WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer lung cancer

  1. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spreads in different ways, and each is treated differently. Non-small cell lung cancer is more common than small cell lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer grows more quickly and is more likely to spread to other organs in the body. Learn more about non-small cell lung cancer. Learn ...

  2. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  3. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  4. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  5. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  6. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  9. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There will be over 160,000 cases of lung cancer diagnosed in the US in 1991, and deaths from this disease account for a quarter of all cancer deaths in this country. The incidence of lung cancer has continued to increase, especially among women. With 31% of American men and 25% of American women identified in the 1985 census as cigarette smokers, it is likely that this trend will continue well into the next century. Unfortunately, the majority of patients present with locally advanced tumors or distant metastatic disease. Presently, most patients with lung cancer will receive radiation therapy either in an attempt to control inoperable or locally advanced disease, or for palliation of symptomatic intrathoracic or metastatic disease. Because of the poor prognosis of all patients excepting those with early stage resectable lesions, lung cancer is appropriately the subject of intense clinical investigation and controversy throughout the world

  10. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  11. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  12. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of lung cancer. Before the treatment the histological samples allowing the diagnosis as well as its histological variety. The diagnosis include techniques such as bronchoscopy, ultrasound, tomography, puncture and endoscopic thoracotomy. The chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the main techniques used for the treatment

  13. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  14. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which therapy (or therapies) should be used. Second, lung cancer staging tells how much your cancer has spread. Knowing ... your body. How good are these tests at staging lung cancer? If your biopsy finds cancer cells, this is ...

  15. Chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer remains a disease associated with a poor prognosis. Chemoradiotherapy is performed for unresectable stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and inoperable limited-disease small cell lung cancer. In this lecture, chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer is outlined primary according to the 2014 edition of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Lung Cancer, and also referring to molecular targeted drugs, radiation pneumonitis, and particle radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bahader Yasser; Jazieh Abdul-Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promisi...

  17. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  18. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... copy to myself The information used on this page will not be used to send unsolicited emails or shared with a third party. HPF: Did You Know? Video Series Lung Cancer - Did you know that lung cancer is the ...

  19. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  20. AUTOPHAGY IN LUNG CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lu, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The relatively poor cure rate in lung cancer patients has been associated with a resistance to chemotherapy and radiation that is at least in part related to defects in cellular apoptotic machinery. Exploitation of another form of cell death, autophagy, has the capacity to improve the therapeutic gain of current therapies. In an effort to develop novel treatment strategies to enhance the therapeutic ratio for lung cancer, we...

  1. Epigenetics of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Langevin, Scott M; Kratzke, Robert A.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA expression, have widely been reported in the literature to play a major role in the genesis of lung cancer. The goal of this review is to summarize the common epigenetic changes associated with lung cancer to give some clarity to its etiology, and provide an overview of the potential translational applications of these ...

  2. Metachronous lung cancer that presented as bilateral synchronous lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kocaturk, Celalettin Ibrahim; Cansever, Levent; Kanmaz, Dilek Zehra; Bedirhan, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    Every patient undergoing curative treatment for primary lung cancer is a candidate for metachronous lung cancer, with a reported risk of 5% per year. The majority of cases are stage I patients. Patients who undergo resection for lung cancer should be followed regularly. A metachronous lung cancer that develops as bilateral synchronous lung cancer is very rare.

  3. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews and...... large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation with...... vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects are...

  4. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  5. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  6. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  7. Women and lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Itri, L

    1987-01-01

    Lung cancer has now surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths in American women. In 1986, 49,000 women were diagnosed as having lung cancer; only 16 percent of them will survive 5 years or more. Cigarette smoking is unquestionably the leading contributing factor. Large numbers of women took up cigarette smoking during and after World War II. The grim aftermath has taken 20 years to surface--between 1950 and 1985, lung cancer deaths in women increased 500 percent. Even wors...

  8. Occupational lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 592 cases of occupational lung cancer were recorded in the Czech Republic during the 1992 to 1999 period. Ionizing radiation was the causal etiological factor in 92% cases. Uranium miners constituted the group which was affected most. Primary and secondary prevention measures are highlighted and the procedure for assessing occupational lung cancer from radioactive substances is outlined. The basic principles of a rational interdisciplinary collaboration in investigating the occupational nature of lung cancer and the mandatory assessment criteria are discussed

  9. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  10. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  11. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. While avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or inhibit the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to co...

  12. Lung Cancer Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. Although avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established, advanced-stage disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or block the carcinogenic process and has been successfu...

  13. Lung cancer in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Rodriguez R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Raúl Barrera-Rodriguez,1 Jorge Morales-Fuentes2 1Biochemistry and Environmental Medicine Laboratory, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, 2Lung Cancer Medical Service, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, Tlalpan, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, women, genetic susceptibility, genetic differences, tobacco

  14. Lung cancer in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, G; Roder, D M

    1989-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death of cancer in Australian men and the third leading cause in Australian women. Efforts are being made to reduce the incidence of this disease by smoking-cessation programmes and improved industrial hygiene, and these measures need to be encouraged strongly by all sectors of the community. On a population basis, insufficient evidence is available to justify screening procedures for the early detection of lung cancer in "at-risk" groups. Cure is possible by surgical resection in early cases. Improvements in therapeutic results with traditional cancer treatments largely have reached a plateau, but a number of newer therapies, and combinations of standard therapies, currently are being evaluated. Of particular interest is concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in localized non-small-cell lung cancer; laser "debulking" in conjunction with radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer, and biological response-modifying agents in non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer. It is important that data be collected adequately to define epidemiological changes and to evaluate treatment results (including repeat bronchoscopy, to assess local control of tumour), and that the quality of life is recorded and reported in the evaluation process. Finally, phase-III studies in lung-cancer treatments require adequate numbers of subjects to enable meaningful conclusions to be achieve objectives within a reasonable study period. PMID:2469943

  15. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  16. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  17. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, Sharon R.; Blair Marshall; Lyuba Varticovski

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation p...

  18. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  19. Lung cancer screening: Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers

  20. Lung cancer screening: Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyea Young [Dept. of Radiology, Center for Lung Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers.

  1. Lung Cancer Screening and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. van 't Westeinde (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed major cancer worldwide and the leading cause of death from cancer. Lung cancer is divided into two subgroups: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting for 10-20% and 75% of lung cancer cases, respectivel

  2. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  3. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Horn L, Eisenberg R, Gius D, et al. Cancer of the lung. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic and brand names. This page also lists common drug combinations used in lung ...

  5. PET in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hans C. Steinert,

    2005-01-01

    Accurate tumor staging is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy inpatients with lung cancer. It has already been shown that FDG-PET is highly accurate inclassifying lung nodules as benign or malignant. Integrated PET-CT enables the exactmatching of focal abnormalities on PET to anatomic structures on CT. PET-CT is superior indiagnostic accuracy for T staging and differentiation between tumor and peritumoral atelectasis.PET has also proved to be a very effective staging mod...

  6. Lung cancer: assessing resectability

    OpenAIRE

    Quint, Leslie E

    2003-01-01

    Staging classification in patients with non-small cell lung cancer does not always correlate perfectly with surgical resectability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate individual features of a patient’s tumor in order to determine if surgical resection is the optimal method of treatment, regardless of tumor stage. Such features include characteristics of the primary tumor, regional lymph nodes and distant sites.

  7. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  8. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  10. Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting lung cancer or dying from lung cancer varies by race ...

  11. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kemal Kara; Ersin Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as as...

  12. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Kara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, beryllium, mustard gas increases the risk of lung cancer. The well defined risk factor is exposure to asbestos. In addition advanced age, diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and genetic predisposition are the risk factors that increases lung cancer. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 749-756

  13. Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause among Hispanic women. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a good time to separate myth from fact when it comes to lung cancer. So what are the facts?  Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer. Not ...

  14. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagn

  15. Controversies in Lung Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ritu R; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Jacobson, Francine L

    2016-02-01

    There remains an extensive debate over lung cancer screening, with lobbying for and against screening for very compelling reasons. The National Lung Screening Trial, International Early Lung Cancer Program, and other major screening studies favor screening with low-dose CT scans and have shown a reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality. The increasing incidence of lung cancer and the dismal survival rate for advanced disease despite improved multimodality therapy have sparked an interest in the implementation of national lung cancer screening. Concerns over imaging workflow, radiation dose, management of small nodules, overdiagnosis bias, lead-time and length-time bias, emerging new technologies, and cost-effectiveness continue to be debated. The authors address each of these issues as they relate to radiologic practice. PMID:26846531

  16. Screening for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Brendon M; Pua, Bradley; Altorki, Nasser K

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is a global health burden and is among the most common and deadliest of all malignancies worldwide. The goal of screening programs is to detect tumors in earlier, curable stages, consequently reducing disease-specific mortality. The issue of screening has great relevance to thoracic surgeons, who should play a leading role in the debate over screening and its consequences. The burden is on thoracic surgeons to work in a multidisciplinary setting to guide and treat these patients safely and responsibly, ensuring low morbidity and mortality of potential diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. PMID:27261909

  17. Epigenetic Therapy in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Stephen V.; Fabbri, Muller; Gitlitz, Barbara J.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic deregulation of gene function has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis and is one of the mechanisms contributing to the development of lung cancer. The inherent reversibility of epigenetic alterations makes them viable therapeutic targets. Here, we review the therapeutic implications of epigenetic changes in lung cancer, and recent advances in therapeutic strategies targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation.

  18. Advances in Lung Cancer Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Rahimi

    2010-01-01

    Imaging has a critical role in diagnosis, staging and monitoring of patients with lung cancer."nThe role of imaging in screening for malignancy has not been established."nWe discuss new concepts in staging also the early diagnosis and screening for lung cancer.

  19. UK partnership targets lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Cancer Research UK has joined with two major pharmaceutical companies to launch a large multiarm clinical trial, dubbed the National Lung Matrix trial, to test the effectiveness of promising experimental therapies in treating rare forms of advanced lung cancer. PMID:25002593

  20. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional ima...

  1. Radiation and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidemiological data from the atomic bomb survivors and from different groups of Rn-exposed underground miners are so far the main sources of our knowledge on radiation-induced lung cancer. In the first part of this paper the results of these two different data sets are outlined and compared. This comparison concerns the following topics: Primary risk coefficients, the differences between both sexes, the influence of smoking and the variation of the excess relative risk with time since exposure. Of main concern for radiation protection is the possible lung cancer risk of the general population from indoor exposure to radon daughters. In the second part the results of two different types of approaches are discussed: The direct approach from miners data and the so-called dosimetric approach from LSS data. The approach from the atomic bomb survivors' data yields considerably higher risk values for this indoor exposure than the approach from miners. This is particularly valid for females. This difference between both approaches increases if the proposed new dosimetric model for inhaled radon daughters is applied. Possible reasons for this inconsistency and the consequences for radiation protection are outlined. (author)

  2. Advances in lung cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Hennon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed an explosion of the use of minimally invasive techniques for the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of all stages of lung cancer. The use of these techniques has improved the risk-benefit ratio of surgery and has made it more acceptable to patients considering lung surgery. They have also facilitated the delivery of multi-modality therapy to patients with advanced lung cancer. This review article summarizes current surgical techniques that represent the "cutting edge" of thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

  3. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma,...

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seon-Hee Yim; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differenc...

  5. Palliative Procedures in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Emi; Sista, Akhilesh K.; Pua, Bradley B.; Madoff, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care aims to optimize comfort and function when cure is not possible. Image-guided interventions for palliative treatment of lung cancer is aimed at local control of advanced disease in the affected lung, adjacent mediastinal structures, or distant metastatic sites. These procedures include endovascular therapy for superior vena cava syndrome, bronchial artery embolization for hemoptysis associated with lung cancer, and ablation of osseous metastasis. Pathophysiology, clinical pres...

  6. Lung cancer and air pollution.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, A J; Pope, C A

    1995-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies over the last 40 years suggest rather consistently that general ambient air pollution, chiefly due to the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, may be responsible for increased rates of lung cancer. This evidence derives from studies of lung cancer trends, studies of occupational groups, comparisons of urban and rural populations, and case-control and cohort studies using diverse exposure metrics. Recent prospective cohort studies observed 30 to 50% increases in lung ca...

  7. Lung Cancer Screening: The Radiologist's Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prokop, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and accounts for more deaths than breast, prostate, colon, and pancreatic cancers combined. A distinct minority (15\\%) of lung cancers are diagnosed at an early stage; 5-year survival (all lung cancers) approximates 15\\%. Randomized, control

  8. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2009, lung cancer is really the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in this country. It ... that, you know, lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality. And unfortunately, it’s normally detected in ...

  9. Skin metastases of lung cancer:

    OpenAIRE

    Kecelj, Peter; Košnik, Mitja; Požek, Igor; Triller Vadnal, Katja; Triller, Nadja

    2008-01-01

    Skin metastases of lung cancer are rare. In over a 3-year period we found only14 cases of skin metastases among 1,614 patients with lung cancer admittedto the University Clinic of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases in Golnik. The metastases are usually manifested on the skin of the chest. Skin metastases are symptoms of progressive disease, and usually a sign of a poor prognosis. The median survival time of lung cancer patients with skin metastases was 85 days from the time of detection of the...

  10. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Lung Cancer June 15, 2009 Welcome to this “OR-Live” webcast presentation, premiering from Beth Israel ... number one cause of cancer-related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, ...

  11. Changing paradigm in treatment of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sundaram Viswanath; Abhishek Pathak; Amul Kapoor; Anvesh Rathore; Bhupendra Nath Kapur

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest forms of cancer. It accounts for 13% of all new cancer cases and 19% of cancer-related deaths. In India, lung cancer constitutes 6.9% of all new cancer cases and 9.3% of all cancer cases. There has also been a dramatic rise worldwide in both the absolute and relative frequencies of lung cancer occurrence. In 1953 it became the most common cause of cancer mortality in men. By 1985, it became the leading cause of cancer deaths in women, causing almost twice as many deaths as breast cancer. The demographic proifle of lung cancer has changed greatly over the years; however, methods for diagnosing, screening, and managing lung cancer patients have improved. This is due to our growing understanding of the biology of lung cancer. It is now possible to further deifne lung cancer types beyond small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, new histology-based therapeutic modalities have been developed, and more new lung cancer biomarkers have been uncovered. Therefore, more detailed histological characterization of lung cancer samples is warranted in order to determine the best course of treatment for speciifc patients. This review article describes how these new molecular technologies are shaping the way lung cancer can be treated in future.

  12. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  13. Target Therapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarotti, Stefano; Lococo, Filippo; Froesh, Patrizia; Zappa, Francesco; Andrè, Dutly

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is an extremely heterogeneous disease, with well over 50 different histological variants recognized under the fourth revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) typing system. Because these variants have differing genetic and biological properties correct classification of lung cancer is necessary to assure that lung cancer patients receive optimum management. Due to the recent understanding that histologic typing and EGFR mutation status are important for target the therapy in lung adenocarcinoma patients there was a great need for a new classification that addresses diagnostic issues and strategic management to allow for molecular testing in small biopsy and cytology specimens. For this reason and in order to address advances in lung cancer treatment an international multidisciplinary classification was proposed by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS), further increasing the histological heterogeneity and improving the existing WHO-classification. Is now the beginning of personalized therapy era that is ideally finalized to treat each individual case of lung cancer in different way. PMID:26667341

  14. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  15. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and former heavy smokers. Current smokers whose LDCT scan results show possible signs of cancer may be more likely to quit smoking. A Guide is available for patients and doctors to learn more about the benefits and harms of low-dose helical CT screening for lung cancer. Screening with chest x- ...

  16. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  18. Radioimmunoscintigraphy in lung cancer diagnosing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer at males, the exact staging is essential. Monoclonal antibodies marked with radionuclides like 131I, 111In, 99mTc, etc., allow detecting and staging the small cell lung cancer with sensibility 90%, specificity 45% and accuracy 85%. It is suggested this method to be applied simultaneously with computerized tomography. The diagnostic possibility of radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) in earlier detection, recurrence or metastasis as well as follow up the effect of therapy performed at patients with lung cancer are reviewed. RIS is performed with IODOMAB-R-2 (Sorin Biomedica) 131I antiCEA Mob F(ab')2, dose 92.5-185 MBq. Planar images were performed 72 hours after i.v. injection. Four patients with epidermoid squamous cell cancer were examined. Positive results were obtained at 3 patients and one false negative. In general sensitivity of radioimmunoscintigraphy of lung cancer is 75-90%. However there are difficulties at its application linked with necessity of permanent availability of radiolabelled antibodies with high specific activity at the moment of their injection. Despite all radioimmunoscintigraphy is developing as an useful diagnostic method for evaluation and follow up of lung cancer patients

  19. MR imaging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since publication of the Radiologic Diagnostic Oncology Group Report in 1991, the clinical application of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to patients with lung cancer has been limited. Computed tomography has been much more widely available for staging of lung cancer in clinical situations. Currently, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy is the only modality that demonstrates pulmonary function while 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography is the only modality that reveals biological glucose metabolism of lung cancer. However, recent advancements in MR imaging have made it possible to evaluate morphological and functional information in lung cancer patients more accurately and quantitatively. Pulmonary MR imaging may hold significant potential to substitute for nuclear medicine examinations. In this review, we describe recent advances in MR imaging of lung cancer, focusing on (1) characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules; (2) differentiation from secondary change; evaluation of (3) medastinal invasion, (4) chest wall invasion, (5) lymph node metastasis, and (6) distant metastasis; and (7) pulmonary functional imaging. We believe that further basic studies, as well as clinical applications of newer MR techniques, will play an important role in the management of patients with lung cancer

  20. MR imaging of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu E-mail: yosirad@med.kokbe-u.ac.jpyosirad@kobe-u.ac.jpyoshiharuohno@aol.com; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2002-12-01

    Since publication of the Radiologic Diagnostic Oncology Group Report in 1991, the clinical application of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to patients with lung cancer has been limited. Computed tomography has been much more widely available for staging of lung cancer in clinical situations. Currently, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy is the only modality that demonstrates pulmonary function while 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography is the only modality that reveals biological glucose metabolism of lung cancer. However, recent advancements in MR imaging have made it possible to evaluate morphological and functional information in lung cancer patients more accurately and quantitatively. Pulmonary MR imaging may hold significant potential to substitute for nuclear medicine examinations. In this review, we describe recent advances in MR imaging of lung cancer, focusing on (1) characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules; (2) differentiation from secondary change; evaluation of (3) medastinal invasion, (4) chest wall invasion, (5) lymph node metastasis, and (6) distant metastasis; and (7) pulmonary functional imaging. We believe that further basic studies, as well as clinical applications of newer MR techniques, will play an important role in the management of patients with lung cancer.

  1. The Cost of Lung Cancer in Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Demeter, Sandor J; Philip Jacobs; Chester Chmielowiec; Wayne Logus; David Hailey; Konrad Fassbender; Alexander McEwan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. In addition, lung cancer has a significant economic impact on society.OBJECTIVE: To present an economic analysis of the actual care costs of lung cancer which will allow comparison with, and verification of, cost estimates that were developed through modelling and opinion.METHODS: A chart review was conducted of incident cases (circa 1998) of primary bronchogenic lung cancer. Cases were censored at two years from ...

  2. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hardavella, Georgia; George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer ...

  3. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  4. Physical treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trend of physical treatment and its outcome of lung cancer are described together with authors' experience. In locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCC) at stages IIIA and B, radiotherapy, chemotherapy (CT) and their combined therapy (RCT) have been major mainly in US since 1980s. After phase I/II trials of RCT by Okayama Lung Cancer Study Group where 5-year survival with nondisease is shown to be 31% (2003), phase III trial has been performed with results to be reported in 2008. A similar study by West Japan Oncology Group is now in summary. The secondary carcinogenesis not by radiation post RCT has become a problem: 10 years after, reportedly 61% incidence. Concerning the choice and regimen of CT medicals, there are many discussions. In recurrent/advanced NSCC, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) (gefitinib and recently, erlotinib) will be further useful, and molecular target medicals like an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody (bevacizumab) and other novel RTK inhibitors will be also promising. In small cell lung cancer (SCC), efficacy 50% of amrubicin has been reported in a phase II trial recently. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in the extensive cases has been recognized effective also recently. CT studies with a large dose of anti-cancer drugs of SCC are still under progress. Along with the introduction of many molecular target drugs, physical treatment of lung cancer is to be bright in future. (R.T.)

  5. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) LUNG CANCER Sources for This Page Berger AH, Imielinski M, Duke F, Wala J, Kaplan N, Shi GX, Andres DA, Meyerson M. Oncogenic RIT1 mutations in lung adenocarcinoma. Oncogene. 2014 Aug 28;33(35):4418- ...

  6. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes Living Will: A legal document explaining a person’s desires regarding the use of life ... other parts of the body Precancerous/Premalignant: An early cellular change that may develop into cancer Primary ...

  7. Early detection of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midthun, David E

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  8. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sriram

    Full Text Available Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778 regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements. Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001. Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001. Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care.

  9. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  11. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, N; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K; Hamann, Heidi A; Nosek, Brian A; Schiller, Joan H

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (Plung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (Pcaregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  12. Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Siegfried, Jill M.; Hershberger, Pamela A.; Stabile, Laura P.

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer has long been thought of as a cancer that mainly affects men, but over the past several decades, because of the high increase in tobacco use by women, there has been a corresponding dramatic increase in lung cancer among women. Since 1998, lung cancer deaths in women have surpassed those caused by breast cancer in the United States. Annual lung cancer deaths among women in the US also currently surpass those caused by breast, ovarian, and cervical cancers combined. Women are more ...

  13. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... really the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, ... is still less than the total number of deaths from lung cancer in general. I hope that ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is still less than the total number of deaths from lung cancer in general. I hope that our discussion today will be informative to you and help us to help you understand lung cancer as it ...

  15. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  16. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center in New York City. During the program, it’s easy for you to make referrals, make appointments ... to try to tackle the lung cancer as it stands in 2009. In 2009, lung cancer is ...

  18. Mediastinal Staging for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob Gelberg; Sean Grondin; Alain Tremblay

    2014-01-01

    Staging of the mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes plays a crucial role in identifying the best treatment option for patients with confirmed or suspected lung cancer and, in many cases, can simultaneously confirm a diagnosis of cancer. Noninvasive modalities, such as computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-CT, are an important first step in this assessment. Ultimately, invasive staging is frequently required to confirm or rule out the presence of metastatic disease ...

  19. PET in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary clinical application of FDG-PET is in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer and includes diagnosis, staging and restaging of non-small cell lung cancer. PET has a very high accuracy (sensitivity=97%, specificity=78%) for characterizing nodules that are indeterminate by chest radiograph and computed tomography. The major utility of PET in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer is the staging of the entire body. PET is more accurate than the conventional imaging modalities of CT and bone scans in the detection of metastatic disease. PET is accurate in the staging of the mediastinum, adrenal glands, and the skeletal system. PET is not as accurate in the detection of brain metastases because of their small size and the normal cortical accumulation

  20. Electrochemical treatment of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Y.L.; Xue, F.Z.; Ge, B.S.; Zhao, F.R.; Shi, B.; Zhang, W. [China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery

    1997-03-01

    A pilot study of electrochemical treatment (ECT) as a therapy for 386 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer was undertaken. There were 103 stage 2 cases, 89 stage 3a cases, 122 stage 3b cases, and 72 stage 4 cases. Two ECT methods were used. For peripherally located lung cancer, platinum electrodes were inserted transcutaneously into the tumor under x-ray or CT guidance. For central type lung cancer or for those inoperable during thoracotomy, electrodes were inserted intraoperatively directly into the cancer. Voltage was 6--8 V, current was 40--100 mA, and electric charge was 100 coulombs per cm of tumor diameter. The number of electrodes was determined from the size of cancer mass, because the diameter of effective area around each electrode is approximately 3 cm. The short-term (6 months after ECT) results of the 386 lung cancer cases were: complete response (CR), 25.6% (99/386); partial response (PR), 46.4% (179/386); no change (NC), 15.3% (59/386); and progressive disease (PD), 12.7% (49/386). The total effective rate (CR + PR) was 72% (278/386). The 1, 3, and 5 year overall survival rates were 86.3% (333/386), 58.8% (227/386), and 29.5% (114/386), respectively. The main complication was traumatic pneumothorax, with an incidence rate of 14.8% (57/386). These clinical results show that ECT is simple, safe, effective, and minimally traumatic. ECT provides an alternative method for treating lung cancers that are conventionally inoperable, that are not responsive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or that cannot be resected after thoracotomy. Long-term survival rates suggest that ECT warrants further investigation.

  1. Significance of tumor markers in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mumbarkar, P. P.; Raste, A. S.; Ghadge, M. S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to test the utility of the cytokeratins CYFRA 21-1, tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), Neuron specific enolase (NSE) and Carcino Embryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with lung cancer and in the pleural fluid of the patients with lung cancer and also the predicting ability of these tumor markers with respect to the histological types [including non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC)] and pathological stages. 40 normal subjects and 222 case...

  2. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell;

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry was...... opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  3. Lung Cancer Awareness Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, Catherine; Laczko, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society. Tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths in the United States and the cause of premature death of approximately 2 million individuals in developed countries. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths and is a major cause of heart disease, cerebrovascular…

  4. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Lung Cancer in the 1990s

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Nevin

    1990-01-01

    The author reviews the investigation and staging of patients with lung cancer. Surgical, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy roles in management of non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer are discussed. The author concludes with practical guidelines for screening and prevention by family physicians.

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  7. Markers of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma SK; Taneja Tarvinder

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; however, no specific serum biomarker is available till date for detection of early lung cancer. Despite good initial response to chemotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers that might influence survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. The review aims to summarize the current knowledge of serum biomarkers in SCLC to improve diagnostic effi...

  8. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Bicheng; Doll, Donald; Shen, Kui; Kloecker, Goetz; Freter, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential ...

  9. Cell of origin of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Jennifer M.; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and current therapies are disappointing. Elucidation of the cell(s) of origin of lung cancer may lead to new therapeutics. In addition, the discovery of putative cancer-initiating cells with stem cell properties in solid tumors has emerged as an important area of cancer research that may explain the resistance of these tumors to currently available therapeutics. Progress in our understanding of normal tissue stem cells, tumor cell o...

  10. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, N.; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K.; Hamann, Heidi A.; Nosek, Brian A.; Schiller, Joan H.

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants’ rating...

  11. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. S. Cho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed.

  12. Chemoradiotherapy for youngster lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To define the clinico-pathologic characteristics and survival of young-robust patients (2 vs 70 mg/m2, P<0.001), and more cycles of chemotherapy 6 vs 4, P<0.001) were observed in the youngster group. There was no difference between the two groups in family history of cancer, cigarette smoking, weight loss, and KPS. The median survival intervals of all stages (10 months vs 12 months), and the 2-and 5-year survival rates (11.1% vs 23.1% and 3.1% vs 5.4%) were comparable (P=0.090) between them. For stage IIIb, there was a trend that young patients would give better outcome than the older ones with median survivals of 11 months to 9 months and the 2-year survivals of 3.8% to 0% (P=0.071). Conclusions: The different clinico-pathologic features of the young lung cancer patients are confirmed from that of old patients, but without any survival disparity. In order to enhance our understanding and reduce the mis-diagnosis rate, it is rational to define the lung cancer in relative young people as the youngster lung cancer, which may be beneficial to the clinical practice

  13. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Leest, Cor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagnosed at an early stage patients are considered to have the best overall survival rate 2. Unfortunately, only a minority of patients is currently diagnosed at a curable stage of disease. The lack of...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for lung cancer screen

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Lo, Gladys G.; Yuan, Jing; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death throughout the world. Lung cancer is an example of a disease for which a large percentage of the high-risk population can be easily identified via a smoking history. This has led to the investigation of lung cancer screening with low-dose helical/multi-detector CT. Evidences suggest that early detection of lung cancer allow more timely therapeutic intervention and thus a more favorable prognosis for the patient. The positive relationshi...

  15. Infective complications in patients with lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rančić Milan; Ristić Lidija; Stanković Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. This study was aimed at analyzing the site, kind and type of infection which develop in patients having lung cancer at hospital treatment. Material and methods. Clinical data of the patients hospitalized for lung cancer were analyzed at the Clinic for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Knez Selo in the period from January 2002 till December 2007. A great number of patients (1296-75.9%) had non-small cell lung cancer. In 1708 patients with lung cancer, 773 febrile episodes were re...

  16. Irradiation lung injury in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of chest irradiation on pulmonary function was studied in 16 patients with lung cancer and one with malignant thymoma. Radiation pneumonitis was detected by chest radiography in 15 cases (88%), 35 days (average) after the completion of radiation therapy. In these cases the radiation field included the lungs, and the hilar and mediastinal regions. No radiation pneumonitis occurred in the other two patients, receiving only lung field irradiation. Various pulmonary functions were measured in all patients following radiation therapy. Inspiratory reserve volume, inspiratory capacity and diffusing capacity were significantly reduced 1 month and 3 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Furthermore, reduction of vital capacity was found 3 months after treatment. It may be concluded that pulmonary function tests are not useful in predicting the onset of radiation pneumonitis, as chest radiography revealed inflammatory changes before the reduction of pulmonary function was detected. (author)

  17. What You Need to Know about Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Lung Cancer This booklet is about lung cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer can ... The anatomy of the lungs and basics about lung cancer Treatment for lung cancer, including taking part in ...

  18. Cancer of lung in miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period of 1983-1994 was registered at Clinic of occupational diseases 87 cases of professional cancer of lung. Mostly /85/ of cases was related to miners, by whom act as risk factor alpha ionisation from radon. Average age group was 60.2 y, average time of exposition was 21.6 y. Epidermoid carcinoma was the most frequent type of tumor /46.5 %/ of cases/. Smoking plays a supportive role. (authors)

  19. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an oropharyngeal cancer, the cancer of the upper airway here in the throat. And during the workup ... room and performed a thoracoscopic lobectomy because we wanted to minimize the effects of surgery, major lung ...

  20. [Innovation in Surgery for Advanced Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Yasunori, Sohara; Endo, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery can be one of less invasive surgical interventions for early stage lung cancer. Locally advanced lung cancer, however, cannot avoid aggressive procedures including pneumonectomy and/or extended combined resection of chest wall, aorta, esophagus, etc. for complete resection. Surgical approach even for advanced lung cancer can be less invasive by benefit from new anti-cancer treatment, innovated manipulations of bronchoplasty and angioplasty, and bench surgery( lung autotransplantation technique). We herein reviewed the strategy to minimize invasive interventions for locally advanced lung cancer, introducing 2 successful cases with advanced lung cancer. The 1st patient is a 62-year old man with centrally advanced lung cancer invading to mediastinum. Right upper sleeve lobectomy with one-stoma carinoplasty following induction chemoradiation therapy was successful. The operation time was 241 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 60 months after surgery. The 2nd is a 79-year old man with advanced lung cancer invading to the distal aortic arch. Left upper segmentectomy following thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stentgraft was successful with no extracorporeal circulation. The operation time was 170 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 30 months after surgery. The invasiveness of surgical interventions for local advanced lung cancer can be minimized by innovated device and new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27440037

  1. Chemotherapy for lung cancers: here to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris, Mark G; Hellmann, Matthew D; Chaft, Jamie E

    2014-01-01

    Four decades of clinical research document the effectiveness of chemotherapy in patients with lung cancers. Chemotherapeutic agents can improve lung cancer symptoms, lengthen life in most patients with lung cancers, and enhance curability in individuals with locoregional disease when combined with surgery or irradiation. Chemotherapy's effectiveness is enhanced in patients with EGFR-mutant and ALK-positive lung cancers and can "rescue" individuals whose oncogene-driven cancers have become resistant to targeted agents. As immunotherapies become part of the therapeutic armamentarium for lung cancers, chemotherapeutic drugs have the potential to modulate the immune system to enhance the effectiveness of immune check point inhibitors. Even in this era of personalized medicine and targeted therapies, chemotherapeutic agents remain essential components in cancer care. PMID:24857127

  2. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  3. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approac | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers.

  4. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Screening, Diagnosis, and Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, J; Magalhães, M; Rocha, E; Marques, F

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Tobacco consumption is the primary cause of lung cancer, accounting for more than 85% 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers. Several studies have shown that low-dose helical CT of the lung detects more nodules and lung cancers, including early-stage cancers, than does chest radiography. The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial results show that three annual roun...

  5. The New Lung Cancer Staging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank C. Detterbeck,MD, FCCP; Daniel J. Boffa, MD; Lynn T, Tanoue, MD, FCCP

    2009-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) has conducted an extensive initiative to inform the revision of the lung cancer staging system. This involved development of an international database along with extensive analysis of a large population of patients and their prognoses. This article reviews the recommendations of the IASLC International Staging Committee for the definitions for the TNM descriptors and the stage grouping in the new non-small cell lung cancer staging system.

  6. Tracheal metastasis of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    De, Sajal

    2009-01-01

    Endotracheal metastases of primary lung cancer are rare. Only one case of tracheal metastasis from small cell lung cancer has been reported in literature. Here, we report a rare case of a 45-year-old woman who was admitted for sudden-onset breathlessness with respiratory failure and required ventilatory support. Endotracheal growth was identified during bronchoscopy, and biopsy revealed endotracheal metastasis of small cell lung cancer.

  7. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of rec...

  8. Lung cancer risk factors among women

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of female lung cancer in developed countries has been increasing since 1950 and particularly in France where the cigarettes consumption has also increased. Since 1980, a growing number of epidemiological surveys have pinpointed the risk of female lung cancer related to smoking. Consecutively, a debate on gender differences in lung cancer risk has appeared, but still in progress nowadays. The reproductive factors could explain these differences. In order to have recent and reliab...

  9. Mental health of patients with lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Τogas Κ.; Alexias G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a very common type of cancer. The psychological reactions of these patients haven't been studied yet. Aim: The examination of the mental health of lung cancer patients. Methods: A bibliographical review of relevant articles was conducted at the electronic data bases of Pubmed, Pcych Info and Scholar Google by key-words. The quest included researches and reviews which have been published in Greek and English language between 1990- 2013. Results: Lung canc...

  10. Diabetes and Lung Cancer Among Postmenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Juhua; Chlebowski, Rowan; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Tinker, Lesley; Margolis, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Epidemiological evidence of diabetes as a lung cancer risk factor is limited and conflicting. Therefore, we assessed associations among diabetes, diabetes therapy, and lung cancer risk in postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Postmenopausal women (n = 145,765), ages 50–79 years, including 8,154 women with diabetes at study entry were followed for a mean of 11 years with 2,257 lung cancers diagnosed. Information o...

  11. Stage IV lung cancer: Is cure possible?

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Thippeswamy; Vanita Noronha; Vamshi Krishna; Amit Joshi; Munita Meenu Bal; Nilendu Purandare; Rangarajan, V.; Pramesh, C. S.; Sabita Jiwnani; Kumar Prabhash

    2013-01-01

    Reporting a case, 53 years old male with stage IV Nonsamall cell lung cancer in view of cytologically proven malignant pleural effusion. Usually the management of stage IV lung cancer is with palliative intent where the patient receives palliative chemotherapy along with palliative radiotherapy and surgery if required. Most of the data on curative management of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer includes patient with adrenal metastasis and some reports with brain metastasis. There is ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  13. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  14. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  16. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  17. Chemotherapy of lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Papac, R J

    1981-01-01

    The potential for substantial improvement in the outcome of patients with carcinoma of the lung seem most likely to develop in the field of chemotherapy. In the past decade, striking advances in the management of small cell carcinoma have yielded response rates and longer survival. While the greatest improvement can be predicted for patients whose disease is limited in extent, combination chemotherapy and combined modality therapy generally are effective in causing tumor regression for the ma...

  18. Clinical potential of gene mutations in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carper, Miranda B.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer type worldwide and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The majority of newly diagnosed patients present with late stage metastatic lung cancer that is inoperable and resistant to therapies. High-throughput genomic technologies have made the identification of genetic mutations that promote lung cancer progression possible. Identification of the mutations that drive lung cancer provided new targets for non-small cell lung cancer...

  19. Markers of small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma SK

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; however, no specific serum biomarker is available till date for detection of early lung cancer. Despite good initial response to chemotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers that might influence survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. The review aims to summarize the current knowledge of serum biomarkers in SCLC to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of tumor progression in lung cancer. The current knowledge on the known serum cytokines and tumor biomarkers of SCLC is emphasized. Recent findings in the search for novel diagnostic and therapeutic molecular markers using the emerging genomic technology for detecting lung cancer are also described. It is believed that implementing these new research techniques will facilitate and improve early detection, prognostication and better treatment of SCLC.

  20. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... history, as well as her very, very excellent pulmonary function tests and preoperative evaluation and her young age that we would address the lung cancer -- the lung mass first, and that’s essentially all ...

  1. Diagnostic Value of Transbronchial Lung Biopsy in Peripheral Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui TANG

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Because the locations of peripheral lung cancer are special, diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer is difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic value of transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB in peripheral lung cancer. MethodsTransbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB were performed in 78 cases of peripheral lung cancer which could not be observed by bronchoscope, 42 cases among whom were diagnosed by pathology and cytologic examination. Thirty-six cases of peripheral lung cancer were not able to be diagnosed by TBLB, 22 cases among them were diagnosed by percutaneous lung biopsy (PNLB, and 14 cases being left were diagnosed by surgical operation, lymphadenopathy biopsy, pleura biopsy and sputum cytologic examination successively. Results The positive rate produced by transbronchial lung biopsy, brush biopsy were 53.8% and 8.9% respectively. The total positive rate was 57.7%. The positive rate produced by TBLB was higher than that of brush biopsy (P <0.01. Along with tumor's diameter enlarge, the positive rate of diagnosis was higher. The positive rate of right lung was higher than that of left lung. The positive rate of inferior lung was higher than that of upper lung. The lesions near the inner belt and hilus pulmonis, had the higher positive rate. Complicatin frequency in PNLB was much higher than that in TBLB. Conclusion Transbronchial lung biopsy is an important method in diagnosingof peripheral lung cancer. Combination of TBLB can increase the diagnostic positive rate of peripheral lung cancer.

  2. Radiodiagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung occurring in the periphery grows as superficial spreading and/or deeply invading parts in the alveolar area. The superficial spreading part develops on the internal surface of alveoli, and when this part shows a monolayer arrangement of tumor cells and is low in height, not accompanied by mucus production, the shadow is faint, and does not cause deformation or deviation of the pre-existing structures. When tumor cell have amultilayer, substantial or polyoid arrangement and marked mucus production, the shadow is dense with a clear margin and no change or occasional compression of the pre-existing architecture. The deeply invading part develops on the alveolar wall, manifesting itself primarily as interstitial hyperplasia and fibrosis. Roentogenologically, the part shows a slightly high density and convergence in the pre-existing structures. Each adenocarcinoma shows an architecture consisting of these progressing parts combined and is similar roentogenologically. Therefore, X-ray features such as the density of tumor shadow, marginal properties and presence or absence and the intensity of convergence demonstrate the rough architecture and mode and stage of tumors. (Chiba, N.)

  3. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city

  4. Lung Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Lung Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/lungcancer.html Other topics ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Lung Cancer - Multiple Languages ... To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - ...

  5. Transesophageal ultrasonography for lung cancer staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging are...

  6. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer June 15, 2009 Welcome to this “OR-Live” webcast presentation, premiering from Beth Israel Medical Center in New ... can have. My role is to deliver radiation therapy in these lung cancer patients. And what radiation therapy is is the ...

  7. Radiation therapy of cancer of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the lung, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of cancer of the lung, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  9. Advances of Hypoxia and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebing LI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the malignant tumors with fastest growing rates in incidence and mortality in our country, also with largest threat to human health and life. However, the exact mechanisms underlying lung cancer development remain unclear. The microenvironment of tumor hypoxia was discovered in 1955, but hypoxia in lung cancer tissues had not been successfully detected till 2006. Further studies show that hypoxia not only functions through the resistance to radiotherapy, but also regulates lung cancer development, invasion, metastasis, chemotherapy resistance and prognosis through an important oncogene HIF (hypoxia inducible factor, with its regulators PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain and pVHL (product of von Hippel-Lindau gene. Therefore, hypoxia, HIF, PHD and pVHL should be considered as potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer pathogenesis and progression.

  10. Assessing resectability of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the value of computed tomography (CT) of the mediastinum, upper abdomen and head in the assessment of resectability of lung cancer, the CT findings of 262 patients, of whom 198 underwent thoracotomy, were anlyzed retrospectively and the stagings obtained at CT and thoracotomy were compared. Mediastinal CT reliably predicted resectability when there was no evidence of mediastinal involvement. However, it was often impossible to determine whether tumour with apparent mediastinal infiltration on CT was resectable or not. The sole finding of lymph node enlargement did not permit differentiation of benign from malignant lymphadenopathy when the lymph node diameter as < 25 mm and the lymphadenopathy was confined to one lymph node station. Upper abdominal metastases were found in 6.1% and brain metastases in 4.6% of patients and neither the histological type nor other features of the tumour were found to be useful predictors of their presence. The large number of non-specific findings decreased the utility of abdominal CT. The appropriate strategy for the pre-operative evaluation of patients with lung cancer is discussed. (author). 29 refs.; 1 fig.; 10 tabs

  11. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomanno, Geno; Bechtel, Joel J.

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Although the incidence of cigarette smoking is decreasing in the United States it appears to be increasing worldwide. The five-year survival rate has not improved in cases with advanced disease, but several articles have indicated that survival can be improved in cases diagnosed early by sputum cytology and chest x-ray. In cases diagnosed while the lesion is in the in-situ stage or measures less than 1 cm in diameter, surgical excision and/or radiation therapy improves survival; therefore, the early diagnosis of high-risk patients should be vigorously pursued. A recent study at a community hospital in Grand Junction, Colorado, presented 45 lung cancer cases diagnosed with positive sputum cytology and negative chest x-ray, and indicates that early diagnosis does improve survival. This study has been conducted during the past six years; 16 cases have survived three years and six cases show five-year survival.

  12. Personalizing Lung Cancer Prevention Through a Reverse Migration Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Kathryn A.; Kim, Edward S.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Hong, Waun K.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the deadliest cancer in the United States and worldwide. Tobacco use is the one of the primary causes of lung cancer and smoking cessation is an important step towards prevention, but patients who have quit smoking remain at risk for lung cancer. Finding pharmacologic agents to prevent lung cancer could potentially save many lives. Unfortunately, despite extensive research, there are no known effective chemoprevention agents for lung cancer. Clinical trials in the past, using a...

  13. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.sverzellati@unipr.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Randi, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.randi@marionegri.it [Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Spagnolo, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.spagnolo@unimore.it [Respiratory Disease Unit, Center for Rare Lung Disease, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Disease, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 44124 Modena (Italy); Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Radiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Silva, Mario, E-mail: mac.mario@hotmail.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin, E-mail: Jan-Martin.Kuhnigk@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); La Vecchia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.lavecchia@marionegri.it [Department of Occupational Health, University of Milan, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.zompatori@unibo.it [Department of Radiology, Cardio-Thoracic Section, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Albertoni 15, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Pastorino, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.pastorino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV{sub 1} < 60% vs. FEV{sub 1} ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV{sub 1} (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV{sub 1} was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations.

  14. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV1 < 60% vs. FEV1 ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV1 (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV1 was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations

  15. Hypoxia in models of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Edward E; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study, we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer to...... establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ or......H2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. RESULTS: Minimal fluoroazomycin arabinoside and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, whereas subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping...

  16. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continue...

  18. Successes and limitations of targeted cancer therapy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Human cancers usually evolve through multistep processes. These processes are driven by the accumulation of abundant genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. However, some lung cancers depend on a single activated oncogene by somatic mutation, termed 'driver oncogenic mutations', for their proliferation and survival. EGFR(epidermal growth factor receptor) mutations and ALK(anaplastic lymphoma kinase) rearrangement are typical examples of such driver oncogenic mutations found in lung adenocarcinomas. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) or ALK-TKIs significantly improved treatment outcomes compared with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with lung cancers harboring EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangement, respectively. Therefore, treatment strategies for lung cancers have dramatically changed from a 'general and empiric' to a 'personalized and evidence-based' approach according to the driver oncogenic mutation. Several novel driver oncogenic mutations, which are candidates as novel targets, such as ERBB2, BRAF, ROS1, and RET, have been discovered. Despite these successes, several limitations have arisen. One example is that some lung cancers do not respond to treatments targeting driver oncogenic mutations, as exemplified in KRAS-mutated lung cancers. Another is resistance to molecular-targeted drugs. Such resistance includes de novo resistance and acquired resistance. A number of molecular mechanisms underlying such resistance have been reported. These mechanisms can be roughly divided into three categories: alteration of the targeted oncogenes themselves by secondary mutations or amplification, activation of an alternative oncogenic signaling track, and conversion of cellular characteristics. Overcoming resistance is a current area of urgent clinical research. PMID:24727987

  19. Lung cancer during pregnancy: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Mitrou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer deaths in males for decades, has recently become one of commonest causes for women too. As women delay the start of their family, the co-existence of cancer and pregnancy is increasingly observed. Nevertheless, lung cancer during pregnancy remains a rather uncommon condition with less than 70 cases published in recent years. Non-small cell lung carcinoma is the commonest type accounting for about 85% of all cases. Overall survival rates are low. Chemotherapy and/or targeted treatment have been used with poor outcomes. The disease has been also found to affect the products of conception with no short- or long-term consequences for the neonate. This article is referring to a narrative review of lung cancers diagnosed in pregnant women around the world.

  20. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the hallmarks of lung cancer. Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  1. Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Rachel G.; Watanabe, Hideo; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenoc...

  2. Radon and lung cancer in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the incidence of lung cancer is related to inhalation of radon and radon daughters. However, the magnitude of the risk and its dependence upon physiological and environmental factors are still not well defined either experimentally or epidemiologically. Occupational studies of underground miners are the only available human epidemiological information to estimate the risk of exposure to radon daughters in the indoor environment. The results are shown of a study carried out to determine whether lung cancer mortality rates in Spain are significantly correlated with the average indoor radon levels. For this purpose, we have used indoor radon data generated from the national survey carried out in 1989. Lung cancer distribution by cities and deaths, by year of death and sex, were retrieved for each of the different provinces of Spain for the period 1960-1985, showing the evolution and changes in the incidence of lung cancer in the population. Data referring to the evolution of lung cancer for males and females from 1940 until 1985 are also shown. Since cigarette smoking has been linked to lung cancer the effect of smoking habits in the Spanish population was also considered in this analysis. The first results of this study establish no clear evidence of any substantial association between lung cancer mortality rates and indoor radon for males. However, a relationship was evident for females. (author)

  3. Air pollution and lung cancer incidence in 17 European cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Beelen, Rob;

    2013-01-01

    Ambient air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. We aimed to assess the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and lung cancer incidence in European populations.......Ambient air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. We aimed to assess the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and lung cancer incidence in European populations....

  4. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed.

  5. The Schneeberg lung cancer cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    47 cases of ''Schneeberg lung cancer'' are reported which received financial compensation in West Germany after 1945 after being officially acknowledged as occupational disease. With two exceptions, all patients had been occupied in the Saxonian and Bohemian uranium mines (or their extensions after World War II). The geotechnical fundamentals, industrial hygiene measures taken, the radiobiological situation and its effects are presented. Most patients had small-cell carcinomas or epitheliomas. Accompanying silicosis, usually in a mild form, was found in 35 cases. The mean exposure time was 10.3 years (in 11 cases, less than five years), the mean latency time 22 years (minimum: 8 years). The mean age at the time of death was 58.2 years, i.e. 10 years less than in a normal control group. (orig.)

  6. Serum Tumor Markers for Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Shijie; Zhidong LIU; Xu, Shaofa; Zikun LIANG

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective Progress has been made in research of lung cancer tumor markers in recent years, and these tumor markers have been used in clinical application. This study is to evaluate the regimens of six serum tumor markers in lung cancer diagnosis. Methods The serum levels of the six tumor markers (NSE、pro-GRP、CYFRA21-1、SCC、p53 antibody and CA199) were detected in 80 healthy adults, 170 patients with lung cancer and 80 patients with respiratory infection by ELISA. Results The lev...

  7. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  8. Cell of origin of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and current therapies are disappointing. Elucidation of the cell(s of origin of lung cancer may lead to new therapeutics. In addition, the discovery of putative cancer-initiating cells with stem cell properties in solid tumors has emerged as an important area of cancer research that may explain the resistance of these tumors to currently available therapeutics. Progress in our understanding of normal tissue stem cells, tumor cell of origin, and cancer stem cells has been hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease, the lack of good in vivo transplantation models to assess stem cell behavior, and an overall incomplete understanding of the epithelial stem cell hierarchy. As such, a systematic computerized literature search of the MEDLINE database was used to identify articles discussing current knowledge about normal lung and lung cancer stem cells or progenitor cells. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the role of cancer-initiating cells and normal stem cells in the development of lung tumors.

  9. Lung cancer screening overdiagnosis: reports of overdiagnosis in screening for lung cancer are grossly exaggerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortani Barbosa, Eduardo J

    2015-08-01

    The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a mortality reduction benefit associated with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer. There has been considerable debate regarding the benefits and harms of LDCT lung cancer screening, including the challenges related to its practical implementation. One of the controversies regards overdiagnosis, which conceptually denotes diagnosing a cancer that, either because of its indolent, low-aggressiveness biologic behavior or because of limited life expectancy, is unlikely to result in significant morbidity during the patient's remainder lifetime. In theory, diagnosing and treating these cancers offer no measurable benefit while incurring costs and risks. Therefore, if a screening test detects a substantial number of overdiagnosed cancers, it is less likely to be effective. It has been argued that LDCT screening for lung cancer results in an unacceptably high rate of overdiagnosis. This article aims to defend the opposite stance. Overdiagnosis does exist and to a certain extent is inherent to any cancer-screening test. Nonetheless, the concept is less dualistic and more nuanced than it has been suggested. Furthermore, the average estimates of overdiagnosis in LDCT lung cancer screening based on the totality of published data are likely much lower than the highest published estimates, if a careful definition of a positive screening test reflecting our current understanding of lung cancer biology is utilized. This article presents evidence on why reports of overdiagnosis in lung cancer screening have been exaggerated. PMID:25772581

  10. Regular aspirin use and lung cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings K

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a large number of epidemiological studies have examined the role of aspirin in the chemoprevention of colon cancer and other solid tumors, there is a limited body of research focusing on the association between aspirin and lung cancer risk. Methods We conducted a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the role of regular aspirin use in lung cancer etiology. Study participants included 868 cases with primary, incident lung cancer and 935 hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions who completed a comprehensive epidemiological questionnaire. Participants were classified as regular aspirin users if they had taken the drug at least once a week for at least one year. Results Results indicated that lung cancer risk was significantly lower for aspirin users compared to non-users (adjusted OR = 0.57; 95% CI 0.41–0.78. Although there was no clear evidence of a dose-response relationship, we observed risk reductions associated with greater frequency of use. Similarly, prolonged duration of use and increasing tablet years (tablets per day × years of use was associated with reduced lung cancer risk. Risk reductions were observed in both sexes, but significant dose response relationships were only seen among male participants. When the analyses were restricted to former and current smokers, participants with the lowest cigarette exposure tended to benefit most from the potential chemopreventive effect of aspirin. After stratification by histology, regular aspirin use was significantly associated with reduced risk of small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Conclusions Overall, results from this hospital-based case-control study suggest that regular aspirin use may be associated with reduced risk of lung cancer.

  11. Parity and Risk of Lung Cancer in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Paulus, Jessica K.; Asomaning, Kofi; Kraft, Peter; Johnson, Bruce E.; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of lung cancer incidence suggest that gender-associated factors may influence lung cancer risk. Given the association of parity with risk of some women's cancers, the authors hypothesized that childbearing history may also be associated with lung cancer. Women enrolled in the Lung Cancer Susceptibility Study at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts) between 1992 and 2004 (1,004 cases, 848 controls) were available for analysis of the association between parity and lung...

  12. Detection and minimally invasive treatment of early squamous lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    DANIELS, JOHANNES M.A.; Sutedja, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The majority of patents presenting with NSCLC have advanced disease, which precludes curative treatment. Early detection and treatment might result in the identification of more patients with early central lung cancer and improve survival. In addition, the study of early lung cancer improves understanding of lung carcinogenesis and might also reveal new treatment targets for advanced lung cancer. Bronchosc...

  13. Molecular Markers with Predictive and Prognostic Relevance in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alphy Rose-James; TT, Sreelekha

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide of which non-small-cell lung carcinoma alone takes a toll of around 85%. Platinum-based therapy is the stronghold for lung cancer at present. The discovery of various molecular alterations that underlie lung cancer has contributed to the development of specifically targeted therapies employing specific mutation inhibitors. Targeted chemotherapy based on molecular profiling has shown great promise in lung cancer treatment...

  14. Imaging of Lung Cancer in the Era of Molecular Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Mizuki; Jackman, David M.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries characterizing the molecular basis of lung cancer brought fundamental changes in lung cancer treatment. The authors review the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer, including genomic abnormalities, targeted therapies, and resistance mechanisms, and discuss lung cancer imaging with novel techniques. Knowledge of the molecular basis of lung cancer is essential for radiologists to properly interpret imaging and assess response to therapy. Quantitative and functional imaging h...

  15. Guidelines for lung cancer in 2015: Consensus and controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shun; Yong-feng YU; Wen-xiang JI

    2016-01-01

    The standardization of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer has important significance for improving the prognosis of patients with lung cancer. A thorough and accurate interpretation of the guidelines of lung cancer is conducive to enhance a deeper understanding of the standardized diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. The authors of this article intend to give a brief summary and comment for the latest information about diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer at home and abroad, focusing...

  16. Opportunities to address lung cancer disparities among African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D.; Melton, Courtnee E; King, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Race and socioeconomic status are well known to influence lung cancer incidence and mortality patterns in the U.S. Lung cancer incidence and mortality rates are higher among blacks than whites. In this article we review opportunities to address disparities in lung cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. First, we summarize recent advances in the early detection and treatment of lung cancer. Then we consider black-white disparities in lung cancer treatment includ...

  17. Lung Cancer:Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Lung Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research Past Issues / Winter 2013 ... lung cancer are given intravenously or by mouth. Lung Cancer Research The large-scale National Lung Screening Trial, ...

  18. Lung Cancer:Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Lung Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research Past Issues / Winter 2013 ... lung cancer are given intravenously or by mouth. Lung Cancer Research The large-scale National Lung Screening Trial, ...

  19. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Lung Cancer and Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Archontogeorgis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of more than two hundred diseases of either known or unknown etiology with different pathogenesis and prognosis. Lung cancer, which is the major cause of cancer death in the developed countries, is mainly attributed to cigarette smoking and exposure to inhaled carcinogens. Different studies suggest a link between ILDs and lung cancer, through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation, coagulation, dysregulated apoptosis, focal hypoxia, activation, and accumulation of myofibroblasts as well as extracellular matrix accumulation. This paper reviews current evidence on the association between lung cancer and interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pneumoconiosis.

  1. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer June 15, 2009 Welcome to this “OR-Live” webcast presentation, premiering from Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. During ...

  2. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fact that, you know, lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality. And unfortunately, it’s normally detected ... CAT scan with you, Angelo. And the main question we have at that point is whether or ...

  3. Predicting death from surgery for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dowd, Emma L; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Baldwin, David R;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current British guidelines advocate the use of risk prediction scores such as Thoracoscore to estimate mortality prior to radical surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A recent publication used the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) to produce a score to predict 90day mortality...... (NLCA score). The aim of this study is to validate the NLCA score, and compare its performance with Thoracoscore. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed an internal validation using 2858 surgical patients from NLCA and an external validation using 3191 surgical patients from the Danish Lung Cancer Registry...... procedure type, age and performance status. CONCLUSIONS: Neither score performs well enough to be advocated for individual risk stratification prior to lung cancer surgery. It may be that additional physiological parameters are required; however this is a further project. In the interim we propose the use...

  4. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  5. Socioeconomic position and survival after lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne O.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Jakobsen, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To address social inequality in survival after lung cancer, it is important to consider how socioeconomic position (SEP) influences prognosis. We investigated whether SEP influenced receipt of first-line treatment and whether socioeconomic differences in survival could be explained by...... differences in stage, treatment and comorbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the Danish Lung Cancer Register, we identified 13 045 patients with lung cancer diagnosed in 2004-2010, with information on stage, histology, performance status and first-line treatment. We obtained age, gender, vital status, comorbid...... stepwise inclusion of possible mediators. RESULTS: For both low- and high-stage lung cancer, adjusted ORs for first-line treatment were reduced in patients with short education and low income, although the OR for education did not reach statistical significance in men with high-stage disease. Patients with...

  6. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chief of thoracic surgery in their Brooklyn division. We would like to talk to you today about out multidisciplinary approach to lung cancer, how we help to support the patients, how we help ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lung cancer, how we help to support the patients, how we help to treat them both before, ... and how they apply their expertise to our patients. Sam, why don’t you start. Thanks, Dr. ...

  8. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... was saying about the importance of a multidisciplinary team when managing such a complicated disease as lung cancer, and we really do have a great team here to do that because we work so ...

  9. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... unit and the director of the endobronchial ultrasound service on the pulmonary division of Beth Israel. Our ... the lung cancer division of the radiation oncology service. Good morning, Walter? Good morning. How are you? ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical conditions and are also relatively advanced in age. Here you can see me just trying to ... function tests and preoperative evaluation and her young age that we would address the lung cancer -- the ...

  11. Contribution of MRI in lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    A. Khalil; Bouhela, T; Carette, MF

    2013-01-01

    Major advances in the WB-MRI in the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with lung cancer have been performed in recent years. Multicentric studies using different magnet systems are necessary to confirm these promising results.

  12. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a multidisciplinary team when managing such a complicated disease as lung cancer, and we really do have ... a preoperative evaluation of the extent of the disease that you’re dealing with, especially when you ...

  13. Epidemiology, aetiology, diagnosis and screening of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death globally. Smoking causes about 90 % of all lung cancer cases. Passive, i.e. involuntary smoking has been confirmed to enhance the risk of lung cancer in exposed people. Individual susceptibility is one of important factors in lung cancer formation. New knowledge in epidemiology and aetiology of lung cancer gives new possibilities in diagnostic and screening of this disease. Results of large randomised trials aimed at new technologies in lung cancer screening will be available in a few years. (author)

  14. Cost of Lung Cancer: A Methodological Review

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Molinier; Christophe Combescure; Cristos Chouaid; Jean-Pierre Daures; Bruno Housset; Didier Fabre; Alain Grand; Alain Vergnenegre

    2006-01-01

    Cost of illness (COI) studies estimate the overall economic burden of a specific disease, rather than simply treatment-related costs. While having been criticised for not allowing resource prioritisation, COI studies can provide useful guidance, so long as they adhere to accepted methodology. The aim of this review is to analyse the methods used to evaluate the cost of lung cancer. Because of the increasing incidence and high direct and indirect costs of lung cancer, it is an important diseas...

  15. Surgery for small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoyos, Alberto; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2014-11-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises approximately 14% of all lung cancer cases. Most patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are therefore treated nonoperatively with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or both. A small subset of patients with SCLC present with early-stage disease and will benefit from surgical resection plus chemotherapy. The rationale for radiotherapy in these patients remains controversial. PMID:25441133

  16. ICTP in Bone Metastases of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Franjević, Ana; Pavićević, Radomir; Bubanović, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases often appear in advanced stages of lung cancer. They are the result of modulation of bone metabolism by tumor cells that migrated into bone microenvironment and degraded bone organic matrix. Measurement of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) in the serum of subjects with lung cancer with and without bone metastases and healthy population is the way to explore bone resorption. In 343 subjects included in this research ICTP level was significantly higher...

  17. Ancillary Testing in Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    William Dubinski; Leighl, Natasha B.; Ming-Sound Tsao; David M. Hwang

    2012-01-01

    The pathologic diagnosis of lung cancer historically has relied primarily on morphologic features of tumors in histologic sections. With the emergence of new targeted therapies, the pathologist is called upon increasingly to provide not only accurate typing of lung cancers, but also to provide prognostic and predictive information, based on a growing number of ancillary tests, that may have significant impact on patient management. This review provides an overview of ancillary tests currently...

  18. Advances in bronchoscopy for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samjot Singh Dhillon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchoscopic techniques have seen significant advances in the last decade. The development and refinement of different types of endobronchial ultrasound and navigation systems have led to improved diagnostic yield and lung cancer staging capabilities. The complication rate of these minimally invasive procedures is extremely low as compared to traditional transthoracic needle biopsy and surgical sampling. These advances augment the safe array of methods utilized in the work up and management algorithms of lung cancer.

  19. Advances in bronchoscopy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Dexter, Elisabeth U.

    2012-01-01

    Bronchoscopic techniques have seen significant advances in the last decade. The development and refinement of different types of endobronchial ultrasound and navigation systems have led to improved diagnostic yield and lung cancer staging capabilities. The complication rate of these minimally invasive procedures is extremely low as compared to traditional transthoracic needle biopsy and surgical sampling. These advances augment the safe array of methods utilized in the work up and management algorithms of lung cancer. PMID:23346012

  20. Non-conventional imaging of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bellomi, M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This presentation discusses the optimum magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for lung cancer assessment in a clinical setting, and the sensitivity and specificity of MRI (alone and in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-MR) compared with those of computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) for lung cancer staging. The role of perfusion studies (by CT or MRI), of DWI-MRI, blood oxygenation level dependent sequences and PET in d...

  1. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  2. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... me reiterate what Sam was saying about the importance of a multidisciplinary team when managing such a complicated disease as lung cancer, and we really do have a great team here to do that because we work so closely together so often. My role, after Sam assists in diagnosing cancers, is to ...

  3. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... me reiterate what Sam was saying about the importance of a multidisciplinary team when managing such a complicated disease as lung cancer, and we really do have a great team here to do that because we work so closely together so often. My role, after Sam assists in diagnosing cancers, is to ...

  4. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Current Controversies in Lung Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brett W; Godoy, Myrna C B; Wu, Carol C; Erasmus, Jeremy J; Truong, Mylene T

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, and accurate staging of disease plays an important role in the formulation of treatment strategies and optimization of patient outcomes. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has recently proposed changes to the upcoming eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM-8) staging system used for lung cancer. This revised classification is based on significant differences in patient survival identified on analysis of a new large international database of lung cancer cases. Key changes include: further modifications to the T descriptors based on 1 cm increments in tumor size; grouping of tumors resulting in partial or complete lung atelectasis/pneumonitis; grouping of tumors involving a main bronchus with respect to distance from the carina; reassignment of diaphragmatic invasion; elimination of mediastinal pleural invasion as a descriptor; and further subdivision of metastatic disease into distinct descriptors based on the number of extrathoracic metastases and involved organs. Because of these changes, several new stage groups have been developed, and others have shifted. Although TNM-8 represents continued improvement upon modifications previously made to the staging system, reflecting an evolving understanding of tumor behavior and patient management, several limitations and unaddressed issues persist. Understanding the proposed revisions to TNM-8 and awareness of key limitations and potential controversial issues still unaddressed will allow radiologists to accurately stage patients with lung cancer and optimize treatment decisions. PMID:27306388

  6. Surgery for nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Lang-Lazdunski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains the best curative option in patients with early stage lung cancer (stage I and II. Developments in minimally invasive techniques now allow surgeons to perform lung resections on elderly patients, patients with poor pulmonary function or significant cardiopulmonary comorbidities. New techniques, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and ablative procedures, are being evaluated in early-stage lung cancer and may represent an alternative to surgery in patients unfit for lung resection. Perioperative mortality rates have dropped significantly at most institutions in the past two decades and complications are managed more efficiently. Progress in imaging and staging techniques have helped cut futile thoracotomy rates and offer patients the most adequate treatment options. Large randomised trials have helped clarify the role of neoadjuvant, induction and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as radiotherapy. Surgery remains an essential step in the multimodality therapy of selected patients with advanced-stage lung cancer (stage III and IV. Interventional and endoscopic techniques have reduced the role of surgery in the diagnosis and staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer, but surgery remains an important tool in the palliation of advanced-stage lung cancer. Large national/international surgical databases have been developed and predictive risk-models for surgical mortality/morbidity published by learned surgical societies. Nonetheless, lung cancer overall survival rates remain deceptively low and it is hoped that early detection/screening, better understanding of tumour biology and development of biomarkers, and development of efficient targeted therapies will help improve the prognosis of lung cancer patients in the next decade.

  7. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  8. Prof.Zhou Yiqiang'S Experience in Treatment of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范宏宇; 王黎军

    2004-01-01

    @@ Bronchogenic carcinoma, the dominant form of malignant lung cancers, refers to canceration of the bronchial mucosa. Prof. Zhou accumulated a wealth of experience in treating complicated diseases with TCM measures and was especially skillful in treating lung cancers. His understandings about the art of treating lung cancers often brought about excellent results.

  9. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  10. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  11. Basic and technical research on lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In association with clinical study of carbon beam therapy for lung cancer, the basic research for lung cancer and the patients with this disease has been carried out for the past 10 years. With regard to lung damage by the carbon beams, firstly pulmonary function was measured and analyzed for the patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Force expiratory volume in 1 second (FVE 1.0) and TLC (total lung capacity) was found to be reduced significantly at 6 and 12 months after therapy but the reduction rate was a little, which can support the safety of this treatment modality. Secondly, the regional lung damage by the beams was investigated by using correct fusion of CT images with carbon beam dose distribution, diagnostic follow-up CT images and blood flow and ventilation spect images. It demonstrated the graded decrease blood flow by dose and the compensatory increase of blood flow in the adjacent lobe of lung unexposed to irradiation. On the other hand, the biological study of carbon beam effects on lung cancer cells and tumors line was conducted. Firstly, by using 7 or 4 human lung cancer cell line, the radiosensitivity of carbon beams was compared with that of photons by different histological patterns. It was found that there was no essential difference in the sensitivity pattern for lung cancer histology between the carbon beams and photons though the former doubled the later in power. Secondly, by using IA cell lines among them, the dynamic of clonogenic cells (clonogen) in a nude tumor and the changes in its morphology following irradiation was investigated, clarifying that the clonogen proliferating under anoxic or hypoxic conditions played a pivotal role for tumor regrowth and stemmed from the different clone which had been genetically selected and developed under these conditions. The finding of clonogen becomes one of the evidence supporting the superiority of a single-dose radiotherapy to fractionated radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Lung cancer in the Kashmir valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Parvaiz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung cancer has been found to be the second commonest cancer according to a hospital-based data from Kashmir, India. However, no incidence studies are available. Objective: To ascertain the incidence of lung cancer in Kashmir. Materials and Methods: All newly histologically diagnosed cases of lung cancer seen in various hospital and private laboratories of the Kashmir valley were registered over a period of two years (January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2005. Also included were patients attending the various oncological service areas of the institute and those diagnosed from any other laboratory outside the state. The incidence rate was calculated using the January 2005 population as the reference population estimated using the census-based projected populations. Results: Four hundred and sixty-two incident cases of lung cancer were seen during the study period. The crude incidence rate, age standardized (world and truncated age adjusted (40-69 years, world incidence rates for lung cancer per 100 000 population were 4.01, 6.48 and 15.28 respectively (males 6.55, 10.09 and 23.94 respectively and females 1.19, 2.14 and 4.65. The age adjusted rates for males in district Srinagar was 19.34 per 100 000. One hundred and fifty nine (69.8% of the 221 had a history of Hukkah smoking. Conclusions: Even though Kashmir as a whole is a low incidence area for lung cancer (ASR of < 15, Srinagar district has the highest incidence of lung cancer among the males in Kashmir. The data presented is assumed to be the closest approximation to a population-based data registry and the geographical incidence maps of ICMR need appropriate updating

  13. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women. Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment, advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens. As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations, researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at sp...

  14. Limited small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the prognosis of patients with limited small cell lung cancer (LSCLC) not achieving complete response (CR) to induction combination chemotherapy (ICC) but who achieve CR after thoracic irradiation (TI). Twenty-four patients had CRs to ICC (CR- ICC) of two cycles of cytoxan, Adriamycin, and vincristine alternating with two cycles of cisplatin with VP-16. Another 24 had CR after consolidation with subsequent T1 (CR-T1): 45 Gy in daily fractions of 2.5 Gy or twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy. The CR-ICC and CR-TI patients had similar prognostic factors and treatment. Comparing CR-ICC and CR-TI, survival was 40% versus 26% at 2 years and 35% versus 4% at 5 years (P < .05). There were eight (33%) long-term survivors (≥3 years) in the CR-ICC group versus three (13%) in the CR-TI group. Local control for CR-ICC patients was 59% at 5 years versus 21% for the CR-TI patients (not significant). Freedom from DM for the CR-ICC patients was 41% at 5 years versus 8% for the CR-TI patients (P < .05)

  15. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Jung, Seung Hyae; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon; Cho, Kyu Soek; Yang, Moon Ho [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-05-15

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a rare manifestation of lung cancer. Eight cases of pneumothorax found in 1648 patients with lung cancer from 1979-1990 are reported. Histopathologic types of cancer were adenocarcinoma in three cases, squamous cell carcinoma in two cases, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma in two cases, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in one case. The primary tumor mass was not found even after thoracotomy in two cases. Spontaneous pneumothorax occurred on the ipsilateral side of the cancer. All the patients were more than 40 years old with a history of smoking 1-2 packs a day for 20 to 50 years, and had chronic lung diseases. The authors emphasize that bronchogenic carcinoma may be one of the causes of spontaneous pneumothorax in appropriate clinical settings.

  16. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a rare manifestation of lung cancer. Eight cases of pneumothorax found in 1648 patients with lung cancer from 1979-1990 are reported. Histopathologic types of cancer were adenocarcinoma in three cases, squamous cell carcinoma in two cases, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma in two cases, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in one case. The primary tumor mass was not found even after thoracotomy in two cases. Spontaneous pneumothorax occurred on the ipsilateral side of the cancer. All the patients were more than 40 years old with a history of smoking 1-2 packs a day for 20 to 50 years, and had chronic lung diseases. The authors emphasize that bronchogenic carcinoma may be one of the causes of spontaneous pneumothorax in appropriate clinical settings

  17. Role of lymphangiogenesis in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Jankowska

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer represents one of the most frequent causes of death due to neoplastic disease in Poland and around the world. The high mortality which accompany neoplastic diseases used to be ascribed mainly to dissemination of cancerous cells. Studies on animal models suggest that tumour lymphangiogenesis represents the principal factor in the process of metastases formation. Lymphangiogenesis involves a process of formation of new lymphatic vessels from already existing lymphatic capillaries. Lymphangiogenesis is stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF and other, recently reported factors, such as, e.g., cyclooxygenase 2, fibroblast growth factor 2, angiopoetin-1 and the insulin-resembling growth factor. In lymphangiogenesis a key role is played by neutropilin 2 or podoplanin and this promoted development of studies on lymphangiogenesis. Activation of VEGF-C/VEGF-D/VEGFR-3 axis increases motility and invasiveness of neoplastic cells, promotes development of metastases in several types of tumours such as, e.g., lung cancer, mammary carcinoma, cancers of the neck, prostate and large intestine. In recent years lymphangiogenesis provided topic of many studies. A positive correlation was detected between expressions of VEGF-C/D and VEGFR-3 in non-small cell lung cancer. In patients with lung cancer with high expression of VEGF-C a markedly abbreviated survival was noted. Positive correlation was detected between expression of VEGF-C and VEGF-D on one hand and expression of LYVE-1 on the other in sentinel lymph nodes with metastases of neoplastic cells in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Also, high density of lymphatic vessels and high density of intraneoplastic microvessels proved to be independent poor prognostic indices in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Extensive hope is linked to studies on inhibitors of lymphangiogenesis, which may improve results of treatment also in tumour patients.

  18. Infective complications in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rančić Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study was aimed at analyzing the site, kind and type of infection which develop in patients having lung cancer at hospital treatment. Material and methods. Clinical data of the patients hospitalized for lung cancer were analyzed at the Clinic for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Knez Selo in the period from January 2002 till December 2007. A great number of patients (1296-75.9% had non-small cell lung cancer. In 1708 patients with lung cancer, 773 febrile episodes were recorded, i.e. 687 states of infections. Results. Most of the infections were recorded in the tracheobronchial tree (60.9%. The infection was confirmed microbiologically in 38% of infectious states. Predominant Gram positive pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus, but among Gram negative pathogens there were Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Discussion. A significantly better therapy response to antibiotics was found in the group of patients where microbiological agents were isolated (p<0.05. The predominant site of infection in the patients with lung cancer is the tracheobronchial tree without a significant difference between frequency of Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens.

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a complex comorbidity of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Derek Grose; Robert Milroy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major burden throughout the world. It is associated with a signifi cantly increased incidence of lung cancer and may infl uence treatment options and outcome. Impaired lung function confi rming COPD is an independent risk factor for lung cancer. Oxidative stress and infl ammation may be a key link between COPD and lung cancer, with numerous molecular markers being analysed to attempt to understand the pathway of lung cancer developme...

  20. Molecular biology in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, I.; Biroš, Erik

    Poland: Institute of Nuclear Physics, 2002. s. 32. [NATO advanced research workshop. 23.06.2002-27.06.2002, Krakow - Poland] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : cancer Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  2. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David;

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe....... The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a...... feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed...

  3. Quality of life after lung resection for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pompili, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Radical and palliative treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been reported to have a significant impact on the patient quality of life (QoL). The increasing improvements in lung cancer diagnosis and cures in recent years have changed the perspectives of quantity and quality of the life after cancer in these patients. However, despite a growing interest about patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in surgical oncology, we are quite distant from a routine collection of QoL d...

  4. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy

  5. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Christina S., E-mail: cbaik2@u.washington.edu; Eaton, Keith D. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2012-09-25

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy.

  6. Estrogen Signaling in Lung Cancer: An Opportunity for Novel Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D. Eaton

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in U.S. and represents a major public health burden. Epidemiologic data have suggested that lung cancer in women may possess different biological characteristics compared to men, as evidenced by a higher proportion of never-smokers among women with lung cancer. Emerging data indicate that female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone play a significant role in lung carcinogenesis. It has been reported that estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in lung cancer cell lines as well as in patient-derived tumors. Hormone related risk factors such as hormone replacement therapy have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis and several preclinical studies show activity of anti-estrogen therapy in lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging evidence for the role of reproductive hormones in lung cancer and implications for lung cancer therapy.

  7. Classification, staging and prognosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer has increased in incidence throughout the twentieth century and is now the most common cancer in the Western World. It has a poor prognosis, only 10-15% of patients survive 5 years or longer. Outcome is dependent on clinical stage and cancer cell type. Lung cancer is broadly subclassified on the basis of histological features into squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. The histopathological type of lung cancer correlates with tumour behaviour and prognosis. Staging based on prognosis is essential in clinical trials comparing different management strategies, and enables universal communication regarding the efficacy of different treatments in specific patient groups. The anatomic extent of disease determined either preoperatively using imaging supplemented by invasive procedures such as mediastinoscopy, and anterior mediastinotomy or following resection are described according to the T-primary tumour, N-regional lymph nodes, M-distant metastasis classification. The International System for Staging Lung Cancer attempts to group together patients with similar prognosis and treatment options. Various combinations of T, N, and M define different clinical or surgical-pathological stages (IA-IV) characterised by different survival characteristics. Refinements in staging based on imaging findings have enabled clinical staging to more accurately reflect the surgical-pathological stage and therefore more accurately predict prognosis. Recent advances including the use of positron emission tomography in combination with conventional staging promises to increase the accuracy of staging and therefore to reduce the number of invasive staging procedures and inappropriate thoracotomies

  8. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  9. Lung cancer among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patho-statistical study of the relationship between lung cancer and the atomic-bomb (A-bomb) was made on 259 lung cancer cases autopsied in Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital between 1956 and 1983. These autopsy cases were divided into 3 groups; those exposed at 2000 m from the hypocenter or those entering the city after the bombing (group B), and non-exposed group. The incidence of lung cancer was high irrespective of sex in the group A, being 1.8 times higher than in the non-exposed group. It tended to increase rapidly since 1975 in women of the group A, and the ratio of women to men was high, as compared with the other groups. In the group B and the non-exposed group, the incidence of lung cancer tended to increase year by year, particularly in men. Grip-sized adenocarcinoma was seen more frequently in the group A than in the other groups. Squamous cell carcinoma and undifferentiated cancer occurred more frequently than adenocarcinoma in older women of the exposed groups. This seemed to be due to the fact that older patients tended to have squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated cancer more frequently than adenocarcinoma. The incidence of lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma, tended to increase in the exposed groups. There was no great difference in the incidence of organ metastasis between the exposed groups and non-exposed group. Twenty-one of 24 cases of multiple cancer were A-bomb victims, although the incidence of complications was independent of exposure status. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Review on Immunotherapies for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha JIN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis, most cases are diagnosed at a very late stage. More effective medications or therapies should be developed to improve its prognosis. The advancement of tumor immunity and tumor immunosuppression facilitated the feasibility of immunotherapies for lung cancer. Ipilimumab, antibody to Programmed death-1 (PD-1, Toll-like receptor agonists, liposomal BLP25 (L- BLP25, belagenpumatucel-L, melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3 vaccine and talactoferrin have been proved to be effective for lung cancer through early clinical trials, most of the drugs have moved forward to phase III trials, so as to collect much higher level evidence to support the immunotherapies incorporated into the multidisciplinary treatment of lung cancer. The selection of target patients at appropriate stages, breaking down of tumor immunosuppression as well as the objective measurement of tumor response to the therapy are major challenges for the development of immunotherapies for lung cancer. The clarifying of the mechanism of immune escape led to the above drug development, and immune-senescence has already become the hotspot in this field.

  11. Lung cancer molecular epidemiology in China: recent trends

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Caicun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is both the most common diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in China. During the past three decades, the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China are increasing rapidly. According to data from National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) in 2010, the crude incidence of lung cancer in China was 46.08 per 100,000 population (61.86 per 100,000 men and 29.54 per 100,000 women), with an estimated over 600,000 new diagnosed lung cancer patients (416,333 mal...

  12. Explorations of lung cancer stigma for female long term survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Cati; Cataldo, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, accompanied by greater psychological distress than other cancers. There is minimal but increasing awareness of the impact of lung cancer stigma (LCS) on patient outcomes. LCS is associated with increased symptom burden and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of female long term lung cancer survivors in the context of LCS and examine how participants discursively adhere to or reject stigma...

  13. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeuti...

  14. A Novel Bioluminescence Orthotopic Mouse Model for Advanced Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bo; Torossian, Artour; Li, Wenyan; Schleicher, Stephen; Niu, Kathy; Giacalone, Nicholas J; Kim, Sung June; Chen, Heidi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Moretti, Luigi; Lu, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States despite recent advances in our understanding of this challenging disease. An animal model for high-throughput screening of therapeutic agents for advanced lung cancer could help promote the development of more successful treatment interventions. To develop our orthotopic lung cancer model, luciferase-expressing A549 cancer cells were injected into the mediastinum of athymic nude mice. To determine whether the model ...

  15. Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159289.html Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That Study found ... HealthDay News) -- A new smartphone app may help lung cancer patients live longer and better by monitoring their ...

  16. Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159289.html Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That Study found ... HealthDay News) -- A new smartphone app may help lung cancer patients live longer and better by monitoring their ...

  17. Xalkori Approved for Rare Genetic Form of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Xalkori Approved For Rare Genetic Form of Lung Cancer ROS-1 positive NSCLC To use the sharing ... Drug Administration to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with tumors that have a rare ROS- ...

  18. Lung cancer in the meat industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B.; Pippard, E C; Winter, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Routine statistics of occupational mortality and incidence of cancer have consistently shown high rates of lung cancer in butchers. Possible explanations include infection by carcinogenic papilloma viruses, exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrites in the preservation of meat, or a confounding effect of tobacco. To explore these possibilities, we have examined the mortality of 1610 men employed at three British companies processing pork, beef, lamb, bacon, and other meat produ...

  19. Lung Cancer Staging: Clinical and Radiologic Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chheang, Sophie; Brown, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Published in 2009, the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is the culmination of an extensive worldwide initiative to standardize and validate lung cancer staging. Unlike prior editions, the new staging system is now inclusive of small cell carcinoma and carcinoid tumors. In addition, significant changes were made to the T and M descriptors, resulting in improved prognostic stratification of disease. This review article highlights these changes, the ration...

  20. Characterizing the cancer genome in lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Weir, Barbara A.; Woo, Michele S.; Getz, Gad; Perner, Sven; Ding, Li; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lin, William M.; Province, Michael A; Kraja, Aldi; Johnson, Laura A.; Shah, Kinjal; Sato, Mitsuo; Thomas, Roman K.; Barletta, Justine A; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2007-01-01

    Somatic alterations in cellular DNA underlie almost all human cancers1. The prospect of targeted therapies2 and the development of high-resolution, genome-wide approaches3–8 are now spurring systematic efforts to characterize cancer genomes. Here we report a large-scale project to characterize copy-number alterations in primary lung adenocarcinomas. By analysis of a large collection of tumors (n = 371) using dense single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, we identify a total of 57 significantly ...

  1. Narcissus, the Beam, and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    In the management of lung cancer, the rules of engagement of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are not clearly defined. The potential for SABR to affect to an unprecedented level current protocols and in all disease stages emerges vehemently from the literature. However, in a time when the role of surgery is being reassessed, surgeons need to take a closer look at the evidence for the use of SABR in lung cancer patients and clearly define their indisputable role within the context of multidisciplinary teams. The myth of Narcissus exemplified in the absolute masterpiece by Caravaggio seems to represent an ideal metaphor to explain the ever-evolving interaction between surgery and SABR in lung cancer management. PMID:27209014

  2. Status of particle therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current standard treatment for lung cancer, the most common type of cancer worldwide, depends on disease stage. Surgery is the treatment of choice for early-stage tumors, but radiotherapy is a good option for those with early-stage tumors who cannot undergo surgery, and radiotherapy in conjunction with chemotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced tumors. Although advances in photon (x-ray)-based radiotherapy involving three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy allow radiation doses to be escalated beyond the traditional limit of 60 Gy, this dose is not considered to be sufficient for tumor eradication. Moreover, the improvements in local control and survival conferred by concurrent chemotherapy come at the cost of considerable toxicity owing to inadvertent irradiation of surrounding normal tissues, and this toxicity often limits the radiation dose that can be delivered. Unfortunately for patients with locally advanced lung cancer, local control and survival remain poor. Attempts to improve clinical outcomes for patients with lung cancer have led to the use of charged particle therapy in an effort to exploit the physical properties of such particles to escalate the dose to the tumor while simultaneously limiting the dose to nearby structures, thereby enhancing the therapeutic ratio and potentially improving cancer cure rates. This review summarizes the rationale for and challenges associated with the use of charged particles for lung cancer therapy and reviews the clinical experience to date with using protons and carbon ions for early-stage and locally advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer

  3. DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION IN SPUTUM OF LUNG CANCER PATIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG He-long; WANG Wen-liang; CUI Da-xiang

    1999-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor, which has ahigh incidence and mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to seek a new method for the diagnosis, especially the early diagnosis of lung cancer. The development of molecular biology makes the gene diagnosis of lung cancer possible.PCR-SSCP was applied to detect p53 gene mutation of lung cancer patients' sputum cells and we have achieved good results.

  4. Research status and funding trends of lung cancer biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cui; Hong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of malignant tumors with the highest morbidity and mortality in the world. At present, research of early diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and metastasis associated biomarkers is most active. This article reviewed the research status of lung cancer biomarkers and analyzed the funding situation in the field of lung cancer markers in recent 10 years in China and abroad, to provide a reference for the future basic and clinical translational research of lung cancer biomarkers.

  5. Importance of Smoking Cessation in a Lung Cancer Screening Program

    OpenAIRE

    Munshi, Vidit; McMahon, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of lung cancer and smoking cessation interventions can decrease lung cancer mortality, but information on the effectiveness and interaction between smoking cessation and lung cancer screening is sparse and inconsistent. This review aims to synthesize recent studies in two major areas of interest. First, we explore the interactions and potential for synergies between lung cancer screening programs and smoking cessation by summarizing reported changes in smoking behavior observe...

  6. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...... expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  7. Lung cancer and radon in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positive correlations between radon and lung cancer have been found only for mine workers but not for the general population in dwellings. In this study we are looking for a connection between the mean radon values in 41 different regions of Switzerland and the corresponding lung cancer mortalities. For yound woman in general and young men and young women from rural areas a correlation was found. Such calculations, however, do not prove a causal connection, since they use only present day radon levels and can account neither for their temporal variations nor for the mobility and life habits of the population or for the real amount of time spent inside the dwellings. (orig.)

  8. MRI in lung cancer: a pictorial essay

    OpenAIRE

    Hochhegger, B; Marchiori, E.; Sedlaczek, O; Irion, K.; Heussel, C. P.; Ley, S; Ley-Zaporozhan, J; Soares Souza, A; Kauczor, H-U

    2011-01-01

    Imaging studies play a critical role in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. CT and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT (PET/CT) are widely and routinely used for staging and assessment of treatment response. Many radiologists still use MRI only for the assessment of superior sulcus tumours, and in cases where invasion of the spinal cord canal is suspected. MRI can detect and stage lung cancer, and this method could be an excellent alternative to CT or PET/CT in the inv...

  9. Expression and Significance of MAGE Genes in Human Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guangxu LI; Song, Pingping; ZHANG, BAIJIANG

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the common malignancies with an extremely poor prognosis, because of the current diagnostic techniques are not easy to find micrometastases. Melanoma associated antigens genes (MAGE) are tumor specific antigen genes, closely related to the occurrence, development and prognosis of lung cancer. The research of MAGE genes provide a new direction for the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

  10. Perspectives of African Americans on Lung Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lathan, Christopher S.; Waldman, Laura Tesler; Browning, Emily; Gagne, Joshua; Emmons, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study suggests that African American smokers are aware of the relationship between smoking and lung cancer and are interested in smoking-cessation treatment. These data also indicate that lung cancer disparities are unlikely to be associated with differential willingness to receive care but that African Americans may perceive financial and insurance barriers to lung cancer treatment.

  11. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate lung cancer growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PaulDGardner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels modulate ion flux across cell membranes, activate signal transduction pathways, and influence cellular transport – vital biological functions that are inexorably linked to cellular processes that go awry during carcinogenesis. Indeed, deregulation of ion channel function has been implicated in cancer-related phenomena such as unrestrained cell proliferation and apoptotic evasion. As the prototype for ligand-gated ion channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have been extensively studied in the context of neuronal cells but accumulating evidence also indicate a role for nAChRs in carcinogenesis. Recently, variants in the nAChR genes CHRNA3, CHRNA5, and CHRNB4 have been implicated in nicotine dependence and lung cancer susceptibility. Here, we silenced the expression of these three genes to investigate their function in lung cancer. We show that these genes are necessary for the viability of small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC, the most aggressive type of lung cancer. Furthermore, we show that nicotine promotes SCLC cell viability whereas an α3β4-selective antagonist, α-conotoxin AuIB, inhibits it. Our findings posit a mechanism whereby signaling via α3/α5/β4-containing nAChRs promotes lung carcinogenesis.

  12. Nuclear medicine procedures in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are still the methods of choice for the study of lung cancer, they have certain limitations in the determination of the nature of suspicious lung nodules, the evaluation of mediastinal involvement, the assessment of the viability of previously treated lesions and the diagnosis of tumour relapse. There is a wide range of current oncological requirements related to lung cancer: detection of malignant lesions at the earliest stage and in the most effective way; the definition of the biological characteristics of a lesion (proliferation, aggressiveness, differentiation, etc.); the need to define the operability of the patient (function of residual lung and staging); and the need to evaluate the behaviour of the tumour (response to therapy, early detection of recurrences, metastatic spread). Most of the efforts of the nuclear medicine community have been focussed on diagnosis, staging, restaging and therapy monitoring of lung cancer. Many radiopharmaceuticals have been employed for this, including gallium, monoclonal antibodies, somatostatin analogues, lipophilic cations and positron emission tracers. There is ample evidence that nuclear medicine techniques may provide complementary information with respect to anatomical imaging, for example in the assessment of preoperative function by means of ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy, or in tumour localisation by means of specific tumour-seeking agents. However, clinical data suggest that, when properly used, nuclear medicine procedures in some cases may be not only complementary to radiology but essential for the clinical management of lung cancer. An example of such a procedure is fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) the introduction of which has greatly contributed to confirmation of the clinical value of nuclear medicine in this field. FDG PET has proved of great help in lung cancer management and its cost-effectiveness in

  13. Increased risk of cancer among relatives of patients with lung cancer in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xu Ming; Xu Yingchun; Jin Yongtang; Xue Saoli

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Genetic factors were considered as one of the risk factors for lung cancer or other cancers. The aim of this work was to determine whether a genetic predisposition accounts for such familial aggregation of cancer among relatives of lung cancer probands. Methods A case-control study was conducted in 800 case families identified by lung cancer patients (probands), and in 800 control families identified by the probands'spouses. The data were analysed with logistic regression ...

  14. Isolating and Testing Circulating Tumor DNA and Soluble Immune Markers During the Course of Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. About the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention.Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials ProgramThe group jointly administers the Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program evaluating new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and technologies to identify premalignant lesions, and related cancers.  |

  16. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer June 15, 2009 Welcome to this “OR-Live” webcast presentation, premiering from Beth Israel Medical ... when detected, you know, and when patients get treatment. Okay. So it’s very important, you know, to ...

  18. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today is Dr. Walter Choi who is the director of the lung cancer division of the radiation oncology service. Good morning, Walter? Good morning. How are you? Morning Sam, thank you for coming. I really appreciate that you took time out of your day to come. As an ...

  19. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical doctor, you know, with an abnormal chest X-ray. As you know, the suspicion of lung cancer, ... to reach a diagnosis. Once you have abnormal X-ray, I think the next thing to do would ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out multidisciplinary approach to lung cancer, how we help to support the patients, how we help to treat them both before, during, and after ... you to some members of our team and help you understand some of the things that we ...

  1. The wind god promotes lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Steven M; Schaller, Michael D

    2014-05-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and colleagues demonstrate that the hematopoietic transcription factor Aiolos (named after the Wind God of Greek mythology) confers anoikis resistance in lung tumor cells through repression of cell adhesion-related genes including the mechanosensor p66Shc. PMID:24823631

  2. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  3. Lung cancer following exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case-control study of lung cancer was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, to evaluate risk factors for this common neoplasm, with special attention given to assessing the potentially interactive roles of cigarette smoking and atomic radiation. The investigation involved interviews with 428 patients with primary lung cancer and 957 matched controls, or with their next of kin in the event of death or disability. The interview information was supplemented by data on atomic bomb radiation exposure for each individual and on smoking and other factors from prior surveys of subsets of the population studied. Separate effects of smoking and high dose (greater than 100 rad) radiation were found, with the two exposures combining to affect lung cancer risk in an approximate additive fashion. The additive rather than multiplicative model was favored whether the smoking variable was dichotomized (ever vs. never smoked), categorized into one of several groups based on amount smoked, or treated as a discrete variable. The findings are contrasted with those for Colorado uranium miners and other cohorts occupationally exposed to radon and its daughter products, where smoking and radiation have been reported to combine multiplicatively to enhance lung cancer risk

  4. Treatment of Brain Metastasis from Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastases are not only the most common intracranial neoplasm in adults but also very prevalent in patients with lung cancer. Patients have been grouped into different classes based on the presence of prognostic factors such as control of the primary tumor, functional performance status, age, and number of brain metastases. Patients with good prognosis may benefit from more aggressive treatment because of the potential for prolonged survival for some of them. In this review, we will comprehensively discuss the therapeutic options for treating brain metastases, which arise mostly from a lung cancer primary. In particular, we will focus on the patient selection for combined modality treatment of brain metastases, such as surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with whole brain irradiation; the use of radiosensitizers; and the neurocognitive deficits after whole brain irradiation with or without SRS. The benefit of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) and its potentially associated neuro-toxicity for both small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are also discussed, along with the combined treatment of intrathoracic primary disease and solitary brain metastasis. The roles of SRS to the surgical bed, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, WBRT with an integrated boost to the gross brain metastases, as well as combining WBRT with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, are explored as well

  5. Relation between indoor radon and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Low level of exposures to residential radon and dosimetric uncertainties due to mobility have hampered the evaluation of lung cancer risk and the comparison to radon-exposed miners. To address these limitations, the authors conducted a case-control study in a predominantly rural area of China with low mobility and high radon levels. Methods: Cases studied including all lung cancer patients diagnosed between January 1994 and April 1998, aged 30-75 years, and resided in two prefectures of Gansu Province. Controls were randomly selected from census lists and matched on age sex and prefecture. Radon detectors were placed in all houses having been occupied two or more years in the past 5-30 years prior to enrollment. Measurements covered 77% of the possible exposure time. Results: Mean radon concentration were 230.4 Bq/m3 for the cases (n = 768) and 222.2 Bq/m3 for the controls (n = 1659). Lung cancer risk increased along with increasing of the radon level (P 3 was 0.19 (95% CI:0.05, 0.47) for all subjects, and 0.31(95% CI:0.10, 0.81) for subjects with 100% coverage of the exposure interval. Adjusting for exposure uncertainties increased estimates about 70%. Conclusion: The results support increased lung cancer risks with indoor radon exposures, which may equal to or exceed extrapolation-based risks from miner data

  6. Penile metastasis as a first sign of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevket Ozkaya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sevket Ozkaya1, Serhat Findik2, Atilla G Atici21Samsun Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Hospital, Samsun, Turkey; 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayis University, Kurupelit, Samsun, TurkeyAbstract: Lung cancer does not generally produce any symptoms at the early stages and it rapidly metastasizes. Although lung cancer has a potential of metastasis to all organs and tissues, metastasis to the penis from lung cancer is very rare. We present a case with a penile lesion as the first sign of lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, metastasis, penis

  7. Women and Lung Cancer: What’s New?

    OpenAIRE

    North, Crystal M.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 20 years there has been increased focus on gender differences in health and disease. The earliest studies of lung cancer enrolled mainly men, as the incidence of lung cancer among women was exceedingly low. As social patterns changed around World War II and women began to smoke more, the epidemiology of lung cancer has changed. The higher percentage of lung cancer in non-smoking women as compared to non-smoking men suggests that lung cancer in women behaves differently. Studies of...

  8. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Palacios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods: The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012 were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results: There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%, and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2, with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9 years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7% patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5% had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232, the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397, and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0% and 23 (38.3% cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3% cases with advanced stages (III and IV at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%, chemotherapy 14 (24.1%, surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%, radiotherapy 7 (12.1%, surgery 4 (6.9%, and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%. Forty-six (76.7% patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%. Conclusions: The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis

  9. Comparative study between characteristics of the lung cancer, breast cancer and esophageal cancer distal bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the characteristics of the distribution of bone metastases in lung cancer, breast cancer and esophageal cancer. Methods: SPECT bone imaging of the entire body was performed after the injection of 99Tcm-methylene diphosphonate (99Tcm-MDP) in 454 cases. Analyzed the distribution of metastatic bone lesions in upper limbs' middle and distal or the pelvis and lower limbs and the distinction of metastatic bone lesions between different diseases were distinguished. Results: Of all the 454 patients, 130 cases showed abnormal radionuclide concentration in the region of upper limbs' middle and distal or the pelvis and lower limbs. One thousand three hundreds and three metastatic bone lesions were found in all the patients [893 were in lung cancer (64.4%), 36 1 were in breast cancer (27.7%) and 103 were in esophageal cancer (7.9%)]. Radioactive uptake in rotor area of femur lesions in these diseases was demonstrated to be of large proportion. Conclusions: The result of 99Tcm-MDP bone imaging shows that the distribution of the metastatic bone lesions in lung cancer, breast cancer and esophageal cancer vary from place to place. (authors)

  10. Screening study on new tumor marker periplakin for lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqin Dai; Wei Li; Mian Kong; Yuzhen Zheng; Shuying Chen; Junye Wang; Linquan Zang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to use lung cancer targeting binding polypeptide ZS-9 to screen cDNA library of human lung cancer and obtain ZS-9 specific ligand to confirm tumor marker of non small-cell lung cancer. Methods: Artificially synthesize biotin labeled peptide ZS-9, anchored ZS-9 in the enzyme label plate coupled by avidin, used ZS-9 as probe to screen cDNA library of human lung cancer, after screening, obtained bacteriophage clone specifically binding with anchored polypeptide ZS-9. Extracted plasmid of bacteriophage and performed sequencing after amplified by PCR. Results: It was demonstrated by bioinformatic analysis on the sequence of ligand binded by lung cancer specific peptide ZS-9 that the ligand was the cytoskeletal protein periplakin on the surface of lung cancer cells, suggesting that periplakin might be a new marker for non-small-cell lung cancer in lung cancer. Conclusion: Use specific lung cancer binding peptide to screen new tumor marker periplakin in lung cancer and further studies on its biologic functions in genesis and development of lung cancer are still needed.

  11. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer ...

  13. Tobacco and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  14. Targeting lung cancer through inhibition of checkpoint kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Syljuåsen, Randi G; Hasvold, Grete; Hauge, Sissel; Helland, Åslaug

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of checkpoint kinases ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the basic principles behind the use of such inhibitors as anticancer agents, and particularly discuss their potential for treatment of lung cancer. As lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, new treatment strategies are highly needed. We discuss how checkpoint kinase inhibition in principle can lead to selective killing of lung cancer cells while sparing t...

  15. Gender-associated Differences of Lung Cancer and Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    XING, XIN; Liao, Yongde; Hexiao TANG; Chen, Guang; Ju, Sheng; You, Liangkun

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer has been viewed as the most common malignant cancer with high incidence, mortality and poor survival all over the world. A lot of investigations indicated there are significant gender-associated differences in lung cancer in several characteristics such as epidemiology, pathology, clinical outcome and prognosis. The insight into these differences may help to clarify the gender-associated characteristics of lung cancer, and to drawn out new approach for treatment and prevent of lun...

  16. Lung cancer survival in England: trends in non-small-cell lung cancer survival over the duration of the National Lung Cancer Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Khakwani, A; Rich, A L; Powell, H A; Tata, L J; Stanley, R A; Baldwin, D R; Duffy, J P; Hubbard , R B

    2013-01-01

    Background: In comparison with other European and North American countries, England has poor survival figures for lung cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the changes in survival since the introduction of the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA). Methods: We used data from the NLCA to identify people with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and stratified people according to their performance status (PS) and clinical stage. Using Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for death according t...

  17. Unilateral facial pain and lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Stevens, M.J. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia)

    1996-02-01

    Facial pain in lung cancer patients may be secondary to metastatic disease to the brain or skull base. Since 1983 there have been 19 published reports of hemi-facial pain as a non-metastatic complication of lung carcinoma. This report describes an additional case in whom unilateral face pain preceded the diagnosis of lung cancer by 9 months. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made after a normal brain CT scan. Later on the patient complained of global lethargy, weight loss and haemoptysis. A chest X-ray disclosed a 6 cm right hilar mass that was further defined with a whole body CT scan. The neural mechanism of the unilateral facial pain is discussed and the literature reviewed. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with Lung Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhiwei; Jin, Shi; Yu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease is one of the most serious side effects caused by lung cancer treatment. Due to the complexity diagnosis and variability of the disease, it is often not diagnosied and treated in time, even endanger the patient's life and affect the patient's prognosis. The mechanism of interstitial pneumonia caused by radiotherapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy is still not fully known. Therefore, it become a problem that how to early detection, diagnosis and treat the interstit...

  19. Age dependence and latency periods for lung cancer from radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children are exposed as much, or even more, than adults to domestic radon. As children are supposed to be more sensitive to radiation, childhood exposure should cause more lung cancer than exposure at elderly ages. Assuming a latency period of 20 years, as found for lung cancer for miners, the lung cancer cases from radon should be expected to start in the age groups between 20-35 years. Even in high radon countries, as for example Sweden and the other Nordic countries, lung cancer is very rare in the age group of less than 35 years. Thus, either children do not seem to be very sensitive to radon or the latency period is longer. Assuming a latency period of 35 years, instead, the expected lung cancer cases from domestic radon to children should be expected in the age group 35-50 years. Although the lung cancer cases start rising in that age period, most of the lung cancer cases are at much higher ages. Most of the lung cancer cases occur among heavy smokers and smoking is considered the by far highest risk factor for lung cancer. Children are generally not smokers. Thus it should be of great value to study the relationship between lung cancer and domestic radon for this age group. The lack of lung cancer cases at younger ages makes such a study difficult. At elderly ages, the smoking habits make a study of the relationship between domestic radon and lung cancer difficult and inexact. It could be suggested that lung cancer starts about 20 years after smoking debut, both what concerns radon related and smoking related lung cancer

  20. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of cancer-related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, ... enough information to give patients good advice as far as what sort of treatments they need for ...

  1. Lung Nodule and Cancer Detection in CT Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental to the diagnosis of lung cancer in CT scans is the detection and interpretation of lung nodules. As the capabilities of CT scanners have advanced, higher levels of spatial resolution reveal tinier lung abnormalities. While not all detected lung nodules should be reported, radiologists strive to detect all nodules that might have relevance to cancer diagnosis. Although medium to large lung nodules are detected consistently, inter-reader agreement and reader sensitivity for lung nod...

  2. Uranium miner lung cancer study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study on uranium miners was started in 1957 and extended through June 30, 1986. It consisted of the routine screening of sputum from uranium miners of the Colorado Plateau, and collection of surgical and autopsy material from uranium miners who developed lung cancer. The projects resulted in: (1) Proof, for the first time, that cancer takes from 10 to 15 years to develop from the maximum accumulated carcinogenic insult and can be demonstrated through progressive cellular changes of the bronchial tree; (2) Development of a method for preserving, concentrating, and processing sputum samples. This is known as the Saccomanno Technique, and is used worldwide in diagnosing lung cancer; (3) Publication of the 1st and 2nd editions of a full-color textbook entitled ''Diagnostic Pulmonary Cytology;'' (4) Presentation of conclusive data on the effects of cigarette smoking and alpha progeny radiation on uranium miners, and information on safe radiation exposure levels; (5) Development of a brush-wash tube for collecting, concentrating, and preparing bronchial brushings and washings; (6) Development of cytological criteria which has improved sensitivity from 30% to about 60%; (7) Development of criteria for cytologic identification of carcinoma in situ, making it possible to diagnose lung cancer before it can be detected on chest x-ray

  3. Cancer of the lung in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer of the lung in uranium miners is due to cigarette smoking and high radon daughter product exposure in uranium mines. The incidence of oat cell cancer was very high (75 to 80%) when the miners were exposed to high levels of radiation (WLM). Exposure to these two carcinogens causes squamous cell metaplasia which is also due to upper respiratory inflammatory disease. The squamous metaplasia is not distinguishable as to cause, but when due to carcinogen, these cells persist over a longer period of time and become progressively more and more atypical until invasive neoplasia develops. This is the latent period and lasts about 10 to 15 years

  4. Czech studies of lung cancer and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, there is a significant evidence to classify radon as a carcinogen. Using extrapolations from occupational studies, it can be shown that for some countries environmental exposure to radon is the second most important cause of lung cancer in the general population after cigarette smoking. Czech studies among uranium miners, established in 1970 by Josef Sevc, and in the general population aim to contribute to knowledge on the risk from radon, particularly by evaluating temporal factors and interaction of radon exposure and smoking

  5. Lung Cancer Epidemiology in Mainland China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingsheng Wang; Xiaoping Lin

    2006-01-01

    Lung cancer incidence has increased rapidly in China over the last 20 years, especially in females. Among the 183 registered worldwide populations, lung cancer incidence in males was ranked as the 73rd, 74th, 127th and 23rd respectively for Shanghai, Tianjin, Qidong and Hong Kong, and in females the 52nd, 13th, 102nd and 23rd. The sex ratio (M/F) ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 for most areas. The ratio of squamous/ adenocarcinoma was 2.01 in males and 0.67 in females in Tianjin, 0.97 and 0.28 in Hong Kong, 1.00 and 0.61 in the US white population and 1.18 and 0.49 in US blacks. Much research on risk factors have been conducted and documented including the following: genetic predisposition/polymorphism, smoking/coal soot and DNA adduct, cytochrome p450-1A1 (CYP1A1), glutathione S-transferase-M (GST-M), viral infection/HPV infection, high background radiation, family history, tobacco consumption, mental health, prior lung diseases, coal soot indoor air pollution, cooking fume indoor air pollution, hormones, diet, occupational exposure, outdoor air pollution, socioeconomic level/education, alcohol consumption and their interactions(addition/synergy). Based on current information we should carefully devise a plan to control lung cancer that can be put into practice.

  6. [Minimally Invasive Open Surgery for Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shunichi

    2016-07-01

    Significant efforts have been made to reduce the invasiveness of surgical procedures by surgeons for a long time. Surgeons always keep it in mind that the basic principle performing less invasive surgical procedures for malignant tumors is to decrease the invasiveness for patients without compromising oncological curability and surgical safety. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been used increasingly as a minimally invasive approach to lung cancer surgery. Whereas, whether VATS lobectomy is a less invasive procedure and has equivalent or better clinical effect compared with open lobectomy for patients with lung cancer remains controversial because of the absence of randomized prospective studies. The degree of difficulty for anatomical lung resection depends on the degree of the fissure development, mobility of hilar lymph nodes, and the degree of pleural adhesions. During pulmonary surgery, thoracic surgeons always have to deal with not only these difficulties but other unexpected events such as intraoperative bleeding. Recently, we perform pulmonary resection for lung cancer with minimally invasive open surgery (MIOS) approach. In this article, we introduce the surgical procedure of MIOS and demonstrate short-term results. Off course, the efficacy of MIOS needs to be further evaluated with long-term results. PMID:27440030

  7. Smoking Cessation: An Integral Part of Lung Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cataldo, Janine K.; Dubey, Sarita; Prochaska, Jodi J.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the US. About 50% of lung cancer patients are current smokers at the time of diagnosis and up to 83% continue to smoke after diagnosis. A recent study suggests that people who continue to smoke after a diagnosis of early-stage lung cancer almost double their risk of dying. Despite a growing body of evidence that continued smoking by patients after a lung cancer diagnosis is linked with less effective treatment and a poorer prognosis, the bel...

  8. Trends in Lung Cancer Incidence Rates, Oklahoma 2005–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Mowls, Dana S.; McCaffree, D. Robert; Beebe, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer among men and women in the United States. With cigarette smoking causing the majority of cases, patterns in lung cancer are often monitored to understand the impact of anti-tobacco efforts. The purpose of this research was to investigate trends in lung cancer incidence rates for the period 2005–2010 in Oklahoma. Methods Data on Oklahoma’s incident cases of lung cancer (2005–2010) were obtained from the Centers for Disease Cont...

  9. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  10. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation

  11. Clinical significance of PHPT1 protein expression in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU An-jian; XIA Xiang-hou; DU Song-tao; GU Jun-chao

    2010-01-01

    Background in our previous studies, we found the expression of 14-kD phosphohistidine phosphatase (PHPT1) was associated with lung cancer cells migration and invasion, and PHPT1 mRNA expression level in lung cancer tissues clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis. in the present study, we aimed to further investigate the expression of PHPT1 protein in lung cancer.Methods Expression of PHPT1 protein in tissue samples from 146 lung cancers and 30 normal tissues adjacent to lung cancers was assessed using immunohistochemical method. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze expression patterns of PHPT1 protein in these tissue types. Meanwhile, we studied the correlation between expression of PHPT1 protein and clinicopathological features in lung cancer.Results Significantly higher expression levels of PHPT1 protein were found in lung cancer samples (53.42%) than in normal tissues adjacent to lung cancer (23.33%) (P=0.003). Fisher's exact test showed that lung cancer stage positively correlated with expression of PHPT1 protein (P=0.02), and lung cancer samples with lymph node metastasis showed higher PHPT1 protein expression (P=0.016) than the samples without lymph node metastasis.Conclusions The results of this study agree with findings from our previous study of PHPT1 mRNA expression in lung cancer tissues, and strongly suggest that PHPT1 protein is closely associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of lung cancer. Thus, therapy targeting PHPT1 (inhibition or silencing) could be potentially benefited for lung cancer patients.

  12. Lung Cancer Detection Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhled S. AL-TARAWNEH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, image processing techniques are widely used in several medical areas for image improvement in earlier detection and treatment stages, where the time factor is very important to discover the abnormality issues in target images, especially in various cancer tumours such as lung cancer, breast cancer, etc. Image quality and accuracy is the core factors of this research, image quality assessment as well as improvement are depending on the enhancement stage where low pre-processing techniques is used based on Gabor filter within Gaussian rules. Following the segmentation principles, an enhanced region of the object of interest that is used as a basic foundation of feature extraction is obtained. Relying on general features, a normality comparison is made. In this research, the main detected features for accurate images comparison are pixels percentage and mask-labelling.

  13. Uncovering growth-suppressive MicroRNAs in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Galimberti, Fabrizio;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiles improve classification, diagnosis, and prognostic information of malignancies, including lung cancer. This study uncovered unique growth-suppressive miRNAs in lung cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: miRNA arrays were done on normal lung tissues and...... adenocarcinomas from wild-type and proteasome degradation-resistant cyclin E transgenic mice to reveal repressed miRNAs in lung cancer. Real-time and semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR as well as in situ hybridization assays validated these findings. Lung cancer cell lines were derived from each......-malignant human lung tissue bank. RESULTS: miR-34c, miR-145, and miR-142-5p were repressed in transgenic lung cancers. Findings were confirmed by real-time and semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR as well as in situ hybridization assays. Similar miRNA profiles occurred in human normal versus malignant lung...

  14. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Imaging and screening in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giaj Levra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the main cause of death for neoplasia in the world. Hence it’s growing the necessity to investigate screening tests to detect tumoral lesions at the early stages: several trials have been performed to establish the best method, target and frequence of the screening to offer. CT, X-ray, PET, sputum citology and CAD software are here analyzed, together with the associated statistics and bias.

  16. Staging lung cancer: role of endobronchial ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inage T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terunaga Inage, Takahiro Nakajima, Ichiro Yoshino Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Accurate staging is the first step in the management of lung cancer. Nodal staging is quite important for physicians to be able to judge the primary operability of patients harboring no distant metastasis. For many years, mediastinoscopy has been considered a “gold standard” modality for nodal staging. Mediastinoscopy is known to be a highly sensitive procedure for mediastinal staging and has been performed worldwide, but is invasive. Because of this, clinicians have sought a less invasive modality for nodal staging. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA is a minimally invasive modality for diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. EBUS-TBNA is a needle biopsy procedure that has accessibility compatible with the reach of the convex-probe EBUS scope, so N1 nodes are also assessable. The diagnostic yield is similar to that of mediastinoscopy, and the core obtained by the dedicated needle biopsy can be used for histological assessment to determine the subtypes of lung cancer. The samples can also be used to test for various biomarkers using immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction for DNA/complementary DNA, and in situ hybridization, and the technique is useful for selecting candidates for specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents. According to the newly published American College of Chest Physicians guideline, EBUS-TBNA is now considered "the best first test" for nodal staging in patients with radiologically suspicious nodes. Appropriate training and thorough clinical experience is required to be able to perform correct nodal staging using this procedure. Keywords: lung cancer, staging, endobronchial ultrasound, transbronchial biopsy

  17. Staging lung cancer: role of endobronchial ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Inage T; Nakajima T; Yoshino I

    2014-01-01

    Terunaga Inage, Takahiro Nakajima, Ichiro Yoshino Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Accurate staging is the first step in the management of lung cancer. Nodal staging is quite important for physicians to be able to judge the primary operability of patients harboring no distant metastasis. For many years, mediastinoscopy has been considered a “gold standard” modality for nodal staging. Mediastinoscopy is k...

  18. Staging lung cancer: role of endobronchial ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Terunaga Inage, Takahiro Nakajima, Ichiro Yoshino Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Accurate staging is the first step in the management of lung cancer. Nodal staging is quite important for physicians to be able to judge the primary operability of patients harboring no distant metastasis. For many years, mediastinoscopy has been considered a “gold standard” modality for nodal staging. Mediastinosc...

  19. Staging Lung Cancer: Current Controversies and Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Riyad Karmy-Jones; Hyland, Robert H.; Lewis, Joseph W; Paul Kvale

    1997-01-01

    A consistent approach to staging is required for the rational management of lung cancer. This paper was prepared at the request of the Standards Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society, and reviews and discusses the relative merits of the available methods of staging. Whichever methods are chosen by a particular institution, the following points must be stressed. No patient can be considered automatically "unresectable" when chest radiography and/ or computed tomography demonstrate adenopa...

  20. Treatment of Brain Metastasis from Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Chi; Ritsuko Komaki

    2010-01-01

    Brain metastases are not only the most common intracranial neoplasm in adults but also very prevalent in patients with lung cancer. Patients have been grouped into different classes based on the presence of prognostic factors such as control of the primary tumor, functional performance status, age, and number of brain metastases. Patients with good prognosis may benefit from more aggressive treatment because of the potential for prolonged survival for some of them. In this review, we will com...

  1. Lung cancer mimicking massive pulmonary embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kaier, Thomas Edward; Madani, Yasser

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common finding in patients with underlying malignancy and is the commonest cause of acute cor pulmonale. A 65-year-old woman with a background of non-small-cell lung cancer presented to the emergency department with nausea and vomiting after starting erlotinib; she was pyrexial and had raised C-reactive protein. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and antibiotics the patient remained tachycardic, hypotensive, profoundly hypoxic and had a persistent raised jugul...

  2. Improving surgical resection rate in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Laroche, C.; Wells, F; Coulden, R.; Stewart, S; Goddard, M; Lowry, E.; Price, A; Gilligan, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Surgical resection is the recognised treatment of choice for patients with stage I or II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the UK surgical resection rates have remained far lower (20%), despite the recent introduction of fast access investigation units. It remains unclear therefore why UK surgical resection rates lag so far behind those of other countries.
METHODS—A new quick access two stop investigation service was established at Papworth in November 199...

  3. Calculated lung cancer mortality due to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From studies of miners, it is clear that an exposure to high concentrations of radon daughters leads to an increased incidence of lung cancer. In this Chapter the authors discuss how the experience for miners is used to estimate the incidence of radon-induced lung cancer among the general population. Such estimates cannot be very precise, in part because the miners studies do not lead to a well-determined relationship between the rate of cancer induction and the exposure levels. In particular, there are disparities in the results of studies for different groups of miners. These disparities may arise from the difficulties in obtaining accurate crucial data, such as the year-by-year exposure history over the working lifetime of the individual miners. Other differences may arise from differences in the smoking patterns in different groups and in details of the handling of the data. In any event, there remain substantial uncertainties in the conclusions for the miners themselves, both as to the ''average'' rate of cancer induction per WLM and as to the variation of this rate with the magnitude of the total exposure. Further, there are problems in using results obtained for miners at relatively high radon exposure levels for the prediction of the effects of radon at the much lower levels encountered in the normal indoor environment. Here one faces the problem of extrapolating from large dose levels to small dose levels. The generally adopted solution is to assume linearity

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSA tests. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 10 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advanced melanoma. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 12 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain people. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 11 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  7. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerman, Peter S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Voet, Douglas; Jing, Rui; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Stojanov, Petar; McKenna, Aaron; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Imielinski, Marcin; Helman, Elena; Hernandez, Bryan; Pho, Nam H.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chu, Andy; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Stoll, Dominik; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Chuah, Eric; Coope, Robin J. N.; Corbett, Richard; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Anhe Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Karen; Nip, Ka Ming; Olshen, Adam; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Slobodan, Jared R.; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Saksena, Gordon; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Schumacher, Stephen E.; Tabak, Barbara; Carter, Scott L.; Pho, Nam H.; Nguyen, Huy; Onofrio, Robert C.; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Hammerman, Peter S.; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Protopopov, Alexei; Zhang, Jianhua; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Lee, Semin; Xi, Ruibin; Yang, Lixing; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Hailei; Shukla, Sachet; Chen, Peng-Chieh; Haseley, Psalm; Lee, Eunjung; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Socci, Nicholas D.; Liang, Yupu; Schultz, Nikolaus; Borsu, Laetitia; Lash, Alex E.; Viale, Agnes; Sander, Chris; Ladanyi, Marc; Auman, J. Todd; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Shi, Yan; Liquori, Christina; Meng, Shaowu; Li, Ling; Turman, Yidi J.; Topal, Michael D.; Tan, Donghui; Waring, Scot; Buda, Elizabeth; Walsh, Jesse; Jones, Corbin D.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Singh, Darshan; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Dolina, Peter; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; O'Connor, Brian D.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze; Chiang, Derek Y.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Pan, Fei; Van den Berg, David J.; Triche, Timothy; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sinha, Rileen; Ciriello, Giovanni; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Gao, Jianjiong; Aksoy, B. Arman; Weinhold, Nils; Ramirez, Ricardo; Taylor, Barry S.; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Mo, Qianxing; Seshan, Venkatraman; Paik, Paul K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod; Unruh, Anna; Wakefield, Chris; Cason, R. Craig; Baggerly, Keith A.; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Ted; Waltman, Peter; Sokolov, Artem; Ellrott, Kyle; Collisson, Eric A.; Zerbino, Daniel; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Auman, J. Todd; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Du, Ying; Cabanski, Christopher; Walter, Vonn; Singh, Darshan; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Marron, J. S.; Liu, Yufeng; Wang, Kai; Liu, Jinze; Prins, Jan F.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Zhang, Yiqun; Travis, William D.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Yi, Joanne; Aubry, Marie C.; Cheney, Richard; Dacic, Sanja; Flieder, Douglas; Funkhouser, William; Illei, Peter; Myers, Jerome; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Shelton, Troy; Hatfield, Martha; Morris, Scott; Yena, Peggy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Paulauskis, Joseph; Meyerson, Matthew; Baylin, Stephen B.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Akbani, Rehan; Azodo, Ijeoma; Beer, David; Bose, Ron; Byers, Lauren A.; Carbone, David; Chang, Li-Wei; Chiang, Derek; Chu, Andy; Chun, Elizabeth; Collisson, Eric; Cope, Leslie; Creighton, Chad J.; Danilova, Ludmila; Ding, Li; Getz, Gad; Hammerman, Peter S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hernandez, Bryan; Herman, James G.; Heymach, John; Ida, Cristiane; Imielinski, Marcin; Johnson, Bruce; Jurisica, Igor; Kaufman, Jacob; Kosari, Farhad; Kucherlapati, Raju; Kwiatkowski, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Lawrence, Michael S.; Maher, Christopher A.; Mungall, Andy; Ng, Sam; Pao, William; Peifer, Martin; Penny, Robert; Robertson, Gordon; Rusch, Valerie; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Siegfried, Jill; Sinha, Rileen; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sougnez, Carrie; Stoll, Dominik; Stuart, Joshua; Thomas, Roman K.; Tomaszek, Sandra; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Travis, William D.; Vaske, Charles; Weinstein, John N.; Weisenberger, Daniel; Wheeler, David; Wigle, Dennis A.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wilks, Christopher; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Jianjua John; Jensen, Mark A.; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari B.; Chu, Anna L.; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric E.; Pontius, Joan; Pihl, Todd D.; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique L.; Nicholls, Matthew C.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter A.; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi N.; Barletta, Sean P.; Greene, John M.; Pot, David A.; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Bandarchi-Chamkhaleh, Bizhan; Boyd, Jeff; Weaver, JoEllen; Wigle, Dennis A.; Azodo, Ijeoma A.; Tomaszek, Sandra C.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ida, Christiane M.; Yang, Ping; Kosari, Farhad; Brock, Malcolm V.; Rogers, Kristen; Rutledge, Marian; Brown, Travis; Lee, Beverly; Shin, James; Trusty, Dante; Dhir, Rajiv; Siegfried, Jill M.; Potapova, Olga; Fedosenko, Konstantin V.; Nemirovich-Danchenko, Elena; Rusch, Valerie; Zakowski, Maureen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Fan, Zhen; Todaro, Nicole; Eckman, John; Myers, Jerome; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh B.; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bartlett, Johnm. S.; Kodeeswaran, Sugy; Zanke, Brent; Sekhon, Harman; David, Kerstin; Juhl, Hartmut; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Thorp, Richard; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Phu, Bui Duc; Hajek, Richard; PhiHung, Nguyen; Khan, Khurram Z.; Muley, Thomas; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Sheth, Margi; Yang, Liming; Buetow, Ken; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Schaefer, Carl; Guyer, Mark S.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.; Peterson, Jane; Sofia, Heidi J.; Thomson, Elizabeth; Meyerson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment.

  8. Testing lung cancer drugs and therapies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigators have designed a genetically engineered mouse for use in the study of human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC is a type of non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common types of lung cancer, with

  9. Cavitary Lung Cancer Lined with Normal Bronchial Epithelium and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Reports of cavitary lung cancer are not uncommon, and the cavity generally contains either dilated bronchi or cancer cells. Recently, we encountered a surgical case of cavitary lung cancer whose cavity tended to enlarge during long-term follow-up, and was found to be lined with normal bronchial epithelium and adenocarcinoma cells.

  10. Lung Cancer Survivors May Be Getting Too Many PET Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Survivors May Be Getting Too Many PET Scans Study finds using costly test as first option ... of imaging detection might not improve survival rates. PET scans can detect early signs of cancer. But these ...

  11. Lung cancer: district active treatment rates affect survival

    OpenAIRE

    CARTMAN, M.; Hatfield, A; Muers, M; Peake, M; Haward, R; Forman, D

    2002-01-01

    Design: A retrospective study of population based data held by the Northern & Yorkshire Cancer Registry and Information Service (NYCRIS), comparing active treatment rates for lung cancer with survival by districts.

  12. Hyperspectral imaging of skin and lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherdeva, Larisa A.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Alonova, Marina V.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of cancer control requires design of new approaches for instrumental diagnostics, as the accuracy of cancer detection on the first step of diagnostics in clinics is slightly more than 50%. In this study, we present a method of visualization and diagnostics of skin and lung tumours based on registration and processing of tissues hyperspectral images. In a series of experiments registration of hyperspectral images of skin and lung tissue samples is carried out. Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, nevi and benign tumours are studied in skin ex vivo and in vivo experiments; adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas are studied in ex vivo lung experiments. In a series of experiments the typical features of diffuse reflection spectra for pathological and normal tissues were found. Changes in tissues morphology during the tumour growth lead to the changes of blood and pigments concentration, such as melanin in skin. That is why tumours and normal tissues maybe differentiated with information about spectral response in 500-600 nm and 600 - 670 nm areas. Thus, hyperspectral imaging in the visible region may be a useful tool for cancer detection as it helps to estimate spectral properties of tissues and determine malignant regions for precise resection of tumours.

  13. MRI in staging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging of lung cancer. Currently available methods of imaging lung cancer, lymph node and distant metastases by MRI are explained. At present, MRI is mainly used in the detection of cerebral metastases and assessment of infiltration of the thoracic wall and of the mediastinum. The capabilities of T2-weighted single-shot TSE (HASTE) and T1-weighted 3D gradient echo techniques (VIBE) are demonstrated. With the advent of new fast sequences like HASTE and VIBE the spatial resolution comes close to that of computed tomography but with an outstanding soft tissue contrast and without radiation exposure. The introduction of lymph node specific contrast media will improve sensitivity and specificity in N staging. Additionally, whole-body MRI is capable of detecting distant metastases, in particular in the organs at risk, i.e. brain, upper abdomen and musculoskeletal system. MRI is gaining importance as part of a multimodal imaging approach for staging of lung cancer. (orig.)

  14. Risk of second primary lung cancer in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Several epidemiological studies have reported increased risks of second lung cancers after breast cancer irradiation. In this study we assessed the effects of the delivered radiation dose to the lung and the risk of second primary lung cancer. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study of second lung cancer in a population based cohort of 23,627 early breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy from 1982 to 2007. The cohort included 151 cases diagnosed with second primary lung cancer and 443 controls. Individual dose-reconstructions were performed and the delivered dose to the center of the second lung tumor and the comparable location for the controls were estimated, based on the patient specific radiotherapy charts. Results: The median age at breast cancer diagnosis was 54 years (range 34–74). The median time from breast cancer treatment to second lung cancer diagnosis was 12 years (range 1–26 years). 91% of the cases were categorized as ever smokers vs. 40% among the controls. For patients diagnosed with a second primary lung cancer five or more years after breast cancer treatment the rate of lung cancer increased linearly with 8.5% per Gray (95% confidence interval = 3.1–23.3%; p < 0.001). This rate was enhanced for ever smokers with an excess rate of 17.3% per Gray (95% CI = 4.5–54%; p < 0.005). Conclusions: Second lung cancer after radiotherapy for early breast cancer is associated with the delivered dose to the lung. Although the absolute risk is relative low, the growing number of long-time survivors after breast cancer treatment highlights the need for advances in normal tissue sparing radiation techniques

  15. CD24 negative lung cancer cells, possessing partial cancer stem cell properties, cannot be considered as cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Haineng; Mu, Jiasheng; Xiao, Jing; Wu, Xiangsong; Li, Maolan; Liu, Tianrun; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play vital role in lung cancer progression, resistance, metastasis and relapse. Identifying lung CSCs makers for lung CSCs targeting researches are critical for lung cancer therapy. In this study, utilizing previous identified lung CSCs as model, we compared the expression of CD24, CD133 and CD44 between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells. Increased ratio of CD24- cells were found in CSCs. CD24- cells were then sorted by flow cytometry and their proliferative ability, che...

  16. Impact of fine particles in ambient air on lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerard Hoek; Ole Raaschou-Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified outdoor air pol ution and the particulate matter component of outdoor air pollution as class I carcinogen. Air pollution is consistently associated with lung cancer in epidemiologic and experimental studies. The IARC assessment is specifical y designed as hazard identification, and it does not quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk. This article addresses the magnitude of the lung cancer risk in the population due to ambient air pol ution exposure.

  17. Synchronous colorectal and lung cancer:Report of three cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of synchronous colorectal and lung cancer is relatively rare.We report three cases of patients with tumors located in the rectum,ascending colon,the lower lobe of the left lung,and the upper lobe of the right lung.Synchronous curative resection of the two lesions was performed in two patients,whereas colectomy was performed in an elderly patient with a poor lung function.Pathological examination showed the colorectal cancer was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and the lung cancer was a squamous cell carcinoma.Surgical treatment and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for the lung cancer were different from those for colorectal cancer with pulmonary metastasis.If possible,radical resection should be performed for each cancer when synchronicity is found.

  18. Surgical management of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamousa Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery plays a major role in the management of patients with lung cancer. Surgery is not only the main curative treatment modality in patients with early-stage lung cancer but it also has a significant role in the initial workup for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. This article describes the surgical management of patients with lung cancer. Surgical resection for lung cancer is still regarded as the most effective method for controlling the primary tumor, provided it is resectable for cure and the risks of the procedure are low. The 5-year survival rare following complete resection (R0 of a lung cancer is stage dependent [Table 1]. [1-3] Incomplete resection (R1, R2 rarely, if ever, cures the patient.

  19. Penile metastasis as a first sign of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Findik, Serhat; Özkaya, Şevket; Gatici,A

    2009-01-01

    Sevket Ozkaya1, Serhat Findik2, Atilla G Atici21Samsun Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Hospital, Samsun, Turkey; 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayis University, Kurupelit, Samsun, TurkeyAbstract: Lung cancer does not generally produce any symptoms at the early stages and it rapidly metastasizes. Although lung cancer has a potential of metastasis to all organs and tissues, metastasis to the penis from lung cancer is very rare. We present a case with a peni...

  20. Lung Cancer Mortality and Topography: A Xuanwei Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyan Ren; Wei Cao; Gongbo Chen; Junxing Yang; Liqun Liu; Xia Wan; Gonghuan Yang

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of lung cancer in Xuanwei City, China, remains serious despite the reduction of the risk of indoor air pollution through citywide stove improvement. The main objective of this study was to characterize the influences of topography on the spatiotemporal variations of lung cancer mortality in Xuanwei during 1990–2013. Using the spatially empirical Bayes method, the smoothed mortality rate of lung cancer was obtained according to the mortality data and population data collected from...

  1. Genetic evidence linking lung cancer and COPD: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crapo JD

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Young1,4, Raewyn J Hopkins1, Gregory D Gamble1, Carol Etzel2, Randa El-Zein2, James D Crapo31Department of Medicine and School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Epidemiology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 4Synergenz Biosciences Ltd, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: Epidemiological studies indicate that tobacco smoke exposure accounts for nearly 90% of cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer. However, genetic factors may explain why 10%–30% of smokers develop these complications. This perspective reviews the evidence suggesting that COPD is closely linked to susceptibility to lung cancer and outlines the potential relevance of this observation. Epidemiological studies show that COPD is the single most important risk factor for lung cancer among smokers and predates lung cancer in up to 80% of cases. Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer, lung function, and COPD have identified a number of overlapping “susceptibility” loci. With stringent phenotyping, it has recently been shown that several of these overlapping loci are independently associated with both COPD and lung cancer. These loci implicate genes underlying pulmonary inflammation and apoptotic processes mediated by the bronchial epithelium, and link COPD with lung cancer at a molecular genetic level. It is currently possible to derive risk models for lung cancer that incorporate lung cancer-specific genetic variants, recently identified “COPD-related” genetic variants, and clinical variables. Early studies suggest that single nucleotide polymorphism-based risk stratification of smokers might help better target novel prevention and early diagnostic strategies in lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk model

  2. Expression and Significance of MAGE Genes in Human Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxu LI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the common malignancies with an extremely poor prognosis, because of the current diagnostic techniques are not easy to find micrometastases. Melanoma associated antigens genes (MAGE are tumor specific antigen genes, closely related to the occurrence, development and prognosis of lung cancer. The research of MAGE genes provide a new direction for the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

  3. Update in non small- cell lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, RA; Snoeckx, A.; Spinhoven, M; Beeck, B Op de; Corthouts, B; Parizel, PM

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made with the introduction of the TNM-7 staging system for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Constituting the first major revision in 12 years, the seventh edition of NSCLC TNM (TNM-7) is based on the recommendations from the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project of 2007. This new TNM iteration includes a subset analysis on SCLC and carcinoid tumors.A thorough understanding of its principles by the radiologis...

  4. Mediastinal Staging in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamliel, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In the absence of distant metastases, lung cancer treatment is determined by the results of mediastinal lymph node staging. Occult mediastinal lymph node metastases can be missed by radiologic and needle-based staging methods. Aggressive staging of mediastinal lymph nodes improves staging accuracy. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging results in more appropriate lung cancer treatment. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging can improve stage-specific survival from lung cancer. PMID:27261911

  5. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Amit; BABOOTA, SANJULA; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed ove...

  6. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as a Malar Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh Veerappan; Christopher Lettieri; Brian Cuneo

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer metastasizing to the face has rarely been reported and is an even more unusual presentation. Case: This is the case of a 49-year-old man diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the face, scheduled for resection. Preoperative radiographs revealed a left upper lobe mass, found to be squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis was changed to Stage IV primary lung cancer. The patient did not undergo resection. Discussion: No previous cases of primary lung cancer presenting as a...

  7. Descriptive-epidemiological characteristics of lung cancer in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimović Nataša; Spanopoulos Kyriakos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Lung cancer represents the most common malignant tumour among men, and appears more and more frequently among women in many countries worldwide. The aims of this descriptive epidemiological study were to evaluate the mortality trends of all malignant tumours and lung cancer in Central Serbia from 1990 to 1999, and to estimate the incidence, mortality and the basic demographic characteristics of lung cancer in Central Serbia in 1999. Material and methods. The source of data conce...

  8. Surgical treatment of lung cancer. On the clinical guideline for the management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical treatments of lung cancer are discussed mainly on the evidence-based medicine (EBM)-based Clinical Guideline for the Management of Lung Cancer (revised 2005). Described items are application of surgical treatment, techniques, evidence bases for certain techniques, lymph node excision, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), postoperative therapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCC), preoperative adjuvant therapy of NSCC, and present state and future of surgical treatment. Comments are mentioned in this order as follows. The operation can be only applicable on physiological and oncological (clinical stage) considerations. For respectable cancer, lobectomy is essentially recommendable. Recommended techniques like bronchoplasty are orderly described with their evidence. Evidence is said to be insufficient to excise lymph nodes and to perform VATS. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) of early stage NSCC is not a standard, but chemotherapy (CMT) is recommended because evidences have been accumulated until the revision of the guideline. Evidence is said not yet enough to recommend preoperative RT, CMT or RT+CMT as a standard. Studies of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer are now under remarkable progress as exemplified by 3D therapeutic plan by CT-simulation, heavy ion therapy, stereotactic RT and intra-cavitary RT, and surgery will be still one of multiple modalities. (R.T.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in peripheral lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by comparison of MRI studies and pathological findings in lung cancer patients. From May 2005 to May 2006, 52 lung cancer patients underwent surgical operation in our division. Forty-five patients, each with a preoperatively recognized peripheral lung lesion underwent the MRI study. Short TI inversion recovery (STIR), high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with free breathing scanning and dynamic MRI studies were performed. There was no statistically significant difference between adenocarcinoma (n=35) and other carcinomas (n=10) on MRI findings. Twenty-seven adenocarcinomas (less than 30 mm in diameter) were histologically diagnosed as follows: 9 patients with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), 12 patients with advanced BAC, and 6 non-BAC cases (adenocarcinoma without a BAC component) group. When the lesions demonstrated a strong enhancement (steep type) on dynamic studies or showed a strong signal (score 4) intensity on DWI, we judged them to be positive (indicating invasion). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 94.4%, 66.6%, and 85.2%, respectively. The MRI studies permitted the acquisition of more detailed information on peripheral lung adenocarcinomas, and high b-value DWI is valuable as a supporting tool in evaluating the grade of malignancy. (author)

  10. Optimization of Lung Cancer using Modern Data Mining Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sowmiya, M. Gopi, M. New Begin, L. Thomas Robinson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Now a day the most dangerous diseases in the world are Cancer. Lung cancer is one of the most dangerous cancer types in the world. These diseases can spread worldwide by uncontrolled cell growth in the tissues of the lung. Early detection of the cancer can save the life and survivability of the patients who affected by this diseases. In this paper we survey several aspects of data mining procedures which are used for lung cancer prediction for the patients. Data mining concepts is useful in lung cancer classification. We also reviewed the aspects of ant colony optimization (ACO technique in data mining. Ant colony optimization helps in increasing or decreasing the disease prediction value of the diseases. This case study assorted data mining and ant colony optimization techniques for appropriate rule generation and classifications on diseases, which pilot to exact Lung cancer classifications. In additionally to, it provides basic framework for further improvement in medical diagnosis on lung cancer. Our Proposed idea for the lung cancer optimization on data mining is by using the (ROCO method. We use reduced-order constrained optimization (ROCO to create clinically acceptable IMRT plans quickly and automatically for advanced lung cancer patients Diagnosis. Our new ROCO implementations works with the treatment planning system and full dose calculations

  11. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past Issues / ... answer questions about cancer at 1-800-4-CANCER. The NCI Lung Cancer Home Page provides up-to-date information ...

  12. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) and standard chest X-ray. Both chest X-rays and low-dose helical CT scans have been used to find lung cancer early, but the effects of these screening techniques on lung cancer mortality rates had not been determined. NLST enrolled 53,454 current or former heavy smokers from 33 sites and coordinating centers across the United States. | The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: participants who received low-dose helical CT scans had a 20% lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest X-rays.

  13. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, and, in fact, ... and try and get a biopsy of the lesion. There are other ways to approach the lesion, ...

  14. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, and, in fact, ... when detected, you know, and when patients get treatment. Okay. So it’s very important, you know, to ...

  15. Effect of primarily cultured human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts on radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) on the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when CAF is placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer cells. Methods: Human lung CAF was obtained from fresh human lung adenocarcinoma tissue specimens by primary culture and subculture and was then identified by immunofluorescence staining. The CAF was placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells, and the effects of CAF on the radiosensitivity of A549 and H1299 cells were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Results: The human lung CAF obtained by adherent culture could stably grow and proliferate, and it had specific expression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast activation protein,but without expression of cytokeratin-18. The plating efficiency (PE, %) of A549 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.0 ± 3.9)% when cultured alone versus (32.3 ± 5.5)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=3.16, P<0.05), and the PE of H1299 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.6 ± 3.1)% when cultured alone versus (35.2 ± 2.3)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=6.55, P<0.05). The cell survival rate at 2 Gy irradiation (SF2) of A549 cells was 0.727 ±0.061 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.089 when co-cultured with CAF (t=0.88, P>0.05), and the SF2 of H1299 cells was 0.692 ±0.065 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.037 when co-cultured with CAF (t=2.08, P>0.05). The protection enhancement ratios of human lung CAF for A549 cells and H1299 cells were 1.29 and 1.25, respectively. Conclusions: Human lung CAF reduces the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when placed in direct contact co-culture with them, and the radioprotective effect may be attributed to CAF promoting the proliferation of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  16. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  17. Invasive thymoma associated with lung cancer: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, T; Terashima, H; Shimizu, T; Hirayama, K

    2001-01-01

    We report herein a case of invasive thymoma simultaneously associated with lung cancer. A 64-year-old man presented with a cough and anterior chest pain, and preoperative examinations revealed an anterior mediastinal tumor as well as lung cancer. The patient underwent a total thymectomy, partial resection of the right lung, left lower lobectomy, and mediastinal lymph node dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Although it is well known that thymomas may be accompanied by nonthymic cancers, invasive thymomas occurring coincidentally with lung cancer are rarely reported in Japan. This case is very interesting in its relation to the oncogenesis of thymomas. PMID:11428602

  18. Bone metastases: When and how lung cancer interacts with bone

    OpenAIRE

    Roato, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and debilitating consequence of lung cancer: 30%-40% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer develop bone metastases during the course of their disease. Lung cancer cells find a favorable soil in the bone microenvironment due to factors released by the bone matrix, the immune system cells, and the same cancer cells. Many aspects of the cross-talk among lung tumor cells, the immune system, and bone cells are not clear, but this review aims to summarize the recen...

  19. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as a Malar Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Veerappan

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer metastasizing to the face has rarely been reported and is an even more unusual presentation. Case: This is the case of a 49-year-old man diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the face, scheduled for resection. Preoperative radiographs revealed a left upper lobe mass, found to be squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis was changed to Stage IV primary lung cancer. The patient did not undergo resection. Discussion: No previous cases of primary lung cancer presenting as a malar mass have been reported. Facial lesions can be the presenting feature of primary lung cancer. Discovery of the true primary lesion can alter therapy and prognosis.

  20. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  1. Stereotactic Irradiation of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the best stereotactic irradiation (STI) technique in treatment of small lung tumors, using dose-volume statistics. Methods: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the study phantom consisting of CT using the software of FOCUS-3D planning system. The beam was a 6MV X-ray from a Varian 2300C. The analysis data of Dose-volume statistics was from the technique used for: (1) 2- 12 arcs; (2) 20° - 45° separation angle of arcs; (3) 80° - 160° of gantry rotation. Then we studied the difference of DVH with various irradiation techniques and the influence of target positions and field size by calculated to the distribution of dose from 20%- 90% of the six targets in the lung with 3×3 cm2, 4′ 4 cm2 and 5′ 5 cm2 field size. Results: The volume irradiated pulmonary tissue was the smallest using a six non-coplanar 120° arcs with 30° separation between arcs in the hypothetical set up, the non-coplanar SRI was superiority than conventional one's. The six targets were chosen in the right lung, the volume was the largest in geometric center and was decreased in hilus, bottom, anterior chest wall, lateral wall and apex of the lung in such an order. The DVH had significant change with an increasing field size. Conclusion: the irradiation damage of normal pulmonary tissue was the lowest using the six non-coplanar 120° arcs with a 30° separation between arcs by <5×5 cm2 field and the position of target was not a restricting factor.

  2. Early Palliative Care With Standard Care or Standard Care Alone in Improving Quality of Life of Patients With Incurable Lung or Non-colorectal Gastrointestinal Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Liver Cancer; Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Malignant Mesothelioma; Pancreatic Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Associated with a Family History of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shuji Haraguchi, Kiyoshi Koizumi, Iwao Mikami, Okamoto Junichi, Yoshihito Iijima, Takayuki Ibi, Kazuo Shimizu

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with a family history of lung cancer (FHLC) have not been well established.Methods: Clinical records of patients with NSCLC treated at our institute from 1982 to 2010 were reviewed with special reference to family history of lung cancer and clinicopathological factors including patient's outcome. Univariate analyses of the factors between the groups of FHLC and non-FHLC were performe...

  4. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Associated with a Family History of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Haraguchi, Shuji; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Mikami, Iwao; Junichi, Okamoto; Iijima, Yoshihito; Ibi, Takayuki; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with a family history of lung cancer (FHLC) have not been well established. Methods: Clinical records of patients with NSCLC treated at our institute from 1982 to 2010 were reviewed with special reference to family history of lung cancer and clinicopathological factors including patient's outcome. Univariate analyses of the factors between the groups of FHLC and non-FHLC were perform...

  5. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  6. Interpretation of lung cancer study outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Diego; Abbate, Marida; Bidoli, Paolo; Pelizzoni, Davide; Canova, Stefania

    2015-11-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. However, in the last few years we observed an important acceleration in drug development due to oncogenic driver tumors discovery. Sharing and putting together preclinical data from benchmark and data from clinical research is the scientific paradigm that allows real breakthrough in clinical practice in this field, but only a few targeted agents are worthy and practice changing. The clinical research and proper use of statistical methodology are the pillars to continue to achieve important goals like improvement of overall survival. A good medical oncologist should be able to critically read a scientific paper and move from the observed outcomes into clinical perspective. Despite clinical improvements, sometimes the union of promising targeted agents and optimistic expectations misrepresent the reality and the value of clinical research. In this article, we try to analyze the meaning of statistical assumptions from clinical trials, especially in lung cancer, through a critical review of the concept of value-based medicine. We also attempt to give the reader some practical tools to weigh scientific value of literature reports. PMID:26716052

  7. [Current perspectives on supportive care for lung cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, A; Zurkinden, C; Castellani, P; Eicher, M

    2015-05-20

    The fight against cancer comprises not only survival of the disease but also survival with the highest possible quality of life. Thus, supportive care in cancer aims at reducing physical and psycho-emotional symptom burden. Furthermore, supportive care in cancer includes self-management-support for patients and their families/caregivers. Due to high symptom prevalence and poor prognosis, lung cancer patients express more unmet supportive care needs than other patient populations with cancer. Interventions to meet these needs have been developed in the last decade. They involve new models of care that incorporate the role of a lung cancer nurse in comprehensive cancer centers and eHealth-systems to support lung cancer patients and their families/caregivers. PMID:26152086

  8. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J;

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home...... exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer...

  9. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  10. Discovery – Lung Cancer Screening Saves Lives: The NLST

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI funded the National Lung Screening Trial, an eight-year study that used new technology to detect small, aggressive tumors early enough to surgically remove them. This approach reduced lung cancer deaths among participants by 20 percent.

  11. Rapid Cancer Fluorescence Imaging Using A γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase-Specific Probe For Primary Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hino, Haruaki; Kamiya, Mako; Kitano, Kentaro; Mizuno, Kazue; Tanaka, Sayaka; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Urano, Yasuteru; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We set out to examine the activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) in lung cancer and the validity of γ-glutamyl hydroxymethyl rhodamine green (gGlu-HMRG) for intraoperative imaging of primary lung cancer. METHODS: GGT activities and mRNA expression levels of GGT1 (one of the GGT subtypes) in five human lung cancer cell lines were examined by fluorescence imaging and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vivo imaging of an orthotopic A549 xenograft mod...

  12. Positron Emission Tomography in the Management of Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in men and the second most common cancer in women. Globally it remains the most commonly diagnosed cancer at 1.35 million, representing 12.4% of all new cancers. Almost half (49.9%) of the lung cancer cases occur in the developing countries of the world, which is a big change since 1980, when it was estimated that 69% were in developed countries. Although lung cancer is the most deadly of all the cancers, it is the only major cancer that does not have a widely accepted screening test. Lung cancer often presents as a solitary pulmonary nodule on chest radiographs, which are usually performed on patients as a preoperative screening test, or as a part of routine health screening, often in the absence of symptoms. Incidental detection can occur in up to 12% of cases in asymptomatic cases. It is clear that there is a need for the accurate diagnosis of these lesions. In recent years Positron early and Emission Tomography (PET) holds early and promise as a noninvasive investigative tool for the evaluation of lung cancer. 18F-FDG PET is currently indicated for the characterization of lung lesions, staging of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), detection of distant metastases, and diagnosis of recurrent disease. PET/CT studies are also being increasingly employed in radiotherapy treatment also planning. Furthermore PET also plays an important role in monitoring of treatment response. On the face of it a PET-CT study may appear expensive. But in the overall context, PET/CT is cost-effective in the treatment of Lung cancer. The modality is the best discriminator of disease load if used in the correct clinical setting. It can do away with the need for multiple, many times needless investigations. It can reduce the number of futile operations, unwarranted interventions, as well as over and under treatments of lung cancer. (author)

  13. Synchronous colorectal and lung cancer: Report of three cases

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yi-Fan; Gu, Jin

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of synchronous colorectal and lung cancer is relatively rare. We report three cases of patients with tumors located in the rectum, ascending colon, the lower lobe of the left lung, and the upper lobe of the right lung. Synchronous curative resection of the two lesions was performed in two patients, whereas colectomy was performed in an elderly patient with a poor lung function. Pathological examination showed the colorectal cancer was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma a...

  14. MDT lung cancer care: input from the Surgical Oncologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Biniam; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Although there have been many advancements in the multidisciplinary management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery remains the primary modality of choice for resectable lung cancer when the patient is able to tolerate lung resection physiologically. There have been recent advances in surgical diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Increasing use of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer has resulted in increased detection of small peripheral nodules or semi-solid ground glass opacities. Here, we review different modalities of localization techniques that have been used to aid surgical excisional biopsy when needle biopsy has failed to provide tissue diagnosis. We also report on the current debates regarding the use of sublobar resections for Stage I NSCLC as well as the surgical management of locally advanced NSCLC. Finally, we discuss the complex surgical management of T4 NSCLC lung cancers. PMID:26059591

  15. Primary lung cancer associated with Werner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Shunichiro; Fujimoto, Masaki; Oide, Takashi; Nakatani, Yukio; Tsurutani, Yuya; Koshizaka, Masaya; Mezawa, Morito; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro

    2010-10-01

    A 52-year-old man with Werner Syndrome (WS) was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of skin ulcers on his thighs. Routine chest radiography revealed an abnormal shadow in the left upper lung field. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a poorly demarcated homogeneous mass (diameter, 4 cm) in the S1 + 2 lung area; no pleural effusion was observed. CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy revealed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. Other imaging studies did not reveal any lymph-node involvement or presence of metastatic lesions. The patient was diagnosed with stage IB adenocarcinoma (T2N0M0), and a left upper lobectomy was successfully carried out; postoperative wound healing was steady and uneventful, with no obvious ulcer formation. Primary lung cancers very rarely develop in patients with WS; non-epithelial tumors are usually observed in such patients. Patients with WS usually develop severe skin problems, such as refractory skin ulcers in the extremities; however, our patient did not develop any skin-related complications after surgery. As the expected lifespan of patients with WS is increasing, we need to pay attention not only to the rare non-epithelial malignancy, but also cancer. Further, the expected short lifespan of patients with WS, as well as the possibility of skin-related problems after surgery, should not be considered while deciding whether to take the option of surgery in the case of malignancy. PMID:20887625

  16. Assessing non-resectability of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether the assessment of resectability of lung cancer can be reliably made on the basis of computed tomography (CT), the thoracic CT scans of 96 lung cancer patients who were operated on, and in whom the tumour was classified to be of stage III at preoperative CT or at thoracotomy, were analysed. Of the patients, 58 underwent complete resection of the tumour, whereas thoracotomy resulted in non-complete resection or exploration only in 38 cases. Overlapping of the CT findings in the groups of complete and non-successful resection was observed. The majority of tumours with apparent growth to the carina, trachea, oesophagus or great vessels at CT were completely resected. Tumours that only bordered on the pleura could not be distinguished from those with pleural invasion. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement did not always mean metastatic spread. We conclude that there is no definite sign that identifies non-resectability of lung tumours, and a certain proportion of non-curative thoracotomies must be accepted. (orig.)

  17. Lung cancer-initiating cells: a novel target for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Morris, John C.; Steel, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major public health problem causing more deaths than any other cancer. A better understanding of the biology of this disease and improvements in treatment are greatly needed. Increasing evidence supports the concept that a rare and specialized population of cancer cells, so-called cancer-initiating cells with stem cell-like characteristics, is responsible for tumor growth, maintenance, and recurrence. Cancer-initiating cells also exhibit characteristics that render them resis...

  18. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...

  19. CT features of lung cancer associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hyoung; Song, Koun Sik; Lee, Deok Hee; Kim, Jin Suh; Lim, Tae Hwan [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the incidence of lung cancer is high in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis(IPF). We analyzed the CT features of lung cancer associated with IPF. Retrospective analyzed the CT features of lung cancer associated with IPF. Retrospective analysis was performed in 23 patients with lung cancer(24 lung cancers) associated with IPF. The diagnosis of IPF was made by clinical and CT findings, and lung cancer was confirmed pathologically. We divided the location of lung cancer by lobar distribution and central or peripheral lung zone, and measured the size of mass. We classified the mediastinal lymph node enlargement by American Thoracic Society (ATS) mapping scheme. We evaluated the CT pattern of IPF. The subjects consisted of 6 cases of small cell carcinoma and 18 cases of non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancers were located in the right upper lobe in 5 cases, left upper lobe in 6 cases, right middle lobe in 1 case, right lower lobe in 9 cases, and left lower lobe in 3 cases. Twenty cancers(85%) were located in the peripheral lung zone. Eighteen cancers(73%) were surrounded by fibrotic lung. The size of the mass ranged from 1 to 12 cm, and in 12 cases it was below 3cm in diameter. Mediastinal lymph nodes were enlarged in 22 cases(92%) and classified as N2 or N3 in 15 cases out of 18 non-small cell lung. The size of the mass ranged from 1 to 12 cm, and in 12 cases it was below 3 cm in diameter. Mediastinal lymph nodes were enlarged in 22 cases(92%) and classified as N2 or N3 in 15 cases out of 18 non-small cell lung cancers. CT patterns of underlying IPF were honey-combing in 18 patients(78%) and mixed honey-combing and ground-glass opacity in 5 patients(22%). The lung cancer associated with IPF shows variable cell types. Most of the lung cancers were located peripherally, surrounded by end-stage fibrosis, and were associated with mediastinal lymph node enlargement.

  20. CT features of lung cancer associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the incidence of lung cancer is high in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis(IPF). We analyzed the CT features of lung cancer associated with IPF. Retrospective analyzed the CT features of lung cancer associated with IPF. Retrospective analysis was performed in 23 patients with lung cancer(24 lung cancers) associated with IPF. The diagnosis of IPF was made by clinical and CT findings, and lung cancer was confirmed pathologically. We divided the location of lung cancer by lobar distribution and central or peripheral lung zone, and measured the size of mass. We classified the mediastinal lymph node enlargement by American Thoracic Society (ATS) mapping scheme. We evaluated the CT pattern of IPF. The subjects consisted of 6 cases of small cell carcinoma and 18 cases of non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancers were located in the right upper lobe in 5 cases, left upper lobe in 6 cases, right middle lobe in 1 case, right lower lobe in 9 cases, and left lower lobe in 3 cases. Twenty cancers(85%) were located in the peripheral lung zone. Eighteen cancers(73%) were surrounded by fibrotic lung. The size of the mass ranged from 1 to 12 cm, and in 12 cases it was below 3cm in diameter. Mediastinal lymph nodes were enlarged in 22 cases(92%) and classified as N2 or N3 in 15 cases out of 18 non-small cell lung. The size of the mass ranged from 1 to 12 cm, and in 12 cases it was below 3 cm in diameter. Mediastinal lymph nodes were enlarged in 22 cases(92%) and classified as N2 or N3 in 15 cases out of 18 non-small cell lung cancers. CT patterns of underlying IPF were honey-combing in 18 patients(78%) and mixed honey-combing and ground-glass opacity in 5 patients(22%). The lung cancer associated with IPF shows variable cell types. Most of the lung cancers were located peripherally, surrounded by end-stage fibrosis, and were associated with mediastinal lymph node enlargement

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung ... Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health ...

  2. Frequencies of poor metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2C19 in esophagus cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Xing Shi; Shu-Qing Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) gene polymorphism and cancer susceptibility by genotyping of CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (PMs) in cancer patients.METHODS: One hundred and thirty-five cases of esophagus cancer, 148 cases of stomach cancer, 212 cases of lung cancer, 112 cases of bladder cancer and 372 controls were genotyped by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) for CYP2C19 PMs. The frequencies of PMs in cancer groups and control group were compared.RESULTS: The frequencies of PMs of CYP2C19 were 34.1%(46/135) in the group of esophagus cancer patients, 31.8%(47/148) in the stomach cancer patients, 34.4%(73/212) in the group of lung cancer patients, only 4.5% (5/112) in the bladder cancer patients and 14.0%(52/372) in control group.There were statistical differences between the cancer groups and control group (esophagus cancer, x2=25.65, P<0.005,OR=3.18, 95% CI=2.005-5.042; stomach cancer, x2=21.70,P<0.005, OR=2.86, 95%CI=1.820-4.501; lung cancer,x2=33.58, P<0.005, OR=3.23, 95%CI=1.503-6.906; bladder cancer, x2=7.50, P<0.01, OR=0.288, 95%CI=0.112-0.740).CONCLUSION: CYP2C19 PMs have a high incidence of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, conversely they have a low incidence of bladder cancer. It suggests that CYP2C19 may participate in the activation of procarcinogen of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, but may involve in the detoxification of carcinogens of bladder cancer.

  3. The value of proteomics in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Wekken, Anthonie J.; Hiltermann, Thijo J. N.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have identified the prognostic and predictive value of proteins or peptides in lung cancer but most failed to provide strong evidence for their clinical applicability. The strongest predictive proteins seem to be fatty acid-binding protein heart (H-FABP), and the 8-peak mass spectrography signature of VeriStrat. When focusing on VeriStrat, a ‘VeriStrat good’ profile did not discriminate between chemotherapy and erlotinib. The ‘VeriStrat poor’ profile showed a better outcome to ch...

  4. Tracheobronchial reconstructive procedures for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracheobronchial reconstructive procedures have been done for lung cancer in 26 patients. Twenty-four of the 26 cases were advanced cases in stage 3. Six of the 26 cases were irradiated preoperatively. The survival rate for 26 patients at three years was 43.4% and that for 20 patients without preoperative irradiation at three years was 58.0%. Three of the six preoperative irradiated cases died within two months after operation due to anastomotic dehiscences it appears that the use of preoperative irradiation resulted in increase in complications. (author)

  5. Phlebography of the mediastinum in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the major mediastinal veins was studied in 113 patients with central cancer of the right lung upper lobe with metastases to the regional lymph nodes. Routine angiography was performed in 92 patients, digital subtraction angiography - in 21 patients. Vascularization was shown to be common in a low differentiated type of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The authors identified 2 groups of angiographic signs: marked and doubtful ones. They have been of opinion that only the presence of marked signs can be a contraindication for surgical intervention. The informative value of routine angiography was compared with that of digital subtraction angiography

  6. Lung cancers already produced by plutonium inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter presents the basis for the author's estimate that plutonium particulates have already committed approximately 950,000 persons worldwide to a lung-cancer death, and that more will be so committed in the future, even if no more plutonium is dispersed in the environment. The author's calculations are based on fallout data from atmospheric bomb testing, and on two sets of workers exposed to plutonium: one group at the Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado, and the other at the Los Alamos Laboratory who were involved in the Manhattan Project

  7. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelsomino, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.gelsomino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Medical Oncology Unit 1, Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via G. Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rossi, Giulio [Operative Unit of Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124 Modena (Italy); Tiseo, Marcello [Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Viale A. Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-10-13

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  8. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gelsomino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  9. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection of pancreatic metastases in oncology patients. Tissue diagnosis is imperative because radiological techniques alone are incapable of differentiating them from primary pancreatic tumours. Pancreatic metastases occur in the relative end stage of small cell lung cancer. The main complications of these lesions, although rare, are acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice. Early chemotherapy can provide a survival benefit even in patients with mild acute pancreatitis or extrahepatic biliary obstruction

  10. Immunoproteasomes and immunotherapy—a smoking gun for lung cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spits, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in both women and men with some 221,200 new cases and 158,040 deaths reported in 2015. Almost 90% of these are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and these patients have a very poor prognosis. Recently a new treatment option for NSCLC appeared that strongly improved treatment responses—immunotherapy. Here we review the various forms of immunotherapy and how immune modification of proteasomes in lung cancer may support the immune system in controlling NSCLC. These immunoproteasomes then support recognition of NSCLC and may act as a biomarker for selecting responding patients to immunotherapy. PMID:27501321

  11. Mechanisms of immune response regulation in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Domagala-Kulawik, Joanna; Osinska, Iwona; Hoser, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths. As a solid tumor with low antigenicity and heterogenic phenotype lung cancer evades host immune defense. The cytotoxic anticancer effect is suppressed by a complex mechanism in tumor microenvironment. The population of regulatory T cells (Tregs) plays a crucial role in this inhibition of immune response. Tregs are defined by presence of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) molecule. The high expression of Foxp3 was found in lung cancer cells and in tumor in...

  12. Analysis of intratumor heterogeneity unravels lung cancer evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Elza C; McGranahan, Nicholas; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a disease with dismal outcome. We recently reported a detailed intratumor heterogeneity analysis in 7 non-small cell lung cancer samples, revealing spatially separated driver events as well as the temporal dynamics of mutational processes and demonstrating an important role for APOBEC-mediated heterogeneity later in disease evolution. PMID:27308463

  13. PESTICIDES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the relationship between 50 widely used agricultural pesticides and lung cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 57,284 pesticide applicators, and 32,333 spouses of farmer applicators with no prior history of lung cancer. Self...

  14. Coincidence of lung cancer and silicosis in Czechoslovak uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    27 patients with established coincidence of lung cancer and silicosis from a group of 1607 cases of lung cancer from radioactive compounds, and 166 cases of pneumoconiosis were reported by the Occupational Diseases Ward of the works Institute of National Health in Uranium Industry in the 1962 to 1986 years. Lung cancer was found in 16% of reported silicosis patients, in 81% it was simple silicosis, in 50% of cases in was an epidermoid type of cancer. In two cases the malignant process originated in the silicotic node, in one case from a tuberculoma. Lung cancer occurred most frequently in the right lower lung region. The mean age of the silicosis group was 48.6 years and 56.0 years for the lung cancer group. No difference was thus seen from the mean age of patients with lung cancer from radioactive compounds diagnosed in the years 1976 to 1980 but it was significantly lower that the reported average age of patients with coincidence of lung cancer and pneumoconiosis in the population not exposed to ionizing radiation. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  15. The Danish randomized lung cancer CT screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper H; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger;

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (CT) has not yet been evaluated in randomized clinical trials, although several are underway. METHODS: In The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 4104 smokers and previous smokers from 2004 to 2006 were randomized to either...

  16. Do patients with lung cancer benefit from physical exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas Holst; Vinther, Anders; Poulsen, Lise-Lotte;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer are often burdened by dyspnoea, fatigue, decreased physical ability and loss of weight. Earlier studies of physical exercise of patients with COPD have shown promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate, if a well-documented COPD rehabilitation protocol can...... improve physical fitness and quality of life (QoL) in patients with lung cancer....

  17. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Balder, H.F.; Tielemans, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Methods: Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands Cohor

  18. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sahiner, Ilgin; Vural, Gulin Ucmak

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-(18F)-flouro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has emerged as a useful tool in the clinical work-up of lung cancer. This review article provides an overview of applications of PET in diagnosis, staging, treatment response evaluation, radiotherapy planning, recurrence assessment and prognostication of lung cancer.

  19. Social inequality in breast, lung and colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Andersen, P K; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Osler, Merete

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether family factors shared by siblings explained the association between education and risk of lung, colorectal and breast cancer.......To examine whether family factors shared by siblings explained the association between education and risk of lung, colorectal and breast cancer....

  20. PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM FOLLOWING THORACOTOMY FOR LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xu; LI Hou-wen; LI Yu; WANG Yu; XU Jie; YIN Hong-nian; ZHANG Lin; CHEN Dong-yi; ZHAO Hui-ru; HU Yong-xiao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical features of pulmonary thromboembolism in patients with primary lung cancer in relation to thoracotomy, and to shed light on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this fatal disease after lung resection. Methods: A total of 1245 cases with primary lung cancer received thoracotomy in the past 13 years were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data of a total of 14 patients (1.1%) suffering from pulmonary thromboembolism and requiring cardiao-pulmonary resuscitation were collected and analyzed. Results: The diagnosis was established primarily by clinical findings in 9 cases (64.3%), including further confirmation of one case during operation, by pulmonary ventilation-perfusion scan in 2, by spiral CT angiography in 1, by pulmonary angiography in 1, and by autopsy in 1 case. Even using prompt resuscitation, 8 patients (57.1%) died within 48 h (mean 4 h) after the onset of the symptoms. Six cases eventually recovered. Of the 6 salvaged patients, they all received anticoagulation therapy with heparin intravenously and warfarin orally, including 3 cases of additional thrombolytic therapy with urokinase. Two cases with massive pulmonary emboli received emergency surgery, including one pulmonary embolectomy, and one bilobectomy after right upper lobectomy, with satisfactory results. Conclusion: Massive pulmonary embolism is an infrequent but fatal early postoperative complication after lung resection. The diagnosis should be based mainly on clinical findings in order to initiate the appropriate therapy immediately. The direct diagnostic techniques including radionuclide pulmonary scan, spiral CT angiography, and pulmonary angiography could be based on a careful evaluation of the expected benefits and risks of the various available treatments.

  1. COPD in primary lung cancer patients: prevalence and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ytterstad E

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elinor Ytterstad,1 Per C Moe,2 Audhild Hjalmarsen3 1Department of Mathematics and Statistics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 3Department of Clinical Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Background: Previous studies have relied on international spirometry criteria to diagnose COPD in patients with lung cancer without considering the effect lung cancer might have on spirometric results. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of COPD and emphysema at the time of primary lung cancer diagnosis and to examine factors associated with survival.  Materials and methods: Medical records, pulmonary function tests, and computed tomography scans were used to determine the presence of COPD and emphysema in patients diagnosed with primary lung cancer at the University Hospital of North Norway in 2008–2010.  Results: Among the 174 lung cancer patients, 69% had COPD or emphysema (39% with COPD, 59% with emphysema; male:female ratio 101:73. Neither COPD nor emphysema were significantly associated with lung cancer mortality, whereas patients with non-small-cell lung cancer other than adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma had a risk of lung cancer mortality that was more than four times higher than that of patients with small-cell lung cancer (hazard ratio [HR] 4.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56–11.25. Females had a lower risk of lung cancer mortality than males (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.94, and patients aged ≥75 years had a risk that was twice that of patients aged <75 years (HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.59–3.87. Low partial arterial oxygen pressure (4.0–8.4 kPa increased the risk of lung cancer mortality (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.29–3.96. So did low partial arterial carbon dioxide pressure (3.0–4.9 kPa among stage IV lung cancer patients (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.29–3.85. Several patients with respiratory failure had previously been diagnosed

  2. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  3. Establishing of the Transplanted Animal Models for Human Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingli Zhang; Jinchang Wu

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide.Even with the applications of excision,radiotherapy,chemotherapy,and gene therapy,the 5 year survival rate is only 15% in the USA.Clinically relevant laboratory animal models of the disease could greatly facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of lung cancer,its progression,invasion and metastasis.Transplanted lung cancer models are of special interest and are widely used today.Such models are essential tools in accelerating development of new therapies for lung cancer.In this communication we will present a brief overview of the hosts,sites and pathways used to establish transplanted animal lung tumor models.

  4. Mortality and survival of lung cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Green, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background In the 1990s outcomes in Danish lung cancer patients were poor compared with the other Nordic countries. The five-year survival was only about 5%, only 10% of patients were operated on and less than 60% received active surgical or oncologic treatment. This paper describes trends in...... mortality and survival of lung cancer in Denmark from 2000 to 2012. Methods The study population comprised 52 435 patients with a diagnosis of cancer of the trachea and the lung, primarily ascertained from the Danish Lung Cancer Register and grouped into three cohorts by year of diagnosis. The outcome...... all strata by gender, comorbidity, stage and surgery status and was accompanied by corresponding improvements in both absolute and relative survival. Conclusions The mortality has been significantly declining and the prognosis correspondingly improving in lung cancer in Denmark since the turn of the...

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mie Grunnet; Sorensen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic...... significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those...... relevant for the present study. Four of these included both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients, and 31 dealt solely with NSCLC patients. Regarding SCLC no studies showed that serum level of CEA was a prognostic marker for overall survival (OS). The use of CEA...

  6. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woode, Denzel; Shiomi, Takayuki; D’Armiento, Jeanine, E-mail: jmd12@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10033 (United States)

    2015-02-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD.

  7. Graphic Evolution Witness the Development of Lung Cancer Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer treatment has altered from conventional chemotherapy to targeted treatment, which now has been turned to the immunotherapy. Translational research has played an irreplaceable role during this progression which graphic evolution has witnessed. The evolution has gone through forest plot, KM-curve, waterfall plot, spider plot and timeline-area, showing us the refining concept and gradual process of lung cancer treatment undergoing from community towards individual. Even though the latest immunotherapy is getting increasingly hot, the result isn’t quite expected. Meanwhile, the limitations of conventional treatment still exist which require further research. This article will primarily illustrate the development of translational research of lung cancer via the aspect of curve evolution and analysis some abortive clinical trials in lung cancer surgery for inspiring the next graphic style and lung cancer treatment.

  8. [Graphic Evolution Witness the Development of Lung Cancer Translational Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-06-20

    Lung cancer treatment has altered from conventional chemotherapy to targeted treatment, which now has been turned to the immunotherapy. Translational research has played an irreplaceable role during this progression which graphic evolution has witnessed. The evolution has gone through forest plot, KM-curve, waterfall plot, spider plot and timeline-area, showing us the refining concept and gradual process of lung cancer treatment undergoing from community towards individual. Even though the latest immunotherapy is getting increasingly hot, the result isn't quite expected. Meanwhile, the limitations of conventional treatment still exist which require further research. This article will primarily illustrate the development of translational research of lung cancer via the aspect of curve evolution and analysis some abortive clinical trials in lung cancer surgery for inspiring the next graphic style and lung cancer treatment. PMID:27335306

  9. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD

  10. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denzel Woode

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD.

  11. Development of computer aided diagnosis for lung cancer CT screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of low dose lung cancer helical CT screening to the clinical site has been the fundamental basis of research on Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) using thoracic CT images. Our purpose is the early detection of lung cancer leading to its early treatment, in order to reduce the mortality of lung cancer. From multi-slice CT, lung cancer screening has been activated more. Since CT screening contains a lot of images compared with the conventional X-ray, research and development on the utilization of computer and network using the new diagnosis support technology is required. Due to the demand from actual clinical site, the research group from The University of Tokushima has started the research and development of CAD using lung cancer CT images. We report the result and the future works. (author)

  12. SEGMENTATION OF LUNG CANCER PET SCAN IMAGES USING FUZZY CMEANS

    OpenAIRE

    Santhosh T; Narasimha Prasad L V

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a vital role in medical image processing. Eventually, the proposed work is subjected to classify the tumour and non-tumour parts, followed by the segmentation of tumour region in PET scan images. Lung cancer has been the largest cause of cancer deaths. This paper focuses on Fuzzy C means algorithm for Lung tumour part segmentation of PET scan images to diagnose accurately the region of cancer. A PET scan can often detect cellular level metabolic changes at the earl...

  13. Lung cancer care: the impact of facilities and area measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lathan, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the US, and while treatment disparities by race and class have been well described in the literature, the impact of social determinates of health, and specific characteristics of the treatment centers have been less well characterized. As the treatment of lung cancer relies more upon a precision and personalized medicine approach, where patients obtain treatment has an impact on outcomes and could be a major factor in treatment d...

  14. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    OpenAIRE

    Purandare, Nilendu C; Venkatesh Rangarajan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  15. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu C Purandare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  16. ALK in Lung Cancer: Past, Present, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, scientists discovered that anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements are present in a small subset of non–small-cell lung cancers. ALK-positive cancers are highly sensitive to small-molecule ALK kinase inhibitors, such as crizotinib. Phase I and II studies of crizotinib in ALK-positive lung cancer demonstrated impressive activity and clinical benefit, leading to rapid US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2011. Although crizotinib induces remissions and extends the l...

  17. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PRIMARY LUNG CANCER AND ROLE OF BRONCHOSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Bharate; Mhaisekar; Jadhav,, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cancer is a Latin word meaning "A CRAB". The Greek word for a crab is "KARKINES" and Sanskrit word is "KARKARA ” . (1 ) Lung cancer is one of the commonest fatal neoplastic disease s in the world . It is at the first place at central and North India and at second place at south India. It is estimated that, every year in India, about 30,000 new lung cancer cases are registered .

  18. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer: Clinical Experience and Novel Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jill E.; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E.; Heymach, John V; Minna, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography–based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene “addictions” as important therapeutic ta...

  19. Inhalable Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Hyperthermia in Lung Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy Scott; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (specifically, non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Poor response rates and survival with current treatments clearly indicate the urgent need for developing an effective means to treat NSCLC. Magnetic hyperthermia is a non-invasive approach for tumor ablation, and is based on heat generation by magnetic materials, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, when subjected to an alternating magnetic fi...

  20. Radiation dosimetry for epidemiology lung cancer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung doses have been calculated for 999 workers whose primary exposure was to airborne uranium during the period 1943 to 1947. Internal dose calculations were needed because the major exposure potential was to airborne uranium and because no external monitoring data exists. The lung dose estimates process was divided into two phases: estimation of the uranium intake and calculation of the internal dose. The intake information required included the number of hours worked and the concentration, chemical and physical forms of uranium. These factors were determined through researching historical documents including plant process descriptions, personnel records, operations records, monitoring records, etc. Additional information was also gained through interviews of former plant workers. Job titles and department codes were used to relate uranium exposure conditions to a given individual. Lung doses were estimated using internal dose models developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This system takes into account both particle size and solubility class. Results show that some workers may have received doses as high as 74 rads or 740 rems if a quality factor of 10 is used. The results of this study have been used in a lung cancer case control study to be reported at this conference

  1. MicroRNA signatures as clinical biomarkers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markou A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Athina Markou, Martha Zavridou, Evi S Lianidou Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells, Lab of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Even if early lung cancer detection has been recently significantly improved, the invasive nature of current diagnostic procedures, and a relatively high percentage of false positives, is limiting the application of modern detection tools. The discovery and clinical evaluation of novel specific and robust non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of lung cancer at an early stage, as well as for better prognosis and prediction of therapy response, is very challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs can play an important role in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients, as important and reliable biomarkers for cancer detection and prognostic prediction, and even as promising as novel targets for cancer therapy. miRNAs are important in cancer pathogenesis, and deregulation of their expression levels has been detected not only in lung cancer but in many other human tumor types. Numerous studies strongly support the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer, and there is increasing evidence that altered miRNA expression is associated with tumor progression and survival. It is worth mentioning also that detection of miRNAs circulating in plasma or serum has enormous potential, because miRNAs serve as non-invasive biomarkers not only for the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease, but also as novel response and sensitivity predictors for cancer treatment. In this review, we summarize the current findings on the critical role of miRNAs in lung cancer tumorigenesis and highlight their potential as circulating biomarkers in lung cancer. Our review is based on papers that have been published after 2011, and includes the key words “miRNAs” and “lung cancer”. Keywords: non-small-cell lung carcinoma, miRNAs, tumor biomarkers, circulating miRNAs, liquid

  2. Navigated Early Survivorship Transition in Improving Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I-III Breast, Lung, Prostate, or Colorectal Cancer and Their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Cancer Survivor; Caregiver; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  3. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production. PMID:24477002

  4. The value of proteomics in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltermann, Thijo J. N.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have identified the prognostic and predictive value of proteins or peptides in lung cancer but most failed to provide strong evidence for their clinical applicability. The strongest predictive proteins seem to be fatty acid-binding protein heart (H-FABP), and the 8-peak mass spectrography signature of VeriStrat. When focusing on VeriStrat, a ‘VeriStrat good’ profile did not discriminate between chemotherapy and erlotinib. The ‘VeriStrat poor’ profile showed a better outcome to chemotherapy than to erlotinib. VeriStrat is a prognostic test and only the “poor profile” discriminates for the type of therapy that should be chosen. Whether it adds useful information in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild type EGFR mutations is still doubtful. The position of the VeriStrat test in clinical practice is still not clear and we are waiting for prospective studies where biomarker test are involved in clinical decision. PMID:25815290

  5. Importance of Molecular Features of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer for Choice of Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Approximately 85% of lung cancer is categorized as non–small cell lung cancer, and traditionally, non–small cell lung cancer has been treated with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Targeted agents that inhibit the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have been developed and integrated into the treatment regimens in non–small cell lung cancer. Currently, approved epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors ...

  6. Updates and Controversies in the Rapidly Evolving Field of Lung Cancer Screening, Early Detection, and Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Hasmeena Kathuria; Yaron Gesthalter; Avrum Spira; Brody, Jerome S.; Katrina Steiling

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Cigarette smoking is a well-recognized risk factor for lung cancer, and a sustained elevation of lung cancer risk persists even after smoking cessation. Despite identifiable risk factors, there has been minimal improvement in mortality for patients with lung cancer primarily stemming from diagnosis at a late stage when there are few effective therapeutic options. Early detection of lung cancer and effective sc...

  7. AUTOFLUORESCENCE BRONCHOSCOPY AS A MODALITY FOR EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF LUNG CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    KAW Nugraha; IDM Artika

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer has become a complicated health problem in the world. In 2005, approximately 172,500 people diagnosed with lung cancer in the United States. In Indonesia, lung cancer ranks fourth highest. Lung cancer is also the most common cause of death from cancer, so we need appropriate early detection modality to reduce the number of deaths from lung cancer. Compared with other modalities that currently available, Autofluorescence Bronchoscopy (AFB) seems to have better accuracy in early dia...

  8. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  9. Sociocultural Barriers to Lung Cancer Screening Among Korean Immigrant Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mo-Kyung; Ha, Ara; Taylor, Vicky

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is a commonly occurring cancer among Korean American men. Korean Americans have lower rates of cancer screening participation than other Asian American sub-groups. However, little is known about factors that influence the cancer screening behavior of Korean immigrants. The purpose of this study was to explore facilitators of and barriers to lung cancer screening (i.e., low dose CT of the chest) among Korean immigrant men, using qualitative individual interviews and focus groups. A convenience sample of 24 Korean men who were immigrants, Washington State residents, able to speak Korean, aged 55-79, and eligible for lung cancer screening (based on current guidelines) were recruited from Korean churches and senior centers. Five focus groups (that included between two and five men) and nine individual interviews were conducted. Content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Facilitators of lung cancer screening included perceptions about positive aspects of the health care system in South Korea, recommendations from others (physicians, family members, and community organizations), existing health problems and respiratory symptoms, interest in health, and the health consequences of aging. Barriers included costs of health care in the US, lack of time, lack of knowledge (about lung cancer and screening), attitudes about prevention, and lack of physician recommendation. This study adds new knowledge to a field where little information is available. It also lays the groundwork for developing culturally relevant lung cancer screening interventions for Korean Americans and the health care providers who serve them. PMID:26846627

  10. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Mullapudi

    Full Text Available Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC, we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T-non-tumor (NT pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16. Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents.

  11. Differential Reactions of Microglia to Brain Metastasis of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    He, Bei Ping; Wang, Jian Jun; Zhang, Xian; Wu, Yan; Wang, Miao; Bay, Boon-Huat; Chang, Alex Yuang-Chi

    2006-01-01

    The brain is a common metastatic site for various types of cancers, especially lung cancer. Patients with brain metastases have a poor prognosis in spite of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. It is postulated that immune cells in the brain may play a major role in cancer metastasis, dormancy, and relapse. Although microglia may serve as a major component in the brain immune system, the interaction between metastatic cancer cells and microglia is still largely unknown and remains to be elucidat...

  12. Improving lung cancer survival; time to move on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuvers Marlies E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, numerous efforts have been made to decrease the death rate among lung cancer patients. Nonetheless, the improvement in long-term survival has been limited and lung cancer is still a devastating disease. Discussion With this article we would like to point out that survival of lung cancer could be strongly improved by controlling two pivotal prognostic factors: stage and treatment. This is corresponding with recent reports that show a decrease in lung cancer mortality by screening programs. In addition, modulation of the patient’s immune system by immunotherapy either as monotherapy or combined with conventional cancer treatments offers the prospect of tailoring treatments much more precisely and has also been shown to lead to a better response to treatment and overall survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients. Summary Since only small improvements in survival can be expected in advanced disease with the use of conventional therapies, more research should be focused on lung cancer screening programs and patient tailored immunotherapy with or without conventional therapies. If these approaches are clinically combined in a standard multidisciplinary policy we might be able to advance the survival of patients with lung cancer.

  13. Lung cancer death rates fall, helping drive decrease in overall cancer death rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, covering the period 1975–2010, showed death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, dropping at a faster pace than in previous years.

  14. Trends in lung cancer incidence and survival: studies based on cancer registries

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis trends in the incidence and survival of patients with lung cancer since 1960 in the southeastern part of the Netherlands are described and interpreted. These trends may provide an insight into changes in mortality due to lung cancer in a region with the oldest cancer registlY in the Netherlands. Chapter 1.2 contains a review of literature on trends in the incidence and survival of lung cancer. The methods used for the studies of this thesis are described in chapter ...

  15. PET/CT in Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    either PET or CT findings should be closely followed up by spiral CT. The interval between the CT exams depends on the size of the nodules and other considerations. The clinician has to review all factors in making their final decision knowing that early diagnosis of lung cancer might increase the chance of cure or prolong the period of disease free survivals. Early biopsy of these nodules depends on many factors that have to be considered. Initial staging of the disease: Despite improvements in imaging techniques the five-year survival for lung cancer is still under 20%. The reason could be due to choosing radical surgical resection for patients who have been wrongly under staged due to limitations of current imaging and staging imaging techniques. Accurate mediastinal staging is important for selecting surgically resected candidates. The accuracy of CT is only about 70% and for PET/CT is about 92% and depends on the size of the mediastinal lymph nodes. PET and CT also suffer from causes of false positive including hyperplasia and inflammation of the lymphoid tissue. Accordingly all positive FDG and CT studies and all enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes detected by CT; even if not FDG avid must have biopsy before radical surgical resection. Mediastinoscopy using either direct or the fiber optic approach is the correct approach since the yield of false negative biopsy of these nodes is high and therefore is not justifiable. Initial staging of lung cancer using F-18 FDG PET/CT might reveal asymptomatic metastases in the liver, brain or even the bones and will accordingly exclude surgical resection. PET/CT as a guide for radiation therapy fields: The need for radiation ports to include the gross tumor volume with surrounding margins to cover peripheral micro spread of the disease and to also include the mediastinal lymph nodes cannot be decided by chest X-ray or CT alone. The addition of F-18 FDG has made changes in these radiation ports in more than 50% of the patients. The

  16. An Overview: Treatment of Lung Cancer on Researcher Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Javeria Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cancers is defined as the uncontrolled cell divisions. Cell does not grow maturely and destined to uncontrolled cell growth. When these cells of lungs grow uncontrolled it is called lung cancer. Nowadays mortality rate due to lung cancer is increasing day by day. Many treatment and diagnoses are now a day’s available to deal with lung cancer. Here we disused different method for diagnosis the common types of lung cancer Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cance...

  17. “Unique trend” and “contradictory trend” in discrimination of primary synchronous lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Cheng; Xu, Huan; Lunxu LIU; Zhou, Yubin; Chen, Dali; Du, Heng; Han, Zhaojie; Che, Guowei

    2013-01-01

    Background Distinguishing between multiple primary lung cancers and metastatic tumors is often difficult when the tumor histology is same. Since genomic instability is a common feature of cancer, we hypothesized that independently arising neoplasms in an individual patient would exhibit measurable genomic variation, enabling discrimination of tumor lineage and relatedness. The feasibility of analyzing genomic instability expression profiles to distinguish multiple primary lung cancers from me...

  18. Lung cancers unrelated to smoking: characterized by single oncogene addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2011-08-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Currently, adenocarcinoma is its most common histological subtype in many countries. In contrast with small cell lung cancer or squamous cell carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma often arises in never-smokers, especially in East Asian countries, as well as in smokers. Adenocarcinoma in never-smokers is associated with a lower incidence of genetic alterations (i.e., somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity, and methylation) than in smokers. In addition, most adenocarcinomas in never-smokers harbor one of the proto-oncogene aberrations that occur in a mutually exclusive manner (EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, HER2 mutations, or ALK translocation). It is of note that the proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells that harbor one of these oncogenic aberrations depend on the signaling from each aberrantly activated oncoprotein (oncogene addiction). Therefore, most adenocarcinomas in never-smokers can be effectively treated by molecularly targeted drugs that inhibit each oncoprotein. Moreover, from a pathological aspect, lung adenocarcinoma in never-smokers is characterized by terminal respiratory unit-type adenocarcinoma and a particular gene expression profile. Finally, epidemiological analyses have identified many candidate causes of lung cancer in never-smokers (genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors). The elucidation of the particular features of lung cancer unrelated to smoking and the development of new therapeutic modalities may reduce the mortality from lung cancers in the future. PMID:21655907

  19. TP53 Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Abnormality of the TP53 gene is one of the most significant events in lung cancers and plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Human lung cancers are classified into two major types, small cell lung cancer (SCLC and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The latter accounts for approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers, and the incidence of NSCLC is increasing yearly. Most clinical studies suggest that NSCLC with TP53 alterations carries a worse prognosis and may be relatively more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. A deep understanding of the role of TP53 in lung carcinogenesis may lead to a more reasonably targeted clinical approach, which should be exploited to enhance the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. This paper will focus on the role of TP53 in the molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategies of TP53 mutation in NSCLC.

  20. Lung cancer radiosensitization by CMNa in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To probe into the radiosensitization effect of CMNa on lung tumor cell lines after γ-irradiation combined with γ-knife to treat patients suffering from lung cancer. Methods: 1. Cells of small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 and non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H596 irradiated with 60Co γ-rays combined with or without CMNa were counted using trypan blue exclusion methods, and cell survival rate curves were depicted. 2. Patients suffering from lung cancer at different clinical stages were treated using γ-knife combined with or without CMNa, and the curative effect was evaluated 6 weeks after one cycle of treatment. Results: CMNa could significantly increase the sensitivity of lung cancer cell lines to γ-irradiation. Curative effect increased significantly by γ-knife treatment combined with CMNa i. e., the CR+PR rates for these two groups were 47.22% and 37.67% separately (P0.05). Conclusion: CMNa could significantly increase the radiation sensitivity of lung cancer cell line cells in vitro and tumors in vivo, therefore, it could be used as a radiosensitization agent in clinical treatment of lung cancer. (authors)

  1. Impact of intraoperative lung-protective interventions in patients undergoing lung cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Licker, Marc; Diaper, John; Villiger, Yann; Spiliopoulos, Anastase; Licker, Virginie; Robert, John; Tschopp, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In lung cancer surgery, large tidal volume and elevated inspiratory pressure are known risk factors of acute lung (ALI). Mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume has been shown to attenuate lung injuries in critically ill patients. In the current study, we assessed the impact of a protective lung ventilation (PLV) protocol in patients undergoing lung cancer resection. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of an observational cohort. Demographic, surgical, clinical and o...

  2. Telomerase Activity and the Risk of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Jung, Deuk Kju; Choi, Yi Young; Kang, Hyo Gyoung; Lee, Won-Kee; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lim, Jeong-Ok; PARK, JAE YONG

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase play a key role in the maintenance of telomere length and chromosome integrity. We have evaluated the association between telomerase activity and the risk of lung cancer in peripheral blood. Telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured by a PCR-designed telomeric repeat amplification protocol in 63 lung cancer patients and 190 healthy controls that were matched for age, gender, and smoking status. Telomerase activity was significantly lower in the lung can...

  3. On Academician Behounek's paper ''Lung cancer induced by ionizing radiation''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance and scientific contribution are discussed of the paper ''Lung Cancer Induced by Ionizing Radiation'' submitted by Academician Frantisek Behounek to the nation-wide workshop of the Czechoslovak Society of Pneumology and Oncology in Prague, October 3 and 4, 1952 and published in the Proceedings in 1953. The paper discussed the problem which still remains topical, ie., lung exposure to radon daughters, which Academician Behounek considered to be the true cause of lung cancer in Jachymov miners. (B.S.)

  4. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to try and determine if the cancer has spread beyond the primary lesion itself, you know. And ... Okay. And with most cancers, you know, they spread first by going through what we call the “ ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and prostate cancer, and, in fact, if you add up the mortalities from those three cancers alone, ... for this patient or in other cases a combined approach of radiation, with or without chemotherapy, in ...

  6. Evidence for tankyrases as antineoplastic targets in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New pharmacologic targets are urgently needed to treat or prevent lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer death for men and women. This study identified one such target. This is the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which is deregulated in cancers, including those lacking adenomatous polyposis coli or β-catenin mutations. Two poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) enzymes regulate canonical Wnt activity: tankyrase (TNKS) 1 and TNKS2. These enzymes poly-ADP-ribosylate (PARsylate) and destabilize axin, a key component of the β-catenin phosphorylation complex. This study used comprehensive gene profiles to uncover deregulation of the Wnt pathway in murine transgenic and human lung cancers, relative to normal lung. Antineoplastic consequences of genetic and pharmacologic targeting of TNKS in murine and human lung cancer cell lines were explored, and validated in vivo in mice by implantation of murine transgenic lung cancer cells engineered with reduced TNKS expression relative to controls. Microarray analyses comparing Wnt pathway members in malignant versus normal tissues of a murine transgenic cyclin E lung cancer model revealed deregulation of Wnt pathway components, including TNKS1 and TNKS2. Real-time PCR assays independently confirmed these results in paired normal-malignant murine and human lung tissues. Individual treatments of a panel of human and murine lung cancer cell lines with the TNKS inhibitors XAV939 and IWR-1 dose-dependently repressed cell growth and increased cellular axin 1 and tankyrase levels. These inhibitors also repressed expression of a Wnt-responsive luciferase construct, implicating the Wnt pathway in conferring these antineoplastic effects. Individual or combined knockdown of TNKS1 and TNKS2 with siRNAs or shRNAs reduced lung cancer cell growth, stabilized axin, and repressed tumor formation in murine xenograft and syngeneic lung cancer models. Findings reported here uncovered deregulation of specific components of the Wnt pathway in both

  7. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  8. Risk of second cancer from scattered radiation of intensity-modulated radiotherapies with lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dongoh; Hong, Seongeon; Park, Sung Ho; Park, Sung-Yong; Chung, Kwangzoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Lee, Hyun-ho; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the risk of secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy (TOMO) in patients with lung cancer. Methods IMRT, VMAT and TOMO were planned for five lung cancer patients. Organ equivalent doses (OEDs) are estimated from the measured corresponding secondary doses during irradiation at various points 20 to 80 cm from the iso-center by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter ...

  9. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  10. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis will increase the risk of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Junyao; Yang Ming; Li Ping; Su Zhenzhong; Gao Peng; Zhang Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the studies investigating the increased risk of lung cancer in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).Data sources Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed and Medline from 1999 to 2013 and highly regarded older publications were also included.Study selection We identified,retrieved and reviewed the information on the frequency,risk factors,anatomical features,histological types,clinical manifestations,computed tomography findings and underlying mechanisms of lung cancer in IPF patients.Results The prevalence rates of lung cancer in patients with IPF (4.8% to 48%) are much higher than patients without IPF (2.0% to 6.4%).The risk factors for lung cancer in IPF include smoking,male gender,and age.Lung cancers often occur in the peripheral lung zones where fibrotic changes are predominant.Adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common types of lung cancer in patients with IPF.Radiologic features of these patients include peripherally located,ill-defined mass mimicking air-space disease.The underlying mechanisms of the development of lung cancer in patients with IPF have not been fully understood,but may include the inflammatory response,epithelial injury and/or abnormalities,aberrant fibroblast proliferation,epigenetic and genetic changes,reduced cell-to-cell communication,and activation of specific signaling pathways.Conclusions These findings suggest that IPF is associated with increased lung cancer risk.It is necessary to raise the awareness of lung cancer risk in IPF patients among physicians and patients.

  11. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Andersen, Claus Erik; Sørensen, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993–1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer...... occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used...... to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and...

  12. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng ZZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhenzi Peng, Chunfang Zhang, Chaojun Duan Institute of Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cancer Proteomics of Chinese Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. Keywords: ncRNA, tumorigenesis, biomarker, network, proliferation, apoptosis 

  13. Advances in immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckamp, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    In most patients, lung cancer presents as advanced disease with metastases to lymph nodes and/or distant organs, and survival is poor. Lung cancer is also a highly immune-suppressing malignancy with numerous methods to evade antitumor immune responses, including deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation, release of immunomodulatory cytokines, and inhibition of T-cell activation. Advances in understanding the complex interactions of the immune system and cancer have led to novel therapies that promote T-cell activation at the tumor site, resulting in prolonged clinical benefit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically programmed death receptor 1 pathway antibodies, have demonstrated impressively durable responses and improved survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article will review the recent progress made in immunotherapy for lung cancer with data from trials evaluating programmed death receptor 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 monoclonal antibodies in addition to cancer vaccines. The review will focus on studies that have been published and the latest randomized trials exploring immune therapy in lung cancer. These results form the framework for a new direction in the treatment of lung cancer toward immunotherapy. PMID:27058851

  14. Personalized Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer related deaths in both men and women in the United States and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for over 85 % of all lung cancers. Survival of these patients has not significantly altered in over 30 years. This chapter initially discusses the clinical presentation of lung cancer patients. Most patients diagnosed with lung cancer due to symptoms have advanced stage cancer. Once diagnosed, lung cancer patients need imaging studies to assess the stage of the disease before decisions regarding therapy are finalized. The most important prognostic factors are stage of the disease and performance status and these factors also determine therapy. The chapter subsequently discusses management of each stage of the disease and the impact of several pathologic, clinical factors in personalizing therapy for each individual patient. Transition from chemotherapy for every patient to a more personalized approach based on histology and molecular markers has occurred in the management of advanced stage NSCLC. It is expected that such a personalized approach will extend to all stages of NSCLC and will likely improve the outcomes of all NSCLC patients. PMID:26703806

  15. Emerging applications of nanoparticles for lung cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Uday Kumar; Bhushan, Bharat; Dubey, Poornima; Matai, Ishita; Sachdev, Abhay; Packirisamy, Gopinath

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, most of them being active tobacco smokers. Non small cell lung cancer accounts for around 85% to 90% of deaths, whereas the rest is contributed by small cell lung cancer. The extreme lethality of lung cancer arises due to lack of suitable diagnostic procedures for early detection of lung cancer and ineffective conventional therapeutic strategies. In course with desperate attempts to address these issues independently, a multifunctional nanotherapeutic or diagnostic system is being sought as a favorable solution. The manifestation of physiochemical properties of such nanoscale systems is tuned favorably to come up with a versatile cancer cell targeted diagnostic and therapeutic system. Apart from this, the aspect of being at nanoscale by itself confers the system with an advantage of passive accumulation at the site of tumor. This review provides a broad perspective of three major subclasses of such nanoscale therapeutic and diagnostic systems which include polymeric nanoparticles-based approaches, metal nanoparticles-based approaches, and bio-nanoparticles-based approaches. This review work also serves the purpose of gaining an insight into the pros and cons of each of these approaches with a prospective improvement in lung cancer therapeutics and diagnostics.

  16. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Narumol Bhummaphan; Pithi Chanvorachote

    2015-01-01

    As cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent ...

  17. Right upper lobe lung cancer: Resection through left anterior mediastinotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Marco; Abu Arab, Walid; Turcotte, Eric; Poulin, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    There is sparse information concerning approaches to metachronous lung cancer in patients who had a previous pneumonectomy for lung carcinoma. We describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who underwent a left pneumonectomy for lung carcinoma. Four years later, a radiological examination revealed a hypermetabolic nodule in the right upper lobe, which was located in the left hemithorax because of right lung hyperinflation and a mediastinal shift to the left. Wedge resection was carried out through a left anterior mediastinotomy. We believe that an anterior mediastinotomy represents a valuable option for the management of recurrent lung cancer after previous surgery. PMID:26124429

  18. Lung cancer brain metastases – the role of neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aleshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is mostly common occurring oncological disease in the developed countries. Currently lung cancers are subdivided into nonsmall-cell (adenocarcinoma, large-cell, squamous cell and small-cell. The difference in the clinical and morphological picture leads to the necessity of choosing therapeutic approaches to patients of various groups.Lung cancer should be referred to encephalotropic diseases since metastatic lesion of the central nervous system is sufficiently common complication. Successes of complex treatment of primary tumor result in increase of total longlivety currently ther is ageing of patients suffering lung cancer. These factors increase the risk of metastatic lesions of the brain.Interest to the problem of neurosurgical treatment of patients suffering lung cancer is determined by frequency of lesion, varicosity of morphological variants of the disease, requiring various algorithms of treatment and diagnosis.The main role of neurosurgical intervention in cerebral metastases of lung cancer consist in creation of the paled of carrying out combined therapy. Ideally, a neurosurgical operation should be carried out with clearcut observance of oncological principles of ablasty.Adequate comprehensive approach to treatment or patients with cerebral metastases of various forms of lung cancer with the developed of optimal tactics of and stages of treatment would make it possible to increase duration and quality of life of patients.

  19. Lung cancer treatment rates and the role of the lung cancer nurse specialist: a qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Tod, A.M.; Redman, J; McDonnell, A.; Borthwick, D.; White, J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This qualitative study examines how the Lung Cancer Nurse Specialist (LCNS) role operates and why they may be able to increase access to treatment. SETTING: 4 Hospital NHS Foundation Trusts in England. DESIGN: A multiple case study design using semistructured interviews, observation and Framework Analysis techniques. PARTICIPANTS: Four LCNSs, comprised the 'cases'. Twenty four clinicians who worked with the LCNS participated in individual interviews. Six LCNSs took ...

  20. Contributions of the European trials (European randomized screening group) in computed tomography lung cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In 2011, the largest lung cancer screening trial worldwide, the US National Lung Screening Trial, published a 20% decrease in lung cancer-specific mortality in the computed tomography (CT)-screened group, compared with the group scr

  1. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past Issues / ... 2013 Table of Contents Tests What type of lung cancer do I have? Has the cancer spread from ...

  2. Smoking and Lung Cancer: It's Never Too Late To Quit | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Smoking and Lung Cancer: It's Never Too Late to ... getting another cancer. To get help with quitting smoking... Go online to www.smokefree.gov. (See this ...

  3. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kauppinen, T.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and smoking.

  4. Environmental radon and lung cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on lung cancer (LC) deaths have been collected from OPCS statistics for England and Wales over the period 1950-1987. The male deaths after an initial increase levelled off in the seventies; the female deaths remained fairly constant during the fifties and mid-sixties, followed by a sharp rise which is continuing. Employing ICRP 50 analysis of U-miners, a small positive correlation has been found between the female LC-deaths in the fifties and the radon concentrations as obtained by the NPRB national survey. The male and female LC-deaths in five countries with the highest radon concentrations as calculated by the BEIR IV procedure, do not correlate well with the OPCS values. It is concluded that the use of US statistics in the calculation, the inaccuracy of radon concentration values and the basis of the BEIR IV report itself possibly contributed to the disagreement. (author)

  5. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Grigoryevskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC annually afflicts 63–65 thousand people in Russia and 1.04 million worldwide, which amounts to 12.8% of all notified cases of neoplasms. In LC patients, infectious complications are characterized by a severe course; destruction foci, decay cavities, and abscess may form.All give rise to difficulties in making a diagnosis and in choosing a treatment policy. Infections caused by P. aeruginosa, A. baumanii, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriacae, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp present the greatest problem in inpatients with LC. The early diagnosis of infectiouscomplications and the use of adequate schemes of antibiotic prevention and therapy promote a reduction in mortality from infection in this categoryof patients and expand the possibilities of their specific antitumor treatment.

  6. Gefitinib in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Costanzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gefitinib is an oral, reversible, tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR that plays a key role in the biology of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Phase I studies indicated that the recommended dose of gefitinib was 250 mg/day. Rash, diarrhea, and nausea were the most common adverse events. The positive results obtained in early phase 2 clinical trials with gefitinib were not confirmed in large phase 3 trials in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC. The subsequent discovery that the presence of somatic mutations in the kinase domain of EGFR strongly correlates with increased responsiveness to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors prompted phase 2 and 3 trials with gefitinib in the first line-treatment of EGFR-mutated NSCLC. The results of these trials have demonstrated the efficacy of gefitinib that can be now considered as the standard first-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC harbouring activating EGFR mutations.

  7. Main clinical epidemiological features of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and cross-sectional study of 95 patients with lung cancer, discharged from Neumology Service at 'Dr Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso' General Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, was carried out from January, 2008 to December, 2008 in order to identify the main clinical epidemiological features of the aforementioned disease. A malignancy predominance among men aged between 56 and 65 years old, belonging to urban areas and being heavy smoker (out of 30 cigarettes per day over 30 years ), was found. Those affected without a confirmed histological type and IV clinical stage epidermoid carcinoma were predominant. Most of them had the opportunity to be treated. Increasing and intensifying health promotion and disease prevention campaigns were recommended so as to achieve the population to avoid or quit the smoking habit. (author)

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have a...... good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical staging in patients with suspected and proven lung cancer, but until then surgical staging remains the gold...

  9. Clinical Utility of Serum Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao ZHAO

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer shows a tendency of higher incidence and higher mortality in recent years, but the overall 5-year survival rate is less than 15%. Serum tumor markers of lung cancer play an important role in early diagnosis, determining of pathology types, staging, evaluation of response, and prognosis of lung cancer. In this review, 6 most important markers were reviewed, including neuron-specific enolase (NSE, pro-gastrin-releasing peptide (ProGRP, cytokeratin 19 fragments (Cyfra 21-1, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA, squamous cell carcinoma associated antigen (SCC-Ag, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA.

  10. Lineage factors and differentiation states in lung cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, W K C; Nguyen, D X

    2015-11-19

    Lung cancer encompasses a heterogeneous group of malignancies. Here we discuss how the remarkable diversity of major lung cancer subtypes is manifested in their transforming cell of origin, oncogenic dependencies, phenotypic plasticity, metastatic competence and response to therapy. More specifically, we review the increasing evidence that links this biological heterogeneity to the deregulation of cell lineage-specific pathways and the transcription factors that ultimately control them. As determinants of pulmonary epithelial differentiation, these poorly characterized transcriptional networks may underlie the etiology and biological progression of distinct lung cancers, while providing insight into innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:25823023

  11. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  12. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; pLAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  13. Insight into early-phase trials for lung cancer in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jin-Ji; Wu, Yi-Long

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Few data have been published comparing early-phase trials for lung cancer between China and the United States (US). This study was to investigate the differences of phase 1 trials for lung cancer between these two countries. Methods In 2014, a cross-sectional survey was conducted to compare phase 1 trials for lung cancer between the Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute (GLCI), the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC), and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Cen...

  14. Enhanced Heme Function and Mitochondrial Respiration Promote the Progression of Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md. Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Sullivan, Laura A.; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair...

  15. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  16. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  17. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  18. Flavonoids as Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Agents Against Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present review is to study the relationship between flavonoids and lung cancer, proposing that their regular consumption in Western diets could be beneficial for protecting patients against lung cancer. An extensive search of the scientific literature was performed in the following electronic specialized databases (PubMed central (PMC-NBCI, Elsevier Journal, SciELO Spain, Scirus, Science Direct, including studies in animals, cells, and humans, in order to establish the effect of flavonoids in the prevention and development of lung cancer. Although in vitro and animal studies show the potential ability of flavonoids to act against different types of cancers, especially against lung cancers, the diverse results reported within epidemiological studies, together with the lack of experiments in humans, are the major factors in limiting making dietary recommendations based on scientific evidence for the management of patients with lung cancer. Therefore, the authors of the present study recommend following the dietary health practice guidelines which promotes the consumption of food enriched in flavonoids and reflects the current state of knowledge of an effective and appropriate diet in lung cancer patients.Erratum in: Rev Esp Nutr Hum Diet. 2013;17(2:91-92Link: http://www.renhyd.org/index.php/renhyd/article/view/6/17

  19. Asthma Control in Asthmatic Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsing Hsieh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The balance of the Th1 and Th2 immune response plays an important role inthe regulation of the immune system and in general health. Tumor bearinghosts are supposed to have a balance shifting to the Th2 pathway, while afavorable Th1 anti-tumor pathway is induced in tumor-resected hosts. Theclinical impacts of a tumor-related Th2 environment have not been clearlystudied. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that nonsmallcell lung cancer (NSCLC has an impact on control of asthma, a wellknownTh2-predominant inflammatory disease.Method: Thirty-eight patients with the diagnoses of both asthma and lung cancer wereretrospectively enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups according totheir response to lung cancer treatment, the responder group (completeregression, partial regression and stable disease and non-responder group(progression of disease. Asthma control test (ACT scores were analyzedone year before diagnosis, at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer, and at thetime of re-staging after cancer treatment.Results: All the asthmatics with lung cancer had worsening of their symptomsaccording to their ACT scores at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer comparedto scores in the preceding year (21.6

  20. Lung Cancer of the Uranium Miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 'The Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association' (hereinafter referred to as PPMCA) is the only world diversified mining company, which, in addition to underground mining of uranium ore, carries out refining of such ores in hydrometallurgical process to produce natural uranium oxide. The paper deals with the evaluation of the occupational morbidity of the PPMCA's miners depending on their work conditions. In order to evaluate radiological risks of the malignant neoplasm incidence, we used the available medical-dosimetry data being received over the Association life. Our study covers information of 584 miners. The main part of this group includes men (87%), involved in uranium mining (sinkers, timber-men, etc.). Women accounted 13%, being involved in subsidiary works. The highest mean external doses (20 - 40 mSv/year) got those, who worked in the mines over 1980-1983, but the number of this subgroup is small - 18 persons. Generally, mean doses over next years were about 5 mSv/year. However, almost each year, maximum doses above 20 mSv/year can be observed. Internal doses to men were 42.9 mSv on average, while those to women were 23.9 mSv. When generating the medical database, we collected data of 130 mail mines, employed to the PPMCA mines. Among all cases of the malignant neoplasm incidence of miners, the highest contribution is made by the lung cancer (46%); this is well above the national data (23.3 %). The second part is digestive tract cancer (the stomach, the lower lip, and pancreas), contributing 29 % in total, and the stomach cancer contributes 16 %. Depositions of these malignancies do not exceed the national data. The problem of the further work improvement of the miners to eliminate occupational lung disease in the uranium mining operations remains important to the present. Epidemiological and radio-ecological studies will help both regulators and operators to make more objective assessment of each specific situation and to determine

  1. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome ...

  2. Enrichment and Function Research of Large Cell Lung Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wenke YUE; JIAO, FENG; Liu, Bin; Jiacong YOU; Zhou, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective There are no universal method to recognize and screen for lung cancer stem cell markers and indicators. Commonly used methods are flow Cytometry and learning from other cancer stem cell sorting tags to sort lung cancer stem cells. But this method has low specificity screening, the workload is huge. In this study, Serum-free suspension culture was used to enrich lung cancer stem cells, and explore method for lung cancer stem cell screening. Methods Human large lung can...

  3. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X [Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun Jianqi; Gu Xiang; Liu Ping [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xiao Tiqiao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: pingliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lisaxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2010-04-21

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  4. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  5. Factors influencing the decline in lung density in a Danish lung cancer screening cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Saher B.; Dirksen, Asger; Lo, Pechin; Skovgaard, L.T.; de Bruijne, Marleen; Pedersen, Jesper H.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer screening trials provide an opportunity to study the natural history of emphysema by using CT lung density as a surrogate parameter.In the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 2,052 participants were included. At screening rounds, smoking habits were recorded and spirometry was performed....... CT lung density was measured as the volume-adjusted 15th percentile density (PD15). A mixed effects model was used with former smoking males with...

  6. Testing of human papillomavirus in lung cancer and non-tumor lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk factors for lung cancer, such as cigarette smoking, environmental pollution, asbestos, and genetic determinants, are well-known, whereas involvement of the human papillomavirus (HPV) is still unclear. We examined a series of 100 lung cancer patients from Italy and the UK for the presence of HPV DNA in both lung tumor specimens and adjacent non-tumoral specimens from the same patients. Thirty-five of the most clinically relevant HPV types were assayed using PCR amplification of the highly conserved L1 region of the viral genome followed by hybridization with specific probes. No HPV was detected in tumor specimens nor in normal lung tissue of any patient. These data indicate that, in this Western series, HPV is not associated with the risk of lung cancer. Our findings will help refine estimates of lung cancer risk in patients affected by a common viral infection involved in other types of human cancer

  7. December 2013 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: lung cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Mathew

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. During this month’s pulmonary journal club we reviewed several of the sentinel studies looking at lung cancer screening. Since the National Lung Screening Research Team (NLSRT (1 published the impressive results showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality, the debate on when and if to initiate a national lung cancer screening program has been at the forefront of debate. The American Lung Association and American Cancer Society have issued statements that are not guidelines, but did offer insight on the price we pay for earlier lung cancer detection and reduction in mortality…which is the increased rates of false positives detected and increased rates of biopsies. The US Task Force on Lung Cancer Screening has yet to decide on a screening program and have yielded a statement that neither supports nor refutes the current level of evidence. Prior to the NLSRT study there were others that showed conflicting results on …

  8. Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Lung Cancer in Korean Men: The Seoul Male Cancer Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Lee, Moo-Song; Shin, Myung-Hee; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Zhong-Min; Ahn, Yoon-Ok

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Korea. The aim of this study was to estimate lung cancer risk of cigarette smoking in Korean men by a 10-yr follow-up prospective cohort study using the primary databases. The number of subjects was 14,272 men, who had full information of smoking habits among participants in the Seoul Male Cancer Cohort Study (SMCC). Total 125,053 person-years were calculated by determining the number of days from the start of follow-up, January 1, 1993, un...

  9. Lung Cancer Care Before and After Medicare Eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesch, Marco D; Ong, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Uninsured and underinsured near-elderly may not have timely investigation, diagnosis, or care of cancer. Prior studies suggest Medicare eligibility confers significant and substantial reductions in mortality and increases in health service utilization. We compared 2245 patients diagnosed with lung cancer at ages 64.5 to 65 years and 2512 patients aged 65 to 65.5 years, with 2492 patients aged 65.5 to 66 years (controls) in 2000 to 2005. Compared with controls, patients diagnosed with lung cancer before Medicare eligibility had no statistically significant differences in cancer stage, time to treatment, type of treatment, and survival. Study power was sufficient to exclude mortality reductions and health service utilization changes of the magnitude found in prior work, suggesting that typically, appropriate lung cancer care may be sought and delivered regardless of insurance status. PMID:27166413

  10. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  11. Lipoplatin Treatment in Lung and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Ravaioli; Alessandra Affatato; Cinzia Castellani; Fabrizio Drudi; Lorenzo Gianni; Carlotta Santelmo; Manuela Fantini; Mario Nicolini

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of cisplatin in cancer treatment represents an important achievement in the oncologic field. Many types of cancers are now treated with this drug, and in testicular cancer patients major results are reached. Since 1965, other compounds were disovered and among them carboplatin and oxaliplatin are the main Cisplatin analogues showing similar clinical efficacy with a safer toxicity profile. Lipoplatin is a new liposomal cisplatin formulation which seems to have these characteri...

  12. The genetics and biology of KRAS in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M.K.Westcott; Minh D.To

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of KRAS is a common oncogenic event in lung cancer and other epithelial cancer types.Efforts to develop therapies that counteract the oncogenic effects of mutant KRAS have been largely unsuccessful,and cancers driven by mutant KRAS remain among the most refractory to available treatments.Studies undertaken over the past decades have produced a wealth of information regarding the clinical relevance of KRAS mutations in lung cancer.Mutant Kras-driven mouse models of cancer,together with cellular and molecular studies,have provided a deeper appreciation for the complex functions of KRAS in tumorigenesis.However,a much more thorough understanding of these complexities is needed before clinically effective therapies targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers can be achieved.

  13. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  14. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  15. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  16. Trial Yields Positive Data on Pembrolizumab for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from an early phase clinical trial may point to a biomarker that identifies patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer most likely to respond to the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda®).

  17. Abdominal pain as initial presentation of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisa, Naseem; Alhafez, Bishr; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated spleen metastasis (ISM) in general is very rare with a reported incidence of 2.3–7.1% for all solid cancers. Lung cancers rarely metastasise to the spleen. It is very atypical for ISM to be the initial presentation of lung cancer as well. In our case, a 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of left-sided abdominal fullness and dull pain. Workup was remarkable for splenic mass that turns out to be adenocarcinoma with unknown primary tumour. Biopsy of the mass with immunohistochemistry and whole body position emission tomography scan was able to identify lung cancer as the primary tumour. The patient underwent splenectomy, wedge resection of the lung mass along with short-course of chemotherapy. She never had any recurrences since then. PMID:24835801

  18. Staging by tomography: Lung, esophagus, mama and pleural cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation shows images of different types of cancer in the lung, esophagus, mama and pleura. The chest radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and PET CT contribute to detect the morphology, size, location, metastasize, malignant and benign nodules, lymph glands.

  19. Can Certain 'Poor Carb' Diets Raise Nonsmokers' Lung Cancer Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_157612.html Can Certain 'Poor Carb' Diets Raise Nonsmokers' Lung Cancer Risk? Study suggests link ... the disease may rise if they eat a diet rich in certain carbohydrates. These so-called "high ...

  20. Lung cancer screening: Computed tomography or chest radiographs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edwin; JR; van; Beek; Saeed; Mirsadraee; John; T; Murchison

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the leading cause of mortalitydue to malignancy. The vast majority of cases of lung cancer are smoking related and the most effective way of reducing lung cancer incidence and mortality is by smoking cessation. In the Western world, smoking cessation policies have met with limited success. The other major means of reducing lung cancer deaths is to diagnose cases at an earlier more treatable stage employing screening programmes using chest radiographs or low dose computed tomography. In many countries smoking is still on the increase, and the sheer scale of the problem limits the affordability of such screening programmes. This short review article will evaluate the current evidence and potential areas of research which may benefit policy making across the world.

  1. Advanced Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the malignant disease with the highest rate in terms of incidence and mortality in China. Early diagnosis and timely monitoring tumor recurrence and metastasis are extremely important for improving 5-year survival rate of lung cancer patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs, as a "liquid biopsy specimens” for the primary tumor, provide the possibility to perform real-time, non-invasive histological identification for lung cancer patients. The detection of CTCs contributes to early diagnosis, surveillance of tumor recurrence and metastasis, and prediction of therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. Furthermore, CTCs-dependent detection emerges as a new approach for molecularly pathologic examination, study of molecular mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and resolution for tumor heterogeneity. This study reviewed the recent progress of CTCs in lung cancer research field.

  2. Development of lung cancer CT screening operating support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Rikuta; Hanai, Kozou; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    In Japan, lung cancer death ranks first among men and third among women. Lung cancer death is increasing yearly, thus early detection and treatment are needed. For this reason, CT screening for lung cancer has been introduced. The CT screening services are roughly divided into three sections: office, radiology and diagnosis sections. These operations have been performed through paper-based or a combination of paper-based and an existing electronic health recording system. This paper describes an operating support system for lung cancer CT screening in order to make the screening services efficient. This operating support system is developed on the basis of 1) analysis of operating processes, 2) digitalization of operating information, and 3) visualization of operating information. The utilization of the system is evaluated through an actual application and users' survey questionnaire obtained from CT screening centers.

  3. Residential Radon Exposure and Risk of Lung Cancer in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    A case-control study of lung cancer and residential radon exposure in which investigators carried out both standard year-long air measurements and CR-39 alpha detector measurements (call surface monitors)

  4. Mortality from lung cancer in Ontario uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortality from lung cancer was greater in Ontario uranium miners than in the general male population (observed = 152, expected = 67.6, standardised mortality ratio 225, 95% confidence interval 191-264). Part of the excess of lung cancer may be because the proportion of men who are smokers or have smoked is greater in uranium miners than in Ontario men. Smoking does not explain the whole excess. The excess relative risk of lung cancer from the same degree of exposure to short lived radon progeny is greatest five to 14 years after exposure and less subsequently. It is greater in men under the age of 55 years and less in older men. Part of the excess of lung cancer mortality in Ontario uranium miners is probably also due to exposure to arsenic that occurred earlier in gold mines. (Author)

  5. Non-surgical management of stage I lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gore, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Stage I lung cancer has a high cure rate with surgery, although many patients are not surgical candidates due to comorbid conditions. Historically, non-operative treatment has been disappointing. New and promising ablative therapies offer a curative option.

  6. 4. DNA REPAIR CAPACITY IN LUNG CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The ability for DNA repair is an important host factor which influences the individual susceptibility to genotoxic carcinogen exposures. It has been shown in different case-control studies that DNA repair capacity (DRC) can be reduced in lung cancer patients.We have used an alkaline comet assay to measure the cellular DRC in peri-pheral blood lymphocytes of lung cancer patients and tumor-free control

  7. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer Prognosis: Quantity and Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is very heterogeneous in its clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment response; and like other diseases, the prognosis consists of two essential facets: survival and quality of life (QOL). Lung cancer survival is mostly determined by disease stage and treatment modality, and the five-year survival rate has been in a plateau of 15% for three decades. QOL is focused on life aspects that are affected by health conditions and medical interventions; the balance of p...

  8. European randomized lung cancer screening trials: Post NLST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, JK; Klaveren, R; Pedersen, JH;

    2013-01-01

    Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects of their ......Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects...

  9. The importance of exercise in lung cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Michaels, Carol

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that exercise can help in a variety of different ways for people with lung cancer. Exercise can be beneficial at any stage of the patient journey through increasing strength, endurance and decreasing emotional issues. A recovery fitness program is described and provides guidance on breathing, stretching, aerobic exercise and strength training. There are more people surviving lung cancer with services needing to cater for the varying requirements of each patient. Pro...

  10. Proton beam therapy for locally advanced lung cancer: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Schild, Steven E.; Rule, William G; Ashman, Jonathan B; Vora, Sujay A; Keole, Sameer; Anand, Aman; Liu, Wei; Bues, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Protons interact with human tissue differently than do photons and these differences can be exploited in an attempt to improve the care of lung cancer patients. This review examines proton beam therapy (PBT) as a component of a combined modality program for locally advanced lung cancers. It was specifically written for the non-radiation oncologist who desires greater understanding of this newer treatment modality. This review describes and compares photon (X-ray) radiotherapy (XRT) to PBT. Th...

  11. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo; Zulueta, Javier J.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emph...

  12. Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, Kristy; Arenberg, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer diagnosis and treatment has evolved to require the input and expertise of multiple diverse medical and surgical specialties. The approach to lung cancer patients requires the adherence to a few principles that include thorough use of staging modalities to assure the proper treatment for each patient, and an understanding of the limitations and advantages of each of these modalities. Evidence is continuing to emerge that supports the notion that diagnostic workup and treatment of l...

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have a good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical stagin...

  14. Intermediate Megavoltage Photon Beams for Improved Lung Cancer Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ahmad, Munir; Ming, Xin; Zhou, Li; Deng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of intermediate megavoltage (3-MV) photon beams on SBRT lung cancer treatments. To start with, a 3-MV virtual beam was commissioned on a commercial treatment planning system based on Monte Carlo simulations. Three optimized plans (6-MV, 3-MV and dual energy of 3- and 6-MV) were generated for 31 lung cancer patients with identical beam configuration and optimization constraints for each patient. Dosimetric metrics were evaluated and compared am...

  15. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Yevgeniya Gokun; William M. Andrews Jr.; Bethany L. Overfield; Heather Robertson; Amanda Wiggins; Mary Kay Rayens

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method: This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = ...

  16. A comparison of pathological methods of measuring lung cancer volume.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Binks; Clelland, C. A.; Layton, C

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To determine which of several pathological methods of measuring lung cancer volume compared most favourably with the gold standard. METHODS: Three pathological methods were used on 54 resected lung cancers: (1) measuring the maximum dimension and assuming a spherical shape; (2) measuring three dimensions and assuming an ellipsoidal shape; and (3) deriving the volume from the area of tumour on sequential 1 cm slices using a photocopier and an image analysis system. The gold standard was o...

  17. Usefulness of transbronchial needle aspiration for initial lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Soja; Artur Szlubowski; Piotr Kocoń; Wojciech Czajkowski; Piotr Grzanka; Romana Tomaszewska; Adam Ćmiel; Jarosław Kużdżał

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Besides radio logical methods (especially positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography), endoscopic techniques including transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of mediastinal lymph nodes play an important role in lung cancer staging, thus having a significant effect on further patient management. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of blind TBNA in staging of lung cancer, using systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection (...

  18. Lung cancer in HIV infected patients: facts, questions and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Cadranel, J.; GARFIELD D; Lavolé, A; Wislez, M.; Milleron, B.; Mayaud, C.

    2006-01-01

    AIDS related mortality has fallen sharply in industrialised countries since 1996 following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. This has been accompanied by an increase in the proportion of deaths attributable to non‐AIDS defining solid tumours, especially lung cancer. The risk of developing lung cancer seems to be higher in HIV infected subjects than in the general population of the same age, partly because the former tend more frequently to be smokers and, especially, i...

  19. Diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: A pleural effusion is defined as an abnormal amount of fluid in the space between the layers of tissue (the pleura) that line the lungs. If cancer cells are present in this fluid (pleural cavity) it is called a malignant cancerous pleural effusion. Many benign and malignant disease can cause pleural effusion.The new onset of pleural effusion may herald the presence of a previously undiagnosed malignancy, or more typically, complicate the course of a known lung tumor. Malignant pleural effusions can lead lead to an initial diagnosis of lung cancer in patients.and it was the first symptom of lung cancer. Pleural deposits of tumor cause pleuritic pain. Purpose of this presentation is to show the role of CT in diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer. Material and methods: CT examinations of chest were made to 138 patients for 1 year (1/6/2011- 1/6/2012) with Siemens Somatom Emotion 16 CT Scanner. Patients were at age of 30 -81 years, 93 of them are male and 45 are female. Results: 56 (40.5%) of the patients had pleural effusion. From this group 21 37.5% had malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer. 17 (81%) of them are male, and 4 (19%) are female. 9 (43%) diagnosed lung cancer for first time. Conclusion: Pleural effusion more commonly occur in patient with advanced-stage tumor who frequently have metastases to other organs and long-term survival is uncommon in this group. CT diagnosed malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer and help to choice treatment for these patients

  20. Family History of Lung Cancer and Contemplation of Smoking Cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Madlensky, Lisa; Bousman, Chad A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of cigarette smoking in the United States has decreased, but current rates remain above nationally set objectives. A family history of lung cancer may motivate adult smokers to quit and contribute to further reductions in smoking prevalence. Methods We surveyed adult smokers (N = 838) interviewed as part of the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. We examined the association between family history of lung cancer and smoking cessation precontemplation (no...