vitamin D3 is effective in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis in animal models. Vitamin D3 has been estimated to lower the incidence of colorectal cancer by 50%, which is consistent with the inverse correlation between dietary vitamin D3 intake or sunlight exposure and human colorectal cancer. Several studies confirmed that increasing vitamin D3 lowers colon cancer incidence, reduces polyp recurrence, and that sufficient levels of vitamin D3 are associated with better overall survival of colon cancer patients. Vitamin D regulates the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium by modulating the oncogenic Wnt signaling pathway and by inhibiting tumor-promoting inflammation. Both activities contribute to the ability of 1,25D3 to prevent the development and progression of colon cancer.

  12. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  13. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Metastatic Squamous ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  14. Patients with Acromegaly Presenting with Colon Cancer: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray B. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Frequent colonoscopy screenings are critical for early diagnosis of colon cancer in patients with acromegaly. Case Presentations. We performed a retrospective analysis of the incidental diagnoses of colon cancer from the ACCESS trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995734. Colon cancer was identified in 2 patients (4.5%. Case  1 patient was a 36-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma. After surgery, the patient underwent routine colonoscopy screening, which revealed a 40 mm tubular adenoma in the descending colon. A T1N1a carcinoma was surgically removed, and 1 of 22 lymph nodes was positive for metastatic disease, leading to a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. Case  2 patient was a 50-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove a 2 cm pituitary adenoma. The patient reported severe cramping and lower abdominal pain, and an invasive 8.1 cm3 grade 2 adenocarcinoma with signet rings was identified in the ascending colon and removed. Of the 37 lymph nodes, 34 were positive for the presence of tumor cells, and stage 3c colon cancer was confirmed. Conclusion. Current guidelines for colonoscopy screening at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly and at appropriate follow-up intervals should be followed.

  15. Patients with Acromegaly Presenting with Colon Cancer: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhle, Samer; Ludlam, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Frequent colonoscopy screenings are critical for early diagnosis of colon cancer in patients with acromegaly. Case Presentations. We performed a retrospective analysis of the incidental diagnoses of colon cancer from the ACCESS trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995734). Colon cancer was identified in 2 patients (4.5%). Case  1 patient was a 36-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma. After surgery, the patient underwent routine colonoscopy screening, which revealed a 40 mm tubular adenoma in the descending colon. A T1N1a carcinoma was surgically removed, and 1 of 22 lymph nodes was positive for metastatic disease, leading to a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. Case  2 patient was a 50-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove a 2 cm pituitary adenoma. The patient reported severe cramping and lower abdominal pain, and an invasive 8.1 cm3 grade 2 adenocarcinoma with signet rings was identified in the ascending colon and removed. Of the 37 lymph nodes, 34 were positive for the presence of tumor cells, and stage 3c colon cancer was confirmed. Conclusion. Current guidelines for colonoscopy screening at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly and at appropriate follow-up intervals should be followed. PMID:28025627

  16. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contrast Barium Enema(DCBE) Play Play Colon Cancer Treatments Play Play Colon Cancer Surgery: What You Need ... Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treatment After Treatment Back To Top Imagine a world ...

  17. Inguinal lymph node metastasis of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloane McGraw

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of adenocarcinoma of colon with unusual metastasis to inguinal lymph nodes. Our patient is a young male with bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy, bone pains, and jaundice who presented as carcinoma of unknown primary. He was diagnosed as widely metastatic adenocarcinoma of colon for which he received chemotherapy and has had a good response to the treatment.

  18. Bone resorption facilitates osteoblastic bone metastatic colonization by cooperation of insulin-like growth factor and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Hoshino, Takuya; Aikawa, Tomoya; Yasuda, Hisataka; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2014-05-01

    Bone metastasis is a multistep process that includes cancer cell dissemination, colonization, and metastatic growth. Furthermore, this process involves complex, reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment. Bone resorption is known to be involved in both osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis. However, the precise roles of the bone resorption in the multistep process of osteoblastic bone metastasis remain unidentified. In this study, we show that bone resorption plays important roles in cancer cell colonization during the initial stage of osteoblastic bone metastasis. We applied bioluminescence/X-ray computed tomography multimodal imaging that allows us to spatiotemporally analyze metastasized cancer cells and bone status in osteoblastic bone metastasis models. We found that treatment with receptor activator of factor-κB ligand (RANKL) increased osteoblastic bone metastasis when given at the same time as intracardiac injection of cancer cells, but failed to increase metastasis when given 4 days after cancer cell injection, suggesting that RANKL-induced bone resorption facilitates growth of cancer cells colonized in the bone. We show that insulin-like growth factor-1 released from the bone during bone resorption and hypoxia-inducible factor activity in cancer cells cooperatively promoted survival and proliferation of cancer cells in bone marrow. These results suggest a mechanism that bone resorption and hypoxic stress in the bone microenvironment cooperatively play an important role in establishing osteoblastic metastasis.

  19. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along......Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...

  20. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  1. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Slovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit.

  2. Cholesterol excretion and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    Populations consuming diets high in fat and cholesterol exhibit a greater incidence of colon cancer than those consuming less fat and cholesterol. Lowering elevated serum cholesterol levels experimentally or clinically is associated with increased large-bowel tumorigenesis. Thus, cholesterol lost to the gut, either dietary or endogenously synthesized, appears to have a role in large-bowel cancer. Whether the effect(s) is mediated by increases in fecal bile acid excretion or some other mechanism is not clear.

  3. Metastatic superscan on (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy in a case of carcinoma colon: Common finding but rare etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Sharma, Punit; Karunanithi, Sellam; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-07-01

    Bone scintigraphy in which there is excessive skeletal radioisotope uptake in relation to soft tissues along with absent or faint activity in the genitourinary tract is known as a 'superscan'. Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy associated with superscan along with others such as lung cancer, breast cancer and haematological malignancies. Here we present the case of a 41 year old woman with carcinoma colon with metastatic superscan on (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy, a very rare cause for metastatic superscan.

  4. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Metastatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe that the consciousness-based/holistic medical toolbox has a serious additional offer to cancer patients and, as a consequence, designed a treatment for the patient with metastasized cancer. From a holistic perspective, cancer can be understood as a simple disturbance of the cells, arising from the tissue holding on to a trauma with strong emotional content. This is called “a blockage”, where the function of the cells is allocated from their original function in the tissue to a function of holding emotions. We hope to be able not only to improve the quality of life, but also to improve survival and in some cases even induce spontaneous remission of the metastasized cancer. This paper describes how work with a patient with metastasized cancer can be done in the holistic clinical practice in 14 days on an individual basis, helping the patient to recover her human character, purpose of life, coherence, and will to live, thus improving quality of life and possibly also survival time. The holistic therapeutic work includes (1 teaching existential theory, (2 working with life perspective and philosophy of life, (3 helping the patient to acknowledge the state of the disease and the feelings connected to it, and finally (4 getting the patient into the holistic state of healing: (a feeling old repressed emotions, (b understanding why she got sick from a holistic point of view, and finally (c letting go of the negative beliefs and decisions that made her sick according to the holistic theory of nongenetic diseases. The theory of the human character, the quality of life theories, the holistic theory of cancer, the holistic process theory of healing, the theory of (Antonovsky coherence, and the life mission theory are the most important theories for the patient to find hope and mobilize the will to fight the cancer and survive. The patient went through the following phases: (1 finding the purpose of life and hidden resources; (2 confronting

  6. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkasap, N.; Ozkurt, M. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Erkasap, S.; Yasar, F. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uzuner, K. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ihtiyar, E. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uslu, S.; Kara, M. [Department of Biochemistry, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Bolluk, O. [Department of Biostatistics, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-03-19

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  7. Leptin receptor (Ob-R mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Erkasap

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases and metastatic colon (13 cases cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  8. Duodenal Obstruction as First Presentation of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Khairy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The metastatic breast cancer to the duodenum is rare in spite of common breast cancer. In this paper, we are reporting a rare case of 50-year-old lady who presented with intestinal obstruction as result of metastatic breast cancer which completely responds to chemotherapy. The tumor presents again as brain metastasis after stop of Herceptin due to cardiac toxicity.

  9. Staging breast cancer, rehearsing metastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinding, Christina; Gray, Ross; Fitch, Margaret; Greenberg, Marlene

    2002-01-01

    Social science researchers have fruitfully used a range of conceptualizations of "performance": as a metaphor for social life, a way of vivifying research findings, and a form of scholarly representation. In this article, the researchers consider performance in its hermeneutic sense, as a way of generating meaning. The drama Handle With Care? Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer was created by a research team, a theater troupe, and women with breast cancer. The researchers employ an interpretive phenomenologicalframework to explore interviews with women with breast cancer involved in creating Handle With Care? The performative context in which the drama developed allowed certain illness meanings to emerge, intensify, and shift. The article also considers ethical dilemmas surfaced by this project.

  10. HMGA1 induces intestinal polyposis in transgenic mice and drives tumor progression and stem cell properties in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Belton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although metastatic colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, the molecular mechanisms that enable colon cancer cells to metastasize remain unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that metastatic cells develop by usurping transcriptional networks from embryonic stem (ES cells to facilitate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, invasion, and metastatic progression. Previous studies identified HMGA1 as a key transcription factor enriched in ES cells, colon cancer, and other aggressive tumors, although its role in these settings is poorly understood. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine how HMGA1 functions in metastatic colon cancer, we manipulated HMGA1 expression in transgenic mice and colon cancer cells. We discovered that HMGA1 drives proliferative changes, aberrant crypt formation, and intestinal polyposis in transgenic mice. In colon cancer cell lines from poorly differentiated, metastatic tumors, knock-down of HMGA1 blocks anchorage-independent cell growth, migration, invasion, xenograft tumorigenesis and three-dimensional colonosphere formation. Inhibiting HMGA1 expression blocks tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions, consistent with depletion of tumor-initiator cells in the knock-down cells. Knock-down of HMGA1 also inhibits metastatic progression to the liver in vivo. In metastatic colon cancer cells, HMGA1 induces expression of Twist1, a gene involved in embryogenesis, EMT, and tumor progression, while HMGA1 represses E-cadherin, a gene that is down-regulated during EMT and metastatic progression. In addition, HMGA1 is among the most enriched genes in colon cancer compared to normal mucosa. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that HMGA1 drives proliferative changes and polyp formation in the intestines of transgenic mice and induces metastatic progression and stem-like properties in colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that HMGA1 is a key regulator, both in metastatic

  11. Management of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Jurado, J; Richart Aznar, P; García Mata, J; Fernández Martínez, R; Peláez Fernández, I; Sampedro Gimeno, T; Galve Calvo, E; Murillo Jaso, L; Polo Marqués, E; García Palomo, A

    2011-09-01

    Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors (AI) have been extensively studied in this setting. This section summarizes the key data regarding the use of AI in advanced breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, AI are the first line of treatment for untreated patients, or those who had prior AI treatment and progress after 12 months of adjuvant therapy. A longer disease-free interval and absence of visceral disease is associated with a better response. If tumors recur in less than 12 months, it is recommended that tamoxifen (TAM) or the estrogen-receptor antagonist fulvestrant (FUL) treatment be initiated. In the second-line setting, the best option after progression is the administration of either FUL or TAM. In the third-line setting, reintroduction of AI is considered an acceptable option. In premenopausal women who have not received prior treatment or who have progressed after 12 months following adjuvant treatment, it is recommended to initiate therapy with a combination of TAM and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog. If there is treatment failure with the use of this combination, megestrol acetate or an LHRH agonist plus an AI may be reasonable alternatives. Intensive research is ongoing to understand the mechanisms of resistance to hormone therapy. In human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive-patients, combinations with HER2 antagonists are associated with significant clinical activity.

  12. Is metastatic pancreatic cancer an untargetable malignancy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hampig Raphael Kourie; Joseph Gharios; Fadi Elkarak; Joelle Antoun; Marwan Ghosn

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer(MPC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies, known to be chemo-resistant and have been recently considered resistant to some targeted therapies(TT). Erlotinib combined to gemcitabine is the only targeted therapy that showed an overall survival benefit in MPC. New targets and therapeutic approaches, based on new-TT, are actually being evaluated in MPC going from immunotherapy, epigenetics, tumor suppressor gene and oncogenes to stromal matrix regulators. We aim in this paper to present the major causes rendering MPC an untargetable malignancy and to focus on the new therapeutic modalities based on TT in MPC.

  13. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerlijne; De; Groote; Hans; Prenen

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for locoregional treatment of liver metastases in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  16. PROMISES FOR TREATING COLON CANCER PATIENTS WITH BRAF GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer represents a heterogenous disease group, which differ by cancerogenesis mechanisms, molecular alterations, prognosis and treatment possibilities. In modern clinical practice assessment of KRAS and NRAS genes status is already necessary in order to prescribe anti-EGFR treatment for metastatic disease. A separate poor prognosis group are patients with BRAF mutation. In this review we will focus on biological features of BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, its epidemiology, clinical features on different stages, treatment choice and promising new treatment possibilities.

  17. Phosphatase PRL-3 is a direct regulatory target of TGFbeta in colon cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjun; Liu, Xiao-Qiong; Rajput, Ashwani; Geng, Liying; Ongchin, Melanie; Zeng, Qi; Taylor, Gregory S; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis causes most deaths from cancer yet mechanistic understanding and therapeutic options remain limited. Overexpression of the phosphatase PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is associated with metastasis of colon cancer. Here, we show that PRL-3 is a direct target of signaling by TGFβ, which is broadly implicated in progression and metastasis. We found that suppression of PRL-3 expression by TGFβ was mediated by Smad-dependent inhibition of PRL-3 transcription at the level of promoter activity. PRL-3 activation stimulated PI3K/AKT signaling that caused resistance to stress-induced apoptosis. PRL-3 overexpression promoted metastatic colonization in an orthotopic mouse model of colon cancer, whereas PRL-3 knockdown reduced metastatic potential. Altered metastatic phenotypes were not derivative of primary tumor development or local invasion but could be attributed to PRL-3-mediated cell survival. Our findings suggest that inhibiting PRL-3 expression might be an important mechanism through which TGFβ suppresses metastasis in colon cancer. In addition, our findings suggest that loss of TGFβ signaling, which occurs commonly during colon cancer progression, is sufficient to activate a PRL-3-mediated cell survival pathway that can selectively promote metastasis. Therefore, a major implication of our findings is that PRL-3 antagonists may offer significant value for antimetastatic therapy in patients with colon cancer.

  18. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  19. A case of leptospirosis simulating colon cancer with liver metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Granito; Giorgio Ballardini; Marco Fusconi; Umberto Volta; Paolo Muratori; Vittorio Sambri; Giuseppe Battista; Francesco B. Bianchi

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man who presented with fatigue, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed hepatomegaly and multiple hepatic lesions highly suggestive of metastatic diseases. Due to the endoscopic finding of colon ulcer, colon cancer with liver metastases was suspected. Biochemically a slight increase of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and gammaglutamyl transpeptidase were present; α-fetoprotein, carcinoembryogenic antigen and carbohydrate 19-9 antigen serum levels were normal. Laboratory and instrumental investigations, including colon and liver biopsies revealed no signs of malignancy. In the light of spontaneous improvement of symptoms and CT findings, his personal history was revaluated revealing direct contact with pigs and their tissues. Diagnosis of leptospirosis was considered and confirmed by detection of an elevated titer of antibodies to leptospira. After two mo, biochemical data, CT and colonoscopy were totally normal.

  20. Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wculek, Stefanie K; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-12-17

    Despite progress in the development of drugs that efficiently target cancer cells, treatments for metastatic tumours are often ineffective. The now well-established dependency of cancer cells on their microenvironment suggests that targeting the non-cancer-cell component of the tumour might form a basis for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. However, the as-yet poorly characterized contribution of host responses during tumour growth and metastatic progression represents a limitation to exploiting this approach. Here we identify neutrophils as the main component and driver of metastatic establishment within the (pre-)metastatic lung microenvironment in mouse breast cancer models. Neutrophils have a fundamental role in inflammatory responses and their contribution to tumorigenesis is still controversial. Using various strategies to block neutrophil recruitment to the pre-metastatic site, we demonstrate that neutrophils specifically support metastatic initiation. Importantly, we find that neutrophil-derived leukotrienes aid the colonization of distant tissues by selectively expanding the sub-pool of cancer cells that retain high tumorigenic potential. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the leukotriene-generating enzyme arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) abrogates neutrophil pro-metastatic activity and consequently reduces metastasis. Our results reveal the efficacy of using targeted therapy against a specific tumour microenvironment component and indicate that neutrophil Alox5 inhibition may limit metastatic progression.

  1. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  2. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  3. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  4. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  5. Heart Risks May Boost Women's Colon Cancer Risk, Too

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wasn't involved in the research. Excluding skin cancers, colon cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in ... Cancer Society says. The "absolute" risk of developing colon cancer over a specified period of time varies by ...

  6. Colon visualization on (99m)Tc-HDP whole-body bone scan due to sigmoid colon cancer-related enterovesical fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Song, Bong-Il; Won, Kyoung Sook

    2015-01-01

    An abnormally increased uptake of the bone-seeking agent is rarely observed in structures other than the bone and urinary track on bone scintigraphy. The general etiologies of soft tissue uptake can be explained by heterotopic ossification or dystrophic and metastatic calcification. We report a case of serendipitous visualization of the entire colon on bone scintigraphy. Diffuse colonic uptake was detected on the whole-body bone scan in a patient with biopsy-proven sigmoid colon cancer. Additional imaging studies clearly showed direct bladder invasion of the sigmoid colon cancer. Imaging findings with a brief review of the literature are presented in this article.

  7. Does maintenance of Bevacizumab after treatment failure have a role in metastatic colon cancer?%在转移性结肠癌中治疗失败后贝伐单抗的维持治疗有用吗?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khaled M. Galal; Khaled Zaghlol; Ehab Esmat Fawzy; Saleh Mansour; Mahmoud Abdul Salam; Ehab Mostafa Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the timing of Bevacizumab (BVC) in the overall treatment strategy of advanced metastatic colorectal cancer - early use (first-line) or later use. Methods: 41 patients with progressive metastatic colorectal carcinoma were included. Patients were randomized to receive chemotherapy with or without BVC. Primary end point was objective response. Secondary end points were median survival, time to tumor progression, and toxicity. Results: Partial response with second-line BVC group constituted 25% and 18.8% in patients with first-line chemotherapy and BVC-based regimen respectively, compared to 11.8% and 5.9% with second-line chemotherapy. Median time to progression was 3.1 vs. 2.3 months for cases with first-line chemotherapy and BVC-based regimens respectively. Median survival was 8.2 vs. 4 months in both groups respectively (P = 0.019). Conclusion: Second-line chemotherapy combined BVC had higher disease control rate (partial response and stable disease), median time to progression and median survival in BVC-naive patients compared to patients with first-line BVC-based therapy. BVC should be maintained in the second- and third-line settings, as cases with BVC discontinuation had significantly lower median time to disease progression and median survival. Selection of patients for use of BVC was recommended with taking into consideration the cost-benefit value and that the discontinuation of BVC would increase tumor progression.

  8. Systemic chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yannan Zhao; Biyun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer among women worldwide and the most common cancer in China. Many factors influence the treatment strategy for metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Chemotherapy should be administered to patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors, symptomatic visceral metastasis, and a short disease-free interval. Sequential single-agent chemotherapy has similar efficacy as combination agents in terms of overall survival and quality of life. Anthracyclines are the cornerstone of first-line treatment for MBC, and taxanes represent the second treatment option after resistance. When progression or intolerable toxicity occurs after optimal treatment, the alternative treatments include capecitabine, vinorel-bine, and gemcitabine. Ixabepilone and eribulin are relatively new effective single agents. A combination of cytotoxic agents for patients with rapid clinical progression can further improve the overall response rate and time to progression compared to single-agent treatment. For patients with MBC who were pretreated with anthracyclines in the neoadjuvant/adjuvant setting, a taxane-containing regimen such as docetaxel plus capecitabine or gemcitabine plus paclitaxel should be administered. Platinum-based therapies such as cisplatin or carboplatin have a role in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer. Meanwhile, the efficacy of the addition of targeted drugs such as iniparib, bevacizumab, and cetuximab to chemotherapy remains unproven. Maintenance chemotherapy is routinely recommended in clinical practice at present. Patients who were previously treated with paclitaxel and gemcitabine have better progression-free and overall survival with maintenance chemotherapy according to a Korean phase Ⅲ clinical trial. Sequential maintenance treatment with capecitabine monotherapy after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy (X-based X) appears favorable based on a series of domestic studies.

  9. FIRST LINE 5-FU-BASED CHEMOTHERAPY WITH/WITHOUT BEVACIZUMAB FOR METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER: TISSUE BIOMARKER CANDIDATES

    OpenAIRE

    Assia Konsoulova; Ivan Donev; Nikolay Conev; Sonya Draganova; Nadezhda Petrova; Eleonora Dimitrova; Hristo Popov; Kameliya Bratoeva; Petar Ghenev

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. According to Bulgarian National Statistics Institute, 2370 colon and 1664 rectal cancer cases were diagnosed in 2012 with total number of patients 29995. Adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic disease improves progression-free survival (PFS) but no predictive markers have been proven in the clinical practice. In our study we examined two tissue biomarkers that may correlate with resp...

  10. Anti-inflammatory phytochemicals for chemoprevention of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2013-06-01

    Every year more than a million new cancer cases and 600,000 deaths are reported world-wide. Colorectal cancer is the fourth most commonly occurring and second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Significant progress has been made in understanding colorectal cancer through epidemiological, laboratory and clinical studies. Development of metastatic adenocarcinomas is a multistage process occurring over several years during which multiple genetic alterations and pathophysiological changes are associated. Colorectal cancer can be prevented if the transformation of normal colonic crypt cells to malignant can be halted or reversed. Some of the key molecules that are altered significantly and play important roles in colorectal tumor progression are associated with inflammation. Since chronic inflammation is now recognized as a potential risk factor for tumor development, targeting inflammatory pathways has proven effective in preventing formation of colonic tumors and their malignant progression in both preclinical and clinical studies. Synthetic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) have been identified as potential colorectal cancer chemopreventive agents; however, most of these synthetic agents are associated with unwanted and sometimes fatal side effects. There is mounting evidence in support of the efficacy of naturally-occurring phytochemicals possessing anti-inflammatory activity. In this review we discuss key inflammatory pathways associated with colorectal cancer and promising naturally-occurring phytochemicals as anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  11. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a gallstone ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebally, Shaheel M; Sehgal, Rishabh; Kelly, Justin; Faul, Peter N; Waldron, David

    2013-12-16

    Metastatic breast cancer to the small bowel (SB) presenting as gallstone ileus and resulting in SB obstruction has not been described previously. A 76-year-old woman with previous metastatic breast cancer to the axial spine and hips presented with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. CT scanning revealed SB obstruction consistent with gallstone ileus. The patient underwent two segmental SB resections for distal ileal strictures mimicking what appeared to be macroscopic Crohn's disease. The entero-biliary fistula was undisturbed. Pathological analysis revealed the dual pathologies of gallstone ileus and metastatic carcinoma from a breast primary causing luminal SB obstruction. Improvements in staging and treatment modalities have contributed to the increased overall long-term survival for breast cancer, compelling clinicians to consider metastatic breast cancer as a differential diagnosis in women presenting with new onset of gastrointestinal symptoms in order that appropriate treatment be administered in a timely fashion.

  12. Eribulin Improves Survival of Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment with eribulin (Halaven™) improved overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed despite multiple rounds of prior chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III clinical trial called EMBRACE.

  13. Nab-Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared the combination of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel [Abraxane®]) and gemcitabine (Gemzar®) versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  14. Targeted Sequencing for Discovery and Validation of DNA Methylation Markers of Colon Cancer Metastasis — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. A key issue in treating colon cancer patients is inability to accurately predict tumors that have metastatic potential and require adjuvant chemotherapy. This project will test the model that tumor metastases arise from intra-tumor heterogeneity generated by DNA methylation events, and that detecting these events can provide a predictve signature of tumors with poor outcome

  15. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  16. 8q24 Cancer risk allele associated with major metastatic risk in inflammatory breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bertucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Association studies have identified low penetrance alleles that participate to the risk of cancer development. The 8q24 chromosomal region contains several such loci involved in various cancers that have been recently studied for their propensity to influence the clinical outcome of prostate cancer. We investigated here two 8q24 breast and colon cancer risk alleles in the close vicinity of the MYC gene for their role in the occurrence of distant metastases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective series of 449 patients affected with breast or colon adenocarcinoma was genotyped for the rs13281615 and/or rs6983267 SNPs. Statistical analyses were done using the survival package v2.30 in the R software v2.9.1. The two SNPs did not influence the development of distant metastases of colon cancer; rs6983267 showed a mild effect on breast cancer. However, this effect was greatly emphasized when considering inflammatory breast cancer (IBC solely. Replicated on a larger and independent series of IBC the contribution of the genotype to the metastatic risk of IBC was found an independent predictor of outcome (p = 2e-4; OR 8.3, CI95:2.6-33. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows first that the monitoring of this specific germline variation may add a substantial tool for IBC prognostication, an aggressive disease that evolves towards distant metastases much more frequently than non-IBC and for which no reliable prognostic factor is available in medical practice. Second, it more generally suggests that risk alleles, while associated with low susceptibility, could correlate with a high risk of metastasis.

  17. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jinfu, E-mail: Jinfu.hu@phac-aspc.gc.ca [Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 785 Carling Avenue, AL: 6807B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); La Vecchia, Carlo [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri,” Via La Masa, 19-20156 Milan (Italy); Istituto di Statistica Medica e Biometria, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Venezian, 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Negri, Eva [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri,” Via La Masa, 19-20156 Milan (Italy); Mery, Les [Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 785 Carling Avenue, AL: 6807B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2010-02-10

    Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers.

  18. [Examination of percutaneous microwave coagulation and radiofrequency ablation therapy for metastatic liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Shinichi; Hirokawa, Satoru; Masaki, Takahiro; Miyakawa, Kaoru; Tarao, Kazuo; Akaike, Makoto; Sugimasa, Yukio; Takemiya, Shoji; Sairenji, Motonori; Motohashi, Hisahiko

    2002-11-01

    Percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMCT) and radio frequency ablation therapy (RFA) as treatments for metastatic liver cancer were examined. PMCT or RFA was administered for 18 metastatic liver cancer lesions (primary lesion: 11 colon rectal cancer, one esophagus cancer, one thyroid cancer, one pancreatic cancer, one pheochromocytoma) in 16 patients from July 1999 to March 2002. RFA was performed 1 time for 12 minutes in principle, using a Cool-tip RF system from Radionics. Patients had a mean age of 58.8 years and the mean diameter of the neoplasms was about 22 mm. Critical complications were not seen. The rate of partial recurrence was 35.3% as of March, 2002, in an average observation period of 7.3 months. On the other hand, with the medical treatment for the hepatocellular carcinoma provided during this period, the rate of partial recurrence was 14.8%. The treatment of metastatic liver cancer by PMCT and RFA is associated with a high rate of a recurrence as compared with hepatocellular carcinoma, and needs to be examined to discover ways of adaptation and improvement of the technology.

  19. Hypermethylation of the TPEF/HPP1 Gene in Primary, Metastatic Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias P.A. Ebert

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of promoter methylation in the process of cancer cell metastasis has not yet been studied. Recently, methylation of the TPEF (transmembrane protein containing epidermal growth factor, follistatin domain gene was reported in human colon, gastric, bladder cancer cells. Using the Methylight assay, TPEF/HPP1 gene methylation was assessed in primary colorectal cancers (n = 47, matched normal colon mucosa, as well as in the liver metastasis of 24 patients with colorectal cancer, compared to the methylation status of the TIMP-3, APC, DAPK, caveolin-2, p16 genes. TPEF was frequently methylated in primary colorectal cancers (36 of 47 compared to the normal colon mucosa (1 of 21 (P < .0001. Interestingly, promoter methylation was significantly more frequent in proximal nonrectal cancers (P < .05. Furthermore, a high degree of methylation of the TPEF gene was also observed in liver metastasis. (19 of 24. In summary, we observed frequent TPEF methylation in primary colorectal cancers, liver metastases, indicating that epigenetic alterations are not only present in the early phases of carcinogenesis, but are also common in metastatic lesions. The high frequency of TPEF methylation in this series of colorectal cancers underscores the importance of epigenetic changes as targets for the development of molecular tests for cancer diagnosis.

  20. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-04-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  1. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  2. The Prevalence and Importance of Epithelial Plasticity in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    34Cancer#13,ඩV110.൛" De"Gasperi,"R.,"Rocher,"A."B.,"Sosa,"M."A.,"Wearne,"S."L.," Perez ,"G."M.,"Friedrich,"V."L.,"Jr.,"Hof,"P."R.,"and൜" Elder,"G."A...34 Nieto ,"M."A."(2012)."Metastatic"colonization"requires"the"repression"of"the"epithelialV36" mesenchymal"transition"inducer"Prrx1."Cancer"Cell#22,螕V724

  3. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  4. Clinical experience of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiromichiMaeda; TakehrioOkabayashi; KazuhiroHanazaki; MichiyaKobayashi

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome caused by ovarian metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer, which was accompanied by peritoneal dissemination. A 58-year-old female patient presented with massive right pleural effusion, ascites and a huge pelvic mass. Under the diagnosis of an advanced ovarian tumor, bilateral oophorectomy was performed and sigmoidectomy was also carried out after intraoperative diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination involving the sigmoid colon. How- ever, immunohistochemical staining revealed that the ovarian lesions were metastasis from the primary advanced colon cancer. Postoperatively, ascites and pleural effusion subsided, and the diagnosis of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastatic ovarian tumor from colon cancer was determined. The patient is now undergoing a regimen of chemotherapy for colon cancer without recurrence of ascites or hydrothorax 10 mo after the surgery. Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastaticovarian tumor from colon cancer is rare but clinically important because long-term alleviation of symptoms can be achieved by surgical resection. This case report suggests that selected patients, even with peritoneal dissemination, may obtain palliation from surgical resection of metastatic ovarian tumors.

  5. Effect of Proton Beam on Cancer Progressive and Metastatic Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Y. H.; Nam, K. S.; Oh, Y. H.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, M. Y.; Jang, J. S. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of proton beam on enzymes for promotion/progression of carcinogenesis and metastasis of malignant tumor cells to clarify proton beam-specific biological effects. The changes of cancer chemopreventive enzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells irradiated with proton beams were tested by measuring the activities of quinine reductase (QR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), glutathione (GSH) levels, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We also examined the effect of proton beam on the ODC activity and expression of COX-2 in human breast cancer cell. We then assessed the metastatic capabilities of HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cells irradiated with proton beam by measuring the invasiveness of cells through Matrigel-coated membrane and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. QR activity of irradiated HT-29 cells was slightly increased. Proton irradiation at dose of 32 Gy in HT-29 cells increased GST activity by 1.23-fold. In addition GSH levels in HT-29 cells was significantly increased 1.23- (p<0.05), 1.32- (p<0.01) and 1.34-fold (p<0.01) with the proton irradiation at doses of 8, 16 and 32 Gy, respectively. These results suggest that colon cancer chemopreventive activity was increased with the proton irradiation by increasing QR and GST activities and GSH levels and inhibiting ODC activity. Proton ion irradiation decreased the invasiveness of TPA-treated HT-29 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells through Matrigel-coated membrane. Proton ion irradiation pretreatment decreased TPA-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. Further studies are necessary to investigate if these findings could be translated to in vivo situations

  6. 不同转移潜能大肠癌细胞株基因表达谱的差异分析%Analysis gene expression profiling in different metastatic potential colon cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余力; 王瑜; 刘莉; 丁彦青

    2012-01-01

    目的 从基因表达谱轮廓分析不同转移潜能大肠癌细胞株的特点,探讨大肠癌亲器官转移的分子机制.方法 应用Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0原位合成寡核苷酸芯片检测同一亲本分别具有不同转移潜能和转移器官亲和性的大肠癌细胞株SW620、SW480和SW480肝转移细胞株基因表达谱差,以SW480为对照细胞株,筛查“大肠癌转移相关基因”和“亲器官转移相关基因”,应用GOTM软件对基因功能进行分析.结果 筛查出SW620、SW480肝转移细胞株两组共同表达的“大肠癌转移相关基因”共422个,筛查出的“亲器官转移相关基因或ESTs”3 054个.“转移相关基因 &ESTs”功能主要涉及细胞代谢、细胞生理进程调节、信号传导、大分子代谢、基本代谢和代谢调节等.“亲器官转移相关基因或 ESTs”的GO分析结果表明SW620、SW480肝转移细胞株在基因表达谱功能分类差异主要表现在细胞黏附、信号传导、细胞运动、调节酶活性、核酸代谢和金属离子结合等方面.结论 不同转移潜能大肠癌细胞株基因表达谱存在差异,通过对基因表达谱轮廓分析,可进一步了解大肠癌转移器官亲和性的分子机制和筛查转移相关基因.%Objective To analysis characteristics of different metastatic potentials colorectal cancer cell lines through gene expression profiling and explore the pro-organ metastasis of colorectal cancer molecular mechanisms. Methods Affy-tnetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 situ synthesized oligonucleotide microarrays were the same parent with different metastatic potential and organ affinity of metastasis in colorectal cancer cell lines SW620, SW480 and SW480 liver metastasis gene expression profiles, SW4S0 as the control cell lines, screening of " colorectal cancer metastasis-related genes" and " pro-organ metastasis-related genes" and the application of GOTM software for analysis of gene function. Results Screening out two groups of

  7. Novel Therapies in Development for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Michael S.; Kopetz, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Despite advances in therapy, metastatic CRC remains lethal, and further improvements in therapy are needed. Growing understanding of cancer biology, particularly in growth factor signaling, angiogenesis, and cancer immunology, has translated into many novel therapies under investigation. Patients are increasingly selected for clinical trials rationally on the basis of integral biomarkers. This re...

  8. Metastatic breast cancer to the gastrointestinal tract: A case series and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Nazareno; Donald Taves; Harold G Preiksaitis

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer involving the hepatobiliary tract or ascites secondary to peritoneal carcinomatosis has been well described. Luminal gastrointestinal tract involvement is less common and recognition of the range of possible presentations is important for early and accurate diagnosis and treatment. We report 6 patients with a variety of presentations of metastatic breast cancer of the luminal gastrointestinal tract. These include oropharyngeal and esophageal involvement presenting as dysphagia with one case of pseudoachalasia, a linitis plastica-like picture with gastric narrowing and thickened folds, small bowel obstruction and multiple strictures mimicking Crohn's disease, and a colonic neoplasm presenting with obstruction. Lobular carcinoma,representing only 10% of breast cancers is more likely to metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract. These patients presented with gastrointestinal manifestations after an average of 9.5 years and as long as 20 years from initial diagnosis of breast cancer. Given the increased survival of breast cancer patients with current therapeutic regimes, more unusual presentations of metastatic disease, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract can be anticipated.

  9. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ho Kyung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the palliative role of radiotherapy (RT and define the effectiveness of chemotherapy combined with palliative RT (CCRT in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods From August 1995 to December 2007, 80 patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with palliative RT at Samsung Medical Center. Initial presenting symptoms were pain (68 cases, bleeding (18 cases, and obstruction (nine cases. The pelvic mass originated from rectal cancer in 58 patients (73% and from colon cancer in 22 patients (27%. Initially 72 patients (90% were treated with surgery, including 64 complete local excisions; 77% in colon cancer and 81% in rectal cancer. The total RT dose ranged 8-60 Gy (median: 36 Gy with 1.8-8 Gy per fraction. When the α/β for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED, the median RT dose was 46.8 Gy10 (14.4-78. Twenty one patients (26% were treated with CCRT. Symptom palliation was assessed one month after the completion of RT. Results Symptom palliation was achieved in 80% of the cases. During the median follow-up period of five months (1-44 months, 45% of the cases experienced reappearance of symptoms; the median symptom control duration was five months. Median survival after RT was six months. On univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor for symptom control duration was BED ≥40 Gy10 (p Conclusions RT was an effective palliation method in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. For improvement of symptom control rate and duration, a BED ≥ 40 Gy10 is recommended when possible. Considering the low morbidity and improved symptom palliation, CCRT might be considered in patients with good performance status.

  10. Many Early Colon Cancers Linked to Inherited Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162574.html Many Early Colon Cancers Linked to Inherited Genes One in 6 diagnosed ... inherited condition. It increases the rate of many cancers, including colon cancer, according to the U.S. National Library of ...

  11. Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163856.html Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50 Report ... be an estimated 95,500 new cases of colon cancer and 39,900 new cases of rectal cancer ...

  12. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Colorectal (Colon) Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Risk Assessment Tool (National Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  13. MicroRNAs associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Watahiki

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Metastasis is the most common cause of death of prostate cancer patients. Identification of specific metastasis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets is considered essential for improved prognosis and management of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs form a class of non-coding small RNA molecules considered to be key regulators of gene expression. Their dysregulation has been shown to play a role in cancer onset, progression and metastasis, and miRNAs represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. The objective of this study was to identify down- and up-regulated miRNAs in prostate cancer that could provide potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for prostate cancer metastasis. METHODS: Next generation sequencing technology was applied to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in a transplantable metastatic versus a non-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft line, both derived from one patient's primary cancer. The xenografts were developed via subrenal capsule grafting of cancer tissue into NOD/SCID mice, a methodology that tends to preserve properties of the original cancers (e.g., tumor heterogeneity, genetic profiles. RESULTS: Differentially expressed known miRNAs, isomiRs and 36 novel miRNAs were identified. A number of these miRNAs (21/104 have previously been reported to show similar down- or up-regulation in prostate cancers relative to normal prostate tissue, and some of them (e.g., miR-16, miR-34a, miR-126*, miR-145, miR-205 have been linked to prostate cancer metastasis, supporting the validity of the analytical approach. CONCLUSIONS: The use of metastatic and non-metastatic prostate cancer subrenal capsule xenografts derived from one patient's cancer makes it likely that the differentially expressed miRNAs identified in this study include potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for human prostate cancer metastasis.

  14. Colon cancer surgery. Five years of experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Rubio Silveira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundament: Colon-rectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplams in eastern countries and it is the second most frequent type of cancer just behind cancer of the lungs and of the breast respectively. In spite of the advances in the last few years in regards to treatment, colon cancer is the most frequent cause of death due to cancer. Objective: To know morbimortality due to cancer of the colon after both, surgery and oncological treatment. Method: Descriptive - retrospective sdtudy carried out at the Military hospital ¨Dr. Octavio de la Concepción y de la Pedraja¨ from Camaguey Province from January 1999 to January 2004.The sample was composed by 20 patients operated of well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon. The variables under study were: Age, Sex, place, anatomical localization of the tumor, anatomoclinical stage according to Dukes classification, evidencies of far metastases, type of surgery type of oncologic treatment. Results: There was a predominance of males (55% aged more than 45 years old. 55% of the tumors were located in the sigmoid colon. There was a resect of the tumor in 16 cases and only 2 have died due to the disease . Chemotherapy with 5 fluoruracile was applied to 9 patients, with good results.

  15. Stromal targeted therapy in bone metastatic prostate cancer: promise delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor; William Goeckeler; Oyvind Bruland

    2011-01-01

    The ability of epithelial neoplasms to evade both hormonal and cytotoxic therapies is self-evident as the common carcinomas (lung,stomach,breast,colon and prostate) at their metastatic stage are rarely curable with current therapies.Though the precise reasons for incurability are debated,virtually all agree that tumor genetic heterogeneity makes eradication of the tumor difficult given ‘Darwinian' selection processes that are associated with the emergence of drug-resistant cellular clones.

  16. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luiz; Ronaldo; Alberti; Diego; Paim; Carvalho; Garcia; Debora; Lucciola; Coelho; David; Correa; Alves; De; Lima; Andy; Petroianu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates.

  17. Use of capecitabine in management of early colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available H Hameed, J CassidyBeatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: Capecitabine (Xeloda®, Roche, Basel, Switzerland is a pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, and it is converted to 5-FU in the cancer cell by enzymatic degradation. The role of capecitabine in colorectal cancer has evolved in the last 15 years. In early trials in the metastatic setting, capecitabine has shown superior response rates compared with those achieved with 5-FU (Mayo Clinic regimen (26% vs 17%, with equivalent progression-free survival and overall survival. In the adjuvant setting, the Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT trial demonstrated that capecitabine as a single agent led to improvement in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.74–0.99, P = 0.04 and was associated with significantly fewer adverse events than 5-FU plus leucovorin (LV, folinic acid. On the basis of the X-ACT trial, capecitabine was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, and the Scottish Medicines Consortium as monotherapy for the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. The next step was to incorporate capecitabine into combination therapy. The XELOXA trial studied the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX vs 5-FU/LV and demonstrated 5-year disease-free survival of 66% for XELOX, compared with 60% for 5-FU/LV. The toxicity profile was also quite comparable in the two arms. So both the single agent use of capecitabine as well as in combination with oxaliplatin can be considered as part of the standard of care in management of early colon cancer in appropriately selected patient groups.Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, leucovorin, folinic acid, LV, XELOX, oxaliplatin, FOLFOX

  18. Tumor characteristics and metastatic sites may predict bevacizumab efficacy in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varol, Umut; Oktay, Esin; YILDIRIM, Mustafa; SURMELI, ZEKI GOKHAN; Dirican, Ahmet; Meydan, Nezih; KARACA, BURCAK; Karabulut, Bulent; Uslu, Ruchan

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most frequently diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there was an improvement in the time to disease progression (TTP) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line bevacizumab plus chemotherapy, according to tumor characteristics and metastatic sites. Tumor characteristics and tumor burden were considered to be predictive markers of t...

  19. Hyaluronan-Based Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145) correlate with greater tumorigenic and metastatic properties over prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP) that do not...tumorigenic and metastatic properties (right). B) Cy5.5-labeled HA-NPs (50 µg/mL) or HA polymer (234.4 kDa) were incubated for 2 hours with PC3 cells. C...lysed with DISC IP lysis buffer (30 mM Tris, pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 10% glycerol , 1% Triton X-100 with 1 mM PMSF, and 1 μg/mL each of aprotinin, leupeptin

  20. Gene profiles between non-invasive and invasive colon cancer using laser microdissection and polypeptide analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Hua Guo; Ming-Quan Song; Guo-Qiang Chen; Qun Sun; Qiang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of differential gene expression profiles of target cell between non-invasive submucosal and invasive advanced tumor in colon carcinoma using laser microdissection (LMD) in combination with polypeptide analysis.METHODS: Normal colon tissue samples from 20 healthy individuals and 30 cancer tissue samples from early non-invasive colon cancer cells were obtained. The cells from these samples were used LMD independently after P27-based amplification. aRNA from advanced colon cancer cells and metastatic cancer cells of 40 cases were applied to LMD and polypeptide analysis, semiquantitative reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical assays were used to verify the results of microarray and further identify differentially expressed genes in non-invasive early stages of colon cancer.RESULTS: Five gene expressions were changed in colon carcinoma cells compared with that of controls. Of the five genes, three genes were downregulated and two were upregulated in invasive submucosal colon carcinoma compared with non-invasive cases. The results were confirmed at the level of aRNA and gene expression. Five genes were further identified as differentially expressed genes in the majority of cases (50%, 25/40) in progression of colon cancer, and their expression patterns of which were similar to tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes.CONCLUSION: This study suggested that combined use of polypeptide analysis might identify early expression profiles of five differential genes associated with the invasion of colon cancer. These results reveal that this gene may be a marker of submucosal invasion in early colon cancer.

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  3. Metastatic colorectal cancer-past, progress and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The clinical management of metastatic (stage Ⅳ)colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common challenge faced by surgeons and physicians. The last decade has seen exciting developments in the management of CRC, with significant improvements in prognosis for patients diagnosed with stage Ⅳ disease. Treatment options have expanded from 5-fluorouracil alone to a range of pharmaceutical and interventional therapies,improving survival, and providing a cure in selected cases. Enhanced understanding of the biologic pathways most important in colorectal carcinogenesis has led to a new generation of drugs showing promise in advanced disease. It is hoped that in the near future the treatment paradigm of metastatic CRC will be analogous to that of a chronic illness, rather than a rapidly terminal condition.This overview discusses the epidemiology of advanced CRC and currently available therapeutic options including medical, surgical, ablative and novel modalities in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Non-invasive actionable biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current clinical setting, many disease management options are available for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. For metastatic prostate cancer, first-line therapies almost always involve agents designed to inhibit androgen receptor (AR signaling. Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs that arise following first-line androgen deprivation therapies (ADT may continue to respond to additional lines of AR-targeting therapies (abiraterone and enzalutamide, chemotherapies (docetaxel and cabazitaxel, bone-targeting Radium-223 therapy, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T. The rapidly expanding therapies for CRPC is expected to transform this lethal disease into one that can be managed for prolonged period of time. In the past 3 years, a number of promising biomarkers that may help to guide treatment decisions have been proposed and evaluated, including androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, a truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain (LBD and mediate constitutively-active AR signaling. Putative treatment selection markers such as AR-V7 may further improve survival benefit of existing therapies and help to accelerate development of new agents for metastatic prostate cancer. In the metastatic setting, it is important to consider compatibility between the putative biomarker with non-invasive sampling. In this review, biomarkers relevant to the setting of metastatic prostate cancer are discussed with respect to a number of key attributes critical for clinical development of non-invasive, actionable markers. It is envisioned that biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer will continue to be discovered, developed, and refined to meet the unmet needs in both standard-of-care and clinical trial settings.

  5. Abiraterone in metastatic prostate cancer without previous chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, C.J.; Smith, M.R.; Bono, J. De; Molina, A.; Logothetis, C.J.; Souza, P. de; Fizazi, K.; Mainwaring, P.; Piulats, J.M.; Ng, S.; Carles, J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Basch, E.; Small, E.J.; Saad, F.; Schrijvers, D.; Poppel, H. van; Mukherjee, S.D.; Suttmann, H.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Flaig, T.W.; George, D.J.; Yu, E.Y.; Efstathiou, E.; Pantuck, A.; Winquist, E.; Higano, C.S.; Taplin, M.E.; Park, Y.; Kheoh, T.; Griffin, T.; Scher, H.I.; Rathkopf, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abiraterone acetate, an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy. We evaluated this agent in patients who had not received previous chemotherapy. METHODS: In this double-blind study, we

  6. INTRAPLEURAL IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR METASTATIC PLEURISIES IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Titov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrapleural immunotherapy for metastatic pleurisies demonstrates a high efficiency in the treatment of patients with breast cancer (BC. This immunotherapy modality is regarded as one of the stages of complex treatment in patients with disseminated BC and allows its capabilities to be extended for their further management.

  7. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yasuaki; Kido, Choichiro

    1987-12-01

    Some techniques of the most recent interventional radiology are very useful for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer and changing the style of hepatic infusion chemotherapy. This report shows our latest results and methods of hepatic infusion chemotherapy for metastatic liver cancer. 1. For the catheter placement, a new catheterization route via the left subclavian artery into the hepatic artery was developed and performed in 132 cases. Superselective catheterization succeeded in 123 cases (93.2%). This procedure is less invasive than laparotomy and less troublesome than other percutaneous routes. 2. For useful infusion system, an implantable injection port ''Reservoir'' was developed and it was used in 87 cases. This method makes arterial infusion chemotherapy easy, and imploves their quality of life. 3. To acquire adequate drug delivery, arterial redistribution by steel coils was done, and 109 arteries in 80 cases were occluded. This method is very useful to make multiple hepatic artery single and it is important to avoid gasroduodenal complications. 4. Now, using these techniques, the phase II study of 5FU, ADM, MMC combined hepatic infusion in patients with non-resectable metastatic liver cancer is done. Up to this time, such a phase study on arterial infusion chemotherapy was difficult because of technical problems, but these new techniques make it possible. In conclusion, these new methods change the style and conception of hepatic infusion, and these make much progress on the treatment of patients with metastatic liver cancer.

  8. Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164202.html Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you've got a family history of colon or rectal cancers, you probably ...

  9. To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161185.html To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut' Belly pain and black ... between life and death, especially for people with colon cancer, researchers report. People who pay attention to their ...

  10. Is Chemo Overused in Younger Colon Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163245.html Is Chemo Overused in Younger Colon Cancer Patients? Study found the treatment often wasn't ... 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young and middle-aged colon cancer patients may be getting chemotherapy more often than ...

  11. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  12. Metastatic suppressor genes inactivated by aberrant methylation in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To screen out the differentially methylated DNA sequences between gastric primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, test the methylation difference of gene PTPRG between primary gastric tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, and test the regulatory function of 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine which is an agent with suppression on methylation and the level of methylation in gastric cancer cell line.METHODS: Methylated DNA sequences in genome were enriched with methylated CpG islands amplification (MCA)to undergo representational difference analysis (RDA),with MCA production of metastatic lymph nodes as tester and that of primary tumor as driver. The obtained differentially methylated fragments were cloned and sequenced to acquire the base sequence, which was analyzed with bioinformatics. With methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and RT-PCR, methylation difference of gene PTPRG was detected between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes in 36 cases of gastric cancer.Methylation of gene PTPRG and its regulated expression were observed in gastric cancer cell line before and after being treated with methylation-suppressive agent.RESULTS: Nineteen differentially methylated sequences were obtained and located at 5' end, exons, introns and 3' end, in which KL59 was observed to be located at 9p21 as the first exon of gene p16 and KL22 to be located at promoter region of PRPRG. KL22, aS the probes, was hybridized with driver, tester and 3-round RDA products respectively with all positive signals except with the driver. Significant difference was observed in both methylation rate of gene PTPRG and PTPRG mRNA expression rate between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes. Demethylation of gene PTPRG, with recovered expression of PTPRG mRNA, was observed after gastric cancer cell line being treated with methylation-suppressive agent.CONCLUSION: Difference exists in DNA methylation between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes of gastric cancer, with MCA-RDA as one of the good analytical

  13. Enterobacter Strains Might Promote Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakul, Dilşad; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-09-01

    Many studies have been performed to determine the interaction between bacterial species and cancer. However, there has been no attempts to demonstrate a possible relationship between Enterobacter spp. and colon cancer so far. Therefore, in the present study, it is aimed to investigate the effects of Enterobacter strains on colon cancer. Bacterial proteins were isolated from 11 Enterobacter spp., one Morganella morganii, and one Escherichia coli strains, and applied onto NCM460 (Incell) and CRL1790 (ATCC) cell lines. Cell viability and proliferation were determined in MTS assay. Flow Cytometry was used to detect CD24 level and apoptosis. Real-Time PCR studies were performed to determine NFKB and Bcl2 expression. Graphpad Software was used for statistical analysis. The results showed that proteins, isolated from the Enterobacter spp., have significantly increased cell viability and proliferation, while decreasing the apoptosis of the cell lines tested. The data in the present study indicated that Enterobacter strains might promote colon cancer. Moreover, Enterobacter spp. could be a clinically important factor for colon cancer initiation and progression. Studies can be extended on animal models in order to develop new strategies for treatment.

  14. Lack of functioning intratumoral lymphatics in colon and pancreas cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Stanczyk, Marek; Gewartowska, Magdalena; Domaszewska-Szostek, Anna; Durlik, Marek

    2012-09-01

    There are controversial views as to whether intratumoral or peritumoral lymphatics play a dominant role in the metastatic process. Most clinical observations originate from studies of colon cancer. Colon contains mucosa and submucosa rich in lymphatics and with high lymph formation rate. This seems to be a prerequisite for easy metastasis of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes. However, there are other tissues as pancreas with a rudimentary lymphatic network where cancer metastasis formation is as intensive as in colon cancer. This contradicts the common notion that intratumor lymphatics play major role in metastases. We visualized interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of colon and pancreas tumors using the color stereoscopic lymphography and simultaneously immunohistochemical performed stainings specific for lymphatic and blood endothelial cells. The density of open and compressed lymphatic and blood vessels was measured in the tumor core and edge. There were very few lymphatics in the colon and pancreas tumor core but numerous minor fluid "lakes" with no visible connection to the peritumoral lymphatics. Lining of "lakes" did not express molecular markers specific for lymphatic endothelial cells. Dense connective tissue surrounding tumor foci did not contain lymphatics. Peritumoral lymphatics were irregularly distributed in both types of tumor and only sporadically contained cells that might be tumor cells. Similar lymphoscintigraphic and histological pictures were seen in colon and pancreas cancer despite of different structure of both tissues. This suggests a uniform reaction of tissues to the growing cancer irrespective of the affected organ.

  15. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  16. How MMPs Impact Bone Responses to Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    metastatic bone cancer: consensus recommendations from the Second Cambridge Conference. Clin Cancer Res 2008; 14: 6387-95. 10. Cackowski FC, Roodman GD...2005;184:1266–73. 20. Cackowski FC, Roodman GD. Perspective on the osteoclast: an an- giogenic cell? Ann N Y Acad Sci 2007;1117:12–25. 21. Bergers G...We are grateful to Kevin P. Weller and David K. Flaherty for their assistance with flow cytometry. Flow cytometry experiments were performed in the

  17. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  18. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for the treatment of metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geukes Foppen, M H; Donia, M; Svane, I M

    2015-01-01

    five years, treatment with immunotherapy (anti CTLA-4, anti PD-1, or the combination of these antibodies) has shown very promising results and was able to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. Adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes is yet another, but highly...... promising, immunotherapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic melanoma. This review will discuss the development of TIL as a treatment option for melanoma, its mode of action and simplification over time, and the possibilities to expand this therapy to other types of cancer. Also, the future directions...

  19. Copper Cu 64 Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibody M5A PET in Diagnosing Patients With CEA Positive Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Breast Cancer; Colon Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Liver and Intrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Rectal Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina;

    2008-01-01

    Identification of sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colon cancers is increasingly demanded for decisions on adjuvant therapies. We evaluated clinicopathologic factors for the identification of these prognostically favorable tumors. Histopathologic features in 238 consecutive colon cancers...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  1. Therapeutic considerations in Dukes C colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Willem Aldert

    2001-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the main health issues in the western world. In the Netherlands more than 7000 patients are diagnosed yearly with this disease and half of them will die from it. Prognosis largely depends on tumor stage, which is estimated by radiological, clinical and histological characteris

  2. Spotlight on bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer: patient selection and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bupathi M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Manojkumar Bupathi, Daniel H Ahn, Tanios Bekaii-Saab Department of Medical Oncology, Richard Solove Research Institute and James Cancer Hospital, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC is a prevalent disease for which combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. With the use of targeted therapy, including anti-angiogenic agents, there have been significant improvements in overall outcome of patients with mCRC. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand A, is approved for use in mCRC patients in both the first and second lines of therapy. With a better understanding of the disease through molecular profiling, identification of prognostic biomarkers may lead to better patient selection with improved outcomes for those affected by this disease. Keywords: VEGF, colon, rectum, cancer

  3. Metastatic cancer of unknown primary in 21 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, F; Aresu, L; Vignoli, M; Buracco, P; Bettini, G; Ferro, S; Gattino, F; Ghiani, F; Costantino, R; Ressel, L; Bellei, E; Marconato, L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe clinical features, treatment and outcome of 21 dogs with metastatic cancer of unknown primary (MCUP), a biopsy-proven malignancy being diagnosed at a metastatic stage, in which the anatomical origin of the primary tumour cannot be detected. All dogs underwent total-body computed tomography. Signalment, type and duration of clinical signs, metastasis site, pathology results, treatment and outcome were recorded. Carcinoma was the most common diagnosis (57.1%), followed by sarcoma, melanoma and mast cell tumour. The median number of disease sites per dog was 2, with bones, lymph nodes, lungs and spleen being the most frequent metastatic locations. The median survival for all dogs was 30 days. Overall, a primary site was not identified in 20 (95.2%) dogs. MCUP encompasses a variety of different pathologic entities and harbours a poor prognosis.

  4. Anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health concernbeing the third leading cause of cancer mortality inthe United States. The availability of better therapeuticoptions has led to a decline in cancer mortality in thesepatients. Surgical resection should be considered in allstages of the disease. The use of conversion therapyhas made surgery a potentially curative option even inpatients with initially unresectable metastatic disease.In this review we discuss the role of various antiangiogenicagents in patients with metastatic CRC(mCRC). We describe the mechanism of action of theseagents, and the rationale for their use in combinationwith chemotherapy. We also review important clinicalstudies that have evaluated the safety and efficacy ofthese agents in mCRC patients. Despite the discoveryof several promising anti-angiogenic agents, mCRCremains an incurable disease with a median overallsurvival of just over 2 years in patients exposed to allavailable treatment regimens. Further insights intotumor biology and tumor microenvironment may helpimprove outcomes in these patients.

  5. The Complex Function of Hsp70 in Metastatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Juhasz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of the inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is known to correlate with poor prognosis in many cancers. Hsp70 confers survival advantage as well as resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, and promotes tumor cell invasion. At the same time, tumor-derived extracellular Hsp70 has been recognized as a “chaperokine”, activating antitumor immunity. In this review we discuss localization dependent functions of Hsp70 in the context of invasive cancer. Understanding the molecular principles of metastasis formation steps, as well as interactions of the tumor cells with the microenvironment and the immune system is essential for fighting metastatic cancer. Although Hsp70 has been implicated in different steps of the metastatic process, the exact mechanisms of its action remain to be explored. Known and potential functions of Hsp70 in controlling or modulating of invasion and metastasis are discussed.

  6. The Complex Function of Hsp70 in Metastatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhasz, Kata; Lipp, Anna-Maria; Nimmervoll, Benedikt; Sonnleitner, Alois; Hesse, Jan; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Balogi, Zsolt, E-mail: zsolt.balogi@cbl.at [Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH, Gruberstr. 40-42, A-4020 Linz (Austria)

    2013-12-20

    Elevated expression of the inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is known to correlate with poor prognosis in many cancers. Hsp70 confers survival advantage as well as resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, and promotes tumor cell invasion. At the same time, tumor-derived extracellular Hsp70 has been recognized as a “chaperokine”, activating antitumor immunity. In this review we discuss localization dependent functions of Hsp70 in the context of invasive cancer. Understanding the molecular principles of metastasis formation steps, as well as interactions of the tumor cells with the microenvironment and the immune system is essential for fighting metastatic cancer. Although Hsp70 has been implicated in different steps of the metastatic process, the exact mechanisms of its action remain to be explored. Known and potential functions of Hsp70 in controlling or modulating of invasion and metastasis are discussed.

  7. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in two men receiving bevacizumab for metastatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse H Franco

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Thérèse H Franco, Ahmed Khan, Vishal Joshi, Beje ThomasDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, USAAbstract: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. It is a novel chemotherapeutic agent currently approved as part of combination chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer (Hurwitz et al 2004; Sandler et al 2006; Traina et al 2007. Arterial thrombosis, including cerebral infarction, transient ischemic attacks, myocardial infarction, and angina are common, occurring in 4.4% of patients whose regimen includes bevacizumab (versus 1.9% on regimen without bevacizumab (Genetech, Inc. 2008. This series will review two cases of patients exposed to bevacizumab who subsequently developed ST elevations on electrocardiogram (ECG and elevated cardiac biomarkers. Both patients underwent cardiac catheterization, which demonstrated apical ballooning and akinesis in a distribution discordant with the observed (noncritical atherosclerotic lesions. Both patients had recovery of left ventricular function within 30 days. The clinical presentation, including ECGs and findings on catheterization as well as the rapid recovery of ventricular function, is consistent with the diagnosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was first described in 1991, but the pathophysiology and exact mechanism of injury remain largely unknown. These two cases are notable for their occurrence in men and the association with treatment of metastatic cancer including bevacizumab.Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, bevacizumab, metastatic cancer, chemotherapy, takotsubo, cardiomyopathy

  8. Patient Beliefs About Colon Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Daly, Jeanette; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-03-01

    Only about half of eligible individuals undergo colon cancer screening. We have limited knowledge about the patient beliefs that adversely affect screening decisions and about which beliefs might be amenable to change through education. As part of a clinical trial, 641 rural Iowans, aged 52 to 79 years, reported their beliefs about colon cancer screening in response to a mailed questionnaire. Consenting subjects were randomized into four groups, which were distinguished by four levels of increasingly intensive efforts to promote screening. Two of the groups received mailed educational materials and completed a follow-up questionnaire, which allowed us to determine whether their beliefs about screening changed following the education. We also completed a factor analysis to identify underlying (latent) factors that might explain the responses to 33 questions about readiness, attitudes, and perceived barriers related to colon cancer screening. The strongest predictors of a patient's stated readiness to be screened were a physician's recommendation to be screened (1 point difference on 10-point Likert scale, 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.5 to 1.6 point difference), a family history of colon cancer (0.85-point Likert scale difference, 95 % CI, 0.1 to 1.6), and a belief that health-care decisions should be mostly left to physicians rather than patients (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.21, P beliefs, 11 (33 %) changed favorably following the educational intervention. In the factor analysis, the 33 items were reduced to 8 underlying factors, such as being too busy to undergo screening and worries about screening procedures. We found a limited number of underlying factors that may help explain patient resistance to colon cancer screening.

  9. Expression patterns of CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 in primary and metastatic cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldenberg David M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many breast, pancreatic, colonic and non-small-cell lung carcinoma lines express CEACAM6 (NCA-90 and CEACAM5 (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA, and antibodies to both can affect tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we compare both antigens as a function of histological phenotype in breast, pancreatic, lung, ovarian, and prostatic cancers, including patient-matched normal, primary tumor, and metastatic breast and colonic cancer specimens. Methods Antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC using tissue microarrays with MN-15 and MN-3 antibodies targeting the A1B1- and N-domains of CEACAM6, respectively, and the MN-14 antibody targeting the A3B3 domain of CEACAM5. IHC was performed using avidin-biotin-diaminobenzide staining. The average score ± SD (0 = negative/8 = highest for each histotype was recorded. Results For all tumors, the amount of CEACAM6 expressed was greater than that of CEACAM5, and reflected tumor histotype. In breast tumors, CEACAM6 was highest in papillary > infiltrating ductal > lobular > phyllodes; in pancreatic tumors, moderately-differentiated > well-differentiated > poorly-differentiated tumors; mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas had almost 3-fold more CEACAM6 than serous ovarian adenocarcinomas; lung adenocarcinomas > squamous tumors; and liver metastases of colonic carcinoma > primary tumors = lymph nodes metastases > normal intestine. However, CEACAM6 expression was similar in prostate cancer and normal tissues. The amount of CEACAM6 in metastatic colon tumors found in liver was higher than in many primary colon tumors. In contrast, CEACAM6 immunostaining of lymph node metastases from breast, colon, or lung tumors was similar to the primary tumor. Conclusion CEACAM6 expression is elevated in many solid tumors, but variable as a function of histotype. Based on previous work demonstrating a role for CEACAM6 in tumor cell migration, invasion and adhesion, and formation of distant

  10. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  11. [Multimodal surgical intervention to improve outcome after colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, Werner; O'Connell, Ronan; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild

    2011-04-04

    Surgeons have focused their efforts towards improving outcome following surgical treatment of rectal cancer by implementation of the total mesorectal excision technique, among others. Great progress has been made, and in Denmark and Sweden survival rates for rectal cancer now exceed those for colon cancer. Recently, the significance of complete mesocolic excision in colonic cancer has been acknowledged. Treatment of colon cancer is challenging in patients with locally advanced disease, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and emergency presentation, all of which are described.

  12. Diet, Genes, and Microbes: Complexities of Colon Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Birt, Diane F.; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and generally, as countries climb the economic ladder, their rates of colon cancer increase. Colon cancer was an early disease where key genetic mutations were identified as important in disease progression, and there is considerable interest in determining whether specific mutations sensitize the colon to cancer prevention strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that fiber- and vegetable-r...

  13. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  14. Paclitaxel and doxorubicin in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, J; Boesgaard, M; Paaske, T;

    1996-01-01

    be explored. Paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) has been demonstrated to be highly effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer, including those with anthracycline-resistant breast cancer, a fact that has led to efforts to combine paclitaxel and anthracyclines...

  15. Serum-derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of "checkpoint blockade" disrupting an effective, tumor-directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long-term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this difference. We measured the frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of tumor bearers, as well as lung/liver and draining lymph nodes. In some cases mice received infusions of exosomes from nontumor controls, or tumor bearers, with/without additional infusions of anticytokine antibodies. The measured frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood was equivalent in the two models in WT and CD200R1KO mice. Increased metastasis in EMT6 tumor bearers was seen in vivo following adoptive transfer of serum, or serum-derived exosomes, from 4THM tumor bearers, an effect which was attenuated by anti-IL-6, and anti-IL-17, but not anti-TNFα, antibody. Anti-IL-6 also attenuated enhanced migration of EMT6 cells in vitro induced by 4THM serum or exosomes, or recombinant IL-6. Exosome cytokine proteomic profiles responses in 4THM and EMT6 tumor-bearing mice were regulated by CD200:CD200R interactions, with attenuation of both IL-6 and IL-17 in 4THM CD200(tg) mice, and enhanced levels in 4THM CD200R1KO mice. We suggest these cytokines act on the microenvironment at sites within the host, and/or directly on tumor cells themselves, to increase metastatic potential.

  16. Targeted treatment of advanced and metastatic breast cancer with lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Corkery

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Brendan Corkery1,2, Norma O’Donovan2, John Crown1,21St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: Improved molecular understanding of breast cancer in recent years has led to the discovery of important drug targets such as HER-2 and EGFR. Lapatinib is a potent dual inhibitor of HER-2 and EGFR. Preclinical and phase I studies have shown activity with lapatinib in a number of cancers, including breast cancer, and the drug is well tolerated. The main known drug interactions are with paclitaxel and irinotecan. The most significant side-effects of lapatinib are diarrhea and adverse skin events. Rates of cardiotoxicity compare favorably with trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2. This paper focuses on lapatinib in advanced and metastatic breast cancer, which remains an important therapeutic challenge. Phase II and III studies show activity as monotherapy, and in combination with chemotherapy or hormonal agents. Results from these studies suggest that the main benefit from lapatinib is in the HER-2 positive breast cancer population. Combinations of lapatinib and trastuzumab are also being studied and show encouraging results, particularly in trastuzumab-refractory metastatic breast cancer. Lapatinib may have a specific role in treating HER-2 positive CNS metastases. The role of lapatinib as neoadjuvant therapy and in early breast cancer is also being evaluated.Keywords: HER-2, EGFR, erbB, lapatinib, Tykerb®, tyrosine kinase

  17. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Rowe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy.

  18. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms.

  19. Primary site resection is superior for incurable metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusuke; Tanoue; Nobutaka; Tanaka; Yukihiro; Nomura

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate survival in patients treated with FOLFOX followed by primary site resection or palliative surgery for incurable metastatic colorectal cancer. METHODS:Between 2001 and 2009,a total of 98 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and non-resectable metastases were diagnosed and treated with the new systemic agent chemotherapy regimen FOLFOX. Primary site resection was carried out in 38 patients, creation of a colostomy or bypass without resection was carried out in 36 patients,and 23 were not...

  20. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    8217 3𔃾 1 2 Institutional Affiliations: ’Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, San Diego, CA, The Medical Oncology Department of the Ankara University School of...positive patients with advanced prostate cancer. J. Immunotherapy 27, 240-253, (2004). 28. DeVita , Jr., V, Hellman, S., and Rosenberg, S. 6th Edition...Vaccination Paper First Draft October 15, 2005 chemotherapy in murine lymphoma. J. Clinical Oncology (Proceedings of the ASCO), vol 23, p. 165 (Abs #2509

  1. Isolated metachronous splenic metastasis from synchronous colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aker Fugen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolated splenic metastases from colorectal cancer are very rare and there are only 13 cases reported in the English literature so far. Most cases are asymptomatic and the diagnosis is usually made by imaging studies during the evaluation of rising CEA level postoperatively. Case presentation A 76-year-old man underwent an extended left hemicolectomy for synchronous colon cancers located at the left flexure and the sigmoid colon. The tumors were staged as IIIC (T3N2M0 clinically and the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy. During the first year follow-up period, the patient remained asymptomatic with normal levels of laboratory tests including CEA measurement. However, a gradually rising CEA level after the 14th postoperative month necessitated further imaging studies including computed tomography of the abdomen which revealed a mass in the spleen that was subsequently confirmed by 18FDG- PET scanning to be an isolated metastasis. The patient underwent splenectomy 17 months after his previous cancer surgery. Histological diagnosis confirmed a metastatic adenocarcinoma with no capsule invasion. After an uneventful postoperative period, the patient has been symptom-free during the one-year of follow-up with normal blood CEA levels, although he did not accept to receive any further adjuvant therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this 14th case of isolated splenic metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is also the first reported case of splenic metastasis demonstrated preoperatively by 18FDG PET-CT fusion scanning which revealed its solitary nature as well. Conclusion Isolated splenic metastasis is a rare finding in the follow-up of colorectal cancer patients and long-term survival can be achieved with splenectomy.

  2. Red meat and colon cancer : a possible role for heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sesink, Aloysius Lambertus Antonia

    2000-01-01

    Sporadic colon cancer is a multifactorial aging disease affected by long-term exposure to environmental risk factors. Epidemiological studies have shown that risk for colon cancer is associated with diets high in red meat and/or animal fat. The mechanisms by which colonic tumors arise are, however,

  3. Oral bisphosphonates and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiken, Pia; Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used as the main treatment for osteoporosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest that use of BPs may have a potential for colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention. Safety and efficacy in terms of osteoporosis prevention have only been evaluated in randomized controlled ...

  4. Diet and epigenetics in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minna Nystr(o)m; Marja Mutanen

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated indicating that apart from genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations, through e.g. aberrant promoter methylation, play a major role in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Even in the hereditary colon cancer syndromes, in which the susceptibility is inherited dominantly, cancer develops only as the result of the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Diet can both prevent and induce colon carcinogenesis, for instance, through epigenetic changes, which regulate the homeostasis of the intestinal mucosa. Food-derived compounds are constantly present in the intestine and may shift cellular balance toward harmful outcomes, such as increased susceptibility to mutations. There is strong evidence that a major component of cancer risk may involve epigenetic changes in normal cells that increase the probability of cancer after genetic mutation. The recognition of epigenetic changes as a driving force in colorectal neoplasia would open new areas of research in disease epidemiology, risk assessment, and treatment, especially in mutation carriers who already have an inherited predisposition to cancer.(c) 2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolonged time to progression with fulvestrant for metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Celso A L; Chinen, Ludmilla T D; da Silva, Samantha Cabral Severino; do Nascimento Matias, Carolina; Benevides, Carlos Frederico; Gimenes, Daniel Luiz; Fanelli, Marcello F

    2011-06-01

    Although the incidence of breast cancer has been declining in recent years, the disease is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in women. Recently, breast cancer has been treated with innovative approaches that use hormone-sensitive therapies. This is because in at least one-third of breast cancers, estrogens mediated via the estrogen receptor pathway act as endocrine growth factors. Fulvestrant has been studied as both first- and second-line therapy for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer, but few studies have shown its effect as third-line therapy alone. To observe the disease time to progression (TTP) obtained with fulvestrant when used on metastatic breast cancer as first-, second-, and also third-line therapy. We also aimed to correlate the TTP obtained with fulvestrant with hormone receptor, HER2 expression, and metastatic site. This was a cohort study that retrospectively examined medical records of 73 postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer who were treated with fulvestrant (250 mg/month i.m. injection) and followed at the Department of Medical Oncology at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo in São Paulo, Brazil from August 2003 to December 2006. The median TTP with fulvestrant was about 11 months. When used as the first-line therapy, TTP was about 13 months; when used as second-line, TTP was about 6 months; and when used as third-line, it was about 12 months. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding the therapy line. In patients with positive ER tumors, TTP was 11 months. No significant difference in TTP was observed in negative ER tumors (TTP = 10 months). In patients with positive PgR tumors, TTP was 13 months and for negative PgR, TTP was 6 months (P = 0.008). According to the HER2 status, the TTP was 5 months for HER2+ and 10 months for HER2-. Our findings indicate that fulvestrant is an effective alternative for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Multifaceted ability of naturally occurring polyphenols against metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingyu; Bennett, Lunawati L; Zhou, Shufeng

    2016-04-01

    Although cancer metastases are known to be the main cause of cancer-related deaths, truly effective antimetastatic therapeutics remain scarce in clinical practice. Naturally occurring polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in human diets. Many of them possess chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against various types of cancer. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathways that mediate cancer development and progression have led to an increase of interest in preclinical investigations on the mechanisms underlying anticancer activity of polyphenols. In particular, an increasing number of preclinical studies using cultured cells and animal models have demonstrated the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on tumour cell invasion and metastasis, thereby highlighting the potential of polyphenols against metastatic cancer. This review specifically addresses growing evidence of the capability of polyphenols to impair the invasion and migration of tumour cells through a diverse set of mechanisms, including downregulation of expression of matrix metalloproteinases, modulation of regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, interference with Met signalling, inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B mediated transcription, and so on. Given that metastasis occurs through a multistep process in which each step is regulated by a complex network of signalling pathways, the multi-function and multi-target characteristics of polyphenols render those promising candidates for effective adjuvant therapy against metastatic cancer.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Andersen, Fahimeh; Fischer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has proven valuable in several tumors, but it has not been elucidated in colon cancer. The present phase II trial addressed the issue in high-risk patients selected by computed tomography (CT) scan. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with resectable colon cancer...... mutational status received three cycles of capecitabine 2000 mg/m(2) days 1-14 q3w and oxaliplatin 130 mg iv day 1 q3w. Wild-type patients received the same chemotherapy supplemented with panitumumab 9 mg/kg iv q3w. After the operation, patients fulfilling the international criteria for adjuvant chemotherapy......, i.e. high-risk stage II and III patients, received five cycles of the same chemotherapy without panitumumab. Patients not fulfilling the criteria were offered follow-up only. The primary endpoint was the fraction of patients not fulfilling the criteria for adjuvant chemotherapy (converted patients...

  8. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Palaniselvam Kuppusamy; Mashitah M. Yusoff; Gaanty Pragas Maniam; Solachuddin Jauhari Arief Ichwan; Ilavenil Soundharrajan; Natanamurugaraj Govindan

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment o...

  9. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyper...

  10. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  11. Therapeutic considerations in Dukes C colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the main health issues in the western world. In the Netherlands more than 7000 patients are diagnosed yearly with this disease and half of them will die from it. Prognosis largely depends on tumor stage, which is estimated by radiological, clinical and histological characteristics. After histological research; tumor depth, surgical resection margins and lymph node involvement is assessed. These histo-pathological variables are used in classification systems to estimate ...

  12. A case report of thyroid gland metastasis associated with lung metastasis from colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Nozawa, Keijiro; Aoyagi, Yoshiko; Ishihara, Soichiro; Matsuda, Keiji; Fukushima, Junichi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland metastasis of malignant tumors is observed in 1.9% to 9.5% of histologically examined autopsy cases. Thyroid metastasis from colon cancer is extremely rare and the prognosis is poor. Here we report a case of lung metastasis and thyroid gland metastasis following sigmoid colon cancer surgery. In 2000, a 58-year-old woman underwent a sigmoid colectomy for sigmoid colon cancer. In 2005, a metastatic lung tumor was detected by chest CT. The patient underwent a partial thoracoscopic resection of the left lung in April 2005. On a CT scan taken 3 years and 4 months after the lung resection, a tumor mass was observed in the left lung and a low-absorption region with an unclear border was seen in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Thyroid aspiration cytology showed adenocarcinoma, and a diagnosis of thyroid gland metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer was made. In April 2008 a subtotal thyroidectomy was performed. Following surgery, the patient underwent chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 and bevacizumab. Nevertheless a number of lung metastases and expressions of lung metastasis were subsequently observed. Histopathological examination revealed a number of metastases of differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma in the thyroid gland from colon cancer.

  13. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colon & rectal cancer multidisciplinary management: the radiology experts review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudyka, V; Blomqvist, L; Beets-Tan, R G H; Boelens, P G; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J; Dieguez, A; Brown, G

    2014-04-01

    Some interesting shifts have taken place in the diagnostic approach for detection of colorectal lesions over the past decade. This article accompanies the recent EURECCA consensus group reccomendations for optimal management of colon and rectal cancers. In summary, imaging has a crucial role to play in the diagnosis, staging assessment and follow up of patients with colon and rectal cancer. Recent advances include the use of CT colonography instead of Barium Enema in the diagnosis of colonoic cancer and as an alternative to colonoscopy. Modern mutlidetector CT scanning techniques have also shown improvements in prognostic stratification of patients with colonic cancer and clinical trials are underway testing the selective use of neoadjuvant therapy for imaging identified high risk colon cancers. In rectal cancer, high resolution MRI with a voxel size less or equal to 3 × 1 × 1 mm3 on T2-weighted images has a proven ability to accurately stage patients with rectal cancer. Moreover, preoperative identification of prognostic features allows stratification of patients into different prognostic groups based on assessment of depth of extramural spread, relationship of the tumour edge to the mesorectal fascia (MRF) and extramural venous invasion (EMVI). These poor prognostic features predict an increased risk of local recurrence and/or metastatic disease and should form the basis for preoperative local staging and multidisciplinary preoperative discussion of patient treatment options.

  14. Third-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundgaard, M.G.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    , panitumumab. As a result, third-line treatment is now a necessary step in the optimal treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a literature review of English language publications on third-line therapy for MCRC from January 2000 to April 2007. Data......OS of 16 months. With irinotecan and 5-FU, mOS around 8 months were reported and with cetuximab combined with irinotecan, the highest mOS was 9.8 months. CONCLUSION: Third-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer may improve mOS for patients with MCRC. Therefore, randomized studies should be conducted...

  15. Colon Cancer on The Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colon Cancer on the Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials And an old adversary -- the obesity epidemic -- may ... their early 50s and younger -- Gen Xers and millennials -- are experiencing significant increases in colon and rectal ...

  16. Reliability of KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer patients across five laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feigelson Heather

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the KRAS gene are associated with poor response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Factors influencing KRAS test results in tumor specimens include: tumor heterogeneity, sample handling, slide preparation, techniques for tumor enrichment, DNA preparation, assay design and sensitivity. We evaluated comparability and consistency of KRAS test results among five laboratories currently being used to determine KRAS mutation status of metastatic colorectal cancer specimens in a large, multi-center observational study. Findings Twenty formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer samples from colon resections previously tested for KRAS mutations were selected based on mutation status (6 wild type, 8 codon 12 mutations, and 6 codon 13 mutations. We found good agreement across laboratories despite differences in mutation detection methods. Eighteen of twenty samples (90% were concordant across all five labs. Discordant results are likely not due to laboratory error, but instead to tumor heterogeneity, contamination of the tumor sample with normal tissue, or analytic factors affecting assay sensitivity. Conclusions Our results indicate commercial and academic laboratories provide reliable results for the common KRAS gene mutations at codons 12 and 13 when an adequate percentage of tumor cells is present in the sample.

  17. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaniselvam Kuppusamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  18. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  19. Internal radiotherapy with copper-64-diacetyl-bis (N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazone) reduces CD133{sup +} highly tumorigenic cells and metastatic ability of mouse colon carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Yukie [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Furukawa, Takako [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kiyono, Yasushi [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Watanabe, Ryo [Faculty of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Mori, Tetsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yoshii, Hiroshi [Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Asai, Tatsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Welch, Michael J. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa, E-mail: yfuji@nirs.go.j [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: {sup 64}Cu-diacetyl-bis (N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 64}Cu-ATSM) is an imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET) that targets hypoxic tumors. {sup 64}Cu-ATSM is also reported to be a potential agent for internal radiotherapy. In a mouse colon carcinoma (Colon-26) model, we have shown that {sup 64}Cu-ATSM preferentially localizes in intratumoral regions with a high density of CD133{sup +} cells, which show characteristics of cancer stem cells or cancer stem cell-like cells (collectively referred here as CSCs). In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM in relation to CD133 expression using this model. Methods: Systemic administration of 37 MBq {sup 64}Cu-ATSM or saline was conducted twice within a 1-week interval to mice bearing 1-week-old Colon-26 tumors (days 0-7). At day 19, tumor size measurement, flow cytometry analysis and experimental lung metastatic assay were performed. The therapeutic effect of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM on sorted CD133{sup +} and CD133{sup -} Colon-26 cells was also examined in vitro. Results: In vivo studies showed that {sup 64}Cu-ATSM treatment inhibited tumor growth. The percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and metastatic ability in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM treated tumors was decreased compared with that in control animals. In vitro studies demonstrated that {sup 64}Cu-ATSM accumulated in cells under hypoxic conditions and incorporation of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM under hypoxia caused cell death in both CD133{sup +} and CD133{sup -} cells in a similar extent. Conclusions: {sup 64}Cu-ATSM administration reduced tumor volume as well as the percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and the metastatic ability of Colon-26 tumors. Together with our data, it is suggested that {sup 64}Cu-ATSM accumulates in regions high in CD133{sup +} highly tumorigenic cells and kills such regions by radiation, resulting in a decrease of the percentage of CD133{sup +} cells.

  20. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  1. Current therapeutic strategies for invasive and metastatic bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu, Jacob Mathew, Winston W TanDivision of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe, the United States, and Northern African countries. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is an aggressive epithelial tumor, with a high rate of early systemic dissemination. Superficial, noninvasive bladder cancer can most often be cured; a good proportion of invasive cases can also be cured by a combined modality approach of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Recurrences are common and mostly manifest as metastatic disease. Those with distant metastatic disease can sometime achieve partial or complete remission with combination chemotherapy.Recent developments: Better understanding of the biology of the disease has led to the incorporation of molecular and genetic features along with factors such as tumor grade, lympho-vascular invasion, and aberrant histology, thereby allowing identification of ‘favorable’ and ‘unfavorable’ cancers which helps a more accurate informed and objective selection of patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Gene expression profiling has been used to find molecular signature patterns that can potentially be predictive of drug sensitivity and metastasis. Understanding the molecular pathways of invasive bladder cancer has led to clinical investigation of several targeted therapeutics such as anti-angiogenics, mTOR inhibitors, and anti-EGFR agents.Conclusion: With improvements in the understanding of the biology of bladder cancer, clinical trials studying novel and targeted agents alone or in combination with chemotherapy have increased the armamentarium for the treatment of bladder cancer. Although the novel biomarkers and gene expression profiles have been shown to provide important predictive and prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in clinical decision-making, their exact utility

  2. Targeting metastatic colorectal cancer – present and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciombor KK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristen K Ciombor,1 Jordan Berlin21Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Metastatic colorectal cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US and around the world. While several novel cytotoxic and biologic therapies have been developed and proven efficacious in the past two decades, their optimal use in terms of patient selection, drug combinations, and regimen sequences has yet to be defined. Recent investigations regarding anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapies include the comparison of single-agent panitumumab and cetuximab, the benefit of adding cetuximab to chemotherapy in the conversion therapy setting, the comparison of cetuximab and bevacizumab when added to first-line chemotherapy, and predictive biomarkers beyond KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13 mutations. With respect to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies, new data on continuing bevacizumab beyond disease progression on a bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy regimen, the addition of bevacizumab to triplet chemotherapy in the first-line setting, maintenance therapy with bevacizumab plus either capecitabine or erlotinib, the addition of aflibercept to chemotherapy, and regorafenib as monotherapy have emerged. Recent scientific and technologic advances in the field of metastatic colorectal cancer promise to elucidate the biological underpinnings of this disease and its therapies for the goal of improving personalized treatments for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Keywords: cetuximab, panitumumab, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, biomarker

  3. Regulation of Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    important knowledge gap we have developed an all-human hepatic bioreactor . In this award period we have established that the hepatic bioreactor is...functional for 30 days by functional and injury markers (BUN, AST, ALT, CYP). We have generated micrometastases in the bioreactor and determined that...breast cancer cell lines enter spontaneous dormancy in the bioreactor . We have also completed pilot experiments in mouse models for spontaneous

  4. Evaluation of metastatic potential of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitomo Chihara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to establish a method for evaluating malignant potential of prostate cancer using prostatic core needle biopsy (PCNB before prostatectomy. If we can know the final pathological stage before treatment, we can select the most suitable therapeutic tactics. We then examined the expression of E-cadherin and type IV collagenase (MMP-9/-2, which play essential role in cancer cell invasion and metastasis. The expression ratio of MMP-9/-2 to E-cadherin (MER is revealed as the relevant marker correlated with the final pathological stage and Gleason score by prostatectomy specimens. We next confirmed the significance of MER in PCNB, which means PCNB MER enables the prediction of the final pathologic stage at the cancer diagnosis. However, the methodology measuring MER is complicated to produce an observer-to-observer deviation. We then establish a bicolor fluorescent ISH (bicolor FISH with a computerized fluorescence detector- based system. By this method, we can reduce an observer-to-observer deviation and a slide-to-slide deviation. The bicolor FISH-based MER is a useful tool for the preoperative evaluation of the final pathologic stage, by which we can assure a decision of prostatectomy indication.

  5. Prognostic value of serum tetranectin in patients with metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, C K; Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D;

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate serum tetranectin as a prognostic marker before first-line chemotherapy, serum levels were studied in 67 patients with metastatic breast cancer. In the Cox analyses, the relative risk (RR) for death of cancer varied with the cut-off level of serum tetranectin. A maximal RR of 5...... prognostic factor in metastatic breast cancer....

  6. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC and investigated the synergize photothermal and immunological effects. Here, we improve the SWNT-GC nano system and design a new synergistic nano-particle, both have the photothermal effects and immunological effects. We investigate the therapeutic effects and detect the immune response with metastatic mouse tumor models. We also study the therapeutic mechanism after treatment in vitro and in vivo. With the enhancement of nano-materials on photothermal effects, laser treatment could destroy primary tumor and protect normal tissue with low dose laser irradiation. With the immunological effects of nano-materials, the treatment could trigger specific antitumor immune response, to eliminate the metastasis tumor. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the metastatic cancers.

  8. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-03-08

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas.

  9. Combination of TB lymphadenitis and metastatic LAP in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhassan Talaiezadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB may present as pulmonary and extra-pulmonary. TB lymphadenitis is the most common presentation of extra-pulmonary TB. TB lymphadenitis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of different disorders such as metastatic lymphadenopathy. The reported patient was a 65-year-old lady with breast cancer and conglomerated and matted axillary lymphadenopathy who received chemotherapy. She presented with more extensive axillary LAP contrary to our expectation. Modified radical mastectomy was done and pathology analysis reported TB lymphadenitis associated with metastatic LAP. Under cover of anti-TB therapy adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was started. Accordingly, we recommend TB be ruled out in every patient who needs chemotherapy in the endemic region because chemotherapy may cause the extension of TB in the body.

  10. A review on metastatic breast cancer in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamidreza; Alizadeh; Otaghvar; Mostafa; Hosseini; Adnan; Tizmaghz; Ghazaal; Shabestanipour; Hamid; Noori

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is a disease of early breast cancer that usually occurs several years after the early breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Iranian women. According to the new statistics in Iran 6 160 breast cancers are diagnosed in the country each year and 1 063 cases lead to death. In this paper, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment have been investigated. In this study, case-control clinical trials and open studies with adequate data were collected. Due to the higher risk of age group 40-49 years and the advent of advanced breast cancer in Iranian women, the early diagnosis and determination of the exact size of the tumor before surgery is important in choosing a therapy plan. The decision on the therapy of invasive breast cancer depends on several factors such as cancer stage, tumor size and type, pathological and cytological status of the tumor, the patient’s opinion, the presence or absence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the cytoplasm of tumor cells and so on.

  11. Microchimerism and survival after breast and colon cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported microchimerism to be oppositely associated with maternal breast and colon cancer. In women with a blood test positive for male microchimerism the risk of breast cancer development was reduced to one third, whereas the risk of colon cancer was elevated 4-fold. In this article...

  12. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Tan; Xiang Du

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers,and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years.The most frequent mutations in this gene,point substitutions in codons 12 and 13,were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies.Therefore,determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers.Currently,a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however,several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing,including the selection of tumor samples,tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods.Moreover,new testing strategies,in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF,PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists,should be promoted.In addition,we recommend that microsatellite instability,a prognostic factor,be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis.This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing.This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing.

  13. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  14. [The development process of colon cancer centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahm, M; Wesselmann, S; Kube, R; Schöffel, N; Pross, M; Lippert, H; Kahl, S

    2013-02-01

    Colon carcinomas are the most common malignant tumours in the Western world. Important findings about the overall quality of medical care have been reported in multi-centre observational studies. A quality enhancement of therapeutic care can be achieved by an additional increase in diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the interdisciplinary setting. The development of colon cancer centres improves the chance to objectively observe the results of medical care induced by the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral unit that includes a comprehensive medical care for patients. The implementation of the current medical findings based on evidence in clinical routine, the inspection of the usage of guidelines by external specialists as part of an audit and the continuous correction of analysed deficits in the course of treatment guarantee a continuous improvement of service.

  15. Detection of colon cancer by terahertz techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Almeida, Abílio; Moreira, Joaquim A.; Lopes, Patricia C.; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Adomavicius, Ramunas; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Machado

    2011-12-01

    Human normal and cancer affected samples of colon tissue have been measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy and continuous wave terahertz imaging. We show that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in the samples when they are fixed in formalin or embedded in paraffin. The still noticeable contrast in the dried paraffin-embedded tissues could indicate that there are additional contrast-contributing factors other than water, which is the main goal of the present work. Plots of the refractive index of normal and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images are shown. Experimental results are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue are discussed.

  16. Where There's Smoke,There's Colon Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红

    2001-01-01

    @@ Besides causing 160,000 deaths annually from lung, mouth, bladder and other cancers, smoking also increases the risk of death from cancer of the colon or rectum,according to results of a large new study from the American Cancer Society.根据美国癌症协会一项大规模的新的研究结果表明,每年因抽烟而死于肺癌、口腔癌、膀胱癌以及其它癌症的人有16万人;除此之外,抽烟还会增加死于结肠癌、直肠癌的可能性.

  17. Thyroid Cancer Presenting with Concomitant Metastatic Breast Cancer in the Thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Chen Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid is an unusual site to find cancer metastasis. When it does occur, such cancer spread is often manifested in multiple metastases and generally suggests a poor prognosis. We presented here a 49-year-old woman recently diagnosed with thyroid cancer, who had been treated for stage IIA breast cancer 8 years ago. After radical right thyroidectomy and left subtotal thyroidectomy, her pathological report showed papillary thyroid carcinoma, right thyroid, with concomitant metastatic breast carcinoma. This is the first case of which we are aware involving coexisting thyroid cancer and metastatic breast cancer in the ipsilateral lobe. Moreover, the circumstances of this case show a very unique clinical course compared with previous studies. Given the unusual circumstances of our case, we further discuss the relationship between thyroid cancer and breast cancer.

  18. Soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R) mediates colonic tumor cell adherence to the vascular endothelium: a mechanism for metastatic initiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowdall, J F

    2012-02-03

    The mechanisms by which surgery increases metastatic proliferation remain poorly characterized, although endotoxin and immunocytes play a role. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial adherence of tumor cells may be important in the formation of metastases. Soluble receptors of interleukin-6 (sIL-6R) shed by activated neutrophils exert IL-6 effects on endothelial cells, which are unresponsive under normal circumstances. This study examined the hypothesis that sIL-6R released by surgical stress increases tumor cell adherence to the endothelium. Neutrophils (PMN) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Soluble IL-6R release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Colonic tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein and endothelial cells were exposed to sIL-6R, and tumor cell adherence and transmigration were measured by fluorescence microscopy. Basal release of sIL-6R from PMN was 44.7 +\\/- 8.2 pg\\/ml at 60 min. This was significantly increased by endotoxin and CRP (131 +\\/- 16.8 and 84.1 +\\/- 5.3, respectively; both P < 0.05). However, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not significantly alter sIL-6R release. Endothelial and tumor cell exposure to sIL-6R increased tumor cell adherence by 71.3% within 2 h but did not significantly increase transmigration, even at 6 h. Mediators of surgical stress induce neutrophil release of a soluble receptor for IL-6 that enhances colon cancer cell endothelial adherence. Since adherence to the endothelium is now considered to be a key event in metastatic genesis, these findings have important implications for colon cancer treatment strategies.

  19. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: Towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Krul, C.A.M.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, van B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived fr

  20. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived fr

  1. Study of angiogenesis induced by metastatic and non-metastatic liver cancer by corneal micropocket model in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To study the angiogenesis induced by liver cancer with different metastatic potentials using corneal micropocket model in nude mice.METHODS Corneal micropockets were created in nude mice. Tumor tissues and liver tissues were implanted into the corneal micropockets. Angiogenesis was observed using a digital camera under slit-lamp biomicroscope, and compared among different grafts and incision alone. Vascular responses were recorded in regard to the range, number and length of new blood vessels toward the grafts or incisions.RESULTS Vascular responses induced by tumor tissues were greater than those by incision alone and liver tissue grafts. LCI-D20 induced more intensive angiogenesis than LCI-D35.CONCLUSION Highly metastatic liver cancer LCI D20 was more angiogenic than low metastatic cancer LCI D35 and liver tissue. Micropocket was a useful model to study dynamic process of angiogenesis in vivo.

  2. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  3. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  4. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Michelle; Ho, Samantha; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Kubota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-β1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts promoted human colon cancer HT-29 cell proliferation. Cathelicidin pretreatment inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation mediated by media conditioned by human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Cathelicidin disrupted tubulin distribution in colonic fibroblasts. Disruption of tubulin in fibroblasts reduced fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusion Cathelicidin effectively inhibits colon cancer development by interfering with EMT and fibroblast

  5. G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids suppresses colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yakun; Jiang, Hongmei; Robbins, Gregory T; Nie, Daotai

    2011-02-15

    GPR43 is a G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Expression of GPR43 is detected in hematopoietic tissues and the large intestine. SCFAs are derived from bacterial fermentation and metabolism of undigested dietary fibers and have been recognized for their cancer prevention activities in the colon. The role of SCFAs, particularly butyrate, in colon cancer therapy has been extensively studied, and its tumor suppressive functions are believed to be due to their intracellular actions, notably inhibition of histone deacetylase. In our study, we show that SCFAs also exert their antitumor effects via receptor GPR43 and that GPR43 is frequently lost in colon cancer cells. Immunohistostaining revealed that GPR43 immunoreactivity was high in normal colon tissues (N = 31) but was markedly reduced or completely lost in most colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues (N = 70) and their corresponding lymph node metastatic adenocarcinomas (N = 38). RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of full length GPR43 mRNA in only one (HT-29) of nine established human colon cancer cell lines. Restoration of GPR43 expression in HCT8 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and activated caspases, leading to increased apoptotic cell death after propionate/butyrate treatment. Restored GPR43 expression, coupled with propionate treatment, induced an upregulation of p21 and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 1 and 2, while the CDK4 and CDK6 levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that GPR43 functions as a tumor suppressor by mediating SCFA-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptotic cell death in colon cancer.

  6. Diet, genes, and microbes: complexities of colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Diane F; Phillips, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and generally, as countries climb the economic ladder, their rates of colon cancer increase. Colon cancer was an early disease where key genetic mutations were identified as important in disease progression, and there is considerable interest in determining whether specific mutations sensitize the colon to cancer prevention strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that fiber- and vegetable-rich diets and physical activity are associated with reduced rates of colon cancer, while consumption of red and processed meat, or alcoholic beverages, and overconsumption as reflected in obesity are associated with increased rates. Animal studies have probed these effects and suggested directions for further refinement of diet in colon cancer prevention. Recently a central role for the microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract in colon cancer development is being probed, and it is hypothesized that the microbes may integrate diet and host genetics in the etiology of the disease. This review provides background on dietary, genetic, and microbial impacts on colon cancer and describes an ongoing project using rodent models to assess the ability of digestion-resistant starch in the integration of these factors with the goal of furthering colon cancer prevention.

  7. The shifting landscape of metastatic breast cancer to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Matthew R; Fukui, Olivia; Chew, Brandon; Bhatia, Sanjay; Karlovits, Steven

    2013-07-01

    The improved survival following the diagnosis of breast cancer has potentially altered the characteristics and course of patients presenting with CNS involvement. We therefore sought to define our current cohort of breast cancer patients with metastatic disease to the CNS in regard to modern biomarkers and clinical outcome. Review of clinical and radiographic records of women presenting to a tertiary medical center with the new diagnosis of CNS metastatic disease from breast cancer. This was a retrospective review from patients identities obtained from two prospective databases. There were 88 women analyzed who were treated over the period of January 2003 to February 2010, average age 56.9 years. At the time of initial presentation of CNS disease, 68 % of patients had multiple brain metastases, 17 % had a solitary metastasis, and 15 % had only leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The median survival for all patients from the time of diagnosis of breast disease was 50.0 months, and 9.7 months from diagnosis of CNS involvement. The only factor related to overall survival was estrogen receptor-positive pathology (57.6 v. 38.2 months, p = .02 log-rank); those related to survival post CNS diagnosis were presentation with LMD (p = .004, HR = 3.1, Cox regression) and triple-negative hormonal/HER2 status (p = .02, HR = 2.3, Cox regression). Patients with either had a median survival of 3.1 months (no patients in common). Of the 75 patients who initially presented with metastatic brain lesions, 20 (26 %) subsequently developed LMD in the course of their disease (median 10.4 months), following which survival was grim (1.8 months median). Symptoms of LMD were most commonly lower extremity weakness (14/33), followed by cranial nerve deficits (11/33). The recently described Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) tumor index stratified median survival at 2.5, 5.9, 13.1, and 21.7 months, respectively, for indices of 1-4 (p = .004, log-rank), which

  8. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mese...

  9. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab M

    2016-05-01

    treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2− locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the most recent ongoing as well as planned Phase II and Phase III trials of palbociclib in advanced breast cancer.Keywords: cyclin-dependent kinases, cell cycle, metastatic breast cancer, PD0332991

  10. Identification of a novel TGFβ/PKA signaling transduceome in mediating control of cell survival and metastasis in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Chowdhury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding drivers for metastasis in human cancer is important for potential development of therapies to treat metastases. The role of loss of TGFβ tumor suppressor activities in the metastatic process is essentially unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Utilizing in vitro and in vivo techniques, we have shown that loss of TGFβ tumor suppressor signaling is necessary to allow the last step of the metastatic process - colonization of the metastatic site. This work demonstrates for the first time that TGFβ receptor reconstitution leads to decreased metastatic colonization. Moreover, we have identified a novel TGFβ/PKA tumor suppressor pathway that acts directly on a known cell survival mechanism that responds to stress with the survivin/XIAP dependent inhibition of caspases that effect apoptosis. The linkage between the TGFβ/PKA transduceome signaling and control of metastasis through induction of cell death was shown by TGFβ receptor restoration with reactivation of the TGFβ/PKA pathway in receptor deficient metastatic colon cancer cells leading to control of aberrant cell survival. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This work impacts our understanding of the possible mechanisms that are critical to the growth and maintenance of metastases as well as understanding of a novel TGFβ function as a metastatic suppressor. These results raise the possibility that regeneration of attenuated TGFβ signaling would be an effective target in the treatment of metastasis. Our work indicates the clinical potential for developing anti-metastasis therapy based on inhibition of this very important aberrant cell survival mechanism by the multifaceted TGFβ/PKA transduceome induced pathway. Development of effective treatments for metastatic disease is a pressing need since metastases are the major cause of death in solid tumors.

  11. Sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatomo, Ai; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Zuiki, Toru; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan T; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    We report the first case of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. The patient is a 75-year-old man who presented with the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain. He had undergone laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer 2 years before presentation. CT scan showed a distended sigmoid colon with a mesenteric twist, or "whirl sign." Colonoscopy showed a mucosal spiral and luminal stenosis with dilated sigmoid colon distally and ischemic mucosa. The diagnosis of ischemic colonic necrosis due to sigmoid volvulus was established. Resection of the necrotic sigmoid colon was performed and a descending colon stoma was created. A long remnant sigmoid colon and chronic constipation may contribute to the development of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. Prompt diagnosis is essential for adequate treatment, and colonoscopy aids in the diagnosis of ischemic changes in patients without definitive findings of a gangrenous colon.

  12. Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Haciyakupoglu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumor is secondary spread to the central nervous system of primer systemic cancers originating from tissues other than the central nervous system. In adults; there are metastases respectively from lungs, breasts, malign melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, colon and thyroid cancers. 30-60% of lung cancers metastasis to the brain. In children there are quite a few cerebral metastases. Most commonly leukemia, lymphoma, osteogenic sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and germ cell tumors metastasis to the brain. %50 of malign melanoma, lung, breast and colon cancers intend to make multipl metastases but renal cell cancers intend to make solitary metastasis.While lung cancers metastasis to brain in 6-9 months after the definitive diagnosis, renal cancers in 1 year, colon cancers in 2 years, breast cancers and malign melanoma in 3 years metastasis to brain. In 6% of cases there are cerebral metastasis while there isn’t a symptom of a primary tumor. For treatment corticosteroids, surgery, Radiotherapy(RT, Chemotherapy(CT and Stereotactic Radiosurgery(SRS can be implemented. Small cell lung cancers, lymphoma, germ cell tumors are sensitive to RT and CT. Non small cell lung cancers, renal, colon cancers and malign melanoma are radioresistant. The purposes in the surgery of the metastatic brain tumors are; total resection of tumors without neurologic deficits, decreasing the intracranial pressure and decreasing the dose of postoperative radiotherapy. Key Words: Metastatic brain tumors, Stereotactic radiosurgery, Malign melanoma, Lung cancers, Renal cell carcinoma, Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 191-202

  13. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-09-21

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC.

  14. Targeted treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with sipuleucel-T immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, P.F.; Santis, M. de; Powles, T.; Fizazi, K.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent and has a poor clinical outcome once metastatic. Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Sipuleucel-T treatment extends survival but is independent of

  15. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  16. Investigation of correlation between colonic cancer related anemia and characteristics of clinical pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between colonic cancer-related anemia and the pathologic features of colonic cancer.Methods The relationship between colonic cancer-related anemia and the pathologic features of colonic cancer was analyzed in a statistical method.Results There was no statistical significance between the histopathological type and incidence of colonic cancer-related anemia(P>0.05).There was statistical significance between the general classification of colonic cancer

  17. Metastatic ability: adapting to a tissue site unseen

    OpenAIRE

    Bhowmick, Neil A.

    2012-01-01

    The microenvironment of the primary as well as the metastatic tumor sites can determine the ability for a disseminated tumor to progress. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Calon et al. find that systemic TGF-β can facilitate colon cancer metastatic engraftment and expansion.

  18. Clinical issues in the surgical treatment of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amri, R.

    2015-01-01

    More than half of colon cancer patients will eventually die of their disease. Early detection is crucial to maximize chances of cure, as five-year survival can range from 97% to as low as 8% depending on disease stage at diagnosis. Since colon cancer is associated with both old age and obesity, near

  19. Short-term outcomes following laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2011-03-01

    Laparoscopic resection for colon cancer has been proven to have a similar oncological efficacy compared to open resection. Despite this, it is performed by a minority of colorectal surgeons. The aim of our study was to evaluate the short-term clinical, oncological and survival outcomes in all patients undergoing laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

  20. miR-345 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jakob V; Rossi, Simona; Jensen, Benny V

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important regulatory functions in cellular processes and have shown promising potential as prognostic markers for disease outcome in patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to find miRNA expression profiles in whole blood that were prognostic...... for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. METHODS: From 138 patients with mCRC in 3rd line therapy with cetuximab and irinotecan in a prospective phase II study, 738 pretreatment miRNAs were isolated and profiled from whole blood...... to treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. CONCLUSION: We identified miR-345 in whole blood as a potential biomarker for clinical outcome. MiR-345 was a single prognostic biomarker for both OS and PFS in all patients and also in the non-KRAS mutant population....

  1. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastat...

  2. Obesity Contributes to Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Success through Increased Lipogenesis, Enhanced Vascularity, and Decreased Infiltration of M1 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueying; Metzinger, Matthew N; Lewellen, Kyle A; Cripps, Stephanie N; Carey, Kyle D; Harper, Elizabeth I; Shi, Zonggao; Tarwater, Laura; Grisoli, Annie; Lee, Eric; Slusarz, Ania; Yang, Jing; Loughran, Elizabeth A; Conley, Kaitlyn; Johnson, Jeff J; Klymenko, Yuliya; Bruney, Lana; Liang, Zhong; Dovichi, Norman J; Cheatham, Bentley; Leevy, W Matthew; Stack, M Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, with high mortality attributable to widespread intraperitoneal metastases. Recent meta-analyses report an association between obesity, ovarian cancer incidence, and ovarian cancer survival, but the effect of obesity on metastasis has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to use an integrative approach combining in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies to test the hypothesis that obesity contributes to ovarian cancer metastatic success. Initial in vitro studies using three-dimensional mesomimetic cultures showed enhanced cell-cell adhesion to the lipid-loaded mesothelium. Furthermore, in an ex vivo colonization assay, ovarian cancer cells exhibited increased adhesion to mesothelial explants excised from mice modeling diet-induced obesity (DIO), in which they were fed a "Western" diet. Examination of mesothelial ultrastructure revealed a substantial increase in the density of microvilli in DIO mice. Moreover, enhanced intraperitoneal tumor burden was observed in overweight or obese animals in three distinct in vivo models. Further histologic analyses suggested that alterations in lipid regulatory factors, enhanced vascularity, and decreased M1/M2 macrophage ratios may account for the enhanced tumorigenicity. Together, these findings show that obesity potently affects ovarian cancer metastatic success, which likely contributes to the negative correlation between obesity and ovarian cancer survival.

  3. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehab, Moataz; Elbaz, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Each year, thousands die either because of disease progression or failure of treatment. Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes based on the molecular expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These receptors represent important therapeutic targets either through monoclonal antibodies or through small-molecule inhibitors directed toward them. However, up to 40% of patients develop either a primary or a secondary resistance to the current treatments. Therefore, there is an urgent need for investigating new targets in order to overcome the resistance and/or enhance the current therapies. Cell cycle is altered in many human cancers, especially in breast cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), especially CDK4 and CDK6, play a pivotal role in cell cycle progression that makes them potential targets for new promising therapies. CDK inhibition has shown strong antitumor activities, ranging from cytostatic antiproliferative effects to synergistic effects in combination with other antitumor drugs. In order to overcome the drawbacks of the first-generation CDK inhibitors, recently, new CDK inhibitors have emerged that are more selective to CDK4 and CDK6 such as palbociclib, which is the most advanced CDK4/6 inhibitor in trials. In preclinical studies, palbociclib has shown a very promising antitumor activity, especially against ERα+ breast cancer subtype. Palbociclib has gained world attention, and US the Food and Drug Administration has accelerated its approval for first-line treatment in combination with letrozole for the first-line systematic treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2- locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the

  4. Fiber, intestinal sterols, and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C T; Gopalakrishna, G S; Nichols, B L

    1978-03-01

    It has been postulated that dietary fiber's protective effect against the development of colon cancer, diverticular disease, and atherosclerosis may be due to the adsorption and/or dilution of intestinal sterols such as bile acids and neural sterols and their bacterial metabolites by component(s) of fiber. Dietary fiber is made up of four major components-cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and pectin. There is evidence that hemicellulose and pectin may induce an increase in fecal bile acid excretion in man which may be accompanied by a decrease in serum cholesterol. Natural fibers, such as rolled oats, alfalfa, guar gum, and Bengal gram have been shown to have hypocholesterolemic properties of alfalfa, wheat straw, and some other fibers found considerable amounts of bile acids in vitro. On the other hand, wheat bran, oat hulls, and all the synthetic fibers tested bound only negligible amounts of bile acids under the same conditions. Vegetarians in the United States have lower plasma lipids and different plasma lipoprotein patterns than those of comparable control populations on regular mixed diet. They also have smaller daily fractional turnover rates of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid pool size. In addition, populations on a mixed Western diet, where the rate of large bowel cancer is high (North American, English, Scottish, etc.) degraded and excreted cholesterol and bile acid metabolites to a greater degree than populations where the rate of colon cancer is comparatively low (Ugandan, Japanese, etc). It cannot be denied that the fiber theory linking fiber deficiency with the development of colon cancer and other diseases, is simple, attractive and appears to be firmly based in common sense. When subjected to research studies, however, the situation appears much more complex than expected. Although some progress is being made, the data are often contradictory and confusing, probably due to lack of adequate documentation of fiber intake (e.g., use of dietary fiber

  5. Proteoglycans as potential microenvironmental biomarkers for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Aidagulova, Svetlana V; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2015-09-01

    Glycosylation changes occur widely in colon tumours, suggesting glycosylated molecules as potential biomarkers for colon cancer diagnostics. In this study, proteoglycans (PGs) expression levels and their transcriptional patterns are investigated in human colon tumours in vivo and carcinoma cells in vitro. According to RT-PCR analysis, normal and cancer colon tissues expressed a specific set of PGs (syndecan-1, perlecan, decorin, biglycan, versican, NG2/CSPG4, serglycin, lumican, CD44), while the expression of glypican-1, brevican and aggrecan was almost undetectable. Overall transcriptional activity of the PGs in normal and cancer tissues was similar, although expression patterns were different. Expression of decorin and perlecan was down-regulated 2-fold in colon tumours, while biglycan and versican expression was significantly up-regulated (6-fold and 3-fold, respectively). Expression of collagen1A1 was also increased 6-fold in colon tumours. However, conventional HCT-116 colon carcinoma and AG2 colon cancer-initiating cells did not express biglycan and decorin and were versican-positive and -negative, respectively, demonstrating an extracellular origin of the PGs in cancer tissue. Selective expression of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans syndecan-1 and perlecan in the AG2 colon cancer-initiating cell line suggests these PGs as potential biomarkers for cancer stem cells. Overall transcriptional activity of the HS biosynthetic system was similar in normal and cancer tissues, although significant up-regulation of extracellular sulfatases SULF1/2 argues for a possible distortion of HS sulfation patterns in colon tumours. Taken together, the obtained results suggest versican, biglycan, collagen1A1 and SULF1/2 expression as potential microenvironmental biomarkers and/or targets for colon cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  6. [A CASE OF ASCENDING COLON CANCER RECURRENCE WITH INTRALUMINAL URETERAL DISSEMINATION MIMICKING PRIMARY URETERAL CANCER, DETECTED DURING INVESTIGATION FOR FEVER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Kubota, Masashi; Kanno, Toru; Okada, Takashi; Higashi, Yoshihito; Yamada, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    A 69-year-old woman visited our hospital with a chief complaint of fever. Five years ago, she was diagnosed as ascending colon cancer and received right hemi-colectomy. One year later, local recurrence with right hydronephrosis was detected, and she received chemotherapy -4 cycles of modified fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus bevacizumab, and 12 cycles of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) plus bevacizumab- for two years. Local recurrence and right hydronephrosis disappeared on positron emission tomography performed 4 years postoperatively. This time, abdominal computed tomography for investigation of fever showed a relapse of right hydronephrosis and pyonephrosis. Cystoscopy revealed non-papillary tumor from the right ureteral orifice. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple tumors in the right ureter, and the distal lesion projecting into the bladder. After the general condition became well by right nephrostomy for infection control, transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a metastatic tubular adenocarcinoma (colon origin). Although right nephrectomy was performed for pyonephrosis control, she died of local progression of ascending colon cancer 10 months after first visit. Intraluminal ureteral progression of carcinoma originating from organs other than urinary tract is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the 9th report in the English or Japanese literature. In this case we could not rule out primary ureteral cancer preoperatively, and histological examination revealed intraluminal ureteral dissemination of ascending colon cancer.

  7. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluchamy, John P.; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Di Santo, James P.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RASwt metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR− RASwt, EGFR+ RASmut, and EGFR+ BRAFmut cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR+ colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR+ colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR−RASwt (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR+ RASmut (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR+ BRAFmut (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR+ RASmut colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered. PMID:28220124

  8. Effect of host immunity on metastatic potential in renal cell carcinoma: the assessment of optimal in vivo models to study metastatic behavior of renal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Morita, Tatsuo; Chun, Nicole A L; Matsui, Aya; Takahashi, Masafumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    There has been little information about metastatic behavior of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells because human cancers metastasize only rarely in immunodeficient mice. Moreover, it is difficult to know the effect of host immunity on RCC metastasis due to lack of such RCC cells as transplantable in not only xenograft models but also counterparts with intact immunity. Therefore, we scrutinized in vivo metastasis of RCC cells to seek for the optimal preclinical model to study metastatic behavior. The luciferase-expressing three representative human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, A498, and 786-O) and rat ACI-RCC cell which were established in our laboratory were transplanted into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice or immunocompetent ACI rats by intracardiac injection as well as orthotopic inoculation. Metastasis was monitored using a bioluminescent imaging technique. Metastasis was rare in the three human RCC cells even when they were directly disseminated into systemic circulation under the condition least susceptible to host immune attack in NOD/SCID mice. In contrast, ACI-RCC cells spontaneously metastasized to pulmonary tissue from orthotopic tumor sites and systemically spread via intracardiac route. Metastases were more extensive when the cells were inoculated into an immunodeficient host, implying suppressive effect of host immunity on colonization of RCC cells. These results suggest that the representative human RCC cells are not adequate resource to study metastasis but that the luciferase-labeled ACI-RCC cell characterized by its luminescent stability, enhanced tumorigenicity, and widespread metastatic potential provides a useful in vivo model for preclinical assessment of cancer progression and potential therapies against RCC.

  9. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  10. Expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Hou; Yi-Yi Liu; Xiao-Kun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of ALDH1 in colon cancer and its clinical significance. Methods: The expression of ALDH1 was examined in 98 surgical specimens of primary colonic carcinoma and 15 normal colon tissues with immunohistochemistry method. The correlations of the expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of colon cancer were analyzed.Results:The positive rate of expression of ALDH1 was 76.5% (75/98) in the cancer tissues and 13.3% (2/15) in normal colon tissues. There were an obvious statistical difference (P<0.05) between the two groups. The ALDH1 expression was significantly correlated with the histological grade, TNM stages and lymph node metastasis in colon cancer (P<0.05). It was also related with patients’ survival time, those with positive expressions had a poor prognosis (P<0.05). Conclusions: The results suggeste that the overexpression of ALDH1 plays important roles in proliferation and progression in colon cancer, the ALDH1 may be a valuable marker to predict the biological behavior and trend of metastasis of colon cancer.

  11. Bacteria,inflammation,and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liying Yang; Zhiheng Pei

    2006-01-01

    Our relationship with the colonic bacterial flora has long been viewed as benign,but recent studies suggest that this symbiosis has risks as well as benefits.This relationship requires that the host not only provide a supportive environment for the symbiotic bacteria,but also actively maintain intact mechanisms for properly managing the physiologic stresses that are closely associated with the symbiont's essential survival functions.Failure to do so breaches the hostsymbiont contract,and can result in serious effects on the health of the host.Recent investigations that employ several knockout mouse models reveal the consequences of genetic deficiency in the host regarding these mechanisms,and the latent,pro-inflammatory,tumorigenic nature of normal bacterial flora.Further study of the interactions between normal bacterial flora and hosts could shed light on the etiologies and pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and related cancers,with implications for human health.

  12. Near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for colonic cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic cancer detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (colonic tissues (i.e., normal and caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and cancerous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  13. Couples' patterns of adjustment to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, L L; Mood, D; Templin, T; Mellon, S; George, T

    2000-01-01

    The objectives for this longitudinal study were to: (a) compare colon cancer patients' and their spouses' appraisal of illness, resources, concurrent stress, and adjustment during the first year following surgery; (b) examine the influence of gender (male vs female) and role (patient vs spouse caregiver) on study variables; (c) assess the degree of correlation between patients' and spouses' adjustments; and (d) identify factors that affect adjustment to the illness. Fifty-six couples were interviewed at one week post diagnosis, and at 60 days and one year post surgery. Based on a cognitive-appraisal model of stress, the Smilkstein Stress Scale was used to measure concurrent stress; the Family APGAR, Social Support Questionnaire, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale were used to measure social resources; the Beck Hopelessness Scale and Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scales were used to measure appraisal of illness; and the Brief Symptom Inventory and Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale were used to measure psychosocial adjustment. Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance indicated that spouses reported significantly more emotional distress and less social support than patients. Gender differences were found, with women reporting more distress, more role problems, and less marital satisfaction, regardless of whether they were patient or spouse. Both patients and spouses reported decreases in their family functioning and social support, but also decreases in emotional distress over time. Moderately high autocorrelations and modest intercorrelations were found among and between patients' and spouses' adjustment scores over time. The strongest predictors of patients' role adjustment problems were hopelessness and spouses' role problems. The strongest predictors of spouses' role problems were spouses' own baseline role problems and level of marital satisfaction. Interventions need to start early in the course of illness, be family-focused, and identify the couples at risk of

  14. High Throughput Sequencing of Germline and Tumor from Men With Early-Onset Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    challenge, Dr. Tomlins has continued to develop state of the art technologies to use formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer specimens...men with early-onset, metastatic prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kathleen A. Cooney, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...High-Throughput Sequencing of Germline and Tumor From Men with Early-Onset Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0371 5c

  15. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Tome-Garcia

    Full Text Available Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145, it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP. In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines.

  16. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-12-07

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer.

  17. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Rumney, Robin M H; Schoof, Erwin M; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2015-06-04

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in patients with oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified lysyl oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonize and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications.

  18. Sipuleucel-T: in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous active cellular immunotherapy used in the treatment of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). It is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine to receive US FDA approval. Approximately 3 days prior to each infusion of sipuleucel-T, patients undergo a leukapheresis procedure for collection of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Preparation of sipuleucel-T involves enrichment for antigen-presenting cells from the leukapheresis product and activation ex vivo with a recombinant fusion protein (PA2024). In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled IMPACT study in patients with metastatic CRPC, sipuleucel-T was associated with a 22% relative reduction in the risk of death (hazard ratio 0.78; p = 0.03), which was the primary endpoint of the trial. After a median follow-up period of 34.1 months, median survival was 4.1 months longer with sipuleucel-T than placebo (25.8 vs 21.7 months). There was no significant between-group difference for the median time to objective disease progression (a secondary endpoint). Almost all patients treated with sipuleucel-T in clinical trials reported an adverse event, although these were mild or moderate in severity (grade 1 or 2) in most patients. The most common adverse events (e.g. infusion-related events, such as chills and fever) generally occurred within the first day after administration of sipuleucel-T and resolved within 2 days.

  19. Novel structural descriptors for automated colon cancer detection and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Saima; Hussain, Mutawarra; Aksam Iftikhar, Muhammad; Jalil, Abdul

    2015-09-01

    The histopathological examination of tissue specimens is necessary for the diagnosis and grading of colon cancer. However, the process is subjective and leads to significant inter/intra observer variation in diagnosis as it mainly relies on the visual assessment of histopathologists. Therefore, a reliable computer-aided technique, which can automatically classify normal and malignant colon samples, and determine grades of malignant samples, is required. In this paper, we propose a novel colon cancer diagnostic (CCD) system, which initially classifies colon biopsy images into normal and malignant classes, and then automatically determines the grades of colon cancer for malignant images. To this end, various novel structural descriptors, which mathematically model and quantify the variation among the structure of normal colon tissues and malignant tissues of various cancer grades, have been employed. Radial basis function (RBF) kernel of support vector machines (SVM) has been employed as classifier in order to classify/grade colon samples based on these descriptors. The proposed system has been tested on 92 malignant and 82 normal colon biopsy images. The classification performance has been measured in terms of various performance measures, and quite promising performance has been observed. Compared with previous techniques, the proposed system has demonstrated better cancer detection (classification accuracy=95.40%) and grading (classification accuracy=93.47%) capability. Therefore, the proposed CCD system can provide a reliable second opinion to the histopathologists.

  20. Clinical effects of laser immunotherapy on metastatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Lam, Anh K.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials of late-stage breast cancer patients and late-stage melanoma patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT) have shown promising results. In a 2010 study of Li et al, eleven late-stage melanoma patients received LIT in one or multiple 6-week treatment cycles applied to a 200-cm2 treatment site, which usually contained multiple cutaneous metastases. Long-term, positive response was observed in six patients. All lesions in the treatment area of the patients responded to LIT, eight of which achieved complete local response (CLR). CLR was observed in the non-treatment site (regional) lesions in four patients. Five patients were still alive at the time of last follow-up. The probability of 12-month overall survival was 70%.2 In 2011, Li et al, treated ten late stage breast cancer patients with LIT.1 In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%.1 This review demonstrates that LIT is safe and well tolerated, so it can be easily applied on an outpatient basis and can be combined with other pharmaceutical modalities to improve the therapeutic response of metastatic cancers.

  1. First-Line Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Tokh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy that is difficult to treat. Gemcitabine monotherapy has been used first line and many contemporary treatment approaches have focused on gemcitabine plus experimental agents. The 2012 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium Abstract #213 is a study of gemcitabine with IPI-926, a novel hedgehog pathway inhibitor. Abstract #227 is a study of gemcitabine with 90Y-hPAM4 radioimmunotherapy with yttrium labeled anti-mucin humanized antibody. Abstract #296 is a study of gemcitabine with temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor. Gemcitabine and erlotinib has shown slight advantages to gemcitabine alone. Abstract #253 takes this one step further and evaluates gemcitabine and erlotinib with apricoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor. FOLFIRINOX has shown superiority to gemcitabine; however, doing so at the cost of significantly greater toxicity. Abstract #199, is a study which examines the cost effectiveness of first line FOLFIRINOX approaches. Another cost effective study is portrayed in Abstract #372, a study evaluating the survival of unresectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with gemcitabine and the disease course is followed clinically without radiographic follow-up.

  2. Primary gastric cancer presenting with a metastatic embolus in the common carotid artery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ying

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although about 30% of gastric cancers have distant metastasis at the time of initial diagnosis, metastatic tumor embolus in the main blood vessels is not common, especially in the main artery. The report presents, for the first time, an extremely rare clinical case of a metastatic embolus in the common carotid artery (CCA from primary gastric cancer. Metastatic embolus from the primary tumor should be considered when patients present with gastric cancer accompanied by intravascular emboli. The patient should be actively examined further so as to allow early detection and treatment.

  3. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  4. Products of the colonic microbiota mediate the effects of diet on colon cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Stephen J D; Ou, Junhai; Aufreiter, Susanne; O'Connor, Deborah; Sharma, Sumit; Sepulveda, Jorge; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Mawhinney, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that most colon cancers can be attributed to dietary causes. We have hypothesized that diet influences the health of the colonic mucosa through interaction with the microbiota and that it is the milieu interior that regulates mucosal proliferation and therefore cancer risk. To validate this further, we compared colonic contents from healthy 50- to 65-y-old people from populations with high and low risk, specifically low risk Native Africans (cancer incidence fasting, rapid colonic evacuation was performed with 2 L polyethylene glycol. Total colonic evacuants were analyzed for SCFA, vitamins, nitrogen, and minerals. Total SCFA and butyrate were significantly higher in Native Africans than in both American groups. Colonic folate and biotin content, measured by Lactobacillus rhamnoses and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 bioassay, respectively, exceeded normal daily dietary intakes. Compared with Africans, calcium and iron contents were significantly higher in Caucasian Americans and zinc content was significantly higher in African Americans, but nitrogen content did not differ among the 3 groups. In conclusion, the results support our hypothesis that the microbiota mediates the effect diet has on colon cancer risk by their generation of butyrate, folate, and biotin, molecules known to play a key role in the regulation of epithelial proliferation.

  5. EZH2 depletion blocks the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Fussbroich

    Full Text Available The Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2 protein has been reported to stimulate cell growth in some cancers and is therefore considered to represent an interesting new target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated a possible role of EZH2 for the growth control of colon cancer cells. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated intracellular EZH2 depletion led to cell cycle arrest of colon carcinoma cells at the G1/S transition. This was associated with a reduction of cell numbers upon transient transfection of synthetic EZH2-targeting siRNAs and with inhibition of their colony formation capacity upon stable expression of vector-borne siRNAs. We furthermore tested whether EZH2 may repress the growth-inhibitory p27 gene, as reported for pancreatic cancer. However, expression analyses of colon cancer cell lines and colon cancer biopsies did not reveal a consistent correlation between EZH2 and p27 levels. Moreover, EZH2 depletion did not re-induce p27 expression in colon cancer cells, indicating that p27 repression by EZH2 may be cell- or tissue-specific. Whole genome transcriptome analyses identified cellular genes affected by EZH2 depletion in colon cancer cell lines. They included several cancer-associated genes linked to cellular proliferation or invasion, such as Dag1, MageD1, SDC1, Timp2, and Tob1. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EZH2 depletion blocks the growth of colon cancer cells. These findings might provide benefits for the treatment of colon cancer.

  6. Sequential Metastatic Breast Cancer Chemotherapy:Should the Median be the Message?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yon eJung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Counseling and anticipatory guidance of the expected course of treatment for women newly diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (MBC are difficult due to multiple factors influencing survival following metastatic breast cancer therapy. In order to better tailor counseling at the onset and through the duration of metastatic breast cancer we used non-clinical trial data to better characterize real life experience of sequential metastatic breast cancer treatment. We examined the following aims:1. What demographic and tumor characteristics are predictive of survival in metastatic breast cancer?2. What is the median duration of each sequential chemotherapy regimen and subsequent survival of women following each sequence of chemotherapy regimen in metastatic breast cancer?Methods: Retrospective study included 792 women diagnosed from January 1999 through December 2009 at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Program.Results: Median duration of sequential chemotherapy regimen and median survival from completion of sequence of chemotherapy regimens were relatively short with a wide range of treatment duration and survival. Characteristics for poor survival included hormone status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER 2/neu status, and increased number and type of metastatic sites. Women who took more than the second sequential chemotherapy regimens had no more than median 3 months of treatment duration and 6 months survival from treatment termination.Discussion: Median clinical response and survival shorten with sequential chemotherapy regimen but with wide ranges. The rare clinical response of the minority should not set the standard for treatment expectations. All cancer clinicians, including oncology nurses, must ensure that patients are receiving tailored counseling regarding their specific risks and benefits for sequential metastatic breast cancer chemotherapy.

  7. Energy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, M N; Howell, A; Thatcher, N; Baildam, A; Campbell, I

    2005-02-28

    Chemotherapy exerts a variable effect on nutritional status. It is not known whether loss of body fat or fat-free mass (FFM) during chemotherapy relates to diminished dietary intake, failure to meet elevated energy requirements, or to the presence of an acute-phase response. We sought to determine prospective measurements of body mass and composition, resting energy expenditure, energy and protein intake, and C-reactive protein over a course of chemotherapy in 82 patients with advanced cancer. There was a large dropout from the study. Prospective measurements were obtained in 19 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 12 with metastatic melanoma and 10 with metastatic breast cancer. There were significant increases in energy intake among patients with metastatic breast cancer, 873 (266-1480) kJ (mean 95% CI; Pcancer patients gained percentage body fat over the course of treatment, 2.1 (0.8-3.5%). Gain or loss of body fat correlated to mean energy intake throughout chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC (Rs=0.751; Pcancer (Rs=0.617; Pcancer and NSCLC, but did not prevent loss of FFM in these groups.

  8. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Cheng,1,* Samantha Ho,1,* Jun Hwan Yoo,1,2,* Deanna Hoang-Yen Tran,1,* Kyriaki Bakirtzi,1 Bowei Su,1 Diana Hoang-Ngoc Tran,1 Yuzu Kubota,1 Ryan Ichikawa,1 Hon Wai Koon1 1Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Digestive Disease Center, CHA University Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors share co-first authorship Background: Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods: We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results: Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-ß1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of apparent diffusion coefficient value in differentiating metastatic form benign axillary lymph nodes in cancer breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Azeem Ismail

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Compared with lymph node size or routine magnetic resonance sequences, DWI and ADC are promising techniques for differentiating metastatic and non metastatic axillary lymph nodes in known breast cancer patients.

  10. Red meat and colon cancer : how dietary heme initiates hyperproliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, N.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. The risk to develop colorectal cancer is associated with the intake of red meat. Red meat contains the porphyrin pigment heme. Heme is an irritant for the colonic wall and it is previously shown that the addition of heme to

  11. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  12. The Uncontrolled Sialylation is Related to Chemoresistant Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncati, Luca; Barbolini, Giuseppe; Gatti, Antonietta Morena; Pusiol, Teresa; Piscioli, Francesco; Maiorana, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Among the scientific communities, there is a convergence of results supporting a direct relationship between dysregulated sialylation and poor prognosis in many human cancers. For this reason, we have retrospectively investigated 169 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, coming from female patients aged between 31 and 76 years old. The whole series was subdivided into two prognostic groups: the first group consisted of 138 patients, who showed a post-treatment survival time more than 5 years, while the second group was made up by 31 patients, died within 5 years despite of chemotherapy. All the surgical specimens were fixed in 10 % neutral buffered formalin, paraffin embedded and, then, submitted to routinely haematoxylin/eosin staining and to a further histochemical (Alcian Blue, DDD-Fast Blue B, Mercury Orange), immunohistochemical (ST3GAL5 sialyltransferase, Ki67, c-erbB2, ER, PR) and chemico-elemental characterization. In the 31 cases of breast cancer belonging to the second group, an overexpression of sialomucins and sialyltransferases has been detected. Our results lead us to support that in aggressive chemoresistant breast cancers, the altered expression of sialic acid, due to an uncontrolled sialylation, creates an excessive negative charge on cell membranes, which stimulates repulsion between neoplastic cells and their subsequent access into the blood stream. This event implies an early metastatization and a rapid disease progression with fatal outcome. The early application of Alcian Blue stain on diagnostic biopsies of breast cancer is able to cheaply reveal the sialomucin accumulations, providing for the disease course.

  13. Feedback - Colon Cancer Conference and Workshop 2010 —

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains feedback given by the participants of the Colon Cancer Conference and the Histopathology workshop. The meetings took place in October 2010 at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine.

  14. Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162669.html Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk: ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Taking vitamin E and selenium does not appear to reduce ...

  15. Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163274.html Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says High- ... link appears to be a type of intestinal bacteria, the Boston research team said. Specifically, they looked ...

  16. Efficient and reproducible identification of mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Halvarsson, Britta;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of mismatch-repair (MMR) defective colon cancer is clinically relevant for diagnostic, prognostic and potentially also for treatment predictive purposes. Preselection of tumors for MMR analysis can be obtained with predictive models, which need to demonstrate ease...... of application and favorable reproducibility. METHODS: We validated the MMR index for the identification of prognostically favorable MMR deficient colon cancers and compared performance to 5 other prediction models. In total, 474 colon cancers diagnosed ≥ age 50 were evaluated with correlation between...... and efficiently identifies MMR defective colon cancers with high sensitivity and specificity. The model shows stable performance with low inter-observer variability and favorable performance when compared to other MMR predictive models....

  17. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Sleeping Beauty screen reveals Pparg activation in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Imran; Mui, Ernest; Galbraith, Laura; Patel, Rachana; Tan, Ee Hong; Salji, Mark; Rust, Alistair G; Repiscak, Peter; Hedley, Ann; Markert, Elke; Loveridge, Carolyn; van der Weyden, Louise; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J; Adams, David J; Leung, Hing Y

    2016-07-19

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common adult male cancer in the developed world. The paucity of biomarkers to predict prostate tumor biology makes it important to identify key pathways that confer poor prognosis and guide potential targeted therapy. Using a murine forward mutagenesis screen in a Pten-null background, we identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), encoding a ligand-activated transcription factor, as a promoter of metastatic CaP through activation of lipid signaling pathways, including up-regulation of lipid synthesis enzymes [fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)]. Importantly, inhibition of PPARG suppressed tumor growth in vivo, with down-regulation of the lipid synthesis program. We show that elevated levels of PPARG strongly correlate with elevation of FASN in human CaP and that high levels of PPARG/FASN and PI3K/pAKT pathway activation confer a poor prognosis. These data suggest that CaP patients could be stratified in terms of PPARG/FASN and PTEN levels to identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to PPARG/FASN inhibition.

  19. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winston Vuong; Oliver Sartor; Sumanta K Pal

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival beneift in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors inlfuencing clinical implementation.

  20. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Vuong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival benefit in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89, radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors influencing clinical implementation.

  1. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  2. The clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, M; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    with metastatic disease, but the prognostic role of CTC in non-metastatic colorectal cancer is less clear. The aim of this review is to examine the possible clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) with the primary focus on detection methods......BACKGROUND: Finding a clinical tool to improve the risk stratification and identifying those colorectal cancer patients with an increased risk of recurrence is of great importance. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood can be a strong marker of poor prognosis in patients...... and prognosis. METHODS: The PubMed and Cochrane database and reference lists of relevant articles were searched for scientific literature published in English from January 2000 to June 2010. We included studies with non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) and CTC detected pre- and/or post...

  3. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-03-22

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology.

  4. Liver protects metastatic prostate cancer from induced death by activating E-cadherin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bo; Wheeler, Sarah E; Clark, Amanda M; Whaley, Diana L; Yang, Min; Wells, Alan

    2016-11-01

    Liver is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis. Once disseminated, the prognosis is poor as these tumors often display generalized chemoresistance, particularly for carcinomas that derive not from the aerodigestive tract. When these cancers seed the liver, the aggressive cells usually undergo a mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition that both aids colonization and renders the tumor cells chemoresistant. In vitro studies demonstrate that hepatocytes drive this phenotypic shift. However, the in vivo evidence and the molecular signals that protect these cells from induced death are yet to be defined. Herein, we report that membrane surface E-cadherin-expressing prostate cancer cells were resistant to cell death by chemotherapeutic drugs but E-cadherin null cells or those expressing E-cadherin only in the cytoplasm were sensitive to death signals and chemotherapies both in vitro and in vivo. While cell-cell E-cadherin ligandation reduced mitogenesis, this chemoprotection was proliferation-independent as killing of both 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive (or Ki67(+) ) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-negative (Ki67(-) ) cells was inversely related to membrane-bound E-cadherin. Inhibiting the canonical survival kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases, protein kinase B, and Janus kinase, which are activated by chemotherapeutics in epithelial cell-transitioned prostate cancer, abrogated the chemoresistance both in cell culture and in animal models of metastatic cancer. For disseminated tumors, protein kinase B disruption in itself had no effect on tumor survival but was synergistic with chemotherapy, leading to increased killing.

  5. Risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessler, Bodil; Bock, David; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this was to assess potential risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery in a national cohort. METHODS: All patients, who had undergone a resection of a large bowel segment with an anastomosis between 2008 and 2011, were identified in the Swedish Colon Cancer...... that are possible to know preoperatively or during surgery that can indicate whether an anastomosis is an appropriate option. Anastomotic dehiscence increases hospital stay and long-term mortality....

  6. Disseminated breast cancer cells acquire a highly malignant and aggressive metastatic phenotype during metastatic latency in the bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn G Marsden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in the bone marrow may exist in a dormant state for extended periods of time, maintaining the ability to proliferate upon activation, engraft at new sites, and form detectable metastases. However, understanding of the behavior and biology of dormant breast cancer cells in the bone marrow niche remains limited, as well as their potential involvement in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of dormant disseminated breast cancer cells (prior to activation in the bone marrow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Total bone marrow, isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. As a negative control, bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. The resultant tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Mouse lungs, livers, and kidneys were analyzed by H+E staining to detect metastases. The injection of bone marrow isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, resulted in large tumor formation in the mammary fat pad 2 months post-injection. However, the injection of bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice did not result in tumor formation in the mammary fat pad. The DTC-derived tumors exhibited accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. The resultant tumors and the majority of metastatic lesions within the lung and liver exhibited a mesenchymal-like phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Dormant DTCs within the bone marrow are highly malignant upon injection into the mammary fat pad, with the accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. These results suggest the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype of DTCs during

  7. The clinical value of hybrid sentinel lymphoscintigraphy to predict metastatic sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Cang Ju; Kim, Jeong Hun; Choi, Se Hun; Han, Yeon Hee; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee; Youn, Hyun Jo; Lim, Seok Tae [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Hybrid imaging techniques can provide functional and anatomical information about sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer. Our aim in this study was to evaluate which imaging parameters on hybrid sentinel lymphoscintigraphy predicted metastatic involvement of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with breast cancer. Among 56 patients who underwent conventional sentinel lymphoscintigraphy, 45 patients (age, 53.1 ± 9.5 years) underwent hybrid sentinel lymphoscintigraphy using a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) gamma camera. On hybrid SPECT/CT images, we compared the shape and size (long-to-short axis [L/S] ratio) of the SLN, and SLN/periareolar injection site (S/P) count ratio between metastatic and non-metastatic SLNs. Metastatic involvement of sentinel lymph nodes was confirmed by pathological biopsy. Pathological biopsy revealed that 21 patients (46.7 %) had metastatic SLNs, while 24 (53.3 %) had non-metastatic SLNs. In the 21 patients with metastatic SLNs, the SLN was mostly round (57.1 %) or had an eccentric cortical rim (38.1 %). Of 24 patients with non-metastatic SLNs, 13 patients (54.1 %) had an SLN with a C-shape rim or eccentric cortex. L/S ratio was 2.04 for metastatic SLNs and 2.38 for non-metastatic SLNs. Seven (33 %) patients had T1 primary tumors and 14 (66 %) had T2 primary tumors in the metastatic SLN group. In contrast, 18 (75 %) patients had T1 primary tumors and six (25 %) had T2 tumors in the non-metastatic SLN group. S/P count ratio was significantly lower in the metastatic SLN group than the non-metastatic SLN group for those patients with a T1 primary tumor (p = 0.007). Hybrid SPECT/CT offers the physiologic data of SPECT together with the anatomic data of CT in a single image. This hybrid imaging improved the anatomic localization of SLNs in breast cancer patients and predicted the metastatic involvement of SLNs in the subgroup of breast cancer patients with T1 primary tumors.

  8. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The ‘in situ vaccination’ immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  9. Ascending colon cancer with synchronous external iliac and inguinal lymph node metastases but without regional lymph node metastasis: a case report and brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Yuki; Kuramoto, Masafumi; Masuda, Toshiro; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Ikeshima, Satoshi; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Shimada, Shinya; Baba, Hideo

    2017-12-01

    Lymph node metastasis to the iliac or inguinal region of colon cancer is extremely rare. We experienced a case of ascending colon cancer with synchronous isolated right external iliac and inguinal lymph node metastases but without any regional lymph node metastasis. An 83-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to anemia. Colonoscopy and computed tomography revealed an ascending colon cancer and also right external iliac and inguinal lymph node swelling. Further examination by F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography strongly suggested that these lymph nodes were metastatic. Right hemicolectomy with lymph node dissection along the superior mesenteric artery, and right external iliac and inguinal lymph node dissection were performed. Histological examination revealed that both lymph nodes were metastasized from colon cancer, and there was no evidence of regional lymph node metastasis. The patient has shown no sign of recurrence at 27 months after surgery.

  10. Laparoscopic resection of colon cancer and synchronous liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Timothy M; Tebb, Zachary D; Sato, Erika; Miedema, Brent W; Awad, Ziad T

    2006-02-01

    The recommended surgical approach to synchronous colorectal metastasis has not been clarified. Simultaneous open liver and colon resection for synchronous colorectal carcinoma has been shown beneficial when compared to staged resections. A review of the literature has shown the benefits of both laparoscopic colon resection for colorectal cancer and laparoscopic left lateral segmentectomy in liver disease. We present the case of a 60-year-old male with sigmoid colon carcinoma and a synchronous solitary liver metastasis localized to the left lateral segment. Using laparoscopic techniques, we were able to achieve simultaneous resection of the sigmoid colon and left lateral liver segment.

  11. Improving quality of life in patients with advanced cancer: Targeting metastatic bone pain

    OpenAIRE

    von Moos, Roger; Costa, Luis; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Niepel, Daniela; Santini, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease in patients with advanced cancer is frequently associated with skeletal complications. These can be debilitating, causing pain, impaired functioning and decreased quality of life, as well as reduced survival. This review considers how the management of metastatic bone pain might be optimised, to limit the considerable burden it can impose on affected patients. Cancer-related pain is notoriously under-reported and under-treated, despite the availability of many therapeu...

  12. Surgical therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer with a potential for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Terence C; Liauw, Winston; Koong, Heng-Nung; Esquivel, Jesus

    2011-06-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer has evolved from a paradigm that was previously centered upon the use of systemic chemotherapy to one of multimodality therapy. Hepatectomy, pulmonary metastasectomy, and cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy are surgical procedures that are now routinely performed in specialized institutions treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that in selected patients, these procedures are safe and may be beneficial in contributing to long-term survival.

  13. Estramustine phosphate versus placebo as second line treatment after orchiectomy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Asmussen, C;

    1997-01-01

    We compared the effect of 560 mg. estramustine phosphate daily to placebo as a supplement to standard palliative therapy in patients with progressive disease after bilateral orchiectomy as first line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer.......We compared the effect of 560 mg. estramustine phosphate daily to placebo as a supplement to standard palliative therapy in patients with progressive disease after bilateral orchiectomy as first line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer....

  14. Targeted treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with sipuleucel-T immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mulders, Peter F.; Santis, Maria; Powles, Thomas; Fizazi, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Context Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent and has a poor clinical outcome once metastatic. Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Sipuleucel-T treatment extends survival but is independent of traditional short-term markers of treatment response observed with chemotherapy and contemporary hormonal treatments. Therefore, it is essential that clinicians understand the mechanism of action o...

  15. Concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic nutrients metabolism presents a severe problem in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, especially those with canceromatosis. A hypermetabolism-catabolism syndrome frequently develops in in patients with progressing canceromatosis. This leads to cachexia anorexia syndrome, which significantly impedes available treatment options. Artificial nutrition allows to improve available treatment in such patients. We present a successful case of concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patient with peritoneal canceromatosis.

  16. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-24

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications.

  17. A Hierarchical Probability Model of Colon Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We consider a model of fixed size $N = 2^l$ in which there are $l$ generations of daughter cells and a stem cell. In each generation $i$ there are $2^{i-1}$ daughter cells. At each integral time unit the cells split so that the stem cell splits into a stem cell and generation 1 daughter cell and the generation $i$ daughter cells become two cells of generation $i+1$. The last generation is removed from the population. The stem cell gets first and second mutations at rates $u_1$ and $u_2$ and the daughter cells get first and second mutations at rates $v_1$ and $v_2$. We find the distribution for the time it takes to get two mutations as $N$ goes to infinity and the mutation rates go to 0. We also find the distribution for the location of the mutations. Several outcomes are possible depending on how fast the rates go to 0. The model considered has been proposed by Komarova (2007) as a model for colon cancer.

  18. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF TREATMENT FOR VISCERAL METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medications increasing the survival of patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC are lacking today. In the past 3 years, in the pharmaceutical market there have been a few novel drugs to treat progressive prostate cancer. Abiraterone acetate is an androgen synthesis inhibitor, which is also used to increase the survival of patients with metastatic CRPC that progresses after chemotherapy. The results of treatment for metastatic CRPC depend on a number of factors. Visceral metastases are poor predictors of the course of the disease. The results of abiraterone acetate treatment were analyzed in CRPC patients with visceral metastases.

  19. Expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in different metastatic sites in metastatic breast cancer and to determine the clinical implications of these patterns. Immunohistochemical staining was used to investigate the expression of YAP and phospho-YAP in tissue microarrays from 122 cases of metastatic breast cancer (bone metastasis = 29, brain metastasis = 38, liver metastasis = 12, and lung metastasis = 43). The expression levels of YAP and phospho-YAP differed according to the metastatic site in metastatic breast cancer. Specifically, nuclear expression of phospho-YAP was high in brain metastasis but low in lung metastasis (P = 0.010). The effects of YAP and phospho-YAP expression on clinical outcomes were investigated by univariate analysis. This analysis showed that nuclear YAP positivity (P = 0.008) and nuclear phospho-YAP positivity (P = 0.003) were both associated with shorter overall survival. In conclusion, the level of YAP expression varies according to the metastatic site in metastatic breast cancer. Moreover, high YAP expression was correlated with poor prognosis.

  20. Metformin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Recurrent Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Vasudevan, Anita; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G.; Levi, Edi; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties. However, most of the studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of metformin have been on primary cancer. No information is available whether metformin could be effectively used for recurrent cancer, specifically colorectal cancer (CRC) that affects up to 50% of patients treated by conventional chemotherapies. Although the reasons for recurrence are not fully understood, it is thought to be due to re-emergence of chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs). Therefore, development of non-toxic treatment strategies targeting CSCs would be of significant therapeutic benefit. In the current investigation, we have examined the effectiveness of metformin, in combination with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FuOx), the mainstay of colon cancer therapeutics, on survival of chemo-resistant colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in CSCs/CSLCs. Our data show that metformin acts synergistically with FuOx to (a) induce cell death in chemo resistant (CR) HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells, (b) inhibit colonospheres formation and (c) enhance colonospheres disintegration. In vitro cell culture studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment inhibits migration of CR colon cancer cells. These changes were associated with increased miRNA 145 and reduction in miRNA 21. Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was also down-regulated indicating its pivotal role in regulating the growth of CR colon cancer cells. Data from SCID mice xenograft model of CR HCT-116 and CR HT-29 cells show that the combination of metformin and FuOX is highly effective in inhibiting the growth of colon tumors as evidenced by ∼50% inhibition in growth following 5 weeks of combination treatment, when compared with the vehicle treated controls. Our current data suggest that metformin together with conventional chemotherapy could be an effective treatment

  1. Metformin: a potential therapeutic agent for recurrent colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Nangia-Makker

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties. However, most of the studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of metformin have been on primary cancer. No information is available whether metformin could be effectively used for recurrent cancer, specifically colorectal cancer (CRC that affects up to 50% of patients treated by conventional chemotherapies. Although the reasons for recurrence are not fully understood, it is thought to be due to re-emergence of chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs. Therefore, development of non-toxic treatment strategies targeting CSCs would be of significant therapeutic benefit. In the current investigation, we have examined the effectiveness of metformin, in combination with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FuOx, the mainstay of colon cancer therapeutics, on survival of chemo-resistant colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in CSCs/CSLCs. Our data show that metformin acts synergistically with FuOx to (a induce cell death in chemo resistant (CR HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells, (b inhibit colonospheres formation and (c enhance colonospheres disintegration. In vitro cell culture studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment inhibits migration of CR colon cancer cells. These changes were associated with increased miRNA 145 and reduction in miRNA 21. Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was also down-regulated indicating its pivotal role in regulating the growth of CR colon cancer cells. Data from SCID mice xenograft model of CR HCT-116 and CR HT-29 cells show that the combination of metformin and FuOX is highly effective in inhibiting the growth of colon tumors as evidenced by ∼ 50% inhibition in growth following 5 weeks of combination treatment, when compared with the vehicle treated controls. Our current data suggest that metformin together with conventional chemotherapy could be an

  2. High mortality rates after non-elective colon cancer resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, I S; Snijders, H S; Grossmann, Irene

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Colon cancer resection in a non-elective setting is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective study is to identify risk factors for overall mortality after colon cancer resection with a special focus on non-elective resection. METHOD: Data were...... obtained from the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit. Patients undergoing colon cancer resection in the Netherlands between January 2009 and December 2013 were included. Patient, treatment and tumour factors were analyzed in relation to the urgency of surgery. The primary outcome was the thirty day...... gender, and with high comorbidity, advanced tumours, perforated tumours, a tumour in the right or transverse colon and postoperative anastomotic leakage were at risk of postoperative death. In non-elective resections, a right-sided tumour and postoperative anastomotic leakage were associated with high...

  3. Eribulin for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer: an update on its safety and efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty MK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark K Doherty, Patrick G Morris Department of Medical Oncology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death internationally. Treatment approaches for metastatic breast cancer have evolved in recent years; however chemotherapy remains a core component for the majority of patients. Agents such as anthracyclines and taxanes have been extensively studied and form standard treatment. Eribulin mesylate is a novel synthetic microtubule-directed chemotherapy, based on a naturally-occurring compound. Through phase I studies, eribulin was found to be tolerable and activity was seen in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Phase II studies in metastatic breast cancer further demonstrated its efficacy, with responses and survival which compare favorably with other studied chemotherapy agents. The phase III EMBRACE study showed superior survival for patients treated with eribulin compared with those who received a physician’s choice control. This led to its approval for use in many countries in this setting. Its toxicity profile is well established and manageable for the most part, with the commonest reported toxicities being alopecia, fatigue, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy. A second reported phase III study comparing eribulin to capecitabine failed to show an improvement in survival in pretreated patients. This article reviews the clinical pharmacology and mechanism of action of eribulin, and summarizes the results of the major preclinical and clinical studies of eribulin in metastatic breast cancer. Keywords: eribulin, breast cancer, metastatic breast cancer, review, new treatments, chemotherapy

  4. Two distinct expression patterns of urokinase, urokinase receptor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in colon cancer liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Bird, Nigel; Majeed, Ali;

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic growth and invasion by colon cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new tissue environment. Plasmin(ogen) is activated on cell surfaces by urokinase-type PA (uPA), and is regulated by uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1......). To compare the expression patterns of uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in colon cancer with that in their liver metastases, we analysed matched samples from 14 patients. In all 14 primary colon cancers, we found upregulation of uPAR, uPA mRNA and PAI-1 in primarily stromal cells at the invasive front. In 5 of the 14......, whereas 8 of the remaining 9 showed direct contact between the cancer cells and the liver parenchyma. We conclude that there are 2 distinct patterns of expression of uPAR, uPA and PAI-1 in colon cancer liver metastases and that these correlate closely with 2 morphological growth patterns. These findings...

  5. Vinorelbine and cisplatin combined with endostatin as the first-line therapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective Systemic chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer is still a difficult problem in clinical practice.The standard chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer has been gemcitabine,but the response rate is low.Therefore,it is in urgent need to explore an effective clinical therapy for this cancer.This paper,a case report,is aimed at discussing the effectiveness of vinorelbine and cisplatin combined with endostatin as the first-line therapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.Methods A 52-year-old female pati...

  6. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sartor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients.

  7. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor; Silke Gillessen

    2014-01-01

    Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients.

  8. Autofluorescence excitation-emission matrices for diagnosis of colonic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bu-Hong Li; Shu-Sen Xie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the autofluorescence spectroscopic differences in normal and adenomatous colonic tissues and to determine the optimal excitation wavelengths for subsequent study and clinical application.METHODS: Normal and adenomatous colonic tissues were obtained from patients during surgery. A FL/FS920combined TCSPC spectrofluorimeter and a lifetime spectrometer system were used for fluorescence measurement.Fluorescence excitation wavelengths varying from 260 to 540 nm were used to induce the autofluorescence spectra,and the corresponding emission spectra were recorded from a range starting 20 nm above the excitation wavelength and extending to 800 nm. Emission spectra were assembled into a three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy and an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) to exploit endogenous fluorophores and diagnostic information. Then emission spectra of normal and adenomatous colonic tissues at certain excitation wavelengths were compared to determine the optimal excitation wavelengths for diagnosis of colonic cancer.RESULTS: When compared to normal tissues, low NAD (P)H and FAD, but high amino acids and endogenous phorphyrins of protoporphyrin Ⅸ characterized the highgrade malignant colonic tissues. The optimal excitation wavelengths for diagnosis of colonic cancer were about 340, 380, 460, and 540 nm.CONCLUSION: Significant differences in autofluorescence peaks and its intensities can be observed in normal and adenomatous colonic tissues. Autofluorescence EEMs are able to identify colonic tissues.

  9. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Troiani, Teresa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF) is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor. Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated dose yet defined. PMID:21221177

  10. Canadian Physicians’ Choices for Their Own Colon Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoon Raza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compliance with colorectal cancer (CRC screening in Canada is low. The aim of the present survey was to determine whether Canadian physicians older than 50 years were pursuing colon cancer screening. Specifically, physicians were asked to identify their modality of choice and identify their barriers to screening.

  11. Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging for colonic cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaozhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2009-11-01

    We explore an NIR autofluorescence imaging technique for cancer diagnosis and detection. A set of tissue images including NIR white light images, autofluorescence (AF) images and fluorescence polarized images (FPI) (parallel-, and perpendicular- polarization) were acquired in tandem on human colonic tissues. The results show that NIR fluorescence intensity of normal tissue is significantly higher than that of cancer tissue. The perpendicular-polarization image yields the highest diagnostic accuracy 93% compared to other imaging modes. This work demonstrates that Fluorescence polarization imaging (FPI) technique has great potential for cancer diagnosis and detection in the colon.

  12. Limitations of tissue micro array in Duke's B colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brunner, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular...... distribution. We selected 61 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing patients diagnosed with Dukes B colon cancer. Two 1 mm and two 2 mm cores were taken from both the centre and the invasive front of the tumour respectively. The immunostaining included MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, p53, COX-2, TIMP and Betacatenin...... moderate to high agreement (kappa = 0.54-0.9) whereas TIMP-1 had the lowest score (kappa 0.19-0.25). The application of TMA in Dukes B colon cancer has several pitfalls and depends substantially on the immunohistochemical marker in question. Therefore a validation study seems justified before applying...

  13. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in colon neoplasms arising in the azoxymethane colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinstein, Scott C; Conerly, Melissa; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Biswas, Swati; Washington, M Kay; Trobridge, Patty; Henikoff, Steve; Grady, William M

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal tumors have advanced our understanding of the role of gene mutations in colorectal malignancy. However, the utility of these systems for studying the role of epigenetic alterations in intestinal neoplasms remains to be defined. Consequently, we assessed the role of aberrant DNA methylation in the azoxymethane (AOM) rodent model of colon cancer. AOM induced tumors display global DNA hypomethylation, which is similar to human colorectal cancer. We next assessed the methylation status of a panel of candidate genes previously shown to be aberrantly methylated in human cancer or in mouse models of malignant neoplasms. This analysis revealed different patterns of DNA methylation that were gene specific. Zik1 and Gja9 demonstrated cancer-specific aberrant DNA methylation, whereas, Cdkn2a/p16, Igfbp3, Mgmt, Id4, and Cxcr4 were methylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. No aberrant methylation of Dapk1 or Mlt1 was detected in the neoplasms, but normal colon mucosa samples displayed methylation of these genes. Finally, p19(Arf), Tslc1, Hltf, and Mlh1 were unmethylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. Thus, aberrant DNA methylation does occur in AOM tumors, although the frequency of aberrantly methylated genes appears to be less common than in human colorectal cancer. Additional studies are necessary to further characterize the patterns of aberrantly methylated genes in AOM tumors.

  14. Enhanced Metastatic Recurrence Via Lymphatic Trafficking of a High-Metastatic Variant of Human Triple-Negative Breast Cancer After Surgical Resection in Orthotopic Nude Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    We previously developed and characterized a highly invasive and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) variant by serial orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in nude mice. Eventually, a highly invasive and metastatic variant of human TNBC was isolated after lymph node metastases was harvested and orthotopically re-implanted into the mammary gland of nude mice for two cycles. The variant thereby isolated is highly invasive in the mammary gland and metastasized to lymph nodes in 10 of 12 mice compared to 2 of 12 of the parental cell line. In the present report, we observed that high-metastatic MDA-MB-231H-RFP cells produced significantly larger subcutaneous tumors compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Extensive lymphatic trafficking by high-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells was also observed. High-metastatic MDA-MB-231 developed larger recurrent tumors 2 weeks after tumor resection compared with tumors that were not resected in orthotopic models. Surgical resection of the MDA-MB-231 high-metastatic variant primary tumor in orthotopic models also resulted in rapid and enhanced lymphatic trafficking of residual cancer cells and extensive lymph node and lung metastasis that did not occur in the non-surgical mice. These results suggest that surgical resection of high metastatic TNBC can greatly increase the malignancy of residual cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 559-569, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  16. Colon cancer associated with radiation colitis, report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Rikiya; Kitagawa, Shinji; Okazaki, Masatoshi; Ikehara, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Shinnosuke; Iwanaga, Shinichi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Nakamura, Yuichi [Nakamura Gastroenterology, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A 70-year-old female presented with abdominal pain in February 1994. She had undergone barium enema examination at a local hospital, and a stricture was pointed out in the rectosigmoid colon. She was referred to our institution for further evaluation. Double-contrast small-bowel examination revealed strictures involving long segments of the distal ileum. Repeated barium enemas showed tumor in the sigmoid colon. Because she had a past history of radiation therapy for uterine cancer 27 years previously, radiation-associated colon cancer was suspected. She underwent Miles' operation and partial resection of the ileum. Intraoperative colonoscopy showed a polypoid lesion of type 1 in the sigmoid colon. Histopathologic examination of the resected specimen showed mucinous adenocarcinoma associated with radiation enterocolitis. (author)

  17. EMT is the dominant program in human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollenaar Rob AEM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer has been classically described by clinicopathologic features that permit the prediction of outcome only after surgical resection and staging. Methods We performed an unsupervised analysis of microarray data from 326 colon cancers to identify the first principal component (PC1 of the most variable set of genes. PC1 deciphered two primary, intrinsic molecular subtypes of colon cancer that predicted disease progression and recurrence. Results Here we report that the most dominant pattern of intrinsic gene expression in colon cancer (PC1 was tightly correlated (Pearson R = 0.92, P -135 with the EMT signature-- both in gene identity and directionality. In a global micro-RNA screen, we further identified the most anti-correlated microRNA with PC1 as MiR200, known to regulate EMT. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the biology underpinning the native, molecular classification of human colon cancer--previously thought to be highly heterogeneous-- was clarified through the lens of comprehensive transcriptome analysis.

  18. Multi-label classification for colon cancer using histopathological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Jiao, Liping; Wang, Siyu; Wei, Junsheng; Fan, Yubo; Lai, Maode; Chang, Eric I-Chao

    2013-12-01

    Colon cancer classification has a significant guidance value in clinical diagnoses and medical prognoses. The classification of colon cancers with high accuracy is the premise of efficient treatment. Our task is to build a system for colon cancer detection and classification based on slide histopathological images. Some former researches focus on single label classification. Through analyzing large amount of colon cancer images, we found that one image may contain cancer regions of multiple types. Therefore, we reformulated the task as multi-label problem. Four kinds of features (Color Histogram, Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix, Histogram of Oriented Gradients and Euler number) were introduced to compose our discriminative feature set, extracted from our dataset that includes six single categories and four multi-label categories. In order to evaluate the performance and make comparison with our multi-label model, three commonly used multi-classification methods were designed in our experiment including one-against-all SVM (OAA), one-against-one SVM (OAO) and multi-structure SVM. Four indicators (Precision, Recall, F-measure, and Accuracy) under 3-fold cross-validation were used to validate the performance of our approach. Experiment results show that the precision, recall and F-measure of multi-label method as 73.7%, 68.2%, and 70.8% with all features, which are higher than the other three classifiers. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our method on colon histopathological images analysis.

  19. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression...... analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0......Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were...

  20. Rural-Urban Differences in Colon Cancer Risk in Blacks and Whites: The North Carolina Colon Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans Kinney, Anita; Harrell, Janna; Slattery, Marty; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Geographic and racial variations in cancer incidence have been observed. Studies of colorectal carcinoma indicate a higher incidence and mortality rate for blacks than for whites in the United States. Purpose: We evaluated the effect of rural versus urban residence on colon cancer risk and stage of disease at diagnosis in blacks and…

  1. Influence of dietary protein sources on putative in vitro and in vivo colon cancer biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Colon cancer (cancer of the large intestine) is a worldwide problem in especially Western countries. The diet might be responsible for up to 90% of these colon cancer cases. This means that decreasing colon cancer risk should be possible by changing the diet. The research presented in this thesis co

  2. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  3. The ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy prolong survival in mice with systemic metastatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Poff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Abnormal cancer metabolism creates a glycolytic-dependency which can be exploited by lowering glucose availability to the tumor. The ketogenic diet (KD is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet which decreases blood glucose and elevates blood ketones and has been shown to slow cancer progression in animals and humans. Abnormal tumor vasculature creates hypoxic pockets which promote cancer progression and further increase the glycolytic-dependency of cancers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO₂T saturates tumors with oxygen, reversing the cancer promoting effects of tumor hypoxia. Since these non-toxic therapies exploit overlapping metabolic deficiencies of cancer, we tested their combined effects on cancer progression in a natural model of metastatic disease. METHODS: We used the firefly luciferase-tagged VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer to compare tumor progression and survival in mice fed standard or KD ad libitum with or without HBO₂T (2.5 ATM absolute, 90 min, 3x/week. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. RESULTS: KD alone significantly decreased blood glucose, slowed tumor growth, and increased mean survival time by 56.7% in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. While HBO₂T alone did not influence cancer progression, combining the KD with HBO₂T elicited a significant decrease in blood glucose, tumor growth rate, and 77.9% increase in mean survival time compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: KD and HBO₂T produce significant anti-cancer effects when combined in a natural model of systemic metastatic cancer. Our evidence suggests that these therapies should be further investigated as potential non-toxic treatments or adjuvant therapies to standard care for patients with systemic metastatic disease.

  4. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, ... with your comments. We review all feedback and work to provide a better experience. If you need ...

  5. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  6. A metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring BRAF V600E has a durable major response to dabrafenib/trametinib and chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams CB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Casey B Williams,1,* Caitlin McMahon,2,* Siraj M Ali,2 Mark Abramovitz,1 Kirstin A Williams,1 Jessica Klein,1 Heidi McKean,1 Roman Yelensky,2 Thomas J George Jr,3 Julia A Elvin,2 Salil Soman,4 Doron Lipson,2 Juliann Chmielecki,2 Deborah Morosini,2 Vincent A Miller,2 Philip J Stephens,2 Jeffrey S Ross,2,5 Brian Leyland-Jones1 1Avera Cancer Institute, Sioux Falls, SD, USA; 2Foundation Medicine, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA; 3University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA; 4Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The subset of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas that harbor BRAF V600E mutations are aggressive tumors with significantly shortened survival and limited treatment options. Here we present a colorectal cancer patient whose disease progressed through standard chemotherapy and who developed liver metastasis. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne® identified a BRAF V600E mutation in the liver lesion, as well as other genomic alterations consistent with colorectal cancers. Combination therapy of dabrafenib and trametinib with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy resulted in a durable major ongoing response for the patient. This report illustrates the utility of comprehensive genomic profiling with personalized targeted therapy for aggressive metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: oxaliplatin, colorectal adenocarcinoma, combination targeted therapy, BRAF mutations

  7. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant 'stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process.

  8. [Metastatic breast cancer to the stomach: An uncommon evolution of breast carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, C; Talha-Vautravers, A; Hoefler, P; Zirabe, S; Bellocq, J-P; Mathelin, C

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma exceptionally leads to metastatic linitis plastica. Distinguishing a breast cancer metastasis to the stomach from a primary gastric cancer on the basis of clinical and radiological signs is very challenging. Thanks to being cognizant of the previous history of invasive lobular carcinoma and the gastric biopsy followed by immunohistochemical analysis, gastric metastasis can be diagnosed. Despite the use of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, gastric metastasis remains often associated with poor prognosis. We present a case where gastric biopsy allowed a metastatic breast cancer to the stomach to be diagnosed and we discuss its clinical, diagnostic, pathological and therapeutic particularities.

  9. Evaluation of anti-metastatic effect of chitosan nanoparticles on esophageal cancer-associated ifbroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pravin D. Potdar; Aashutosh U. Shetti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Esophageal cancer is one of the major types of cancers, causing death of approximately 5% of all cancer deaths. This is due, in large part, to both relatively ineffectual and unavailable treatment. In order to develop an effective treatment strategy against esophageal cancer, it is important to target metastatic genes. In the present study, we have used a cancer-associated ifbroblast (CAF) cell line derived from culturing peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a metastatic esophageal cancer patient to see whether chitosan nanoparticles (Ch-Np) treatment can modulate the metastatic phenotype of CAF cells by using various cellular and molecular markers.Methods: A CAF cell line was developed from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a metastatic esophageal cancer patient. The cells were treated with 100 µg/mL of chitosan nanoparticlein vitro for the morphological and oncogenic characteristic studies, along with the expression of various genes involved in process of tumor development and metastasis. Techniques such as Light and Phase Contrast Microscopy, cell growth rate, Scratch metastatic assay, and molecular proifling were carried out to see changes in CAF cells before and after Ch-Np treatment.Results: It was observed that CAF cells grew in monolayer and had a doubling time of 25 ± 0.38 h. Morphologically, the cells had a ifbroblastic appearance. After treatment with 100 µg/mL of Ch-Npin vitro, there was an increased doubling time to 30 ± 0.83 h. Similarly, Scratch Assay showed an inhibition in the metastatic property of these cells. These ifndings were conifrmed with gene expression studies. It was also observed that there was complete down-regulation of metastatic genes MMP1 and MMP9 and chemokines such as CXCR-4, CXCR-7, CCR-5, and SDF-1, indicating that Ch-Np inhibited the metastatic characteristic of CAF cells.Conclusion: This study has shown that there was an inhibition of metastatic properties of CAF cells after treatment with Ch

  10. Colon-available raspberry polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer effects on in vitro models of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDougall Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a probable association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and reduced risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the digestive tract. This anti-cancer activity has been attributed in part to anti-oxidants present in these foods. Raspberries in particular are a rich source of the anti-oxidant compounds, such as polyphenols, anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Methods A "colon-available" raspberry extract (CARE was prepared that contained phytochemicals surviving a digestion procedure that mimicked the physiochemical conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The polyphenolic-rich extract was assessed for anti-cancer properties in a series of in vitro systems that model important stages of colon carcinogenesis, initiation, promotion and invasion. Results The phytochemical composition of CARE was monitored using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The colon-available raspberry extract was reduced in anthocyanins and ellagitannins compared to the original raspberry juice but enriched in other polyphenols and polyphenol breakdown products that were more stable to gastrointestinal digestion. Initiation – CARE caused significant protective effects against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in HT29 colon cancer cells measured using single cell microgelelectrophoresis. Promotion – CARE significantly decreased the population of HT29 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, effectively reducing the number of cells entering the cell cycle. However, CARE had no effect on epithelial integrity (barrier function assessed by recording the trans-epithelial resistance (TER of CACO-2 cell monolayers. Invasion – CARE caused significant inhibition of HT115 colon cancer cell invasion using the matrigel invasion assay. Conclusion The results indicate that raspberry phytochemicals likely to reach the colon are capable of inhibiting several important stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro.

  11. Clinical progression of lobaplatin in combination chemotherapy for patients with recurrence or metastatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Peng; Jiangkui Liu; Qiang Lin

    2014-01-01

    The-platinum-based-combination-chemotherapy-has-become-one-of-the-major-modalities-in-anti-cancer-treatment.-After-the-first-line-chemotherapy,-many-patients-need-further-chemotherapy-because-of-recurrence-or-metastasis.-Lobaplatin-is-one-of-the-third-generation-platinum-drugs,and-this-article-briefly-reviews-the-clinical-progression-of-lobaplatin-in-combination-chemotherapy-for-patients-with-recurrence-or-metastatic-cancer.

  12. Chronic Stress, Depression and Immunity in Spouses of Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Jane S. Blake; Sephton, Sandra E.; Kimerling, Rachel; Butler, Lisa; Bernstein, Aaron S.; Spiegel, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine how the chronicity of stress affects psychological stress-responses, depressive symptoms, and "in vivo" immunocompetence in spouses of women with metastatic breast cancer. Methods: Participants were 34 spouses of breast cancer patients. Their wives had been living with a diagnosis of…

  13. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Martinelli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Erika Martinelli1, Floriana Morgillo1, Teresa Troiani1, Giampaolo Tortora2, Fortunato Ciardiello11Cattedra di Oncologia Medica, Dipartimento Medico-Chirurgico di Internistica Clinica e Sperimentale “F. Magrassi e A. Lanzara”, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, Napoli, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Molecolare e Clinina, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli, ItalyIntroduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor.Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential.Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated

  14. Changes of histology and expression of MMP-2 and nm23-H1 in primary and metastatic gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Bo Wang; Zhi-Nong Jiang; Miao-Ying Fan; Chao-Yang Xu; Wen-Jun Chen; Jian-Guo Shen

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the changes of histology and expression of MMP-2 and nm23-H1 in primary and metastatic gastric cancer.METHODS:One hundred and seventy-seven gastric cancer patients with lymph node and/or distal metastasis between 1997 and 2001 were reviewed.Differences in histology of the primary and metastatic gastric cancer were assessed.MMP-2 and nm23-H1 immunoreactivity was compared in 44 patients with tumor infiltration to the serosa layer.RESULTS:Poorly and moderately differentiated metastatic gastric cancer was found in 88.7% (157/177)and primary gastric cancer in 75.7% (134/177) of the patients.The histological type of metastatic gastric cancer that was not completely in accordance with the preponderant histology of primary gastric cancer was observed in 25 patients (14.1%).MMP-2 immunoreactivity in metastatic gastric cancer was significantly stronger than that in primary gastric cancer,while nm23-H1 immunoreactivity showed no difference in primary and metastatic gastric cancer.CONCLUSION:Metastatic gastric cancer presents more aggressive histological morphology and higher MMP-2 immunoreactivity than primary gastric cancer.This heterogeneity may elicit a possible mechanism of gastric cancer metastasis.

  15. Coexistence of Colon Cancer and Diverticilutis Complicated with Diverticular Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Ozgur Karakas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coexistence of a diverticular abscess and colorectal cancer is an extremely rare phenomenon. The clinical presentation and the extension of a diverticular abscess could cause mis-staging of colon cancer. We are presenting an overstaged colon cancer due to a diverticular abscess penetrating into the abdominal wall. A 65-year-old male patient with a history of an enlarging mass in the left lower quadrant of the abdomen was admitted to our service. Diagnostic studies revealed a sigmoid tumor communicating with an abdominal wall mass. The patient was clinically staged as T4 N1. Exploration revealed a diverticular abscess penetrating into the abdominal wall and a sigmoid tumor. Histopathological examination reported an intermediately differentiated T3 N0 adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. After an uneventful postoperative recovery, the patient was referred to chemotherapy. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 231-233

  16. Opposite effects of microchimerism on breast and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Biggar, Robert J; Tjønneland, Anne

    2012-01-01

    was to determine whether the lower concentrations predate cancer diagnosis, and whether a possible beneficial effect was specific to breast cancer. METHODS: We conducted a prospective case-cohort study of 50-64-year-old Danish women enrolled in the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Blood samples and questionnaire...... of male microchimerism was strongly associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer and also the increased risk of developing colon cancer. Confirmatory findings based on an improved study design, failure to identify important confounders and the strength of the associations lead us to believe...

  17. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Crizotinib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingnan; He, Kan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Oncogenic alterations in MET or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified in a variety of human cancers. Crizotinib (PF02341066) is a dual MET and ALK inhibitor and approved for the treatment of a subset of non-small cell lung carcinoma and in clinical development for other malignancies. Crizotinib can induce apoptosis in cancer cells, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we found that crizotinib induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through the BH3-only protein PUMA. In cells with wild-type p53, crizotinib induces rapid induction of PUMA and Bim accompanied by p53 stabilization and DNA damage response. The induction of PUMA and Bim is mediated largely by p53, and deficiency in PUMA or p53, but not Bim, blocks crizotinib-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, MET knockdown led to selective induction of PUMA, but not Bim or p53. Crizotinib also induced PUMA-dependent apoptosis in p53-deficient colon cancer cells and synergized with gefitinib or sorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and therapeutic responses to crizotinib in xenograft models. These results establish a critical role of PUMA in mediating apoptotic responses of colon cancer cells to crizotinib and suggest that mechanisms of oncogenic addiction to MET/ALK-mediated survival may be cell type-specific. These findings have important implications for future clinical development of crizotinib.

  19. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an a

  20. NIBP impacts on the expression of E-cadherin, CD44 and vimentin in colon cancer via the NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun-Yan; Qin, Meng-Bin; Tan, Lin; Liu, Shi-Quan; Huang, Jie-An

    2016-06-01

    NIBP, a novel nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-inducing kinase (NIK) and IκB kinase β (IKKβ) binding protein, directly interacts with NIK and IKKβ, and acts as the 'bridge' of the NF‑κB classical and alternative signaling pathways. However, its influence on epithelial‑mesenchymal transition markers in colon cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NIBP impacting on the expression of E‑cadherin, CD44 and vimentin. In the present study, the associations between NIBP and E‑cadherin, CD44 and vimentin in clinical samples were analyzed by making pairwise comparisons between normal colon tissue, non‑metastatic colon cancer tissue and metastatic colon cancer tissue. In in vitro experiments, after changing the expression of NIBP in cells, the protein expression levels of CD44, vimentin, E‑cadherin were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results revealed that the protein expression levels of NIBP, CD44 and vimentin were markedly increased, and E‑cadherin was markedly decreased, in metastatic colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon tissue and non‑metastatic colon cancer tissue. Upregulation of NIBP expression decreased the levels of E‑cadherin, whereas the downregulation of NIBP increased E‑cadherin levels, while no significant differences were observed in the levels of CD44 and vimentin. In addition, cells that were treated with the NF‑κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), also tended to exhibit increased levels of CD44 and vimentin expression in the NIBP upregulated expression group (29‑NIBP group) compared with the mock group, whereas the expression levels of E‑cadherin, CD44 and vimentin were similar in the NIBP downregulated expression group (116‑NIBPmir group) and the HCT116 blank control group (116‑mock group) on treatment of the cells with tumor necrosis factor‑α. These findings indicated that NIBP, E‑cadherin, CD44 and vimentin are possibly

  1. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  2. Complement 5a Enhances Hepatic Metastases of Colon Cancer via Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1-mediated Inflammatory Cell Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Chunmei; Cai, Lun; Qiu, Shulan; Jia, Lixin; Song, Wenchao; Du, Jie

    2015-04-24

    Complement 5a (C5a), a potent immune mediator generated by complement activation, promotes tumor growth; however, its role in tumor metastasis remains unclear. We demonstrate that C5a contributes to tumor metastases by modulating tumor inflammation in hepatic metastases of colon cancer. Colon cancer cell lines generate C5a under serum-free conditions, and C5a levels increase over time in a murine syngeneic colon cancer hepatic metastasis model. Furthermore, in the absence of C5a receptor or upon pharmacological inhibition of C5a production with an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, tumor metastasis is severely impaired. A lack of C5a receptor in colon cancer metastatic foci reduces the infiltration of macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells, and the role for C5a receptor on these cells were further verified by bone marrow transplantation experiments. Moreover, C5a signaling increases the expression of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and the anti-inflammatory molecules arginase-1, interleukin 10, and transforming growth factor β, but is inversely correlated with the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, which suggests a mechanism for the role of C5a in the inflammatory microenvironment required for tumor metastasis. Our results indicate a new and potentially promising therapeutic application of complement C5a inhibitor for the treatment of malignant tumors.

  3. Even for Men At High Risk, Healthy Living May Help Prevent Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at High Risk, Healthy Living May Help Prevent Colon Cancer Many lives could be saved if people avoided ... that healthy living can lower the odds for colon cancer, a new study finds it's even true for ...

  4. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim;

    2007-01-01

    the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed...... with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management...... trials have yet compared survival with transurethral resection of bladder tumor alone versus cystectomy for the management of patients with muscle-invasive disease. Collaborative international adjuvant chemotherapy trials are needed to assist researchers in assessing the true value of adjuvant...

  5. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the final...... analysis of an early-access protocol trial that was initiated after completion of COU-AA-301 to enable worldwide preapproval access to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, early......-access protocol trial in 23 countries. We enrolled patients who had metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after taxane chemotherapy. Participants received oral doses of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg daily) and prednisone (5 mg twice a day) in 28-day cycles until disease progression...

  6. Factors influencing choice of chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Luigi Rossi, Foteini Vakiarou, Federica Zoratto, Loredana Bianchi, Anselmo Papa, Enrico Basso, Monica Verrico, Giuseppe Lo Russo, Salvatore Evangelista, Guilia Rinaldi, Francesca Perrone-Congedi, Gian Paolo Spinelli, Valeria Stati, Davide Caruso, Alessandra Prete, Silverio TomaoDepartment of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Oncology Unit, ICOT, Latina, ItalyAbstract: Management of metastatic colorectal cancer requires a multimodal approach and must be performed by an experienced, multidisciplinary expert team. The optimal choice of the individual treatment modality, according to disease localization and extent, tumor biology, and patient clinical characteristics, will be one that can maintain quality of life and long-term survival, and even cure selected patients. This review is an overview of the different therapeutic approaches available in metastatic colorectal cancer, for the purpose of defining personalized therapeutic algorithms according to tumor biology and patient clinical features.Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer, patient clinical features, tumor biology, multidisciplinary approach

  7. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  8. Comparison of survival of patients with metastases from known versus unknown primaries: survival in metastatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riihimäki Matias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is considered an aggressive metastatic disease but whether the prognosis differs from metastatic cancers of known primary site is not known. Such data may give insight into the biology of CUP and the metastatic process in general. Methods 6,745 cancer patients, with primary metastatic cancer at diagnosis, were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and were compared with 2,881 patients with CUP. Patients were diagnosed and died between 2002 and 2008. The influence of the primary site, known or unknown, on survival in patients with metastases at specific locations was investigated. Hazard ratios (HRs of death were estimated for several sites of metastasis, where patients with known primary sites were compared with CUP patients. Results Overall, patients with metastatic cancers with known primary sites had decreased hazards of death compared to CUP patients (HR = 0.69 [95% CI = 0.66–0.72]. The exceptions were cancer of the pancreas (1.71 [1.54–1.90], liver (1.58 [1.36–1.85], and stomach (1.16 [1.02–1.31]. For individual metastatic sites, patients with liver or bone metastases of known origin had better survival than those with CUP of the liver and bone. Patients with liver metastases of pancreatic origin had an increased risk of death compared with patients with CUP of the liver (1.25 [1.06–1.46]. The median survival time of CUP patients was three months. Conclusions Patients with CUP have poorer survival than patients with known primaries, except those with brain and respiratory system metastases. Of CUP sites, liver metastases had the worst prognosis. Survival in CUP was comparable to that in metastatic lung cancer. The aggressive behavior of CUP may be due to initial immunosuppression and immunoediting which may allow accumulation of mutations. Upon escape from the suppressed state an unstoppable tumor spread ensues. These novel data on the epidemiology of the

  9. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Facts & Statistics News and Stories Glossary For Health Care Professionals Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC ... Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies Our ...

  10. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-02-26

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer.

  11. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P;

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  12. Implications of occult metastatic cells for systemic cancer treatment in patients with breast or gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Rosenberg, R; Thorban, S; Harbeck, N

    2001-06-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumour cells to the organism is becoming acknowledged as a hallmark in cancer progression, since abundant clinical and experimental data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies against epithelial cytokeratins or tumour-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected in cytological bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of such immunostained cells in bone marrow is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival, even in malignancies that do not preferentially metastasise to bone. As current treatment strategies have resulted in a substantial improvement of cancer mortality rates, it is noteworthy to consider the intriguing options of immunocytochemical screening of bone marrow aspirates for occult metastatic cells. Besides improved tumour staging, such screening offers opportunities for guiding patient stratification for adjuvant therapy trials, monitoring response to adjuvant therapies (which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up), and specifically targeting tumour-biological therapies against disseminated tumour cells. The present review summarises the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic cancer cells in bone marrow.

  13. Clinical use of abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zobniw CM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chrystia M Zobniw,1 Alanna Causebrook,2 Mei Ka Fong1 1Department of Pharmacy, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA; 2School of Pharmacy, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA, USA Abstract: Prostate cancer remains the most common type of cancer among men in the United States. Treatment for metastatic prostate cancer has improved significantly over the years with more and more agents improving overall survival. This review will address the pathophysiology of prostate cancer followed by the mechanism of action and the pharmacokinetic properties of abiraterone. The review will also discuss the role of abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Keywords: glucocorticoid receptor, CYP17, pipeline, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, drug resistance, radium-223 dichloride

  14. Aberrant Crypt Foci: The Case for Inclusion as a Biomarker for Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Morris; Michael J. Wargovich; Brown, Vondina R.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are one of the earliest histopathological manifestations of colon cancer. In this review, we critically present the molecular, cellular, histopathological, and chemopreventive evidence that ACF are relevant biomarkers for colon cancer. The laboratory and clinical evidence are highly suggestive that ACF are in the pathway leading to colon cancer, but not all ACF will do so. The possible fate and outcome of ACF in the progression toward colon cancer may be dependent on...

  15. A Cancer That Went Up in Smoke: Pulmonary Reaction to e-Cigarettes Imitating Metastatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene Margrethe Ring; Vinther Krarup, Niels Henrik; Bergmann, Troels Korshøj;

    2016-01-01

    e-Cigarettes have gained worldwide popularity as a substitute for smoking, but concern has been raised regarding the long-term effects associated with their use. We report a case of a 45-year-old female consumer of e-cigarettes who presented with 4 months of abdominal pain and fever. Initial....... Upon cessation of e-cigarette use (known as vaping), the lung nodules disappeared, and the liver lesions regressed. Our case report suggests that vaping can induce an inflammatory reaction mimicking metastatic cancer....

  16. Metastasis of colon cancer to the thyroid gland: a case diagnosed on fine-needle aspirate by a combined cytological, immunocytochemical, and molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Immacolata; Malapelle, Umberto; Carlomagno, Chiara; Palombini, Lucio; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2010-12-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) with cytological evaluation reliably diagnoses primary and secondary thyroid neoplasms. However, identifying the primary origin of a metastatic process involving the thyroid gland is challenging. In particular, metastasis of colon cancer to the thyroid gland is very rare. In this case report, a right lobe solid thyroid nodule in a 66-year-old male was aspirated. FNA cytology showed necrosis and atypical tall columnar cells; since, the patient at age 60 had undergone surgery for a sigmoid-rectal cancer metastasizing to the liver and subsequently to the lung, a suspicion of metastasis from colon cancer was raised. This was corroborated by cell-block immunocytochemistry showing a cytokeratin (CK) 7 negative/CK20-positive staining pattern; thyreoglobulin and TTF-1 were both negative. Since KRAS codon 12/13 mutations frequently occur in colon cancer, whereas they are extremely uncommon in primary thyroid tumors, DNA was extracted from the aspirated cells, and KRAS mutational analysis was carried out. The codon 12 G12D mutation was found; the same mutation was evident in the primary cancer of the colon and in its liver and lung metastasis. Thus, a combined cytological, immunocytochemical and molecular approach unquestionably correlated metastatic adenocarcinoma cells aspirated from the thyroid to a colo-rectal origin.

  17. Ulcerative colitis six years after colon cancer: only a coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellakis, Minas; Makatsoris, Thomas; Gkermpesi, Maria; Peroukidis, Stavros; Kalofonos, Haralabos

    2014-01-01

    The association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer is well known. Ulcerative colitis is a risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, and this risk increases with the activity and duration of bowel inflammation. Here we describe the case of a 52-year-old man who developed ulcerative colitis 6 years after the diagnosis and treatment of colon cancer. Although this could be a coincidence, there could be additional possibilities, like pre-existence of quiescent colitis, late effect of therapy, or maybe the existence of common pathogenetic factors contributing to the development of ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. PMID:24855393

  18. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease in a patient receiving bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Vijay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with colon cancer who, while receiving bevacizumab, developed sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease (SOSVOD. Certain antitumour agents such as 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine have also been reported to initiate hepatic SOSVOD in isolated cases. There have been no reports so far correlating bevacizumab with SOSVOD. Case presentation A 77-year-old man was being treated with oxaliplatin and a modified de Gramont regimen of 5-fluorouracil for metastatic colon cancer. Bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg was added from the seventh cycle onwards. Protracted neutropenia and thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of oxaliplatin after the ninth cycle. A computed tomography scan showed complete response and bevacizumab was continued for another 3 months, after which time the patient developed right hypochondrial pain, transudative ascites, splenomegaly and abnormal liver function tests. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed oesophageal varices. Liver biopsy showed features considered to be consistent with SOSVOD. Bevacizumab was stopped and a policy of watchful waiting was adopted. He tolerated the acute damage to his liver and subsequently the ascites resolved and liver function tests normalised. Conclusion We need to be aware that bevacizumab can cause sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease and that the occurrence of ascites should not be attributed to progressive disease without appropriate evaluation.

  19. The truth is in the water: metastatic prostate cancer presenting as an intermittent facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooles, N; Gupta, S; Wilkin-Crowe, H; Juratli, A

    2015-04-24

    An elderly man presented to the acute ear, nose and throat (ENT) services with a history of intermittent, self-limiting facial nerve palsy. Full ENT examination was normal, with all cranial nerves and peripheral neurology intact. Multiple imaging modalities suggested an aggressive bony lesion, secondary to locally advanced prostate malignancy with extensive metastatic infiltration. Prostate cancer is known to preferentially metastasise to bone and has been known to cause multiple cranial nerve palsies and ophthalmoplegia. This is the first case described in the literature of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with intermittent facial nerve palsy.

  20. PIK3CA mutations may be discordant between primary and corresponding metastatic disease in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont Jensen, Jeanette; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: PIK3CA mutations are frequent in breast cancer and activate the PI3K/Akt pathway. Unexpectedly, PIK3CA mutation appears in general to be associated with better outcome. In a cohort of patients where both primary and metastatic lesions were available the objective was to assess changes...... recurrence than wild type cases (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: PIK3CA mutations occur at high frequency in primary and metastatic breast cancer; these may not necessarily confer increased aggressiveness as mutants had a longer time to recurrence. Because PIK3CA status quite frequently changes between primary...

  1. [A case of metastatic rectal cancer with fulminant hepatitis caused by XELOX therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmochi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yuta; Yoneda, Masataka; Ito, Yasuhiro; Ohkubo, Yusuke; Egawa, Tomohisa; Nagashima, Atsushi; Shimokawa, Reiko; Makino, Hiroyuki; Yamamuro, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of fulminant hepatitis that was caused by XELOX therapy administered for metastatic rectal cancer. A 69- year-old man with metastatic rectal cancer received 4 courses XELOX therapy. He was subsequently admitted to our hospital with general fatigue. Shenzhen flapping and altered consciousness were noticed on the fifth day of hospitalization. A liver biopsy was subsequently performed. The patient was diagnosed with liver failure due to sinusoidal obstruction syndrome caused by oxaliplatin. This case provides valuable information as there are only a few reports of fulminant hepatitis caused by oxaliplatin.

  2. Green vegetables and colon cancer: the mechanism of a protective effect by chlorophyll

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important environmental determinants of the risk of colon cancer is the composition of the diet. Regular consumption of high amounts of red meat increases colon cancer risk. In contrast, consumption of green vegetables decreases the risk of colon cancer. This thesis provides a molecular m

  3. File list: InP.Dig.50.AllAg.Colon_cancer [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. Detection of colon and rectum cancers by terahertz techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Oliveira, Albino; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius

    2010-04-01

    Based on experimental analyses of colon and rectal tissues by THz spectroscopy and THz imaging, we show it is possible to distinguish between healthy and cancerous zones. Plots of the absorption coefficient and the index of refraction of the healthy and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images will be presented. The experimental results will be discussed and the conditions for the tissues discrimination will be established.

  16. Subcutaneous preconditioning increases invasion and metastatic dissemination in mouse colorectal cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Pavón, Miguel A.; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, Maria A.; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramon; Céspedes, Maria V.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse colorectal cancer (CRC) models generated by orthotopic microinjection of human CRC cell lines reproduce the pattern of lymphatic, haematological and transcoelomic spread but generate low metastatic efficiency. Our aim was to develop a new strategy that could increase the metastatic efficiency of these models. We used subcutaneous implantation of the human CRC cell lines HCT116 or SW48 prior to their orthotopic microinjection in the cecum of nude mice (SC+ORT). This subcutaneous preconditioning significantly enhanced metastatic dissemination. In the HCT116 model it increased the number and size of metastatic foci in lymph nodes, lung, liver and peritoneum, whereas, in the SW48 model, it induced a shift from non-metastatic to metastatic. In both models the number of apoptotic bodies in the primary tumour in the SC+ORT group was significantly reduced compared with that in the direct orthotopic injection (ORT) group. Moreover, in HCT116 tumours the number of keratin-positive tumour buddings and single epithelial cells increased at the invasion front in SC+ORT mice. In the SW48 tumour model, we observed a trend towards a higher number of tumour buds and single cells in the SC+ORT group but this did not reach statistical significance. At a molecular level, the enhanced metastatic efficiency observed in the HCT116 SC+ORT model was associated with an increase in AKT activation, VEGF-A overexpression and downregulation of β1 integrin in primary tumour tissue, whereas, in SW48 SC+ORT mice, the level of expression of these proteins remained unchanged. In summary, subcutaneous preconditioning increased the metastatic dissemination of both orthotopic CRC models by increasing tumour cell survival and invasion at the tumour invasion front. This approach could be useful to simultaneously study the mechanisms of metastases and to evaluate anti-metastatic drugs against CRC. PMID:24487410

  17. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which mod...

  18. Simultaneous Resection of Disseminated Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Haga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman with abdominal pain and vomiting was admitted to our hospital. Colonoscopy showed an advanced colon cancer that encompassed the entire circumference of the descending colon’s lumen. The patient was diagnosed with occlusive ileus associated with the colon cancer. She had been watched for liver cirrhosis due to the hepatitis C virus and received radiofrequency ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC 6 years previously. Although she exhibited a gradual increase in serum levels of α-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II starting 2 years before admission, no tumors were detected in the liver by abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography. On admission, contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed not only the colon cancer but also a tumor adjacent to the cecum. Both tumors were successfully removed by surgery and a pathological analysis revealed that the cecum tumor was poorly-differentiated HCC. The serum levels of α-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II declined markedly after the operation and no masses considered as peritoneal metastasis have been detected to date. This is the first report of the simultaneous resection of disseminated HCC and colon cancer.

  19. Effects of 5-fluorouracil adjuvant treatment of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelder, Wendy; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Plukker, John T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the late 1980s and early 1990s, 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for Stage III colon cancer. After the initial introduction of 5-fluorouracil in standard treatment protocols, several changes have been made based on results of randomized studies on vari

  20. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  1. Metastatic tumor to the iris and ciliary body as an initial sign of lung cancer: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Rui-fang; ZHAO Jia-liang; ZHANG Shun-hua; FENG Rui-e; CHENG Gang-wei; MA Jian-min; MAO Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ The most common sites of lung cancer metastases are pleura, bone, brain, pericardium and liver.1 Tumor metastasis to the eye is a rare complication of lung cancer. Metastatic cancer to the ocular region most often involves the uveal tract, however, most uveal metastases occur in the posterior uvea, and iris metastases are relatively rare. We describe a patient with adenocarcinoma of the lung metastatic to the iris as the first clinical sign without symptoms of lung cancer.

  2. Cytolytic replication of echoviruses in colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullberg Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, killing nearly 50% of patients afflicted. Though progress is being made within surgery and other complementary treatments, there is still need for new and more effective treatments. Oncolytic virotherapy, meaning that a cancer is cured by viral infection, is a promising field for finding new and improved treatments. We have investigated the oncolytic potential of several low-pathogenic echoviruses with rare clinical occurrence. Echoviruses are members of the enterovirus genus within the family Picornaviridae. Methods Six colon cancer cell lines (CaCo-2, HT29, LoVo, SW480, SW620 and T84 were infected by the human enterovirus B species echovirus 12, 15, 17, 26 and 29, and cytopathic effects as well as viral replication efficacy were investigated. Infectivity was also tested in spheroids grown from HT29 cells. Results Echovirus 12, 17, 26 and 29 replicated efficiently in almost all cell lines and were considered highly cytolytic. The infectivity of these four viruses was further evaluated in artificial tumors (spheroids, where it was found that echovirus 12, 17 and 26 easily infected the spheroids. Conclusions We have found that echovirus 12, 17 and 26 have potential as oncolytic agents against colon cancer, by comparing the cytolytic capacity of five low-pathogenic echoviruses in six colon cancer cell lines and in artificial tumors.

  3. Impact of diabetes on oncologic outcome of colorectal cancer patients: colon vs. rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS [hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.00-1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92, DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84 and recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98-1.76 in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer with DM on OS (P = 0.009 and DFS (P = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer.

  4. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  5. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and forkhead box O3a in colon cancer:Dangerous liaison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang; Link

    2012-01-01

    The WNT/-catenin and phosphoinositide 3-kinase(PI3K/AKT) signaling cascades both have been implicated in the formation and progression of colorectal cancer.Oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling suppresses the activity of forkhead box O3a(FOXO3a) transcription factor through phosphorylation leading to its nuclear exclusion.Inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling by PI3K or AKT inhibitors results in the translocation of FOXO3a to the nucleus,and is considered to be a promising therapeutic strategy for many cancers including colon cancer.Now,however,a new study in Nature Medicine has revealed a nuclear interaction of-catenin with FOXO3a as a promoter of metastatic progression in colon cancer.The work has important implications for the treatment of colon cancers,suggests a companion biomarker strategy to enable a personalized medicine approach,and offers an alternative therapeutic strategy to overcome resistance to PI3K and AKT inhibitors.

  6. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    Full Text Available Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+ supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa, its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+ levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  7. Evolutionary strategy for systemic therapy of metastatic breast cancer: balancing response with suppression of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Yoonseok; Das, Tuhin; Minton, Susan; Gatenby, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Conventional systemic therapy for disseminated breast cancer is based on the general assumption that the greatest patient benefit is achieved by killing the maximum number of tumor cells. While this strategy often achieves a significant reduction in tumor burden, most patients with metastatic breast cancer ultimately die from their disease as therapy fails because tumor cells evolve resistance. We propose that the conventional maximum dose/maximum cell kill cancer therapy, when viewed from an evolutionary vantage, is suboptimal and likely even harmful as it accelerates evolution and growth of the resistant phenotypes that ultimately cause patient death. As an alternative, we are investigating evolutionary therapeutic strategies that shift the treatment goal from killing the maximum number of cancer cells to maximizing patient survival. Here we introduce two novel approaches for systemic therapy for metastatic breast cancer, considering the evolutionary nature of tumor progression; adaptive therapy and double-bind therapy.

  8. Lunasin potentiates the effect of oxaliplatin preventing outgrowth of colon cancer metastasis, binds to α5β1 integrin and suppresses FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dia, Vermont P; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2011-12-27

    The effect of lunasin on colon cancer metastasis was studied using three human colon cancer cell lines in vitro and a liver metastasis model of colon cancer in vivo. Lunasin bound with α5β1 integrin and internalized into the nucleus of KM12L4 human colon cancer cells. Lunasin (10 μM) inhibited the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by 28%, 39% and 60% in RKO, HCT-116 and KM12L4 human colon cancer cells, respectively. Lunasin caused an increase in the expression of the inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α), a decrease in nuclear p50 NF-κB and a reduction in the migration of cancer cells. Lunasin (4 mg/kg bw) inhibited metastasis and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin by reducing the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Liver metastatic nodules were reduced from 28 (PBS) to 14 (lunasin, P = 0.047) while combination of lunasin and oxaliplatin to 5 (P = 0.004). The tumor burden was reduced from 0.13 (PBS) to 0.10 (lunasin, P = 0.039) to 0.04 (lunasin + oxaliplatin, P cancer cells by direct binding with α5β1 integrin suppressing FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling, and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in preventing the outgrowth of metastasis.

  9. Inhibition of the transcription factor Sp1 suppresses colon cancer stem cell growth and induces apoptosis in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingying; Zhang, Wenjing; Guo, Zheng; Ma, Feng; Wu, Yao; Bai, Yang; Gong, Wei; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tianming; Zhi, Fachao; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jide; Jiang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    The transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) plays a role in the development and progression of various types of human cancers, while cancer stem cells (CSCs) are important in cancer cell self-renewal, resistance to chemotherapy and metastatic potential. This study investigated the role of Sp1 in colon CSC growth and apoptosis. Colon CSCs were successfully enriched using special culture medium and identified by typical CSC gene expression. In a quiescent state, these CSCs formed spheres with slow proliferation; overexpressed Sp1, CD44, CD166 and CD133 proteins; upregulated mesenchymal markers; and a downregulated epithelial marker were noted. In ex vivo experiments, the Sp1 protein was expressed in 74.8% of colon cancer tissues, whereas it was expressed only in 42.2% of the distant normal colon mucosae. Furthermore, inhibition of SP1 expression using Sp1 siRNA or mithramycin A (MIT) led to marked suppression of CSC growth and induced apoptosis. In addition, the percentage of CD44+/CD166+ cells was significantly downregulated both in vivo and in vitro following Sp1 inhibition. In conclusion, Sp1 suppression attenuated the characteristics of colon CSCs. Thus, Sp1 inhibition may be potentially useful for the future development of a novel therapeutic strategy to control colon cancer.

  10. Sigmoid colon cancer arising in a diverticulum of the colon with involvement of the urinary bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Colon cancer can arise from the mucosa in a colonic diverticulum. Although colon diverticulum is a common disease, few cases have been previously reported on colon cancer associated with a diverticulum. We report a rare case of sigmoid colon cancer arising in a diverticulum with involvement of the urinary bladder, which presented characteristic radiographic images. Case presentation A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for macroscopic hematuria. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sigmoid colon tumor that protruded into the urinary bladder lumen. The radiographs showed a tumor with a characteristic dumbbell-shaped appearance. Colonoscopy showed a type 1 cancer and multiple diverticula in the sigmoid colon. A diagnosis of sigmoid colon cancer with involvement of the urinary bladder was made based on the pathological findings of the biopsied specimens. We performed sigmoidectomy and total resection of the urinary bladder with colostomy and urinary tract diversion. Histopathological findings showed the presence of a colovesical fistula due to extramurally growing colon cancer. Around the colon cancer, the normal colon mucosa was depressed sharply with lack of the muscular layer, suggesting that the colon cancer was arising from a colon diverticulum. Conclusion The present case is the first report of sigmoid colon cancer arising in a diverticulum with involvement of the urinary bladder. Due to an accurate preoperative radiological diagnosis, we were able to successfully perform a curative resection for sigmoid colon cancer arising in a diverticulum with involvement of the urinary bladder. PMID:24884743

  11. Mast Cells in Adjacent Normal Colon Mucosa rather than Those in Invasive Margin are Related to Progression of Colon Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xia; Xiao-shi Zhang; Ying-bo Chen; Ya Ding; Xiao-jun Wu; Rui-qing Peng; Qiang Zhou; Jing Zeng; Jing-hui Hou; Xing Zhang; Yi-xin Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective:Mast cells (MC) reside in the mucosa of the digestive tract as the first line against bacteria and toxins.Clinical evidence has implied that the infiltration of mast cells in colorectal cancers is related to malignant phenotypes and a poor prognosis.This study compared the role of mast cells in adjacent normal colon mucosa and in the invasive margin during the progression of colon cancer.Methods:Specimens were obtained from 39 patients with colon adenomas and 155 patients with colon cancers treated at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between January 1999 and July 2004.The density of mast cells was scored by an immunohistochemical assay.The pattern of mast cell distribution and its relationship with dinicopathologic parameters and 5-year survival were analyzed.Results:The majority of mast cells were located in the adjacent normal colon mucosa,followed by the invasive margin and least in the cancer stroma.Mast cell count in adjacent normal colon mucosa (MCCadjacent) was associated with pathologic classification,distant metastases and hepatic metastases,although it was not a prognostic factor.In contrast,mast cell count in the invasive margin (MCCinvasive) was associated with neither the clinicopathlogic parameters nor overall survival.Conclusion:Mast cells in the adjacent normal colon mucosa were related to the progression of colon cancer,suggesting that mast cells might modulate tumor progression via a long-distance mechanism.

  12. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  13. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Arrigoni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps.

  14. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  15. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Han Han

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (ARC has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  16. DEGRO practice guidelines for palliative radiotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. Bone metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, UKT Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, Wilfried [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Haase, Wulf [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    To provide practice guidelines and clinical recommendations on preferred standard palliative radiation therapy of bone metastases as well as metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) for metastatic breast cancer patients. Methods: The breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials. The literature search encompassed the period 1995-2008 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''breast cancer'', ''bone metastasis'', ''osseous metastasis'', ''metastatic spinal cord compression'' as well as ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. Clinical recommendations were formulated based on the panel's interpretation of the level of evidence referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Results: Different therapeutic goals (pain relief, local tumor control, prevention or improvement of motor deficits, stabilization of the spine or other bones) require complex approaches considering individual factors (i.e. life expectancy, tumor progression at other sites). Best results are achieved by close interdisciplinary cooperation minimizing the interval between diagnosis and onset of treatment. Most important criteria for prognosis and choice of treatment (mostly combined multimodal therapy) are neurologic status at diagnosis of MSCC, time course of duration and progression of the neurologic symptoms. Radiation therapy is effective and regarded as treatment of choice for MSCC with or without motor deficits and/or bone metastases, which do not need immediate surgical intervention. It may be used either postoperatively or as primary treatment in case of inoperability. An optimal dose fractionation schedule or optimal standard dose for treatment of bone

  17. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A; Entrena, José M; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A

    2016-01-11

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies.

  18. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Stephanie Nina; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential...... of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy...... biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen...

  19. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-07-21

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133⁺CD44⁺ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133⁺CD44⁺ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs.

  20. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisoo Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE and its bioactive compounds, including (+-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133+CD44+ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs.

  1. Increased risk of colon cancer after external radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapiti, Elisabetta; Fioretta, Gerald; Verkooijen, Helena M; Zanetti, Roberto; Schmidlin, Franz; Shubert, Hyma; Merglen, Arnaud; Miralbell, Raymond; Bouchardy, Christine

    2008-09-01

    Radiotherapy can induce second cancers. Controversies still exist regarding the risk of second malignancies after irradiation for prostate cancer. We evaluated the risk of developing colon and rectum cancers after prostate cancer in irradiated and nonirradiated patients. Using data from the population-based Geneva cancer registry, we included in the study all men with prostate cancer diagnosed between 1980 and 1998 who survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. Of the 1,134 patients, 264 were treated with external radiotherapy. Patients were followed for occurrence of colorectal cancer up to 31 December, 2003. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) using incidence rates for the general population to obtain the expected cancer incidence. The cohort yielded to 3,798 person-years. At the end of follow-up 19 patients had developed a colorectal cancer. Among irradiated patients the SIR for colorectal cancer was 3.4 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.7-6.0). Compared to the general population, the risk was significantly higher for colon cancer (SIR = 4.0, 95% CI: 1.8-7.6), but not for rectal cancer (SIR = 2.0, 95% CI: 0.2-7.2). The risk of colon cancer was increased in the period of 5-9 years after diagnosis (SIR = 4.7, 95% CI: 2.0-9.2). The overall SIR of secondary cancer in patients treated with radiotherapy was 1.35 (p = 0.056). Nonirradiated patients did not have any increased risk of rectal or colon cancer. This study shows a significant increase of colon but not rectum cancer after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The risk of second cancer after irradiation, although probably small, needs nevertheless to be carefully monitored.

  2. Sigmoid colon cancer arising in a diverticulum of the colon with involvement of the urinary bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Yasumichi; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Shozo; Yoshikawa, Akemi; Tsukioka, Yuji; Fukushima, Wataru; Hirosawa, Hisashi; Izumi, Ryohei; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Colon cancer can arise from the mucosa in a colonic diverticulum. Although colon diverticulum is a common disease, few cases have been previously reported on colon cancer associated with a diverticulum. We report a rare case of sigmoid colon cancer arising in a diverticulum with involvement of the urinary bladder, which presented characteristic radiographic images. Case presentation A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for macroscopic hematuria. Computed tomography and ma...

  3. Skin and Colon Cancer Media Campaigns in Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Broadwater

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The mission of the Utah Cancer Action Network is to reduce cancer incidence and mortality in Utah. Established in 2003, the network selected skin and colon cancers as the first priorities in its comprehensive plan. In its first year of operation, the network planned and implemented a cancer awareness campaign that was organized along two tracks: 1 marketing research, consisting of two telephone surveys, and 2 two advertising/awareness campaigns, one for colon cancer and one for skin cancer. The first telephone survey was conducted in January 2003 to obtain a baseline measurement of the Utah population’s knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The advertising campaigns were launched in April 2003, and the second telephone survey was conducted in May. In January 2003, 18% of survey respondents reported seeing or hearing skin cancer prevention or sun protection announcements; in May, this percentage increased to 76%. In January, 36% indicated they had seen, read, or heard colorectal cancer early detection announcements; in May, this percentage increased to 79%.

  4. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in a Patient with Undiscovered Sigmoid Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Po-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC is a stress-related cardiomyopathy that is characterized by reversible left systolic dysfunction, which appears to be precipitated by sudden emotional or physical stress in the absence of myocardial infarction. Here we present a rare case that clinically presented with intermittent abdominal pain, initially impressed as non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure but with a normal coronary angiogram. Her symptoms relieved spontaneously without returning. Sigmoid colon cancer was diagnosed via colonoscopy later due to persistent abdominal discomfort. In the absence of detectable emotional or physical stress factors, the newly diagnosed sigmoid colon cancer was the only possible trigger factor of TTC. We offer this case as a reminder that cancer should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with the etiology of TTC.

  5. A nationwide study on anastomotic leakage after colonic cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, L N; Andreasen, A H

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a major challenge in colorectal cancer surgery due to increased morbidity and mortality. Possible risk factors should be investigated differentially, distinguishing between rectal and colonic surgery in large-scale studies to avoid selection bias and confounding....... Method: The incidence and risk factors associated with AL were analysed in an unselected nation-wide prospective cohort of patient subjected to curative colonic cancer surgery with primary anastomosis and entered into The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database between May 2001 and December 2008. Results......: AL occurred in 593 (6.4%) of 9333 patients. Laparoscopic surgery (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.70; P = 0.03); left hemicolectomy (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.50-2.72) or sigmoid colectomy (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.32-2.17; P = 0.01); intraoperative blood loss (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1...

  6. Colon cancer stem cells: promise of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Intestinal epithelial cells exist for a shorter amount of time than that required to accumulate tumor-inducing genetic changes, so researchers have investigated the concept that CRC arises from the long-lived stem cells, rather than from the differentiated epithelial cells. Colon CSCs were originally identified through the expression of the CD133 glycoprotein using an antibody directed to its epitope AC133. It is not clear if CD133 is a marker of colon CSCs-other cell surface markers, such as epithelial-specific antigen, CD44, CD166, Musashi-1, CD29, CD24, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, have been proposed. In addition to initiating and sustaining tumor growth, CSCs are believed to mediate cancer relapse after chemotherapy. How can we identify and analyze colon CSCs and what agents are being designed to kill this chemotherapy-refractory population?

  7. Covalent Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wells S; Tan, Li; Smith, Andrew; Gray, Nathanael S; Wendt, Michael K

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic targeting of late-stage breast cancer is limited by an inadequate understanding of how tumor cell signaling evolves during metastatic progression and by the currently available small molecule inhibitors capable of targeting these processes. Herein, we demonstrate that both β3 integrin and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) are part of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that is required to facilitate metastatic outgrowth in response to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Mechanistically, β3 integrin physically disrupts an interaction between FGFR1 and E-cadherin, leading to a dramatic redistribution of FGFR1 subcellular localization, enhanced FGF2 signaling and increased three-dimensional (3D) outgrowth of metastatic breast cancer cells. This ability of β3 integrin to drive FGFR signaling requires the enzymatic activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Consistent with these mechanistic data, we demonstrate that FGFR, β3 integrin, and FAK constitute a molecular signature capable of predicting decreased survival of patients with the basal-like subtype of breast cancer. Importantly, covalent targeting of a conserved cysteine in the P-loop of FGFR1-4 with our newly developed small molecule, FIIN-4, more effectively blocks 3D metastatic outgrowth as compared with currently available FGFR inhibitors. In vivo application of FIIN-4 potently inhibited the growth of metastatic, patient-derived breast cancer xenografts and murine-derived metastases growing within the pulmonary microenvironment. Overall, the current studies demonstrate that FGFR1 works in concert with other EMT effector molecules to drive aberrant downstream signaling, and that these events can be effectively targeted using our novel therapeutics for the treatment of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2096-106. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Next generation sequencing identifies ‘interactome’ signatures in relapsed and refractory metastatic colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Laurence; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2017-01-01

    Background In the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutational status individualizes therapeutic options and identify a cohort of patients (pts) with an aggressive clinical course. We hypothesized that relapsed and refractory mCRC pts develop unique mutational signatures that may guide therapy, predict for a response and highlight key signaling pathways important for clinical decision making. Methods Relapsed and refractory mCRC pts (N=32) were molecularly profiled utilizing commercially available next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Web-based bioinformatics tools (Reactome/Enrichr) were utilized to elucidate mutational profile linked pathways-networks that have the potential to guide therapy. Results Pts had progressed on fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab and/or panitumumab. Most common histology was adenocarcinoma (colon N=29; rectal N=3). Of the mutations TP53 was the most common, followed by APC, KRAS, PIK3CA, BRAF, SMAD4, SPTA1, FAT1, PDGFRA, ATM, ROS1, ALK, CDKN2A, FBXW7, TGFBR2, NOTCH1 and HER3. Pts had on average had ≥5 unique mutations. The most frequent activated signaling pathways were: HER2, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), p38 through BRAF-MEK cascade via RIT and RIN, ARMS-mediated activation of MAPK cascade, and VEGFR2. Conclusions Dominant driver oncogene mutations do not always equate to oncogenic dependence, hence understanding pathogenic ‘interactome(s)’ in individual pts is key to both clinically relevant targets and in choosing the next best therapy. Mutational signatures derived from corresponding ‘pathway-networks’ represent a meaningful tool to (I) evaluate functional investigation in the laboratory; (II) predict response to drug therapy; and (III) guide rational drug combinations in relapsed and refractory mCRC pts. PMID:28280605

  9. Improved survival with early adjuvant chemotherapy after colonic resection for stage III colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Azaquoun, Najah; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In stage III colonic cancer, time from surgery to start of adjuvant chemotherapy may influence survival. In this study, we evaluated the effect of timing of adjuvant therapy on survival. METHODS: Database study from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's national database....... RESULTS: The final population included 1,827 patients scheduled for adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy started within 4 and 8 weeks improved survival when compared to start later than 8 weeks (HR [95%CI]: 1.7 [1.1-2.6]; P = 0.024 and 1.4 [1.07-1.8]; P = 0.013, respectively), whereas...

  10. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, Answers, and Hope. Available Every Minute ... 227.2345 Live Chat Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram help site map privacy accessibility terms of use ...

  11. A close-up of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Heijmans

    2013-01-01

    Understanding development of colorectal cancer requires knowledge on homeostasis of the normal intestinal epithelium as well as intestinal tumorigenesis. In the current thesis, a number of aspects of these two intricately connected subjects are further discussed.

  12. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Live Chat Latest News English English Español More Languages Donate Donate Cancer A-Z Stay Healthy Treatment & Support Our Research Programs Get Involved About Us Donate Live Chat ...

  13. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Stories Glossary For Health Care Professionals Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support ...

  14. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, Answers, and Hope. Available Every ... 800.227.2345 Live Chat Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram help site map privacy accessibility terms of ...

  15. miRNA expression in colon polyps provides evidence for a multihit model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Ann L; French, Amy J; Sarver, Aaron L; Subramanian, Subbaya; Morlan, Bruce W; Riska, Shaun M; Borralho, Pedro M; Cunningham, Julie M; Boardman, Lisa A; Wang, Liang; Smyrk, Thomas C; Asmann, Yan; Steer, Clifford J; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2011-01-01

    Changes in miRNA expression are a common feature in colon cancer. Those changes occurring in the transition from normal to adenoma and from adenoma to carcinoma, however, have not been well defined. Additionally, miRNA changes among tumor subgroups of colon cancer have also not been adequately evaluated. In this study, we examined the global miRNA expression in 315 samples that included 52 normal colonic mucosa, 41 tubulovillous adenomas, 158 adenocarcinomas with proficient DNA mismatch repair (pMMR) selected for stage and age of onset, and 64 adenocarcinomas with defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) selected for sporadic (n = 53) and inherited colon cancer (n = 11). Sporadic dMMR tumors all had MLH1 inactivation due to promoter hypermethylation. Unsupervised PCA and cluster analysis demonstrated that normal colon tissue, adenomas, pMMR carcinomas and dMMR carcinomas were all clearly discernable. The majority of miRNAs that were differentially expressed between normal and polyp were also differentially expressed with a similar magnitude in the comparison of normal to both the pMMR and dMMR tumor groups, suggesting a stepwise progression for transformation from normal colon to carcinoma. Among the miRNAs demonstrating the largest fold up- or down-regulated changes (≥4), four novel (miR-31, miR-1, miR-9 and miR-99a) and two previously reported (miR-137 and miR-135b) miRNAs were identified in the normal/adenoma comparison. All but one of these (miR-99a) demonstrated similar expression differences in the two normal/carcinoma comparisons, suggesting that these early tumor changes are important in both the pMMR- and dMMR-derived cancers. The comparison between pMMR and dMMR tumors identified four miRNAs (miR-31, miR-552, miR-592 and miR-224) with statistically significant expression differences (≥2-fold change).

  16. miRNA expression in colon polyps provides evidence for a multihit model of colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann L Oberg

    Full Text Available Changes in miRNA expression are a common feature in colon cancer. Those changes occurring in the transition from normal to adenoma and from adenoma to carcinoma, however, have not been well defined. Additionally, miRNA changes among tumor subgroups of colon cancer have also not been adequately evaluated. In this study, we examined the global miRNA expression in 315 samples that included 52 normal colonic mucosa, 41 tubulovillous adenomas, 158 adenocarcinomas with proficient DNA mismatch repair (pMMR selected for stage and age of onset, and 64 adenocarcinomas with defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR selected for sporadic (n = 53 and inherited colon cancer (n = 11. Sporadic dMMR tumors all had MLH1 inactivation due to promoter hypermethylation. Unsupervised PCA and cluster analysis demonstrated that normal colon tissue, adenomas, pMMR carcinomas and dMMR carcinomas were all clearly discernable. The majority of miRNAs that were differentially expressed between normal and polyp were also differentially expressed with a similar magnitude in the comparison of normal to both the pMMR and dMMR tumor groups, suggesting a stepwise progression for transformation from normal colon to carcinoma. Among the miRNAs demonstrating the largest fold up- or down-regulated changes (≥4, four novel (miR-31, miR-1, miR-9 and miR-99a and two previously reported (miR-137 and miR-135b miRNAs were identified in the normal/adenoma comparison. All but one of these (miR-99a demonstrated similar expression differences in the two normal/carcinoma comparisons, suggesting that these early tumor changes are important in both the pMMR- and dMMR-derived cancers. The comparison between pMMR and dMMR tumors identified four miRNAs (miR-31, miR-552, miR-592 and miR-224 with statistically significant expression differences (≥2-fold change.

  17. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana;

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated...

  18. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of docetaxel rechallenge in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) relapsing after an initial good response to first-line docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients with mCRPC w...

  19. ESR1 mutations: Moving towards guiding treatment decision-making in metastatic breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Angus (Lindsay); N. Beije (Nick); A. Jäger (A.); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); S. Sleijfer (Stefan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the gene coding for the estrogen receptor (ER), ESR1, have been associated with acquired endocrine resistance in patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Functional studies revealed that these ESR1 mutations lead to constitutive activity of the ER, meaning t

  20. Cost utility analysis of everolimus in the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlović, J.; Minović, I.; Bruinsma, A.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) is becoming an important part of Dutch health care expenditure due to expensive pharmaceutical options for disease control and lack of adequate prevention methods. New targeted therapeutics, such as sunitinib, sorafenib and everolimus, have recently em

  1. RAS testing in metastatic colorectal cancer: excellent reproducibility amongst 17 Dutch pathology centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Tops, B.B.; Rombout, P.D.; Dequeker, E.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) restricted the indication for anti-EGFR targeted therapy to metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with a wild-type RAS gene, increasing the need for reliable RAS mutation testing. We evaluated the completeness and reproducibility of RAS-testing in the Netherl

  2. FCGR polymorphisms and cetuximab efficacy in chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer: an international consortium study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geva, Ravit; Vecchione, Loredana; Kalogeras, Konstantinos T;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to better clarify the role of germline variants of the FCG2 receptor, FCGR2A-H131R and FCGR3A-V158F, on the therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A large cohort with sufficient statistical power was assembled. DESIGN: To show a HR advantage ...

  3. Molecular markers in circulating tumour cells from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Gradilone, Angela; Petracca, Arianna; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Raimondi, Cristina; Iacovelli, Roberto; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico

    2010-08-01

    The prognosis of metastatic cancer patients is still largely affected by treatment failure, mainly due to drug resistance. The hypothesis that chemotherapy might miss circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and particularly a subpopulation of more aggressive, stem-like CTCs, characterized by multidrug resistance, has been recently raised. We investigated the prognostic value of drug resistance and stemness markers in CTCs from metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin (L-OHP) and 5-fluoruracil (5-FU) based regimens. Forty patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were enrolled. CTCs were isolated from peripheral blood and analysed for the expression of aldheyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), CD44, CD133 (used as markers of stemness), multidrug resistance related protein 5 (MRP5 used as marker of resistance to 5-FU and L-OHP) and survivin (used as a marker of apoptosis resistance). CTCs were found in 27/40 (67%) patients. No correlation was found between the expression of either CD44 and CD133 in CTCs and the outcome of patients, while a statistically significant shorter progression-free survival was found in patients with CTCs positive for the expression of ALDH1, survivin and MRP5. These results support the idea that isolating survivin and MRP5+ CTCs may help in the selection of metastatic colorectal cancer patients resistant to standard 5-FU and L-OHP based chemotherapy, for which alternative regimens may be appropriate.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two groups of agents targeting either the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor or the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been added to the therapeutic arsenal against metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Currently available agents in these groups are the anti-VEGF

  5. Prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, S.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Iannotti, N.; Saidman, B.H.; Sabbath, K.D.; Gabrail, N.Y.; Picus, J.; Morse, M.A.; Mitchell, E.; Miller, M.C.; Doyle, G.V.; Tissing, H.; Terstappen, L.W.; Meropol, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We demonstrated that circulating tumor cell (CTC) number at baseline and follow-up is an independent prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This analysis was undertaken to explore whether patient and treatment characteristics impact the prognostic value of CTCs. PATIEN

  6. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access progra...

  7. A PHASE-II AND PHARMACOKINETIC STUDY WITH ORAL PIRITREXIM FOR METASTATIC BREAST-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, EGE; GIETEMA, JA; WORKMAN, P; SCOTT, JE; CRAWSHAW, A; DOBBS, HJ; DENNIS, [No Value; MULDER, NH; SLEIJFER, DT; WILLEMSE, PHB

    1993-01-01

    Piritrexim is a lipid-soluble antifolate which, like methotrexate, has a potent capacity to inhibit dihydrofolate reductase. We performed a multicentre phase 11 study with piritrexim in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four patients of which sixteen had received pri

  8. Phase II study of oxaliplatin, UFT, and leucovorin in patients with metastatic gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, Ester J. M.; Drenth, Annemieke F. J.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Plukker, John T. M.; Hospers, Geke A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, UFT, and leucovorin in metastatic gastric cancer. Patients received intravenous oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) on day 1, followed by oral UFT capsules (350 mg/m(2) per day) and leucovorin tablets (90 mg/day), every 8 h, for 14 days, in a 3

  9. Prevalence and genotype identification of human JC virus in colon cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Paul Yann; Fung, Chiung-Yau; Chang, Fang-Pei; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chang, Deching

    2008-10-01

    Although JC virus (JCV), a human polyomavirus, has been detected in colon cancers, the association between JCV and colon cancer remains controversial. In Taiwan, the prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer patients has not been reported. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate JCV infection in colon cancers in Taiwan. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 22 colon cancer patients were examined in this study. Nested PCR was performed to detect viral genomic DNA. The product of the nested PCR flanking the JCV regulatory region was sequenced further. Viral large tumor protein, LT, and late capsid protein, VP1, were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nested PCR revealed JCV genomic DNA in 86.4% (19/22) of the colon cancer tissue samples. Both rearranged and archetypal genotypes of JCV were identified. Expression of JCV LT was positive in 63.6% (14/22) of the examined colon cancer tissue samples but not in any adjacent normal region. Expression of viral capsid protein VP1 was not detected in any of the tissues examined. The current study demonstrates that JCV genomic DNA was present in the examined colon cancer tissues. The genotypes of JCV in colon cancer tissues were also identified. Expression of viral early protein but not structural capsid protein was detected in the examined colon cancer tissues. Furthermore, a high prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer tissues in Taiwan was also demonstrated.

  10. Prognostic impact of Metadherin-SND1 interaction in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Du, Xilin; Zang, Li; Song, Nuan; Yang, Tao; Dong, Rui; Wu, Tao; He, Xianli; Lu, Jianguo

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between Metadherin (MTDH) and Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1) is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression of several human malignancies. However, its roles in colon cancer are still unclear. To investigate the clinical value of MTDH and SND1 expression in colon cancer. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expression of MTDH and SND1 using human colon cancer and their corresponding non-cancerous colon tissues from 196 patients' biopsies. Positive expression of MTDH and SND1 were both increased in colon cancer tissues compared to paired non-cancerous colon tissues. There was a positive correlation between MTDH and SND1 expression in colon cancer tissues (r = 0.86, p colon cancer patients with positive expression of MTDH and SND1 were significantly shorter than those without their expression (both p = 0.01). Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis suggested that positive expression of MTDH and SND1 was an independent poor prognostic predictor in colon cancer. Our data suggest that the increased expression of MTDH and/or SND1 is closely related to carcinogenesis, progression, and prognosis of colon cancer. The co-expression of MTDH/SND1 may be a novel distinctive marker to benefit us in prediction of the prognosis in colon cancer.

  11. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  12. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zardawi, Ibrahim; Chong, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  13. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardawi, Ibrahim; Chong, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  14. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Zardawi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  15. Metastin is not involved in metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Dilana, Kalliopi D; Gkiozos, Ioannis; Gratsias, Ioannis; Tsimpoukis, Sotirios; Polyzos, Aris; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2011-06-01

    Metastin, the product of the KISS-1 gene, seems to represent a strong suppressant of metastasis for some types of cancer. The aim of this study is to explore whether circulating levels of metastin could be used as a marker for the metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as a diagnostic marker in NSCLC patients. The possible correlation between metastin and leptin circulating levels was also evaluated. Fasting serum levels of metastin and leptin were determined in 96 NSCLC patients at diagnosis (76 with metastatic disease and 21 with locally advanced disease) and 49 healthy volunteers using commercial available ELISA. Serum metastin levels presented no differences between NSCLC patients and healthy volunteers (1.18 ± 0.98 vs. 1.17 ± 0.39 ng/ml, P = 0.979) as well as between patients with metastatic and locally advanced disease (1.17 ± 1.05 vs. 1.21 ± 0.64 ng/ml, P = 0.872). There was no statistically significant correlation between circulating metastin and leptin levels in NSCLC patients and patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease. This study shows a lack of direct involvement of metastin in the diagnosis and metastatic potential of NSCLC.

  16. Sorafenib in radioactive iodine-refractory, locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brose, Marcia S; Nutting, Christopher M; Jarzab, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with radioactive iodine ((131)I)-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer have a poor prognosis because of the absence of effective treatment options. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of orally administered sorafenib...... in the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. METHODS: In this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial (DECISION), we investigated sorafenib (400 mg orally twice daily) in patients with radioactive iodine-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid...... cancer. Adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of sorafenib. These results suggest that sorafenib is a new treatment option for patients with progressive radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. FUNDING: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals and Onyx Pharmaceuticals...

  17. Systemic therapy in muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer: current trends and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Trump, Donald L

    2016-09-01

    Bladder urothelial cancers remain an important urologic cancer with limited treatment options in the locally advanced and metastatic setting. While neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced muscle-invasive cancers has shown overall survival benefit, clinical uptake in practice have lagged behind. Controversies surrounding adjuvant chemotherapy use are also ongoing. Systemic therapies for metastatic bladder cancer have largely used platinum-based therapies without effective standard second-line therapy options for those who fail, although vinflunine is approved in Europe as a second-line therapy based on a Phase III trial, and most recently, atezolizumab, a checkpoint inhibitor, was approved by the US FDA. Given increasing recognition of mutational signatures expressed in urothelial carcinomas, several promising agents with use of VEGF-targeted therapies, HER2-directed agents and immunotherapies with PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in various settings are discussed herein.

  18. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised c...

  19. Oxidative stress may cause metastatic disease in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Edith Smed; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Despite surgical treatment of stage II colorectal cancer many patients will experience relapse. Inflammatory and immunologic reactions created due to the surgical stress response result in the production of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress in turn, may result in the stimulation of cancer...... cells that have not been cleared by the immune system to metastasize. In this paper we present an overview of studies where oxidative stress in relation to surgery has been linked to the development of metastatic disease....

  20. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  1. Clinical impact of FDG PET-CT in patients with potentially operable metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.H. [Department of Radiology, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Chowdhury, F.U. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Lodge, J.P.A. [HPB and Transplant Unit, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarsbrook, A.F., E-mail: andrew.scarsbrook@leedsth.nhs.uk [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the clinical impact of 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Materials and methods: One hundred and two patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer underwent FDG PET-CT in addition to conventional imaging over an 18-month period. The findings were compared to conventional imaging, with histological or clinico-radiological validation. The impact on subsequent management was evaluated using information from clinico-radiological databases. Results: Of 102 patients (mean age 67 years, range 27-85 years), 94 had liver, five had isolated lung, and three had limited peritoneal metastases. In 31 patients (30%) PET-CT had a major impact on subsequent management, by correctly clarifying indeterminate lesions on conventional imaging as inoperable metastatic disease in 16 patients, detecting previously unsuspected metastatic disease in nine patients, identifying occult second primary tumours in three patients, and correctly down-staging three patients. PET-CT had a minor impact in 12 patients (12%), no impact in 49 cases (48%), and a potentially negative impact in 10 cases (10%). Following PET-CT, 36 (35%) patients were no longer considered for surgery. Of those remaining operative 45 of 66 (68%) underwent potentially curative metastatic surgery. In this cohort PET-CT saved 16 futile laparotomies. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT has a valuable role in selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by improving staging accuracy and characterizing indeterminate lesions and helps triage patients to the appropriate treatment.

  2. miR-129-3p controls centrosome number in metastatic prostate cancer cells by repressing CP110.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijnsdorp, Irene V; Hodzic, Jasmina; Lagerweij, Tonny; Westerman, Bart; Krijgsman, Oscar; Broeke, Jurjen; Verweij, Frederik; Nilsson, R Jonas A; Rozendaal, Lawrence; van Beusechem, Victor W; van Moorselaar, Jeroen A; Wurdinger, Thomas; Geldof, Albert A

    2016-03-29

    The centrosome plays a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis. However, it is unclear how abnormal centrosome numbers are regulated when prostate cancer (PCa) cells become metastatic. CP110 was previously described for its contribution of centrosome amplification (CA) and early development of aggressive cell behaviour. However its regulation in metastatic cells remains unclear. Here we identified miR-129-3p as a novel metastatic microRNA. CP110 was identified as its target protein. In PCa cells that have metastatic capacity, CP110 expression was repressed by miR-129-3p. High miR-129-3p expression levels increased cell invasion, while increasing CP110 levels decreased cell invasion. Overexpression of CP110 in metastatic PCa cells resulted in a decrease in the number of metastasis. In tissues of PCa patients, low CP110 and high miR-129-3p expression levels correlated with metastasis, but not with the expression of genes related to EMT. Furthermore, overexpression of CP110 in metastatic PCa cells resulted in excessive-CA (E-CA), and a change in F-actin distribution which is in agreement with their reduced metastatic capacity. Our data demonstrate that miR-129-3p functions as a CA gatekeeper in metastatic PCa cells by maintaining pro-metastatic centrosome amplification (CA) and preventing anti-metastatic E-CA.

  3. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  4. Fluid biopsy in patients with metastatic prostate, pancreatic and breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Malchiodi, Michael; Baehring, Franziska; Voigt, Katharina; Lazar, Daniel; Nieva, Jorge; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Schram, Ethan; Coward, Michael; Yang, Xing; Metzner, Thomas; Lamy, Rachelle; Honnatti, Meghana; Yoshioka, Craig; Kunken, Joshua; Petrova, Yelena; Sok, Devin; Nelson, David; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Hematologic spread of carcinoma results in incurable metastasis; yet, the basic characteristics and travel mechanisms of cancer cells in the bloodstream are unknown. We have established a fluid phase biopsy approach that identifies circulating tumor cells (CTCs) without using surface protein-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. This 'HD-CTC' assay finds >5 HD-CTCs mL-1 of blood in 80% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (n = 20), in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer (n = 30), in 50% of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (n = 18), and in 0% of normal controls (n = 15). Additionally, it finds HD-CTC clusters ranging from 2 HD-CTCs to greater than 30 HD-CTCs in the majority of these cancer patients. This initial validation of an enrichment-free assay demonstrates our ability to identify significant numbers of HD-CTCs in a majority of patients with prostate, breast and pancreatic cancers.

  5. Clinical manifestations and diagnostic approach to metastatic cancer of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, C; Lang, S; Pruckmayer, M; Millesi, W; Rasse, M; Marosi, C; Leitha, T

    1997-10-01

    In a 12-month period, metastatic cancer was diagnosed in eight patients. Six of them presented with pain mimicking toothache, temporomandibular joint disorders or trigeminal neuralgia, while two showed osteopenic bone lesions in the panoramic radiography, and perimandibular swelling. Anesthesia of the lower lip was the only common clinical feature. In seven of the eight patients, a whole body bone scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the skull in combination with a whole body and SPECT anti-granulocyte (Tc-99m MAK 250/183) bone marrow scintigraphy was performed. One patient did not have combined scintigraphy performed secondary to severe systemic illness. In six of the seven, the results were conclusive for a metastatic bone lesion. Biopsies confirmed three patients to have a previously unrecognized primary cancer, one patient to have previously unrecognized recurrent cancer, and three patients to exhibit new metastatic spread of an already diagnosed cancer. Histology revealed breast, lung, renal cancer and a malignancy of inconclusive origin. In the remaining patient, combined scintigraphy suggested osteomyelitis, yet biopsy revealed a prostate cancer metastasis with acute inflammatory cell infiltration. Thus, the scintigraphy pattern of a hot spot in the bone scan and a cold lesion in the bone marrow scintigraphy is highly suggestive of a mandibular metastasis, if accompanied by anesthesia of the lower lip.

  6. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaannet, E; Sampieri, K; Dekkers, O M; de Craen, A J M; van Herk-Sukel, M P P; Lemmens, V; van den Broek, C B M; Coebergh, J W; Herings, R M C; van de Velde, C J H; Fodde, R; Liefers, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based study was to assess the therapeutic effect on overall survival of aspirin/NSAIDs as adjuvant treatment used after the diagnosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Data concerning prescriptions were obtained from PHARMO record linkage systems and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (1998–2007) were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (population-based cancer registry). Aspirin/NSAID use was classified as none, prediagnosis and postdiagnosis and only postdiagnosis. Patients were defined as non-user of aspirin/NSAIDs from the date of diagnosis of the colorectal cancer to the date of first use of aspirin or NSAIDs and user from first use to the end of follow-up. Poisson regression was performed with user status as time-varying exposure. Results: In total, 1176 (26%) patients were non-users, 2086 (47%) were prediagnosis and postdiagnosis users and 1219 (27%) were only postdiagnosis users (total n=4481). Compared with non-users, a survival gain was observed for aspirin users; the adjusted rate ratio (RR) was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63–0.95; P=0.015). Stratified for colon and rectal, the survival gain was only present in colon cancer (adjusted RR 0.65 (95%CI 0.50–0.84; P=0.001)). For frequent users survival gain was larger (adjusted RR 0.61 (95%CI 0.46–0.81; P=0.001). In rectal cancer, aspirin use was not associated with survival (adjusted RR 1.10 (95%CI 0.79–1.54; P=0.6). The NSAIDs use was associated with decreased survival (adjusted RR 1.93 (95%CI 1.70–2.20; P<0.001). Conclusion: Aspirin use initiated or continued after diagnosis of colon cancer is associated with a lower risk of overall mortality. These findings strongly support initiation of

  7. Role of Chemotherapy and Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Vipin; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy using the taxanes, docetaxel and cabazitaxel, remains an important therapeutic option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, despite the survival benefits afforded by these agents, the survival increments are modest and resistance occurs universally. Efforts to overcome resistance to docetaxel by combining with biologic agents have heretofore been unsuccessful. Indeed, resistance to these taxanes is also associated with cross-resistance to the antiandrogen drugs, abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy in metastatic CRPC and the potential role of emerging regimens and agents in varying clinical phases of development.

  8. Critical questions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Integrating emerging clinical evidence and guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC typically confers a poor prognosis, however, novel advances in treatment options, as well as biomarkers for monitoring disease response and progression, have recently helped improve survival rates. Additionally, new guidelines provide some direction on incorporating these new treatments but some confusion still exists among clinicians about best methods for initiating treatment and the optimal sequencing of agents to prolong survival. In this article, we review the literature and answer some frequently asked questions about treating men with metastatic CRPC, including choosing a first-line treatment, monitoring treatment response, and proceeding to additional lines of therapy.

  9. Ulcerative colitis six years after colon cancer: only a coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakellakis M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Minas Sakellakis,1 Thomas Makatsoris,1 Maria Gkermpesi,2 Stavros Peroukidis,1 Haralabos Kalofonos11Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, University, Hospital of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: The association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer is well known. Ulcerative colitis is a risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, and this risk increases with the activity and duration of bowel inflammation. Here we describe the case of a 52-year-old man who developed ulcerative colitis 6 years after the diagnosis and treatment of colon cancer. Although this could be a coincidence, there could be additional possibilities, like pre-existence of quiescent colitis, late effect of therapy, or maybe the existence of common pathogenetic factors contributing to the development of ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer.Keywords: ulcerative, colitis, colorectal, cancer, inflammation

  10. Nature’s treasurer: plants acting on colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Gupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, neoplastic disease, especially colorectal cancer has been emerged as a major challenge for mankind. For treatment of colorectal cancer some drugs available in market (e.g. Capecitabine, Cetuximab, Trinotecan, etc. and many are under investigation. Tremendous possibilities are reviewed and collected from the herbal source (natural treasure for the successful management of colorectal cancer. Intensive research had been done worldwide on the plant source that increases possibilities for providing great opportunities to improve the management of the colorectal cancer. Many researchers had concluded that herbal source can be useful for the successful management of colon cancer. This review provides a brief account on various plants that can be used for therapeutic purposes. Author suggests developing a chemical base moiety for clinical researchers to run clinical trials and future research on such capable plants.

  11. Identifying molecular targets of lifestyle modifications in colon cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Marie Derry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; ~20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes that could positively influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals.

  12. Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay for prediction of recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y Nancy; Rustin, Rudolph B; Sullivan, James D

    2015-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have enabled identification of tumor biomarkers that allow for individualized risk assessment for patients with cancer. Molecular predictors of clinical outcome can help inform discussion regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected colon cancer, such as those with stage II colon cancer in which the benefit of adjuvant therapy is controversial or those with stage III colon cancer who may have a lower risk of recurrence and less absolute benefit from oxaliplatin therapy. This article summarizes the data surrounding the development, validation, and clinical and economic utility of the Oncotype DX(®) colon cancer assay, a multigene expression assay validated to independently predict recurrence risk in patients with stage II and III colon cancer beyond traditional factors.

  13. Robotic complete mesocolic excision for right-sided colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozben, Volkan; Baca, Bilgi; Atasoy, Deniz; Bayraktar, Onur; Aghayeva, Afag; Cengiz, Turgut Bora; Erguner, Ilknur; Karahasanoglu, Tayfun; Hamzaoglu, Ismail

    2016-10-01

    Complete mesocolic excision (CME) with central vascular ligation for right-sided colon cancer has been proven to provide superior oncologic outcomes and survival advantage when compared to standard lymphadenectomy [1]. A number of studies comparing conventional laparoscopic versus open CME have shown feasibility and safety of the laparoscopic approach with acceptable oncological profile and postoperative outcomes [2, 3]. The introduction of robotic systems with its technical advantages, including improved vision, better ergonomics and precise dissection, has further revolutionized minimally invasive approach in colorectal surgery. However, there seems to be a relatively slow adoption of robotic approach in the CME technique for right-sided colon cancer. This video demonstrates our detailed operative technique and feasibility for performing right-sided CME robotically. The surgical procedure is performed with a medial-to-lateral approach through four 8-mm robotic and one assistant ports. First, the ileocolic vessels are isolated, clipped and transected near their origins. Cephalad dissection continues along the ventral aspect of the superior mesenteric vein. Staying in the embryological planes between the mesocolon and retroperitoneal structures, mesenteric dissection is extended up to the root of the right colic vessels, if present, and the middle colic vessels, which are clipped and divided individually near their origins. After the terminal ileum is transected using an endolinear staple, the colon is mobilized fully from gastrocolic tissue and then from its lateral attachments. The transverse colon is transected under the guidance of near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Creation of an intracorporeal side-to-side ileotransversostomy anastomosis and extraction of the specimen complete the operation. We consider robotic CME to be feasible, safe and oncologically adequate for the treatment of right-sided colon cancer. Its technical advantages may lead to further

  14. Chemopreventive effects of dietary canola oil on colon cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ekta; Doddivenaka, Chaitanya; Zhang, Xiaoying; Bommareddy, Ajay; Krishnan, Padmanabhan; Matthees, Duane P; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid composition of dietary fat plays a vital role in colon tumor development in animal models. Fats containing ω-6 fatty acids (e.g., corn oil) enhanced and ω-3 fatty acids (e.g., flaxseed oil) reduced chemically induced colon tumor development in rats. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effects of dietary canola oil, a source of ω-3 fatty acid on azoxymethane-induced colon cancer development in Fischer rats and compare with dietary corn oil. Dietary canola oil significantly (Pcolonic tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity as compared to dietary corn oil in rats. Fatty acid analysis showed that corn oil group had higher levels of ω-6 fatty acid levels, whereas the canola oil groups exhibited higher levels of ω-3 fatty acids from the colon and serum samples of rats. For the mechanistic study, COX-2 expression in the colon samples from the canola oil group was significantly lower (Pcolon tumor development in Fischer rats as compared to possibly by increasing ω-3 fatty acid levels and decreasing COX-2 levels.

  15. Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and colon cancer: myth or reality? A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdy, Salvatore; Nastasi, Giuseppe

    2012-12-05

    A relationship between infective endocarditis and colon cancer was established in 1950, and Streptococcus bovis was successfully isolated in 1970. However, this association and its pathogenesis still remain unclear. In this paper, we describe the clinical case of a patient with a history of colon cancer and infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis. The role of S bovis as an aetiological agent in the development of colon cancer is intriguing but uncertain. S bovis infection should be considered a silent sign of gastrointestinal malignancy or hepatic disease. We believe that in order to demonstrate the presence of colon cancer, all patients with S bovis infection require an endoscopic investigation of the colon.

  16. A multicentric observational trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wischnik Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD is active in metastatic breast cancer. This observational study evaluated the efficacy and safety of PLD in patients treated during routine clinical practice. Methods Eligible patients had metastatic breast cancer and were treated with PLD according to the dose and schedule determined by their physician as part of routine practice. The primary objectives were to analyze the efficacy and toxicity of PLD therapy. Results 125 patients were assessable. Median age was 62 years, 78% had performance status 0-1, and 60% had estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PLD treatment was second- or third-line in 69% of patients. Prior anthracyclines (adjuvant or metastatic had been used in 56% of patients. The majority of patients (79% received PLD every 4 weeks at a median dose of 40 mg/m2. Overall response rate was 43% in all patients and 34% in those previously treated with anthracyclines. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were skin toxicity/hand-foot syndrome (6%, and leukopenia (3%. Conclusions This observational study supports the activity and tolerability of PLD in metastatic breast cancer as demonstrated in PLD clinical trials.

  17. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs.

  18. Does Metastatic Lymph Node SUVmax Predict Survival in Patients with Esophageal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Vatankulu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node in predicting survival in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with esophageal cancer between 2009 and 2011 who had FDG positronemission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT. All patients were followed-up to 2013. Clinical staging, SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node were evaluated. Results: One hundred seven patients were included in the study. All patients were followed-up between 2 and 49 months. The mean SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node were 19.3±8.8 and 10.4±9.1, respectively. Metastatic lymph node SUVmax had an effect in predicting survival whereas primary tumor SUVmax did not have an effect (p=0.014 and p=0.262, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that clinical stage of the disease was the only independent factor predicting survival (p=0.001. Conclusion: Among patients with esophageal cancer, the value of primary tumor SUVmax did not have an effect on survival. Clinical stage assessed with FDG PET/CT imaging was found to predict survival in esophageal carcinoma. Additionally, lymph node SUVmax was identified as a new parameter in predicting survival in the present study

  19. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  20. Green vegetables, red meat and colon cancer: chlorophyll prevents the cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects of haem in rat colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de J.; Jonker-Termont, D.S.M.L.; Lieshout, van E.M.M.; Katan, M.B.; Meer, van der R.

    2005-01-01

    Diets high in red meat and low in green vegetables are associated with increased colon cancer risk. This association might be partly due to the haem content of red meat. In rats, dietary haem is metabolized in the gut to a cytotoxic factor that increases colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial prolifera

  1. Simulated colon fiber metabolome regulates genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, and energy metabolism in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Heli; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Rautonen, Nina

    2011-11-01

    High level of dietary fiber has been epidemiologically linked to protection against the risk for developing colon cancer. The mechanisms of this protection are not clear. Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in production of for example butyrate that has drawn attention as a chemopreventive agent. Polydextrose, a soluble fiber that is only partially fermented in colon, was fermented in an in vitro colon simulator, in which the conditions mimic the human proximal, ascending, transverse, and distal colon in sequence. The subsequent fermentation metabolomes were applied on colon cancer cells, and the gene expression changes studied. Polydextrose fermentation down-regulated gene ontology classes linked with cell cycle, and affected number of metabolically active cells. Furthermore, up-regulated effects on classes linked with apoptosis, with increased caspase 2 and 3 activity, implicate that polydextrose fermentation plays a role in induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells. The up-regulated genes involved also key regulators of lipid metabolism, such as PPARα and PGC-1α. These results offer hypotheses for the mechanisms of two health benefits linked with consumption of dietary fiber, reducing risk of development of colon cancer, and dyslipidemia.

  2. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches to fight metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Singh (Manisha)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Absttract__ Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Breast cancer patients have a reasonable chance of becoming cured, particularly when they are diagnosed in an early phase. Eliminating primary tumors by surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation is quite successful. Ho

  3. ERCC1 Expression in Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Baiomy, Mohamed Ali; El Kashef, Wagdi F

    2017-02-01

    Background: Possible targeted therapies for metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) include cytotoxic chemotherapy that causes interstrand breaks (platinum-based drugs). The excision repair cross-complementation 1 (ERCC1) enzyme plays an essential role in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, removing platinum-induced DNA adducts and contributing to cisplatin resistance. Detecting ERCC1 overexpression is important in considering treatment options for metastatic TNBC, including individualized approaches to therapy, and may facilitate improved responses or reduction of unnecessary toxicity. We hypothesized that assigning cisplatin based on pretreatment ERCC1 expression would improve response and survival. This study was conducted to assess the impact of ERCC1 expression on PFS, OS and response rates in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods: From June 2012 to November 2013, 52 metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients were enrolled. ERCC1 protein expression was detected from pretreatment biopsies by Immunohistochemistry. All patients received cisplatin plus paclitaxel. The primary end point was the impact of ERCC1 expression on PFS and OS. Results: 34 patients (65.4%) showed positive ERCC1 expression while 18 (34.6%) proved negative. Positive ERCC1 expression was associated with short PFS (median, 5 months vs. 7 months; P = 0.043), short OS (median, 9 months vs. 11 months; P = 0.033) and poor response to cisplatin based chemotherapy (P = 0.046). Conclusions: This prospective study further validated ERCC1 as a reliable biomarker for customized chemotherapy in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients. High expression of ERCC1 was thereby fond to be significantly associated with poor outcome in patients treated with platinum based chemotherapy.

  4. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Yumi [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Masaya [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Takakura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ntakaku@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  5. Role of sympathetic nerves in the establishment of metastatic breast cancer cells in bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Elefteriou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The bone marrow microenvironment is characterized by its multicellular nature, and perhaps less obviously by the high mobility of multiple transient and stationary cell lineages present in this environment. The trafficking of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells between the bone marrow and blood compartments is regulated by a number of bone marrow-derived factors. It is suspected that transformed metastatic cells “hijack” these processes to engraft into the skeleton and eventually cause the skeletal complications associated with metastatic disease. In this short review, experimental and association data supporting the contribution of a less recognized cell type of the bone marrow – the nerves of the sympathetic nervous system – to early events of the breast cancer bone metastatic process, are summarized.

  6. The Vitamin D Receptor, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Rong; Wu, Shaoping; Xia, Yinglin; Sun, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor is an emerging therapeutic target in various human diseases. Vitamin D receptor (VDR), a nuclear receptor, mediates the biological functions of vitamin D. Classically, vitamin D is recognized as an essential contributor to mineral and bone homeostasis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that vitamin D is involved in inflammatory responses. Persistent intestinal inflammation is associated with colon cancer. This review focuses on vitamin D and VDR in inflammatory bowel disea...

  7. Modeling survival in colon cancer: a methodological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holbert Don

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Cox proportional hazards model is the most widely used model for survival analysis because of its simplicity. The fundamental assumption in this model is the proportionality of the hazard function. When this condition is not met, other modifications or other models must be used for analysis of survival data. We illustrate in this review several methodological approaches to deal with the violation of the proportionality assumption, using survival in colon cancer as an illustrative example.

  8. Helicobacter Pylori Seropostivity of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tugba Kos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Until now many researches have showed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be etiological factor of colorectal cancer. The aim of current study was to investigate the frequency of H.pylori infection seropositivity of colorectal cancer patients and compare the clinicopathological features of H.pylori positive patients with negative ones. Material and Method: Seventy four colorectal patients were included in study. Retrospectively, patients clinical features, surgery history and pathological characteristics were screened. Patients group serum samples were collected. H.pylori Ig G level were quantitatively measured with ELISA method and levels above 5 arbU/ml were accepted as seropositive. Results: Patients median age was 60.5 ( range 26-83 and 56.8% (n=42 were male. H.pylori Ig G was positive in 37.8% (n=28 and negative in 62.2% (n=46 of patient group. H.pylori serpositive and negative patients median age of diagnosis were 56 and 64 respectively (p=0.01. There were no significant difference between H.pylori seropositive group when compared with negative group according to age, level of CEA and Ca 19-9, stage, lymph node involvement, perineural and vascular invasion, presence of polyps, differantion, localisation of tumours. Discussion: H.pylori seropositive patients were diagnosed at younger age. Association of this finding with etiology was confusing. Further studies with healthy controls may provide detailed information about whether H.pylori seropositivity is associated with colorectal cancer etiology.

  9. Expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 in Primary and Metastatic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tristen S; Groh, Eric M; Patel, Krishna; Kerkar, Sid P; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma-associated antigen-A (MAGE-A) and New York esophageal squamous cell cancer-1 (NY-ESO-1) are 2 cancer testis antigens (CTA) demonstrating potential for use in targeted immunotherapy. Clinical trials in melanoma and synovial sarcomas targeting these antigens in immune-based therapies have demonstrated durable tumor regression. Although protein expression of NY-ESO-1 has been assessed in a variety of cancer types, the expression of MAGE-A has not been studied in depth. In this study we analyzed MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 expression in 314 melanoma specimens from 301 melanoma patients, 38 patients with squamous cell cancers and 111 patients with adenocarcinomas. Our results demonstrated higher expression of MAGE-A compared with NY-ESO-1 in melanomas (32% vs. 13%) and squamous cell carcinomas (45% vs. 7.9%), and higher expression of both CTAs in metastatic versus primary tumors. CTA expression in adenocarcinomas was low (MAGE-A: 10%, NY-ESO-1: 0.9%). In addition, we looked at concordance of expression among metastatic melanoma lesions within the same patient and found concordant expression in 38 of 47 patients for MAGE-A and 43 of 47 patients for NY-ESO-1. Our study demonstrated that the MAGE-A family may be of greater utility than NY-ESO-1 for targeted immunotherapy in a variety of cancer histologies, in particular metastatic melanomas and squamous cell carcinomas.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Nakakura, Eric K; Bova, G Steven; Isaacs, John T; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2006-08-01

    We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a known regulator of migration in neuronal development, plays an important role in prostate cancer motility and metastasis. P35, an activator of CDK5 that is indicative of its activity, is expressed in a panel of human and rat prostate cancer cell lines, and is also expressed in 87.5% of the human metastatic prostate cancers we examined. Blocking of CDK5 activity with a dominant-negative CDK5 construct, small interfering RNA, or roscovitine resulted in changes in the microtubule cytoskeleton, loss of cellular polarity, and loss of motility. Expression of a dominant-negative CDK5 in the highly metastatic Dunning AT6.3 prostate cancer cell line also greatly impaired invasive capacity. CDK5 activity was important for spontaneous metastasis in vivo; xenografts of AT6.3 cells expressing dominant-negative CDK5 had less than one-fourth the number of lung metastases exhibited by AT6.3 cells expressing the empty vector. These results show that CDK5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential in prostate cancer.

  11. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawajiri, Hidemi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Noda, Satoru; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of HER2 - found in approximately 15-20% of all breast cancers - is a negative prognostic factor. Although trastuzumab significantly improves the prognosis of HER2-positive breast cancer, half of the patients with metastatic breast cancer experience disease progression within 1 year. Pertuzumab is a novel HER2-targeted humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the dimerization domain of HER2 and acts synergically with trastuzumab in inhibiting tumor progression. The CLEOPATRA trial demonstrated that adding pertuzumab to trastuzumab plus docetaxel significantly prolonged progression-free survival and overall survival without increasing severe adverse events. Conclusively, pertuzumab was approved by the US FDA in June 2012 for use in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Furthermore, various clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pertuzumab combined with other cytotoxic agents are ongoing at present. Thus, pertuzumab has been becoming important for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

  12. Effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen on adhesive growth and expressions of E-cadherin and VEGF of human colon cancer cell CCL-228

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Lin Cai; Guo-Bing Wang; Li-Juan Xiong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of carbon dioxide on the metastatic capability of cancer cells, and to compare them with that of nitrogen.METHODS: The colon cancer cell CCL-228 was treated with 100 % carbon dioxide or nitrogen at different time points and then cultured under normal condition. Twelve hours after the treatment, the survival rates of suspension cells and the expressions of e-cadherin and VEGF were examined.RESULTS: After 60 min of carbon dioxide and longer time of nitrogen treatment, the suspended cells increased and the expression of e-cadherin decreased while the expression of VEGF was enhanced significantly. And the effects of nitrogen were similar to, but weaker than, those of carbon dioxide.CONCLUSION: Carbon dioxide may improve the metastatic capability of cancer cells and its effects are significantly stronger than that of nitrogen. A sequential use of carbon dioxide and nitrogen in pneumoperitoneum may take the advantage of both gases.

  13. Incisional hernias after open versus laparoscopic surgery for colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K.; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Scheike, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic surgery for colonic cancer decreases the incidence of postoperative complications and length of hospital stay as compared with open surgery, while the oncologic outcome remains equivalent. It is unknown whether the surgical approach impacts on the long-term rate of incisi......BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic surgery for colonic cancer decreases the incidence of postoperative complications and length of hospital stay as compared with open surgery, while the oncologic outcome remains equivalent. It is unknown whether the surgical approach impacts on the long-term rate...... of incisional hernia. Furthermore, risk factors for incisional hernia formation are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of elective open versus laparoscopic surgery for colonic cancer on development of incisional hernia. METHODS: This nationwide cohort study included...... were performed. RESULTS: A total of 8489 patients were included, with a median follow-up of 8.8 (interquartile range 7.0-10.7) years. The incidence of incisional hernia was increased among patients operated on with open techniques compared with patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery (7.3 vs. 5.2 %, p...

  14. Inter- and intra-tumor profiling of multi-regional colon cancer and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sogabe, Shunsuke; Nakai, Takuya; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-02-27

    Intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity may hinder personalized molecular-target treatment that depends on the somatic mutation profiles. We performed mutation profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumors of multi-regional colon cancer and characterized the consequences of intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity and metastasis using targeted re-sequencing. We performed targeted re-sequencing on multiple spatially separated samples obtained from multi-regional primary colon carcinoma and associated metastatic sites in two patients using next-generation sequencing. In Patient 1 with four primary tumors (P1-1, P1-2, P1-3, and P1-4) and one liver metastasis (H1), mutually exclusive pattern of mutations was observed in four primary tumors. Mutations in primary tumors were identified in three regions; KARS (G13D) and APC (R876*) in P1-2, TP53 (A161S) in P1-3, and KRAS (G12D), PIK3CA (Q546R), and ERBB4 (T272A) in P1-4. Similar combinatorial mutations were observed between P1-4 and H1. The ERBB4 (T272A) mutation observed in P1-4, however, disappeared in H1. In Patient 2 with two primary tumors (P2-1 and P2-2) and one liver metastasis (H2), mutually exclusive pattern of mutations were observed in two primary tumors. We identified mutations; KRAS (G12V), SMAD4 (N129K, R445*, and G508D), TP53 (R175H), and FGFR3 (R805W) in P2-1, and NRAS (Q61K) and FBXW7 (R425C) in P2-2. Similar combinatorial mutations were observed between P2-1 and H2. The SMAD4 (N129K and G508D) mutations observed in P2-1, however, were nor detected in H2. These results suggested that different clones existed in primary tumors and metastatic tumor in Patient 1 and 2 likely originated from P1-4 and P2-1, respectively. In conclusion, we detected the muti-clonalities between intra- and inter-tumors based on mutational profiling in multi-regional colon cancer using next-generation sequencing. Primary region from which metastasis originated could be speculated by mutation profile. Characterization of inter- and

  15. Differentially expressed genes associated with the metastatic phenotype in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschmann, D A; Seftor, E A; Nieva, D R; Mariano, E A; Hendrix, M J

    1999-05-01

    We have previously shown that human breast carcinoma cells demonstrating an interconverted phenotype, where keratin (epithelial marker) and vimentin (mesenchymal marker) intermediate filaments are both expressed, have an increased ability to invade a basement membrane matrix in vitro. This increase in invasive potential has been demonstrated in MDA-MB-231 cells, which constitutively express keratins and vimentin, and in MCF-7 cells transfected with the mouse vimentin gene (MoVi). However, vimentin expression alone is not sufficient to confer the complete metastatic phenotype in MoVi cells, as determined by orthotopic administration. Thus, in the present study, differential display analysis was utilized to identify genes that are associated with the invasive and/or metastatic phenotype of several human breast cancer cell lines. Forty-four of 84 PCR fragments were differentially expressed as assessed by Northern hybridization analysis of RNA isolated from MCF-7, MoVi, and MB-231 cell lines. Polyadenylated RNA from a panel of poorly invasive, invasive/non-metastatic, and invasive/metastatic breast carcinoma cell lines was used to differentiate between cell-specific gene expression and genes associated with the invasive and/or metastatic phenotype(s). We observed that lysyl oxidase and a zinc finger transcription factor were expressed only in the invasive and/or metastatic cell lines; whereas, a thiol-specific antioxidant and a heterochromatin protein were down-regulated in these cells. In contrast, tissue factor was expressed only in breast carcinoma cell lines having the highest invasive potential. These results suggest that specific genes involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis can be separated by differential display methodology to elucidate the molecular basis of tumor cell progression.

  16. Inadequate preoperative colonic evaluation for synchronous colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Burgdorf, S K; Wilhelmsen, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Synchronous cancers (SC) are well known (2-11%) in patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). One study has shown that intraoperative palpation can miss up to 69% of the SC while other studies have shown altered planned surgical procedure due to preoperatively diagnosed......-operation and one patient had pulmonary embolism as a complication to re-operation. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that many patients (78%) never underwent FPCE, but also that many of these patients never had a full postoperative colonic evaluation. SC being overlooked can lead to increased morbidity...... and the possibility of advanced staging of the cancer which is also exemplified in this study....

  17. New insights into calcium, dairy and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter R Holt

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to review recent information about the relationship of calcium and dairy foods to colon cancer.The review focuses on primary prevention, discusses the potential components in dairy foods that might be anti-neoplastic, reviews the epidemiologic information and describes intervention studies demonstrating efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in reducing colorectal polyp recurrence. Since vitamin D is important in cancer prevention, pertinent data is discussed and potential mechanisms of actions presented. Calcium and vitamin D are important agents for the primary prevention of colorectal neoplasia.

  18. Potential role of pemetrexed in metastatic breast cancer patients pre-treated with anthracycline or taxane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yan Zhou; Ye-Hui Shi; Yong-Sheng Jia; Zhong-Sheng Tong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This article reviews pharmacology, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, and safety in metastatic breast cancer patients, as well as the predictive biomarkers for outcome of treatment with pemetrexed-based regimens. Methods: PubMed, Embase, OVID, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from the beginning of each database without any limitations to the date of publication. Search terms were‘‘pemetrexed’’ or‘‘LY231514’’ or“Alimta”,“metastatic breast cancer”, and“advanced breast cancer”. Results: There were 15 studies (n ¼ 1002) meeting our criteria for evaluation. Eight single-agent trials (n ¼ 551) and seven using combinations with other agents (n ¼ 451) were identified that evaluated pemetrexed for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Response rates to pemetrexed as a single agent varied from 8%to 31%, and with combination therapy have been reported to be between 15.8% and 55.7%. With routine supplementation of patients with folic acid, dexamethasone, and vitamin B12, the toxicity profile of these patients was mild, including dose-limiting neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, as well as lower grades of reversible hepatotoxicity and gastrointestinal toxicity. Expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) and other biomarkers are associated with the prognosis and sensitivity for pemetrexed in breast cancer. Conclusion: Pemetrexed has shown remarkable activity with acceptable toxicities for treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients. Translational research on pemetrexed in breast cancer identified biomarkers as well as additional genes important to its clinical activity and toxicity. Further research is needed to clarify the role of pemetrexed in breast cancer treatment in order to guide oncologists. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Com-munications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license

  19. RhoC a new target for therapeutic vaccination against metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenandy, L.; Sorensen, R.B.; Straten, P.T.

    2008-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are due to the development of metastases. Increased expression of RhoC is linked to enhanced metastatic potential in multiple cancers. Consequently, the RhoC protein is an attractive target for drug design. The clinical application of immunotherapy against cancer is rapidly...... moving forward in multiple areas, including the adoptive transfer of anti-tumor-reactive T cells and the use of "therapeutic" vaccines. The over-expression of RhoC in cancer and the fact that immune escape by down regulation or loss of expression of this protein would reduce the morbidity and mortality...... of cancer makes RhoC a very attractive target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we describe an HLA-A3 restricted epitope from RhoC, which is recognized by cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, RhoC-specific T cells show cytotoxic potential against HLA-matched cancer cells of different origin. Thus, RhoC may...

  20. What's wrong with sentinel node mapping in colon cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Despite near-universal embrace of the concept and clinical relevance of lymphatic mapping for sentinel node identification and analysis for cancers of the breast and integument, the same technique has struggled to a find a role in gastrointestinal cancers in general and,perhaps, in colon cancer in particular. Despite many studies demonstrating its feasibility in malignancies of the large bowel, concern is continually aroused by the variable and often unacceptably low sensitivity rates.Additionally, many confess uncertainty as to what benefit it could ever confer to patients even if it were proven sufficiently accurate given that standard surgical resection incorporates mesenteric resection anyway.However, the huge impact sentinel node mapping has had on clinical practice in certain cancers means that each of these aspects merit careful reconsideration, from very first principles.