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Sample records for cancer larc dosimetric

  1. Postoperative telegammatherapy of breast cancer (Dosimetric studies)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, J; Mitrov, G [Nauchno-Izsledovatelski Onkologichen Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria); Konstantinov, B; Dobrev, D [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1977-01-01

    The method employed for postoperative radiation therapy of breast cancer at the Radiologic Clinic of the Medical Academy in Sofia is described. Results are reported and discussed of dosimetric studies carried out with the T-100 on heterogeneous tissue-equivalent Rando phantom for dose distributions in the regional lymph basin and the underlying tissues and organs. The results show coincidence between calculated and measured doses in the regional lymph basin and the thoracic wall. It was demonstrated that maximal radiation loading (3600 to 5500 rad) occurs in the apical and the hilar lung area.

  2. High-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) with oral UFT/folinic acid and escalating doses of oxaliplatin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber Vestermark, Lene; Jensen, Helle A; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consensus is that patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) should receive long-term chemoradiotherapy (CRT) before surgery. With the intent to offer the patients intensified concomitant chemotherapy (CT) to improve outcome and to assess tolerability and toxicity of oxaliplatin (Ox...

  3. Dosimetric uncertainty in prostate cancer proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Liyong; Vargas, Carlos; Hsi Wen; Indelicato, Daniel; Slopsema, Roelf; Li Zuofeng; Yeung, Daniel; Horne, Dave; Palta, Jatinder [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The authors we evaluate the uncertainty in proton therapy dose distribution for prostate cancer due to organ displacement, varying penumbra width of proton beams, and the amount of rectal gas inside the rectum. Methods and Materials: Proton beam treatment plans were generated for ten prostate patients with a minimum dose of 74.1 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to the planning target volume (PTV) while 95% of the PTV received 78 CGE. Two lateral or lateral oblique proton beams were used for each plan. The authors we investigated the uncertainty in dose to the rectal wall (RW) and the bladder wall (BW) due to organ displacement by comparing the dose-volume histograms (DVH) calculated with the original or shifted contours. The variation between DVHs was also evaluated for patients with and without rectal gas in the rectum for five patients who had 16 to 47 cc of visible rectal gas in their planning computed tomography (CT) imaging set. The uncertainty due to the varying penumbra width of the delivered protons for different beam setting options on the proton delivery system was also evaluated. Results: For a 5 mm anterior shift, the relative change in the RW volume receiving 70 CGE dose (V{sub 70}) was 37.9% (5.0% absolute change in 13.2% of a mean V{sub 70}). The relative change in the BW volume receiving 70 CGE dose (V{sub 70}) was 20.9% (4.3% absolute change in 20.6% of a mean V{sub 70}) with a 5 mm inferior shift. A 2 mm penumbra difference in beam setting options on the proton delivery system resulted in the relative variations of 6.1% (0.8% absolute change) and 4.4% (0.9% absolute change) in V{sub 70} of RW and BW, respectively. The data show that the organ displacements produce absolute DVH changes that generally shift the entire isodose line while maintaining the same shape. The overall shape of the DVH curve for each organ is determined by the penumbra and the distance of the target in beam's eye view (BEV) from the block edge. The beam setting

  4. Dosimetric uncertainty in prostate cancer proton radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liyong; Vargas, Carlos; Hsi, Wen; Indelicato, Daniel; Slopsema, Roelf; Li, Zuofeng; Yeung, Daniel; Horne, Dave; Palta, Jatinder

    2008-11-01

    The authors we evaluate the uncertainty in proton therapy dose distribution for prostate cancer due to organ displacement, varying penumbra width of proton beams, and the amount of rectal gas inside the rectum. Proton beam treatment plans were generated for ten prostate patients with a minimum dose of 74.1 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to the planning target volume (PTV) while 95% of the PTV received 78 CGE. Two lateral or lateral oblique proton beams were used for each plan. The authors we investigated the uncertainty in dose to the rectal wall (RW) and the bladder wall (BW) due to organ displacement by comparing the dose-volume histograms (DVH) calculated with the original or shifted contours. The variation between DVHs was also evaluated for patients with and without rectal gas in the rectum for five patients who had 16 to 47 cc of visible rectal gas in their planning computed tomography (CT) imaging set. The uncertainty due to the varying penumbra width of the delivered protons for different beam setting options on the proton delivery system was also evaluated. For a 5 mm anterior shift, the relative change in the RW volume receiving 70 CGE dose (V70) was 37.9% (5.0% absolute change in 13.2% of a mean V70). The relative change in the BW volume receiving 70 CGE dose (V70) was 20.9% (4.3% absolute change in 20.6% of a mean V70) with a 5 mm inferior shift. A 2 mm penumbra difference in beam setting options on the proton delivery system resulted in the relative variations of 6.1% (0.8% absolute change) and 4.4% (0.9% absolute change) in V70 of RW and BW, respectively. The data show that the organ displacements produce absolute DVH changes that generally shift the entire isodose line while maintaining the same shape. The overall shape of the DVH curve for each organ is determined by the penumbra and the distance of the target in beam's eye view (BEV) from the block edge. The beam setting option producing a 2 mm sharper penumbra at the isocenter can reduce the

  5. LARC powder prepreg system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermoplastic prepregs of LARC-TPI have been produced in a fluidized bed unit on spread continuous fiber tows. The powders are melted on the fibers by radiant heating to adhere the polymer to the fiber. This process produces tow prepreg uniformly without imposing severe stress on the fibers or requiring long high temperature residence times for the polymer. Unit design theory and operating correlations have been developed to provide the basis for scale up to commercial operation. Special features of the operation are the pneumatic tow spreader, fluidized bed and resin feed systems.

  6. Dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Endres, Eugene J.; Parker, Brent C.; Sormani, Maria Pia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: all patients who underwent external-beam radiotherapy as part of treatment for localized prostate cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA, from May 2002 to November 2006 were extracted from the own database. From the cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), the absolute volumes (V-value) of intestinal cavity (IC) receiving 15, 30, and 45 Gy were extracted for each patient. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was prospectively scored at each weekly treatment visit according to CTC (common toxicity criteria) v2.0. The endpoint was the development of peak grade ≥ 2 diarrhea during RT. Various patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: 149 patients were included in the analysis, 112 (75.2%) treated with whole-pelvis intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) and 37 (24.8%) with prostate-only RT, including or not including, the seminal vesicles (PORT ± SV). 45 patients (30.2%) developed peak grade ≥ 2 diarrhea during treatment. At univariate analysis, IC-V 15 and IC-V 30 , but not IC-V 45 , were correlated to the endpoint; at multivariate analysis, only IC-V 15 (p = 0.047) along with peak acute proctitis (p = 0.041) was independently correlated with the endpoint. Conclusion: these data provide a novel and prostate treatment-specific ''upper limit'' DVH for IC. (orig.)

  7. Organ motion study and dosimetric impact of respiratory gating radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.

    2007-04-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is now the standard treatment for locally advanced or inoperable esophageal carcinoma. In this indication, conformal radiotherapy is generally used. However, prognosis remains poor for these patients. Respiratory gating radiotherapy can decrease healthy tissues irradiation and allows escalation dose in lung, liver and breast cancer. In order to improve radiotherapy technique, we propose to study the feasibility of respiratory gating for esophageal cancer. We will study the respiratory motions of esophageal cancer to optimize target volume delineation, especially the internal margin (I.M.). We will test the correlation between tumour and chest wall displacements to prove that esophageal cancer motions are induced by respiration. This is essential before using free breathing respiratory gating systems. We will work out the dosimetric impact of respiratory gating using various dosimetric analysis parameters. We will compare dosimetric plans at end expiration, end inspiration and deep inspiration with dosimetric plan in free-breathing condition. This will allow us to establish the best respiratory phase to irradiate for each gating system. This dosimetric study will be completed with linear quadratic equivalent uniform dose (E.U.D.) calculation for each volume of interest. Previously, we will do a theoretical study of histogram dose volume gradation to point up its use. (author)

  8. Dosimetric impact of gastrointestinal air column in radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Neil C; Corn, Jonathan B; Ewing, Marvene M; Cardenes, Higinia R; Das, Indra J

    2018-02-01

    Dosimetric evaluation of air column in gastrointestinal (GI) structures in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of pancreatic cancer. Nine sequential patients were retrospectively chosen for dosimetric analysis of air column in the GI apparatus in pancreatic cancer using cone beam CT (CBCT). The four-dimensional CT (4DCT) was used for target and organs at risk (OARs) and non-coplanar IMRT was used for treatment. Once a week, these patients underwent CBCT for air filling, isocentre verification and dose calculations retrospectively. Abdominal air column variation was as great as ±80% between weekly CBCT and 4DCT. Even with such a large air column in the treatment path for pancreatic cancer, changes in anteroposterior dimension were minimal (2.8%). Using IMRT, variations in air column did not correlate dosimetrically with large changes in target volume. An average dosimetric deviation of mere -3.3% and a maximum of -5.5% was observed. CBCT revealed large air column in GI structures; however, its impact is minimal for target coverage. Because of the inherent advantage of segmentation in IMRT, where only a small fraction of a given beam passes through the air column, this technique might have an advantage over 3DCRT in treating upper GI malignancies where the daily air column can have significant impact. Advances in knowledge: Radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer has significant challenges due to positioning, imaging of soft tissues and variability of air column in bowels. The dosimetric impact of variable air column is retrospectively studied using CBCT. Even though, the volume of air column changes by ± 80%, its dosimetric impact in IMRT is minimum.

  9. No benefit of adjuvant Fluorouracil Leucovorin chemotherapy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cancer of the rectum (LARC): Long term results of a randomized trial (I-CNR-RT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainato, Aldo; Cernusco Luna Nunzia, Valentina; Valentini, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Antonino; Maurizi, Enrici Riccardo; Lupattelli, Marco; Aristei, Cynthia; Vidali, Cristiana; Conti, Monica; Galardi, Alessandra; Ponticelli, Pietro; Friso, Maria Luisa; Iannone, Tiziana; Osti, Falchetto Mattia; Manfredi, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NACT-RT). The study was funded by the Italian National Research Council (CNR). Methods: From September 1992 to January 2001, 655 patients with LARC (clinically T3–4, any N) treated with NACT-RT and surgery, were randomized in two arms: follow-up (Arm A) or 6 cycles of ACT with 5 fluorouracil (5FU)-Folinic Acid (Arm B). NACT-RT consisted of 45 Gy/28/ff concurrent with 5FU (350 mg/sqm) and Folinic Acid (20 mg/sqm) on days 1–5 and 29–33; surgery was performed after 4–6 weeks. Median follow up was 63·7 months. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results: 634/655 patients were evaluable (Arm A 310, Arm B 324); 92·5% of Arm A and 91% of Arm B patients received the preoperative treatment as in the protocol; 294 patients of Arm A (94·8%) and 296 of Arm B (91·3%) underwent a radical resection; complete pathologic response and overall downstaging rates did not show any significant difference in the two arms. 83/297 (28%) patients in Arm B, never started ACT. Five year OS and DFS did not show any significant difference in the two treatment arms. Distant metastases occurred in 62 patients (21%) in Arm A and in 58 (19·6%) in Arm B. Conclusions: In patients with LARC treated with NACT-RT, the addition of ACT did not improve 5 year OS and DFS and had no impact on the distant metastasis rate

  10. Dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yun; Catalano, Suzanne; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David S.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Overall, 11 lung SBRT patients (8 female and 3 male; mean age: 75.0 years) with medially located tumors were included. Treatment plans with simulated rotational offsets of 1°, 3°, and 5° in roll, yaw, and pitch were generated and compared with the original plans. Both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations were investigated. The following dosimetric metrics were quantitatively evaluated: planning target volume coverage (PTV V 100% ), max PTV dose (PTV D max ), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc of cord (cord D 0.35 cc ), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc and 5 cc of esophagus (esophagus D 0.35 cc and D 5 cc ), and volume of the lungs receiving at least 20 Gy (lung V 20 ). Statistical significance was tested using Wilcoxon signed rank test at the significance level of 0.05. Overall, small differences were found in all dosimetric matrices at all rotational offsets: 95.6% of differences were 100% , PTV D max , cord D 0.35 cc , esophagus D 0.35 cc , esophagus D 5 cc , and lung V 20 was − 8.36%, − 6.06%, 11.96%, 8.66%, 6.02%, and − 0.69%, respectively. No significant correlation was found between any dosimetric change and tumor-to-cord/esophagus distances (R 2 range: 0 to 0.44). Larger dosimetric changes and intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets. Small dosimetric differences were found owing to rotational offsets up to 5° in lung SBRT for medially located tumors. Larger intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets

  11. Patient feature based dosimetric Pareto front prediction in esophageal cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Jin, Xiance; Zhao, Kuaike; Peng, Jiayuan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Junchao; Zhang, Zhen; Studenski, Matthew; Hu, Weigang

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of the dosimetric Pareto front (PF) prediction based on patient's anatomic and dosimetric parameters for esophageal cancer patients. Eighty esophagus patients in the authors' institution were enrolled in this study. A total of 2928 intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were obtained and used to generate PF for each patient. On average, each patient had 36.6 plans. The anatomic and dosimetric features were extracted from these plans. The mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose (MHD), spinal cord max dose, and PTV homogeneity index were recorded for each plan. Principal component analysis was used to extract overlap volume histogram (OVH) features between PTV and other organs at risk. The full dataset was separated into two parts; a training dataset and a validation dataset. The prediction outcomes were the MHD and MLD. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the anatomical features and dosimetric features. The stepwise multiple regression method was used to fit the PF. The cross validation method was used to evaluate the model. With 1000 repetitions, the mean prediction error of the MHD was 469 cGy. The most correlated factor was the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV and the overlap between heart and PTV in Z-axis. The mean prediction error of the MLD was 284 cGy. The most correlated factors were the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV and the overlap between lung and PTV in Z-axis. It is feasible to use patients' anatomic and dosimetric features to generate a predicted Pareto front. Additional samples and further studies are required improve the prediction model.

  12. Italia/Chile Collaboration for LARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storini, M.; Cordaro, E.G.

    1997-01-01

    An Antarctic Laboratory for Cosmic Rays (LARC) has been opened on the King George Island (Fildes Bay - Ardley Cove) during January 1991. The cosmic-ray detector is a standard 6-NM-64 type. The present status of the LARC project and relevant scientific goals for Solar-Terrestrial Physics are briefly outlined

  13. Dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yun; Catalano, Suzanne; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yoo, David S.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu

    2014-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate dosimetric effects of rotational offsets in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Overall, 11 lung SBRT patients (8 female and 3 male; mean age: 75.0 years) with medially located tumors were included. Treatment plans with simulated rotational offsets of 1°, 3°, and 5° in roll, yaw, and pitch were generated and compared with the original plans. Both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations were investigated. The following dosimetric metrics were quantitatively evaluated: planning target volume coverage (PTV V{sub 100%}), max PTV dose (PTV D{sub max}), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc of cord (cord D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}), percentage prescription dose to 0.35 cc and 5 cc of esophagus (esophagus D{sub 0.35} {sub cc} and D{sub 5} {sub cc}), and volume of the lungs receiving at least 20 Gy (lung V{sub 20}). Statistical significance was tested using Wilcoxon signed rank test at the significance level of 0.05. Overall, small differences were found in all dosimetric matrices at all rotational offsets: 95.6% of differences were < 1% or < 1 Gy. Of all rotational offsets, largest change in PTV V{sub 100%}, PTV D{sub max}, cord D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}, esophagus D{sub 0.35} {sub cc}, esophagus D{sub 5} {sub cc}, and lung V{sub 20} was − 8.36%, − 6.06%, 11.96%, 8.66%, 6.02%, and − 0.69%, respectively. No significant correlation was found between any dosimetric change and tumor-to-cord/esophagus distances (R{sup 2} range: 0 to 0.44). Larger dosimetric changes and intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets. Small dosimetric differences were found owing to rotational offsets up to 5° in lung SBRT for medially located tumors. Larger intersubject variations were observed at larger rotational offsets.

  14. Dosimetric Evaluation of Automatic Segmentation for Adaptive IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Stuart Y.; Hwang, Andrew; Weinberg, Vivian; Yom, Sue S.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Xia Ping

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive planning to accommodate anatomic changes during treatment requires repeat segmentation. This study uses dosimetric endpoints to assess automatically deformed contours. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with head-and-neck cancer had adaptive plans because of anatomic change during radiotherapy. Contours from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) were deformed to the mid-treatment CT using an intensity-based free-form registration algorithm then compared with the manually drawn contours for the same CT using the Dice similarity coefficient and an overlap index. The automatic contours were used to create new adaptive plans. The original and automatic adaptive plans were compared based on dosimetric outcomes of the manual contours and on plan conformality. Results: Volumes from the manual and automatic segmentation were similar; only the gross tumor volume (GTV) was significantly different. Automatic plans achieved lower mean coverage for the GTV: V95: 98.6 ± 1.9% vs. 89.9 ± 10.1% (p = 0.004) and clinical target volume: V95: 98.4 ± 0.8% vs. 89.8 ± 6.2% (p 3 of the spinal cord 39.9 ± 3.7 Gy vs. 42.8 ± 5.4 Gy (p = 0.034), but no difference for the remaining structures. Conclusions: Automatic segmentation is not robust enough to substitute for physician-drawn volumes, particularly for the GTV. However, it generates normal structure contours of sufficient accuracy when assessed by dosimetric end points.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of tomography and four-box field conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mina; Lee, Hyo Chun; Chung, Mi Joo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Jeon, Dong Min; Cheon, Geum Seong

    2013-01-01

    To report the results of dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using Tomotherapy and four-box field conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for pelvic irradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. Twelve patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received a short course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (25 Gy in 5 fractions) on the pelvis using Tomotherapy, between July 2010 and December 2010, were selected. Using their simulation computed tomography scans, Tomotherapy and four-box field CRT plans with the same dose schedule were evaluated, and dosimetric parameters of the two plans were compared. For the comparison of target coverage, we analyzed the mean dose, Vn Gy, Dmin, Dmax, radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and radiation conformity index (RCI). For the comparison of organs at risk (OAR), we analyzed the mean dose. Tomotherapy showed a significantly higher mean target dose than four-box field CRT (p 0.001). But, V26.25 Gy and V27.5 Gywere not significantly different between the two modalities. Tomotherapy showed higher Dmax and lower Dmin. The Tomotherapy plan had a lower rDHI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.000). Tomotherapy showed better RCI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.007). For OAR, the mean irradiated dose was significantly lower in Tomotherapy than four-box field CRT. In locally advanced rectal cancer, Tomotherapy delivers a higher conformal radiation dose to the target and reduces the irradiated dose to OAR than four-box field CRT.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of tomography and four-box field conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mina; Lee, Hyo Chun; Chung, Mi Joo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok; Jeon, Dong Min; Cheon, Geum Seong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To report the results of dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using Tomotherapy and four-box field conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for pelvic irradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. Twelve patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received a short course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (25 Gy in 5 fractions) on the pelvis using Tomotherapy, between July 2010 and December 2010, were selected. Using their simulation computed tomography scans, Tomotherapy and four-box field CRT plans with the same dose schedule were evaluated, and dosimetric parameters of the two plans were compared. For the comparison of target coverage, we analyzed the mean dose, Vn Gy, Dmin, Dmax, radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and radiation conformity index (RCI). For the comparison of organs at risk (OAR), we analyzed the mean dose. Tomotherapy showed a significantly higher mean target dose than four-box field CRT (p 0.001). But, V26.25 Gy and V27.5 Gywere not significantly different between the two modalities. Tomotherapy showed higher Dmax and lower Dmin. The Tomotherapy plan had a lower rDHI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.000). Tomotherapy showed better RCI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.007). For OAR, the mean irradiated dose was significantly lower in Tomotherapy than four-box field CRT. In locally advanced rectal cancer, Tomotherapy delivers a higher conformal radiation dose to the target and reduces the irradiated dose to OAR than four-box field CRT.

  17. Clinical and dosimetric predictors of acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya; Son, Christina H.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with hematologic toxicity (HT) during chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Materials and methods: We analyzed 120 rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant pelvic radiotherapy (PRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The coxal (ilium, ischium, and pubis) bone marrow (BM), sacral BM, and femoral BM were contoured and dose-volume parameters were extracted. Associations between cell count trend and clinical predictors were tested using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Associations between clinical variables, Vx (percentage volume receiving x Gy), and cell count ratio at nadir were tested using linear regression models. Results: Nadirs for white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and platelets (PLT) occurred in the second week of PRT and the fifth week for hemoglobin and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Using cell count ratio, patients treated with 3DCRT had a lower WBC ratio trend during PRT compared to patients treated with IMRT (p = 0.04), and patients ⩾59 years of age had a lower hemoglobin ratio trend during PRT (p = 0.02). Using absolute cell count, patients treated with 3DCRT had lower ANC cell count trend (p = 0.03), and women had lower hemoglobin cell count trend compared to men (p = 0.03). On univariate analysis, use of 3DCRT was associated with a lower WBC ratio at nadir (p = 0.02). On multiple regression analysis using dosimetric variables, coxal BM V45 (p = 0.03) and sacral BM V45 (p = 0.03) were associated with a lower WBC and ANC ratio at nadir, respectively. Conclusions: HT trends during PRT revealed distinct patterns: WBC, ANC, and PLT cell counts reach nadirs early and recover, while hemoglobin and ALC decline steadily. Patients who were treated with 3DCRT and older patients experienced lower cell count ratio trend during PRT. Dosimetric constraints using coxal BM V45 and sacral BM V45 can be considered

  18. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbina, G. L.; Garcia, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  19. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyan, Arthur; Chen, Josephine; Shugard, Erin; Lambert, Louise; Quivey, Jeanne M; Yom, Sue S

    2014-01-01

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Breast Conserving Treatment for Breast Cancer: Dosimetric Comparison of Sequential versus Simultaneous Integrated Photon Boost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Van Parijs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation is widely accepted as standard of care for early breast cancer. Addition of a boost dose to the initial tumor area further reduces local recurrences. We investigated the dosimetric benefits of a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB compared to a sequential boost to hypofractionate the boost volume, while maintaining normofractionation on the breast. Methods. For 10 patients 4 treatment plans were deployed, 1 with a sequential photon boost, and 3 with different SIB techniques: on a conventional linear accelerator, helical TomoTherapy, and static TomoDirect. Dosimetric comparison was performed. Results. PTV-coverage was good in all techniques. Conformity was better with all SIB techniques compared to sequential boost (P = 0.0001. There was less dose spilling to the ipsilateral breast outside the PTVboost (P = 0.04. The dose to the organs at risk (OAR was not influenced by SIB compared to sequential boost. Helical TomoTherapy showed a higher mean dose to the contralateral breast, but less than 5 Gy for each patient. Conclusions. SIB showed less dose spilling within the breast and equal dose to OAR compared to sequential boost. Both helical TomoTherapy and the conventional technique delivered acceptable dosimetry. SIB seems a safe alternative and can be implemented in clinical routine.

  1. Breast conserving treatment for breast cancer: dosimetric comparison of sequential versus simultaneous integrated photon boost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Parijs, Hilde; Reynders, Truus; Heuninckx, Karina; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation is widely accepted as standard of care for early breast cancer. Addition of a boost dose to the initial tumor area further reduces local recurrences. We investigated the dosimetric benefits of a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) compared to a sequential boost to hypofractionate the boost volume, while maintaining normofractionation on the breast. For 10 patients 4 treatment plans were deployed, 1 with a sequential photon boost, and 3 with different SIB techniques: on a conventional linear accelerator, helical TomoTherapy, and static TomoDirect. Dosimetric comparison was performed. PTV-coverage was good in all techniques. Conformity was better with all SIB techniques compared to sequential boost (P = 0.0001). There was less dose spilling to the ipsilateral breast outside the PTVboost (P = 0.04). The dose to the organs at risk (OAR) was not influenced by SIB compared to sequential boost. Helical TomoTherapy showed a higher mean dose to the contralateral breast, but less than 5 Gy for each patient. SIB showed less dose spilling within the breast and equal dose to OAR compared to sequential boost. Both helical TomoTherapy and the conventional technique delivered acceptable dosimetry. SIB seems a safe alternative and can be implemented in clinical routine.

  2. Patient-based dosimetric comparison of interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Anil K.; Julka, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.; Rustogi, Ashish; Subramani, V.; Prabhakar, R.; Rath, G.K.; Semwal, Manoj K.; Thulkar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the form of High Dose Rate (HDR) intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) along with external beam radiotherapy(EBRT) is the main treatment in cancer cervix. Of late, some large centres have started practicing template based transperineal interstitial brachytherapy (TIB) for advanced/ bulky cancer cervix. Usually, TIB is given for patients with advanced disease/ distorted anatomy or recurrent disease for better lateral target coverage. CT/MRI/USG based planning has made volumetric dosimetry possible for the target and the organs at risk (OARs). This has resulted in better correlation between dose received and treatment outcome in terms of tumour control and late toxicities as against the point dosimetry system. It has been shown by many studies that ICRU based point dose reporting may not represent the actual doses received by the OARs. Though it is expected that TIB gives better target coverage and OAR sparing in advanced/ bulky cancer cervix cases as compared to ICRT, detailed patient studies on the subject have not been reported. We have carried out dosimetric comparison between ICRT and TIB for cancer cervix patients undergoing treatment at our centre in terms of treated volume and doses to OARs

  3. Characterizing Interfraction Variations and Their Dosimetric Effects in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Cheng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Chen Guangpei; Anderson, Savannah; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively characterize the interfraction variations and their dosimetric effects in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 486 daily computed tomography (CT) sets acquired for 20 prostate cancer patients treated with daily CT-guided repositioning using a linear accelerator and CT-on-rail combination were analyzed. The prostate, rectum, and bladder, delineated on each daily CT data set, were compared with those from the planning CT scan. Several quantities, including Dice's coefficient and the maximal overlapping rate, were used to characterize the interfraction variations. The delivered dose was reconstructed by applying the original plan to the daily CT scan with consideration of proper repositioning. Results: The mean prostate Dice's coefficient and maximal overlapping rate after bony registration was 69.7% ± 13.8% (standard deviation) and 85.6% ± 7.8% (standard deviation), respectively. The daily delivered dose distributions were generally inferior to the planned dose distribution for target coverage and/or normal structure sparing. For example, for approximately 5% of the treatment fractions, the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose decreased dramatically (15-20%) compared with its planned value. The magnitudes of the interfraction variations and their dosimetric effects indicated that, statistically, current standard repositioning using prostate alignment might be adequate for two-thirds of the fractions, but for the rest of the fractions, better on-line correction strategies, such as on-line replanning, are needed. Conclusion: Different adaptive correction schemes for prostatic interfraction changes can be used according to the anatomic changes, as quantified by the organ displacement and deformation parameters. On-line replanning is needed for approximately one-third of the treatment fractions.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of 3DCRT versus IMRT in whole breast irradiation of early stage breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Ashraf

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The counseling regarding the treatment option is an important objective in the management of early stages breast cancer. In this study, we attempt to compare and analyze the dosimetric aspects of 3DRT over IMRT in the whole breast radiotherapy.Methods and Materials:  Both right and left sided computed tomography simulations of 14 women with early stage breast cancer were used for our retrospective study to compare the 3DCRT and IMRT. The dose prescribed was 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast PTV. The PTV was defined by adding unequal margins to the directional safety margin status of each lumpectomy cavity (i.e., medial, lateral, superior, inferior and deep margins measured from the tumor front after the examination of the surgical specimen: 2, 1.5, and 1 cm for resection margins < 1 cm, 1-2 cm, and > 2cm, respectively. And than modified so that it was no longer closer than 3mm to the skin surface and was no deep than the lung –chest interface. The prescribed dose delivered in 5 fractions per week schedule. Treatment plans were compared for target minimum dose, maximum dose, mean dose, conformity index, heterogeneity index and doses to organs at risk were compared and analysed.Results: The target coverage was achieved with 90% prescription to the 95% of the PTV. Conformity to the PTV was significantly higher with 3DCRT technique than IMRT. 3DCRT technique seems better in sparing critical organs parameters like lung V20 and Mean, heart, V25, Maximum, both lungs V20, Mean and Dose to the Normal Healthy tissue.Conclusion: We conclude from our study that treatment technique selection for whole Breast irradiation is an important factor in sparing the adjacent normal structures and in determining the associated risk. 3DCRT produces better conformity and heterogeneity indices of the target volume, also reduces dose to OARs the 3DCRT reduces the risk of radiation induced heart diseases

  5. Dosimetric Feasibility of Hypofractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Neoadjuvant Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Adams, Judith C; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Alexander, Brian M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of a 5 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) x 5 fraction proton radiotherapy schedule, before initiating a clinical trial of neoadjuvant, short-course proton radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: The first 9 pancreatic cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (1.8 Gy x 28) at the Massachusetts General Hospital had treatment plans generated using a 5 CGE x 5 fraction proton regimen. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Hypofractionated proton and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans both provided acceptable target volume coverage and dose homogeneity. Improved dose conformality provided by the hypofractionated proton regimen resulted in significant sparing of kidneys, liver, and small bowel, evidenced by significant reductions in the mean doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, to these structures. Kidney and liver sparing was most evident in low-dose regions (≤20% prescribed dose for both kidneys and ≤60% prescribed dose for liver). Improvements in small-bowel dosimetry were observed in high- and low-dose regions. Mean stomach and duodenum doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, were similar for the two techniques. Conclusions: A proton radiotherapy schedule consisting of 5 fractions of 5 CGE as part of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas seems dosimetrically feasible, providing excellent target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing. Hypofractionated proton radiotherapy in this setting merits Phase I clinical trial investigation

  6. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Van Gestel, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan w...

  7. Dosimetric benefit of adaptive re-planning in pancreatic cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongbao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.; Li, Nan; Jiang, Carrie [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Tian, Zhen [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gautier, Quentin; Zarepisheh, Masoud [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Jia, Xun [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) shows promise in unresectable pancreatic cancer, though this treatment modality has high rates of normal tissue toxicity. This study explores the dosimetric utility of daily adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT. We used a previously developed supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) to re-plan 10 patients with pancreas SBRT. Tumor and normal tissue contours were deformed from treatment planning computed tomographies (CTs) and transferred to daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans before re-optimizing each daily treatment plan. We compared the intended radiation dose, the actual radiation dose, and the optimized radiation dose for the pancreas tumor planning target volume (PTV) and the duodenum. Treatment re-optimization improved coverage of the PTV and reduced dose to the duodenum. Within the PTV, the actual hot spot (volume receiving 110% of the prescription dose) decreased from 4.5% to 0.5% after daily adaptive re-planning. Within the duodenum, the volume receiving the prescription dose decreased from 0.9% to 0.3% after re-planning. It is noteworthy that variation in the amount of air within a patient's stomach substantially changed dose to the PTV. Adaptive re-planning with pancreas SBRT has the ability to improve dose to the tumor and decrease dose to the nearby duodenum, thereby reducing the risk of toxicity.

  8. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles.

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  10. Dosimetric impact of image-guided 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Song, W; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify the impact of image-guided conformal radiation therapy (CRT) on the dose distribution by correcting patient setup uncertainty and inter-fraction tumour motion. This was a retrospective analysis that used five randomly selected prostate cancer patients that underwent approximately 15 computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation treatment course. The beam arrangement from the treatment plan was imported into each repeat CT study and the dose distribution was recalculated for the new beam setups. Various setup scenarios were then compared to assess the impact of image guidance on radiation treatment precision. These included (1) daily alignment to skin markers, thus representing a conventional beam setup without image guidance (2) alignment to bony anatomy for correction of daily patient setup error, thus representing on-line portal image guidance, and (3) alignment to the 'CTV of the day' for correction of inter-fraction tumour motion, thus representing on-line CT or ultrasound image guidance. Treatment scenarios (1) and (3) were repeated with a reduced CTV to PTV margin, where the former represents a treatment using small margins without daily image guidance. Daily realignment of the treatment beams to the prostate showed an average increase in minimum tumour dose of 1.5 Gy, in all cases where tumour 'geographic miss' without image guidance was apparent. However, normal tissue sparing did not improve unless the PTV margin was reduced. Daily realignment to the tumour combined with reducing the margin size by a factor of 2 resulted in an average escalation in tumour dose of 9.0 Gy for all five static plans. However, the prescription dose could be escalated by 13.8 Gy when accounting for changes in anatomy by accumulating daily doses using nonlinear image registration techniques. These results provide quantitative information on the effectiveness of image-guided radiation treatment of prostate cancer and demonstrate that

  11. Dosimetric effects of immobilization devices on SABR for lung cancer using VMAT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong In; Ye, Sung-Joon; Kim, Hak Jae; Park, Jong Min

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of immobilization devices on the dose distributions of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. A total of 30 patients who underwent SABR for lung cancer were selected retrospectively. Every patient was immobilized using Body Pro-Lok with a vacuum bag customized for each patient body shape. Structure sets were generated to include the patient body inside the body structure with and without the immobilization device. Dose distributions, with and without the immobilization device, were calculated using identical VMAT plans for each patient. Correlations between the change in dose-volumetric parameters and the MU fraction of photon beams penetrating through the immobilization device were analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficients (r). The maximum change in D95%, D100%, and the minimum, maximum and mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) due to the immobilization device were 5%, 7%, 4%, 5%, and 5%, respectively. The maximum changes in the maximum dose to the spinal cord, esophagus, heart, and trachea were 1.3 Gy, 0.9 Gy, 1 Gy, and 1.7 Gy, respectively. Strong correlations were observed between the changes in PTV D95%, the minimum, the maximum, and the mean dose to the PTV, the maximum dose to the esophagus and heart, and the MU fractions, showing values of r higher than 0.7. The decrease in dose to the target volume was considerable for lung SABR using VMAT technique, especially when MU fraction was large.

  12. Dosimetric predictors of radiation-induced pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Ichiro; Watanabe, Shigenobu [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa-prefecture (Japan); Sakamaki, Kentaro [Yokohama City University, Department of Biostatistics, Yokohama City University, Yokohama (Japan); Ogino, Yuka [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Systems and Control Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Kunisaki, Chikara [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kimura, Kazuo [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the dose-volume parameters of the pericardium and heart in order to reduce the risk of radiation-induced pericardial effusion (PE) and symptomatic PE (SPE) in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. In 86 of 303 esophageal cancer patients, follow-up CT was obtained at least 24 months after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Correlations between clinical factors, including risk factors for cardiac disease, dosimetric factors, and the incidence of PE and SPE after radiotherapy were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Significant dosimetric factors with the highest hazard ratios were investigated using zones separated according to their distance from esophagus. PE developed in 49 patients. Univariate analysis showed the mean heart dose, heart V{sub 5}-V{sub 55}, mean pericardium dose, and pericardium V{sub 5}-V{sub 50} to all significantly affect the incidence of PE. Additionally, body surface area was correlated with the incidence of PE in multivariate analysis. Grade 3 and 4 SPE developed in 5 patients. The pericardium V{sub 50} and pericardium D{sub 10} significantly affected the incidence of SPE. The pericardium V{sub 50} in patients with SPE ranged from 17.1 to 21.7%. Factors affecting the incidence of SPE were the V{sub 50} of the pericardium zones within 3 cm and 4 cm of the esophagus. A wide range of radiation doses to the heart and pericardium were related to the incidence of PE. A pericardium V{sub 50} ≤ 17% is important to avoid symptomatic PE in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Dosis-Volumen-Parameter fuer Perikard und Herz zur Risikoreduzierung eines strahleninduzierten Perikardergusses (PE) und eines symptomatischen PE (SPE) bei mit kombinierter Strahlenchemotherapie behandelten Speiseroehrenkrebspatienten. Bei 86 von 303 Speiseroehrenkrebspatienten wurde mindestens 24 Monate nach der Strahlenchemotherapie ein Kontroll

  13. Matched-pair analysis and dosimetric variations of two types of software for interstitial permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi, E-mail: hishiyam@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuji [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanji, Susumu [Department of Urology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Uemae, Mineko [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether identical dosimetric results could be achieved using different planning software for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Data from 492 patients treated with brachytherapy were used for matched-pair analysis. Interplant and Variseed were used as software for ultrasound-based treatment planning. Institution, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, prostate volume, and source strength were used for factors to match the 2 groups. The study population comprised of 126 patients with treatment planning using Interplant software and 127 matched patients using Variseed software. Dosimetric results were compared between the 2 groups. The Variseed group showed significantly higher values for dose covering 90% of prostate volume (pD90), prostate volume covered by 150% of prescription dose (pV150), and dose covering 30% of the urethra (uD30) compared with the Interplant group. Our results showed that use of different software could lead to different dosimetric results, which might affect the clinical outcomes.

  14. A Dosimetric Comparison of Dose Escalation with Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many studies have demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose is associated with improved outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We performed a dosimetric planning study to assess the dosimetric feasibility of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in locally advanced NSCLC. Methods. We enrolled twenty patients. Five different dose plans were generated for each patient. All plans were prescribed a dose of 60 Gy to the planning tumor volume (PTV. In the three SIB groups, the prescribed dose was 69 Gy, 75 Gy, and 81 Gy in 30 fractions to the internal gross tumor volume (iGTV. Results. The SIB-IMRT plans were associated with a significant increase in the iGTV dose (P < 0.05, without increased normal tissue exposure or prolonged overall treatment time. Significant differences were not observed in the dose to the normal lung in terms of the V5 and V20 among the four IMRT plans. The maximum dose (Dmax in the esophagus moderately increased along with the prescribed dose (P < 0.05. Conclusions. Our results indicated that escalating the dose by SIB-IMRT is dosimetrically feasible; however, systematic evaluations via clinical trials are still warranted. We have designed a further clinical study (which is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02841228.

  15. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  16. Individualized margins in 3D conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer: analysis of physiological movements and their dosimetric impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, François; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, André

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

  17. Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, Francois; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage

  18. Can dosimetric parameters predict acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Juefeng; Liu, Kaitai; Li, Kaixuan; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Ninety-three rectal cancer patients receiving concurrent capecitabine and pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were analyzed. Pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium, and lower pelvis (LP). The volume of each site receiving 5–40 Gy (V 5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) as well as patient baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. The endpoint for hematologic toxicity was grade ≥ 2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze correlation between dosimetric parameters and grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Twenty-four in ninety-three patients experienced grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Only the dosimetric parameter V40 of lumbosacral spine was correlated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Increased pelvic lumbosacral spine V40 (LSS-V40) was associated with an increased grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity (p = 0.041). Patients with LSS-V40 ≥ 60 % had higher rates of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than did patients with lumbosacral spine V40 < 60 % (38.3 %, 18/47 vs.13 %, 6/46, p =0.005). On univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, lumbosacral spine V40 and gender was also the variable associated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Female patients were observed more likely to have grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than male ones (46.9 %, 15/32 vs 14.8 %, 9/61, p =0.001). Lumbosacral spine -V40 was associated with clinically significant grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Keeping the lumbosacral spine -V40 < 60 % was associated with a 13 % risk of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  19. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc-therapy for non-anaplastic thyroid cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Jonathan; Vieillevigne, Laure; Boyrie, Sabrina; Ouali, Monia; Filleron, Thomas; Rives, Michel; Laprie, Anne

    2014-11-26

    To evaluate and compare dosimetric parameters of volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for non-anaplastic thyroid cancer adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients with non-anaplastic thyroid cancer at high risk of local relapse received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy with curative intent in our institution, using a two-dose level prescription with a simultaneous integrated boost approach. Each patient was re-planned by the same physicist twice using both VMAT and HT. Several dosimetric quality indexes were used: target coverage index (proportion of the target volume covered by the reference isodose), healthy tissue conformity index (proportion of the reference isodose volume including the target volume), conformation number (combining both previous indexes), Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and homogeneity index ((D2%-D98%)/prescribed dose). Dose-volume histogram statistics were also compared. HT provided statistically better target coverage index and homogeneity index for low risk PTV in comparison with VMAT (respectively 0.99 vs. 0.97 (p=0.008) and 0.22 vs. 0.25 (p=0.016)). However, HT provided poorer results for healthy tissue conformity index, conformation number and DSC with low risk and high risk PTV. As regards organs at risk sparing, by comparison with VMAT, HT statistically decreased the D2% to medullary canal (25.3 Gy vs. 32.6 Gy (p=0.003)). Besides, HT allowed a slight sparing dose for the controlateral parotid (Dmean: 4.3 Gy vs. 6.6 Gy (p=0.032)) and for the controlateral sub-maxillary gland (Dmean: 29.1 Gy vs. 33.1 Gy (p=0.041)). Both VMAT and HT techniques for adjuvant treatment of non-anaplastic thyroid cancer provide globally attractive treatment plans with slight dosimetric differences. However, helical tomotherapy clearly provides a benefit in term of medullary canal sparing.

  20. Dosimetric Study of Pelvic Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Vargas, Carlos; Morris, Christopher G.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Yeung, Daniel; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions in targeted tissues (prostate, seminal vesicles, pelvic regional nodes) and nontargeted tissues in the pelvis with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and forward-planned, double-scattered, three-dimensional proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT). Methods and Materials: IMRT, IMRT followed by a prostate 3D-PRT boost (IMRT/3D-PRT), and 3D-PRT plans were created for 5 high-risk prostate cancer patients (n = 15 plans). A 78-CGE/Gy dose was prescribed to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles and a 46-CGE/Gy was prescribed to the pelvic nodes. Various dosimetric endpoints were compared. Results: Target coverage of the prostate and nodal planning target volumes was adequate for all three plans. Compared with the IMRT and IMRT/3D-PRT plans, the 3D-PRT plans reduced the mean dose to the rectum, rectal wall, bladder, bladder wall, small bowel, and pelvis. The relative benefit of 3D-PRT (vs IMRT) at reducing the rectum and rectal wall V5-V40 was 53% to 71% (p < 0.05). For the bladder and bladder wall, the relative benefit for V5 to V40 CGE/Gy was 40% to 63% (p < 0.05). The relative benefit for reducing the volume of small bowel irradiated from 5 to 30 CGE/Gy in the 3D-PRT ranged from 62% to 69% (p < 0.05). Use of 3D-PRT did not produce the typical low-dose 'bath' of radiation to the pelvis seen with IMRT. Femoral head doses were higher for the 3D-PRT. Conclusions: Use of 3D-PRT significantly reduced the dose to normal tissues in the pelvis while maintaining adequate target coverage compared with IMRT or IMRT/3D-PRT. When treating the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes in prostate cancer, proton therapy may improve the therapeutic ratio beyond what is possible with IMRT.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie; Archambault, Louis

    2015-12-01

    The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7-13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. The minimum daily prostate D95% is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D95% remains constant across the strategies, except for the gradient approach

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D 95% is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D 95% remains constant across the strategies

  3. Effect of stereotactic dosimetric end points on overall survival for Stage I non–small cell lung cancer: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulryan, Kathryn; Leech, Michelle; Forde, Elizabeth, E-mail: eforde@tcd.ie

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivers a high biologically effective dose while minimizing toxicities to surrounding tissues. Within the scope of clinical trials and local practice, there are inconsistencies in dosimetrics used to evaluate plan quality. The purpose of this critical review was to determine if dosimetric parameters used in SBRT plans have an effect on local control (LC), overall survival (OS), and toxicities. A database of relevant trials investigating SBRT for patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer was compiled, and a table of dosimetric variables used was created. These parameters were compared and contrasted for LC, OS, and toxicities. Dosimetric end points appear to have no effect on OS or LC. Incidences of rib fractures correlate with a lack of dose-volume constraints (DVCs) reported. This review highlights the great disparity present in clinical trials reporting dosimetrics, DVCs, and toxicities for lung SBRT. Further evidence is required before standard DVCs guidelines can be introduced. Dosimetric end points specific to stereotactic treatment planning have been proposed but require further investigation before clinical implementation.

  4. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digesu, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  5. Applicability and dosimetric impact of ultrasound-based preplanning in high-dose-rate brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aebersold, D.M.; Isaak, B.; Behrensmeier, F.; Kolotas, C.; Mini, R.; Greiner, R.H.; Thalmann, G.; Kranzbuehler, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: analyses of permanent brachytherapy seed implants of the prostate have demonstrated that the use of a preplan may lead to a considerable decrease of dosimetric implant quality. The authors aimed to determine whether the same drawbacks of preplanning also apply to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients and methods: 15 patients who underwent two separate HDR brachytherapy implants in addition to external-beam radiation therapy for advanced prostate cancer were analyzed. A pretherapeutic transrectal ultrasound was performed in all patients to generate a preplan for the first brachytherapy implant. For the second brachytherapy, a subset of patients were treated by preplans based on the ultrasound from the first brachytherapy implant. Preplans were compared with the respective postplans assessing the following parameters: coverage index, minimum target dose, homogeneity index, and dose exposure of organs at risk. The prostate geometries (volume, width, height, length) were compared as well. Results: at the first brachytherapy, the matching between the preplan and actual implant geometry was sufficient in 47% of the patients, and the preplan could be applied. The dosimetric implant quality decreased considerably: the mean coverage differed by -0.11, the mean minimum target dose by -0.15, the mean homogeneity index by -0.09. The exposure of organs at risk was not substantially altered. At the second brachytherapy, all patients could be treated by the preplan; the differences between the implant quality parameters were less pronounced. The changes of prostate geometry between preplans and postplans were considerable, the differences in volume ranging from -8.0 to 13.8 cm 3 and in dimensions (width, height, length) from -1.1 to 1.0 cm. Conclusion: preplanning in HDR brachytherapy of the prostate is associated with a substantial decrease of dosimetric implant quality, when the preplan is based on a pretherapeutic ultrasound. The implant quality

  6. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs and mixed-energy plans (MEPs were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV energy for both the primary and boost plans. Second, the MEPs were created using 16 MV energy for the primary plan and 6 MV energy for the boost plan. The primary and boost MEPs used identical beam parameters and same dose optimization values as in the primary and boost SEPs for the corresponding case. The dosimetric parameters from the composite plans (SEPs and MEPs were evaluated. Results: The dose to the target volume was slightly higher (on average <1% in the SEPs than in the MEPs. The conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI values between the SEPs and MEPs were comparable. The dose to rectum and bladder was always higher in the SEPs (average difference up to 3.7% for the rectum and up to 8.4% for the bladder than in the MEPs. The mean dose to femoral heads was higher by about 0.8% (on average in the MEPs than in the SEPs. The number of monitor units and integral dose were higher in the SEPs compared to the MEPs by average differences of 9.1% and 5.5%, respectively.Conclusion: The preliminary results from this study suggest that use of mixed-energy VMAT plan for high-risk prostate cancer could potentially reduce the integral dose and minimize the dose to rectum and bladder, but for the higher femoral head dose.-----------------------------------------------Cite this article as:Pokharel S. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:01011.DOI: http

  7. Dosimetric analysis of urethral strictures following HDR 192Ir brachytherapy as monotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez, Patricia; Mullassery, Vinod; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Robert; Alonzi, Roberto; Lowe, Gerry; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate dosimetric parameters related to urethral strictures following high dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) alone for prostate cancer. Material and methods: Ten strictures were identified in 213 patients treated with HDRBT alone receiving 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in 3 fractions or 26 Gy in 2 fractions. A matched-pair analysis used 2 controls for each case matched for dose fractionation schedule, pre-treatment IPSS score, number of needles used and clinical target volume. The urethra was divided into membranous urethra and inferior, mid and superior thirds of the prostatic urethra. Results: Stricture rates were 3% in the 34 Gy group, 4% in the 36 Gy group, 6% in the 31.5 Gy group and 4% in the 26 Gy group. The median time to stricture formation was 26 months (range 8–40). The dosimetric parameters investigated were not statistically different between cases and controls. No correlation was seen between stricture rate and fractionation schedule. Conclusions: Urethral stricture is an infrequent complication of prostate HDRBT when used to deliver high doses as sole treatment, with an overall incidence in this cohort of 10/213 (4.7%). In a matched pair analysis no association with dose schedule or urethral dosimetry was identified, but the small number of events limits definitive conclusions

  8. A dosimetric comparison between traditionally planned and inverse planned radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, V.W.C.; Sham, J.S.T.; Kwong, D.L.W.

    2003-01-01

    This study applied inverse planning in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and evaluated its dosimetric results by comparison with the forward planning of 3DCRT and inverse planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For each of the 15 NSCLC patients recruited, the forward 3DCRT, inverse 3DCRT and inverse EVIRT plans were produced using the FOCUS treatment planning system. The dosimetric results and the planner's time of all treatment plans were recorded and compared. The inverse 3DCRT plans demonstrated the best target dose homogeneity among the three planning methods. The tumour control probability of the inverse 3DCRT plans was similar to the forward plans (p 0.217) but inferior to the IMRT plans (p < 0.001). A similar pattern was observed in uncomplicated tumour control. The average planning time for the inverse 3DCRT plans was the shortest and its difference was significant compared with the forward 3DCRT plans (p < 0.001) but not with the IMRT plans (p = 0.276). In conclusion, inverse planning for 3DCRT is a reasonable alternative to the forward planning for NSCLC patients with a reduction of the planner's time. However, further dose escalation and improvement of tumour control have to rely on IMRT. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  9. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  10. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  11. Dosimetric effects of the prone and supine positions on image guided localized prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bei; Lerma, Fritz A.; Patel, Shilpen; Amin, Pradip; Feng Yuanming; Yi, B.-Y.; Yu, Cedric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare target coverage and doses to rectum and bladder in IMRT of localized prostate cancer in the supine versus prone position, with the inclusion of image guidance. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage localized prostate carcinoma who received external beam radiotherapy in the supine and prone positions underwent approximately 10 serial CT examinations in their respective treatment position in non-consecutive days, except for one patient who was treated prone but serially imaged supine. The prostate, bladder and rectum were contoured on all CT scans. A PTV was generated on the first scan of each patient's CT series by expanding the prostate with a 5 mm margin and an IMRT plan was created. The resultant IMRT plan was then applied to that patient's remaining serial CT scans by aligning the initial CT image set with the subsequent serial CT image sets using (1) skin marks, (2) bony anatomy and (3) center of mass of the prostate. The dosimetric results from these three alignments were compared between the supine and prone groups. To account for the uncertainties associated with prostate delineation and intra-fractional geometric changes, a fictional 'daily PTV' was generated by expanding the prostate with a 3 mm margin on each serial CT scan. Thus, a more realistic target coverage index, V95, was quantified as the fraction of the daily PTV receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose. Dose-volume measures of the organs at risk were also compared. The fraction of the daily PTV contained by the initial PTV after each alignment method was quantified on each patient's serial CT scan, and is defined as PTV overlap index. Results: As expected, alignment based on skin marks yielded unacceptable dose coverage for both groups of patients. Under bony alignment, the target coverage index, V95, was 97.3% and 93.6% for prone and supine patients (p < 0.0001), respectively. The mean PTV overlap indices were 90.7% and 84.7% for prone and supine

  12. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  13. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  14. Is there room for combined modality treatments? Dosimetric comparison of boost strategies for advanced head and neck and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gora, Joanna; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Kuess, Peter; Paskeviciute, Brigita; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the dosimetric difference between three emerging treatment modalities-volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), intensity-modulated proton beam therapy (IMPT) and intensity-modulated carbon ion beam therapy (IMIT)-for two tumour sites where selective boosting of the tumour is applied. For 10 patients with locally advanced head and neck (H and N) cancer and 10 with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) a VMAT plan was generated for PTV initial that included lymph node regions, delivering 50 Gy (IsoE) for H and N and 50.4 Gy (IsoE) for PC patients. Furthermore, separate boost plans (VMAT, IMPT and IMIT) were created to boost PTV boost up to 70 Gy (IsoE) and 78 Gy (IsoE) for H and N and PC cases, respectively. Doses to brainstem, myelon, larynx and parotid glands were assessed for H and N cases. Additionally, various organs at risk (OARs) (e.g. cochlea, middle ear, masticator space) were evaluated that are currently discussed with respect to quality of life after treatment. For PC cases, bladder, rectum and femoral heads were considered as OARs. For both tumour sites target goals were easily met. Looking at OAR sparing, generally VMAT + VMAT was worst. VMAT + IMIT had the potential to spare some structures in very close target vicinity (such as cochlea, middle ear, masticator space) significantly better than VMAT + IMPT. Mean doses for rectal and bladder wall were on average 4 Gy (IsoE) and 1.5 Gy (IsoE) higher, respectively, compared to photons plus particles scenarios. Similar results were found for parotid glands and larynx. Concerning target coverage, no significant differences were observed between the three treatment concepts. Clear dosimetric benefits were observed for particle beam therapy as boost modality. However, the clinical benefit of combined modality treatments remains to be demonstrated. (author)

  15. Effect of photon-beam energy on VMAT and IMRT treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy for advanced prostate cancer

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    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany); Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-12-15

    The goal of the research was to evaluate treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans using 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams for prostate cancer including lymph nodes. In this retrospective study, VMAT and IMRT plans were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} treatment planning system (TPS) (V9.0) for 10 prostate cancer cases. Each plan consisted of two target volumes: PTV{sub B} included the prostate bed, PTV{sub PC+LN} contained PTV{sub B} and lymph nodes. For plan evaluation statistics, the homogeneity index, conformity index, mean doses, and near-max doses to organs at risk (OAR) were analyzed. Treatment time and number of monitor units were assessed to compare delivery efficiency. Dosimetric plan verification was performed with a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. Results: No differences were found for target and OAR parameters in low and high energy photon beam plans for both VMAT and IMRT. A slightly higher low dose volume was detected for 6 MV VMAT plans (normal tissue: D{sub mean} = 16.47 Gy) compared to 10 and 15 MV VMAT plans (D{sub mean} = 15.90 Gy and 15.74 Gy, respectively), similar to the findings in IMRT. In VMAT, > 96% of detector points passed the 3%/ 3 mm {gamma} criterion; marginally better accuracy was found in IMRT (> 97%). Conclusion: For static and rotational IMRT, 15 MV photons did not show advantages over 6 and 10 MV high energy photon beams in large volume pelvic plans. For the investigated TPS and linac combination, 10 MV photon beams can be used as the general purpose energy for intensity modulation.

  16. Neurovascular bundle–sparing radiotherapy for prostate cancer using MRI-CT registration: A dosimetric feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, R.J., E-mail: richardjcassidy@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yang, X.; Liu, T.; Thomas, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nour, S.G. [Department of Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, A.B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer remains an important late adverse toxicity. The neurovascular bundles (NVB) that lie posterolaterally to the prostate are typically spared during prostatectomy, but in traditional radiotherapy planning they are not contoured as an organ-at-risk with dose constraints. Our goal was to determine the dosimetric feasibility of “NVB-sparing” prostate radiotherapy while still delivering adequate dose to the prostate. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with prostate cancer (with no extraprostatic disease on pelvic magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) who that were treated with external beam radiotherapy, with the same primary planning target volume margins, to a dose of 79.2 Gy were evaluated. Pelvic MRI and simulation computed tomography scans were registered using dedicated software to allow for bilateral NVB target delineation on T2-weighted MRI. A volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated using the NVB bilaterally with 2 mm margin as an organ to spare and compared to the patient’s previously delivered plan. Dose-volume histogram endpoints for NVB, rectum, bladder, and planning target volume 79.2 were compared between the 2 plans using a 2-tailed paired t-test. Results: The V70 for the NVB was significantly lower on the NVB-sparing plan (p <0.01), while rectum and bladder endpoints were similar. Target V100% was similar but V{sub 105%} was higher for the NVB-sparing plans (p <0.01). Conclusions: “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is dosimetrically feasible using CT-MRI registration, and for volumetric modulated arc therapy technology — target coverage is acceptable without increased dose to other normal structures, but with higher target dose inhomogeneity. The clinical impact of “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is currently under study at our institution.

  17. Evaluating the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced changes in virally mediated head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Elizabeth; Owen, Rebecca; Mengersen, Kerrie; Harden, Fiona; Porceddu, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Patients with virally mediated head and neck cancer (VMHNC) often present with advanced nodal disease that is highly radioresponsive as demonstrated by tumour and nodal regression during treatment. The resultant changes may impact on the planned dose distribution and so adversely affect the therapeutic ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced anatomical changes in VMHNC patients who had undergone a replan. Thirteen patients with virally mediated oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal cancer who presented for definitive radiotherapy between 2005 and 2010 and who had a replan generated were investigated. The dosimetric effect of anatomical changes was quantified by comparing dose–volume histograms (DVH) of primary and nodal gross target volumes and organs at risk (OAR), including spinal cord and parotid glands, from the original plan and a comparison plan. Eleven three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and two intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were evaluated. Dose to the spinal cord and brainstem increased by 4.1% and 2.6%, respectively. Mean dose to the parotid glands also increased by 3.5%. In contrast, the dose received by 98% of the primary and nodal gross tumour volumes decreased by 0.15% and 0.3%, respectively, when comparing the initial treatment plan to the comparison plan. In this study, treatment-induced anatomical changes had the greatest impact on OAR dose with negligible effect on the dose to nodal gross tumour volumes. In the era of IMRT, accounting for treatment-induced anatomical changes is important as focus is placed on minimizing the acute and long-term side effects of treatment

  18. Organ motion study and dosimetric impact of respiratory gating radiotherapy for esophageal cancer; Etude de mobilite organique et impact dosimetrique de l'asservissement respiratoire dans la radiotherapie des cancers de l'oesophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorchel, F

    2007-04-15

    Chemoradiotherapy is now the standard treatment for locally advanced or inoperable esophageal carcinoma. In this indication, conformal radiotherapy is generally used. However, prognosis remains poor for these patients. Respiratory gating radiotherapy can decrease healthy tissues irradiation and allows escalation dose in lung, liver and breast cancer. In order to improve radiotherapy technique, we propose to study the feasibility of respiratory gating for esophageal cancer. We will study the respiratory motions of esophageal cancer to optimize target volume delineation, especially the internal margin (I.M.). We will test the correlation between tumour and chest wall displacements to prove that esophageal cancer motions are induced by respiration. This is essential before using free breathing respiratory gating systems. We will work out the dosimetric impact of respiratory gating using various dosimetric analysis parameters. We will compare dosimetric plans at end expiration, end inspiration and deep inspiration with dosimetric plan in free-breathing condition. This will allow us to establish the best respiratory phase to irradiate for each gating system. This dosimetric study will be completed with linear quadratic equivalent uniform dose (E.U.D.) calculation for each volume of interest. Previously, we will do a theoretical study of histogram dose volume gradation to point up its use. (author)

  19. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received ≥50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received ≤78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving ≥1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  20. Dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors on step and shoot IMRT for prostate cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, N.M.; Harper, C.S.; Wee, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The positional accuracy of multileaf collimators (MLC) is crucial in ensuring precise delivery of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this planning study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors on step and shoot IMRT of prostate cancer. A total of 12 perturbations of MLC leaf banks were introduced to six prostate IMRT treatment plans to simulate MLC systematic positional errors. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated for the extraction of dose endpoint parameters. Plans were evaluated in terms of changes to the defined endpoint dose parameters, conformity index (CI) and healthy tissue avoidance (HTA) to planning target volume (PTV), rectum and bladder. Negative perturbations of MLC had been found to produce greater changes to endpoint dose parameters than positive perturbations of MLC (p 9 5 of -1.2 and 0.9% respectively. Negative and positive synchronised MLC perturbations of I mm in one direction resulted in median changes in D 9 5 of -2.3 and 1.8% respectively. Doses to rectum were generally more sensitive to systematic MLC en-ors compared to bladder (p < 0.01). Negative and positive synchronised MLC perturbations of I mm in one direction resulted in median changes in endpoint dose parameters of rectum and bladder from 1.0 to 2.5%. Maximum reduction of -4.4 and -7.3% were recorded for conformity index (CI) and healthy tissue avoidance (HT A) respectively due to synchronised MLC perturbation of 1 mm. MLC errors resulted in dosimetric changes in IMRT plans for prostate. (author)

  1. Prediction of Radiation Esophagitis in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Clinical Factors, Dosimetric Parameters, and Pretreatment Cytokine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Hawkins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiation esophagitis (RE is a common adverse event associated with radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. While plasma cytokine levels have been correlated with other forms of radiation-induced toxicity, their association with RE has been less well studied. We analyzed data from 126 patients treated on 4 prospective clinical trials. Logistic regression models based on combinations of dosimetric factors [maximum dose to 2 cubic cm (D2cc and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD], clinical variables, and pretreatment plasma levels of 30 cytokines were developed. Cross-validated estimates of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC and log likelihood were used to assess prediction accuracy. Dose-only models predicted grade 3 RE with AUC values of 0.750 (D2cc and 0.727 (gEUD. Combining clinical factors with D2cc increased the AUC to 0.779. Incorporating pretreatment cytokine measurements, modeled as direct associations with RE and as potential interactions with the dose-esophagitis association, produced AUC values of 0.758 and 0.773, respectively. D2cc and gEUD correlated with grade 3 RE with odds ratios (ORs of 1.094/Gy and 1.096/Gy, respectively. Female gender was associated with a higher risk of RE, with ORs of 1.09 and 1.112 in the D2cc and gEUD models, respectively. Older age was associated with decreased risk of RE, with ORs of 0.992/year and 0.991/year in the D2cc and gEUD models, respectively. Combining clinical with dosimetric factors but not pretreatment cytokine levels yielded improved prediction of grade 3 RE compared to prediction by dose alone. Such multifactorial modeling may prove useful in directing radiation treatment planning.

  2. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Patrinee, Traisathit; Gestel, Dirk Van

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan was generated by applying the optimization parameters of the original treatment plan to the anatomy of the second CT scan. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose statistics of the hybrid plan and the adapted plan were compared. The mean volume of the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid gland decreased by 6.1 cm 3 (30.5%) and 5.4 cm 3 (24.3%), respectively. Compared with the hybrid plan, the adapted plan provided a higher dose to the target volumes with better homogeneity, and a lower dose to the organs at risk (OARs). The Dmin of all planning target volumes (PTVs) increased. The Dmax of the spinal cord and brainstem were lower in 94% of the patients (1.6-5.9 Gy, P < 0.001 and 2.1-9.9 Gy, P < 0.001, respectively). The D mean of the contralateral parotid decreased in 70% of the patients (range, 0.2-4.4 Gy). We could not find a relationship between dose variability and weight loss. Our two-phase adaptive IMRT protocol improves dosimetric results in terms of target volumes and OARs in patients with locally advanced NPC. (author)

  3. SU-E-J-169: The Dosimetric and Temporal Effects of Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouabhi, O; Gross, B; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and temporal effects of high dose rate treatment mode for respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients. Methods: Treatment plans from five lung cancer patients (3 nongated (Group 1), 2 gated at 80EX-80IN (Group 2)) were retrospectively evaluated. The maximum tumor motions range from 6–12 mm. Using the same planning criteria, four new treatment plans, corresponding to four gating windows (20EX–20IN, 40EX–40IN, 60EX–60IN, and 80EX–80IN), were generated for each patient. Mean tumor dose (MTD), mean lung dose (MLD), and lung V20 were used to assess the dosimetric effects. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to compute treatment time by considering gantry rotation time, time to position collimator leaves, dose delivery time (scaled relative to the gating window), and communication overhead. Treatment delivery time for each plan was estimated using a 500 MU/min dose rate for the original plans and a 1500 MU/min dose rate for the gated plans. Results: Differences in MTD were less than 1Gy across plans for all five patients. MLD and lung V20 were on average reduced between −16.1% to −6.0% and −20.0% to −7.2%, respectively for non-gated plans when compared with the corresponding gated plans, and between − 5.8% to −4.2% and −7.0% to −5.4%, respectively for plans originally gated at 80EX–80IN when compared with the corresponding 20EX-20IN to 60EX– 60IN gated plans. Treatment delivery times of gated plans using high dose rate were reduced on average between −19.7% (−1.9min) to −27.2% (−2.7min) for originally non-gated plans and −15.6% (−0.9min) to −20.3% (−1.2min) for originally 80EX-80IN gated plans. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients can reduce lung toxicity, while maintaining tumor dose. Using a gated high-dose-rate treatment, delivery time comparable to non-gated normal-dose-rate treatment can be achieved. This research is supported by Siemens

  4. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Kron, Tomas; Wilson, Lesley; Bressel, Mathias; Haworth, Annette; Hornby, Colin; Pham, Daniel; Cramb, Jim; Gill, Suki; Tai, Keen Hun

    2012-01-01

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  5. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer; Comparacion dosimetrica de las tecnicas de tratamiento IMRT y VMAT para cancer en mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, G. L. [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Maestria en Fisica Medica, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru); Garcia, B. G., E-mail: gerlup@hotmail.com [Red AUNA, Clinica Delgado, Av. Angamos Cdra. 4 esquina Gral. Borgono, Miraflores, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  6. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Higashimura, Kyoji; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ± 3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm(2) field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ± 3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124-358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42-94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5-9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. In the phantom evaluations, AXB and XVMC agreed better with

  7. Needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer evaluated by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Lizondo, Maria; Hokland, Steffen; Rylander, Susanne; Pedersen, Erik M; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    To quantify needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and propose a threshold for needle migration. Twenty-four high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with an HDR boost of 2 × 8.5 Gy were included. Patients received an MRI for planning (MRI1), before (MRI2), and after treatment (MRI3). Time from needle insertion to MRI3 was ∼3 hours. Needle migration was evaluated from coregistered images: MRI1-MRI2 and MRI1-MRI3. Dose volume histogram parameters from the treatment plan based on MRI1 were related to parameters based on needle positions in MRI2 or MRI3. Regression was used to model the average needle migration per implant and change in D90 clinical target volume, CTV prostate+3mm . The model fit was used for estimating the dosimetric impact in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy. Needle migration was on average 2.2 ± 1.8 mm SD from MRI1-MRI2 and 5.0 ± 3.0 mm SD from MRI1-MRI3. D90 CTV prostate+3mm was robust toward average needle migration ≤3 mm, whereas for migration >3 mm D90 decreased by 4.5% per mm. A 3 mm of needle migration resulted in a decrease of 0.9, 1.7, 2.3, 4.8, and 7.6 equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy, respectively. Substantial needle migration in high-dose-rate brachytherapy occurs frequently in 1-3 hours following needle insertion. A 3-mm threshold of needle migration is proposed, but 2 mm may be considered for dose levels ≥15 Gy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A dosimetric comparison of IORT techniques in limited-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairz, O.; Deutschmann, H.; Kopp, M.; Wurstbauer, K.; Kametriser, G.; Fastner, G.; Merz, F.; Sedlmayer, F.; Reitsamer, R.; Menzel, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving treatment four different techniques have been addressed: interstitial brachytherapy, an inflatable balloon with a central high-dose-rate source (MammoSite), a miniature orthovolt system (Intrabeam), and linac-based electron radiotherapy (IOERT). The dosimetric properties of these methods are compared. Material and methods: planning target volumes (PTVs) of the same size but of different shapes are assumed, corresponding to the technique's specific situs. Dose distributions for the PTVs and for surrounding tissues are demonstrated by dose-volume histograms and a list of physical parameters. A dose inhomogeneity index (DII) is introduced to describe the deviation of a delivered from the prescribed dose, reaching its minimal value 0 in case of perfect homogeneity. Results: in terms of DII, IOERT reaches the lowest value followed by the MammoSite, the Intrabeam and interstitial implants. The surrounding tissues receive the smallest average dose with IOERT, closely followed by the orthovolt system. Conclusion: when comparing simplified geometric figures, IOERT delivers the most homogeneous dose distributions. However, in clinical reality PTVs often present asymmetric shapes instead of ideal geometries. Due to a strictly centric dose fall-off, any system with a round central applicator will have technical limits. During IOERT margin-directed applicator guidance is possible and interstitial brachytherapy allows for polygonal dose shaping. These techniques seem to be superior for asymmetric PTV irradiation. (orig.)

  9. Dosimetric impacts of endorectal balloon in CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hong F; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Efstathiou, Jason A; Zietman, Anthony L; De Armas, Ricardo; Harris, Kathryn; Bloch, B Nicolas; Qureshi, Muhammad Mustafa; Keohan, Sean; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2017-05-01

    In SBRT for prostate cancer, higher fractional dose to the rectum is a major toxicity concern due to using smaller PTV margin and hypofractionation. We investigate the dosimetric impact on rectum using endorectal balloon (ERB) in prostate SBRT. Twenty prostate cancer patients were included in a retrospective study, ten with ERB and 10 without ERB. Optimized SBRT plans were generated on CyberKnife MultiPlan for 5 × 7.25 Gy to PTV under RTOG-0938 protocol for early-stage prostate cancer. For the rectum and the anterior half rectum, mean dose and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, 90%, and 100% prescription dose were compared. Using ERB, mean dose to the rectum was 62 cGy (P = 0.001) lower per fraction, and 50 cGy (P = 0.024) lower per fraction for the anterior half rectum. The average V 50% , V 80% , V 90% , and V 100% were lower by 9.9% (P = 0.001), 5.3% (P = 0.0002), 3.4% (P = 0.0002), and 1.2% (P = 0.005) for the rectum, and lower by 10.4% (P = 0.009), 8.3% (P = 0.0004), 5.4% (P = 0.0003), and 2.1% (P = 0.003) for the anterior half rectum. Significant reductions of dose to the rectum using ERB were observed. This may lead to improvement of the rectal toxicity profiles in prostate SBRT. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Radiotherapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: Dosimetric comparison and risk assessment of solid secondary cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sook [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Myung Hee [Dept. of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We compared the dosimetric parameters and the risk of solid secondary cancer from scattered doses among anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior parallel-opposed fields (AP/PA), anterior, posterior, right, and left lateral fields (4{sub f}ield), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) using noncoplanar beams, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy composed of 7 coplanar beams (IMRT{sub c}o) and 7 coplanar and noncoplanar beams (IMRT{sub n}on). We retrospectively generated 5 planning techniques for 5 patients with gastric MALToma. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and mean doses of the kidney and liver were calculated from the dose-volume histograms. Applied the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report to scattered doses, the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) was calculated to estimate the risk of solid secondary cancer. The best value of CI was obtained with IMRT, although the HI varied among patients. The mean kidney dose was the highest with AP/PA, followed by 4{sub f}ield, 3D-CRT, IMRT{sub c}o, and IMRT{sub n}on. On the other hand, the mean liver dose was the highest with 4{sub f}ield and the lowest with AP/PA. Compared with 4{sub f}ield, the LAR for 3D-CRT decreased except the lungs, and the LAR for IMRT{sub c}o and IMRT{sub n}on increased except the lungs. However, the absolute differences were much lower than <1%. Tailored RT techniques seem to be beneficial because it could achieve adjacent organ sparing with very small and clinically irrelevant increase of secondary solid cancer risk compared to the conventional techniques.

  11. Forward-planned intensity modulated radiation therapy using a cobalt source: A dosimetric study in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Cilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis evaluates the feasibility and dosimetric results of a simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment using a cobalt-therapy unit for post-operative breast cancer. Fourteen patients were included. Three plans per patient were produced by a cobalt-60 source: A standard plan with two wedged tangential beams, a standard tangential plan optimized without the use of wedges and a plan based on the forward-planned "field-in-field" IMRT technique (Co-FinF where the dose on each of the two tangential beams was split into two different segments and the two segments weight was determined with an iterative process. For comparison purposes, a 6-MV photon standard wedged tangential treatment plan was generated. D mean , D 98% , D 2% , V 95% , V 107%, homogeneity, and conformity indices were chosen as parameters for comparison. Co-FinF technique improved the planning target volume dose homogeneity compared to other cobalt-based techniques and reduced maximum doses (D 2% and high-dose volume (V 110% . Moreover, it showed a better lung and heart dose sparing with respect to the standard approach. The higher dose homogeneity may encourage the adoption of accelerated-hypofractionated treatments also with the cobalt sources. This approach can promote the spread of breast conservative treatment in developing countries.

  12. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ling-Ling; Feng, Lin-Chun; Wang, Yun-Lai; Dai, Xiang-Kun; Xie, Chuan-Bin

    2011-06-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. It is reported that HT plan for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can give better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the lung than IMRT plan. We compared the dosimetric characteristics of HT for NSCLC with those of conventional IMRT to observe the superiority of HT. There was a comparative case series comprising 10 patients with NSCLC. Computed tomographic (CT) images of delineated targets were transferred to the PrecisePlan planning system (IMRT) and Tomo planning system (HT). The prescription doses were 70 Gy/33F for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the visible lymph nodes (GTVnd), and 60 Gy/33F for the clinical target volume (CTV) and the clinical target volume of the visible lymph nodes (CTVnd). The dose restrictions for organs at risk were as follows: the maximum dose to spinal cord ≤ 45 Gy, V20 to the total lungs 0.05). The maximum doses to the spinal cord, heart, esophagus and trachea in the HT plan were lower than those in the IMRT plan, but the differences were not statistically significant. The HT plan provids better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the organs at risk. It can reduce the high-dose radiation volume for lung and the MLD, but may deliver a larger lung volume of low-dose radiation.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm 2 field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the phantom

  14. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, Eelco, E-mail: e.lens@amc.uva.nl; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V{sub 95%} >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 40Gy}, D{sub mean} and D{sub 2cc} for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D{sub 2cc} of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors.

  15. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lens, Eelco; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V 95% >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V 10Gy , V 20Gy , V 30Gy , V 40Gy , D mean and D 2cc for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D 2cc of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors

  16. Dosimetric Effect of Online Image-Guided Anatomical Interventions for Postprostatectomy Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diot, Quentin; Olsen, Christine; Kavanagh, Brian; Raben, David; Miften, Moyed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess daily variations in delivered doses in postprostatectomy patients, using kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) datasets acquired before and after interventions to correct for observed distortions in volume/shape of rectum and bladder. Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed were studied. For patients with large anatomical variations, quantified by either a rectal wall displacement of >5 mm or bladder volume change of >50% on the CBCT compared with the planning CT, an intervention was performed to adjust the rectum and/or bladder filling. Cumulative doses over the pre- and post-intervention fractions were calculated by tracking the position of the planning CT voxels on different CBCTs using a deformable surface-mapping algorithm. Dose and displacements vectors were projected on two-dimensional maps, the minimal dose received by the highest 95% of the planing target volume (PTV D95) and the highest 10% of the rectum volume (D10) as well as the bladder volume receiving >2 Gy (V2) were evaluated. Results: Of 544 fractions, 96 required intervention. Median (range) number of interventions per patient was 5 (2-12). Compared with the planning values, the mean (SD) pre- vs. postintervention value for PTV D95 was -2% (2%) vs. -1% (2%) (p < 0.12), for rectum D10 was -1% (4%) vs. +1% (4%) (p < 0.24), and for bladder V2 was +6% vs. +20% (p < 0.84). Conclusions: Interventions to reduce treatment volume deformations due to bladder and rectum fillings are not necessary when patients receive daily accurate CBCT localization, and the frequency of those potential interventions is low. However, for hypofractionated treatments, the relative frequency can significantly increase, and interventions can become more dosimetrically beneficial.

  17. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-01-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  18. Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Swallowing Organs Late Complication Probabilities and Dosimetric Correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for Stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing noninvolved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results: Seventy-three patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four Grade ≥2 cases (one of whom was feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (V D s), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the V D s for each organ intercorrelated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle, and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48±17 Gy in patients with, vs 27±12 in patients without strictures, p = 0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, toxic doses (TDs) 50 and TD 25 were 63 Gy and 56 Gy for PC, and 56 Gy and 39 Gy for GSL, respectively. For both PC and GSL, patient

  19. Dosimetric impact of interfraction catheter movement and organ motion on MRI/CT guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Felipe; Chang, Chang; Mesina, Carmen; Dixit, Nayha; Kevin Teo, Boon-Keng; Lin, Lilie L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of catheter movement for MRI/CT image guided high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for gynecologic cancers. Materials and methods: Ten patients were treated with HDR ISBT. The CTV and organs at risk were contoured using a postimplant MRI and CT. 5 fractions were delivered twice daily on 3 consecutive days. The first fraction was delivered on day 1 (d1), fraction 2–3 on d2 and fraction 4–5 on d3. MRI/CT was acquired prior to the second and fourth fractions. Four scenarios were modeled. (1) The d1 plan was applied to the d2 and d3 CT, using the updated catheter positions. (2) Replanning was performed for d2 and d3. (3) We applied the dwell positions/times from the d2 replan over the d3 CT and compared with a d3 CT replan. (4) Based on daily MRI, target volumes were recontoured and replanned. Dosimetry was analyzed for each plan and compared to the d1 dose distribution. Results: (1) When using the d1 plan on the d2 and d3 CT with the updated catheter positions, the mean CTV D90 was reduced from 93.4% on d1 to 89.3% (p = 0.08) on d2 and to 87.7% (p = 0.005) on d3. (2) Replanning on d2 and d3 compensated for catheter movement, mean CTV D90 of 95.4% on d2 and 94.6% (p = 0.36) on d3. (3) When compared to the replan of d2 applied on the d3 CT vs the d3 replan, there was no significant difference in coverage, mean CTV D90 of 90.9% (p = 0.09). (4) Reoptimization based on daily MRI, significantly improved the CTV coverage for each day. The mean D2 cc for the rectum was significantly higher with model 1 vs model 3 59.1 ± 4.7 vs 60.9 ± 4.8 (p = 0.04) Gy EQD2. There were no significant differences in D2 cc of bladder and sigmoid between models. Conclusions: Interfraction dosimetric changes significantly decreased the CTV coverage of the third day. Rather than replanning on each day, replanning on the day 2 CT before the second or third fraction would give an optimal solution that would compensate for

  20. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  1. Dosimetric intercomparison of permanent Ho-166 seed's implants and HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Trindade, Bruno; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comparative dosimetric analysis of permanent implants of Ho(166)-seeds and temporary HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy through computational simulation. Brachytherapy with Ir(192)-HDR or LDR based on temporary wires or permanent radioactive seed implants can be used as dose reinforcement for breast radiation therapy. Permanent breast implants have not been a practical clinical routine; although, I(125) and Pd(103)-seeds have already been reported. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. Simulations of implants of nine Ho(166)-seeds and equivalent with HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy were elaborated in MCNP5, shaped in a computational multivoxel simulator which reproduced a female thorax phantom. Spatial dose rate distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated. Protocol's analysis involving exposure time, seed's activities and dose were performed. Permanent Ho(166)-seed implants presented a maximum dose rate per unit of contained activity (MDR) of 1.1601 μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, a normalized MDR in standard points (8 mm, equidistant to 03-seeds - SP1, 10 mm - SP2) of 1.0% (SP1) and 0.5% (SP2), respectively. Ir(192)-brachytherapy presented MDR of 4.3945 × 10(-3) μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, 30% (SP1), and 20% (SP2). Therefore, seed's implant activities of 333 MBq (Ho(166)) and 259 GBq (Ir(192)) produced prescribed doses of 58 Gy (SP1; 5d) and 56 Gy (SP1, 5 fractions, 6 min), respectively. Breast Ho(166)-implants of 37-111 MBq are attractive due to the high dose rate near 6-10 mm from seeds, equivalent to Ir(192)-brachytherapy of 259 GBq (3 fractions, 6 min) providing similar dose in standard points at a week; however, with spatial dose distribution better confined. The seed positioning can be adjusted for controlling the breast tumor, in stages I and II, in flat and deep tumors, without any breast volumetric limitation.

  2. Dosimetric comparison of axilla and groin radiotherapy techniques for high-risk and locally advanced skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Zhou, Ying; Berry, Sean L.; Barker, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy targeting axilla and groin lymph nodes improves regional disease control in locally advanced and high-risk skin cancers. However, trials generally used conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), contributing towards relatively high rates of side effects from treatment. The goal of this study is to determine if three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may improve radiation delivery to the target while avoiding organs at risk in the clinical context of skin cancer regional nodal irradiation. Twenty patients with locally advanced/high-risk skin cancers underwent computed tomography simulation. The relevant axilla or groin planning target volumes and organs at risk were delineated using standard definitions. Paired t-tests were used to compare the mean values of several dose-volumetric parameters for each of the 4 techniques. In the axilla, the largest improvement for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT was for homogeneity index (13.9 vs. 54.3), at the expense of higher lung V 20 (28.0% vs. 12.6%). In the groin, the largest improvements for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT were for anorectum D max (13.6 vs. 38.9 Gy), bowel D 200cc (7.3 vs. 23.1 Gy), femur D 50 (34.6 vs. 57.2 Gy), and genitalia D max (37.6 vs. 51.1 Gy). IMRT had further improvements compared to 3D-CRT for humerus D mean (16.9 vs. 22.4 Gy), brachial plexus D 5 (57.4 vs. 61.3 Gy), bladder D 5 (26.8 vs. 36.5 Gy), and femur D 50 (18.7 vs. 34.6 Gy). Fewer differences were observed between IMRT and VMAT. Compared to 2D-RT and 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT had dosimetric advantages in the treatment of nodal regions of skin cancer patients

  3. Dosimetric comparison of axilla and groin radiotherapy techniques for high-risk and locally advanced skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Zhou, Ying; Berry, Sean L.; Barker, Christopher A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy targeting axilla and groin lymph nodes improves regional disease control in locally advanced and high-risk skin cancers. However, trials generally used conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), contributing towards relatively high rates of side effects from treatment. The goal of this study is to determine if three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may improve radiation delivery to the target while avoiding organs at risk in the clinical context of skin cancer regional nodal irradiation. Twenty patients with locally advanced/high-risk skin cancers underwent computed tomography simulation. The relevant axilla or groin planning target volumes and organs at risk were delineated using standard definitions. Paired t-tests were used to compare the mean values of several dose-volumetric parameters for each of the 4 techniques. In the axilla, the largest improvement for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT was for homogeneity index (13.9 vs. 54.3), at the expense of higher lung V{sub 20} (28.0% vs. 12.6%). In the groin, the largest improvements for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT were for anorectum D{sub max} (13.6 vs. 38.9 Gy), bowel D{sub 200cc} (7.3 vs. 23.1 Gy), femur D{sub 50} (34.6 vs. 57.2 Gy), and genitalia D{sub max} (37.6 vs. 51.1 Gy). IMRT had further improvements compared to 3D-CRT for humerus D{sub mean} (16.9 vs. 22.4 Gy), brachial plexus D{sub 5} (57.4 vs. 61.3 Gy), bladder D{sub 5} (26.8 vs. 36.5 Gy), and femur D{sub 50} (18.7 vs. 34.6 Gy). Fewer differences were observed between IMRT and VMAT. Compared to 2D-RT and 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT had dosimetric advantages in the treatment of nodal regions of skin cancer patients.

  4. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kim, Kwang pyo [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kyung Hee University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  5. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Kim, Kwang pyo

    2009-01-01

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  6. Toxicity and dosimetric analysis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with 4DCT and image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy: a regional centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Gareth C; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick M; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael J; Connors, Lisa; Leader, Stephanie; Greenham, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    For patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the probability of experiencing severe radiation pneumonitis (RP) appears to rise with an increase in radiation received by the lungs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides the ability to reduce planned doses to healthy organs at risk (OAR) and can potentially reduce treatment-related side effects. This study reports toxicity outcomes and provides a dosimetric comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Thirty curative NSCLC patients received radiotherapy using four-dimensional computed tomography and five-field IMRT. All were assessed for early and late toxicity using common terminology criteria for adverse events. All plans were subsequently re-planned using 3DCRT to the same standard as the clinical plans. Dosimetric parameters for lungs, oesophagus, heart and conformity were recorded for comparison between the two techniques. IMRT plans achieved improved high-dose conformity and reduced OAR doses including lung volumes irradiated to 5-20 Gy. One case each of oesophagitis and erythema (3%) were the only Grade 3 toxicities. Rates of Grade 2 oesophagitis were 40%. No cases of Grade 3 RP were recorded and Grade 2 RP rates were as low as 3%. IMRT provides a dosimetric benefit when compared to 3DCRT. While the clinical benefit appears to increase with increasing target size and increasing complexity, IMRT appears preferential to 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.

  7. Dosimetric implications of residual seminal vesicle motion in fiducial-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Vineberg, Karen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Mary

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether residual interfraction seminal vesicle (SV) displacement necessitates specific planning target volume (PTV) margins during fiducial-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and 2 subsequent CT scans were prospectively obtained for 20 prostate cancer patients with intraprostatic fiducial markers. After CT registration, SV displacement relative to the prostate was quantified as a function of margin size for both the proximal (1 cm) SV (PSV) and the full SV (FSV). Two IMRT plans were simulated for each patient (prostate + PSV and prostate + FSV) both with a uniform 5-mm PTV margin. Minimum clinical target volume (CTV) dose (D min ) and the volume of SV receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V 95% ) were assessed during treatment and compared with the initial plan. In all cases, SV displacement with respect to the prostate was greater for the FSV compared with the PSV. To ensure at least 95% geometrical coverage of the CTV for 90% of patients, margins of 5 and 8 mm were required for the PSV and FSV, respectively. Dosimetrically, residual SV displacement had minimal impact on PSV coverage compared with FSV coverage. For the PSV D min was ≥95% of the prescribed dose in 90% of patients with an overall mean V 95% of 99.6 ± 0.8%; for the FSV D min was ≥95% of the prescribed dose in only 45% of patients with a mean V 95% of 97.9 ± 2.4%. The SVs move differentially from the prostate and exhibit greater variation with increasing distance from the prostate. For plans targeting just the prostate and PSVs, 5-mm PTV expansions are adequate. However, despite daily localization of the prostate, larger PTV margins are required for cases where the intent is to completely cover the FSV.

  8. Dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors on step and shoot IMRT for prostate cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, N.M.; Wee, L.; Harper, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The positional accuracy of multi leaf collimators (MLC) is crucial in ensuring precise delivery of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this planning study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of systematic MLC errors on step and shoot IMRT of prostate cancer. Twelve MLC leaf banks perturbations were introduced to six prostate IMRT treatment plans to simulate MLC systematic errors. Dose volume histograms (OYHs) were generated for the extraction of dose endpoint parameters. Plans were evaluated in terms of changes to the defined endpoint dose parameters, conformity index (CI) and healthy tissue avoidance (HTA) to planning target volume (PTY), rectum and bladder. Negative perturbations of MLC had been found to produce greater changes to endpoint dose parameters than positive perturbations of MLC (p < 0.05). Negative and positive synchronized MLC perturbations of I mm resulted in median changes of -2.32 and 1.78%, respectively to 095% of PTY whereas asynchronized MLC perturbations of the same direction and magnitude resulted in median changes of 1.18 and 0.90%, respectively. Doses to rectum were generally more sensitive to systematic MLC errors compared to bladder. Synchronized MLC perturbations of I mm resulted in median changes of endpoint dose parameters to both rectum and bladder from about I to 3%. Maximum reduction of -4.44 and -7.29% were recorded for CI and HTA, respectively, due to synchronized MLC perturbation of I mm. In summary, MLC errors resulted in measurable amount of dose changes to PTY and surrounding critical structures in prostate LMRT. (author)

  9. Are there any dosimetric advantages in using VMAT for treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, D.; Krhili, S.; Yossi, S.; Cellier, P.; Paumier, A.; Autret, D.; Dupas, A.; Edouard, M.; Mahe, M.A.; Giraud, P.; Le Pechoux, C.; Denis, F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To analyse the dosimetric differences between the conventional conformal radiation therapy (CR) and the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for non-small-cell locally advanced lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods. - Two plans (CR and VMAT) were calculated for ten NSCLC patients. Dose to PTV, organs at risk and external contours (body), conformity index (PTV volume/volume of the 95% reference isodose) and homogeneity index ([maximal dose - minimal dose]/dose prescription) were compared. Results. - Doses delivered to PTV (homogeneity index, maximal, minimal and mean dose) are similar with both techniques but conformity index is improved by 60% with VMAT: from 0.55 ± 0.07 with CR to 0.89 ± 0.07 with VMAT (P = 0.002). Pulmonary protection is improved with VMAT: with CR and VMAT, respectively, the mean lung dose is 14.1 ± 5.2 Gy and 12.2 ± 4.5 Gy, the lung volume which receives at least 30 Gy (V30) is 20 ± 8% and 14 ± 5%, and the V20 is 24 ± 11% and 20 ± 10% (P = 0.002). The mean dose received by the body is also 9% lower (P = 0.004) and V5 is 13% higher (P = 0.004) with VMAT. V10 and V15 were similar with both modalities. From 20 Gy and higher, irradiated body volume is larger with CR than with VMAT. The relative difference increases with the dose: from 10% for 20 Gy (P = 0.014) up to 39% for 62.7 Gy (P = 0.002). Conclusion. - Compared to CR, VMAT greatly improves conformity and reduces mean dose and dose delivered from 20 Gy and higher to the lungs and the body. (authors)

  10. Dosimetric comparison in a cancer of the Cervix with different therapeutic modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Iracheta, L.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Samper Ots, P.; Penas Cabrera, M. D. de las; Jimenez Gonzalez, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is usually treated with radiotherapy composed of 3D (RC3D) and supine position, and is usually not usually outline the small intestine in cases of exclusively pelvic irradiation. In our Center we wanted to check what dose receives the small intestine in these cases and if the positioning of the patient or used irradiation technique influence the distribution of the histogram dose-volume. (Author)

  11. Radiotherapy for stomach cancer: the dosimetric consequences of physiological movement of organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, C.; Joon, D.L.; Joon, M.L.; Quong, G.; Feigen, M.; Wada, M.; Choy, T.; Chui, T.; Mantle, C.; Viotto, A.; Rolfo, A.; Rykers, K.; Grace, M.; Fernando, W.; Liu, G.; Khoo, V.; Chao, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the impact of movement of the liver and kidneys (organs at risk) on the dose volume histogram (DVH) when treating stomach cancer with radiation therapy. Immediate serial CT non-contrast and contrast scans are obtained as part of the planning process for treating stomach cancer with radiation in the neo-adjuvant and adjuvant setting at our institution. In a series of five patients the liver and right and left kidneys were contoured on both sets of scans. The maximal translational movement in three planes and volume changes of each structure was measured. The maximum, minimum and mean dose was calculated and compared for each organ at risk in both scans. To assess the change in the DVH, the following dose volume parameters were analysed: V50Gy, V35Gy, V30Gy, and V10GY for liver; V50Gy, V30Gy, V23Gy and V15Gy for both kidneys. A complete analysis of results will be presented

  12. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutaf, Yildirim D.; Yi, Byong Yong; Prado, Karl; D' Souza, Warren D.; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Zhang Jin [Xcision Medical Systems, Columbia, Maryland 21045 (United States); Yu, Cedric X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 and Xcision Medical Systems, Columbia, Maryland 21045 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A dedicated stereotactic gamma irradiation device, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign from Xcision Medical Systems, was developed specifically to treat small breast cancers. This study presents the first evaluation of dosimetric and geometric characteristics from the initial prototype installed at University of Maryland Radiation Oncology Department. Methods: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign stereotactic radiotherapy device is an assembly of a hemi-spherical source carrier containing 36 {sup 60}Co sources, a tungsten collimator, a dynamically controlled patient support table, and the breast immobilization system which also functions as a stereotactic frame. The source carrier contains the sources in six columns spaced longitudinally at 60 Degree-Sign intervals and it rotates together with the variable-size collimator to form 36 noncoplanar, concentric arcs focused at the isocenter. The patient support table enables motion in three dimensions to position the patient tumor at the focal point of the irradiation. The table moves continuously in three cardinal dimensions during treatment to provide dynamic shaping of the dose distribution. The breast is immobilized using a breast cup applying a small negative pressure, where the immobilization cup is embedded with fiducials also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the breast. Geometric and dosimetric evaluations of the system as well as a protocol for absorbed dose calibration are provided. Dosimetric verifications of dynamically delivered patient plans are performed for seven patients using radiochromic films in hypothetical preop, postop, and target-in-target treatment scenarios. Results: Loaded with 36 {sup 60}Co sources with cumulative activity of 4320 Ci, the prototype GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign unit delivers 5.31 Gy/min at the isocenter using the largest 2.5 cm diameter collimator. Due to the noncoplanar beam arrangement and dynamic dose shaping features, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign device is found to deliver

  13. A comparative dosimetric study of conventional, conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in postoperative pelvic irradiation of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; An Jusheng; Wu Lingying; Huang Manni; Gao Juzhen; Xu Yingjie; Dai Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate target-volume coverage and organ at risk (OAR) protection achieved with conventional radiotherapy (CRT), three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) through dosimetric comparison in patients with cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods: The planning CT scans of 10 patients treated with pelvic radiation after hysterectomy for cervical cancer were used to generate CRT, 3DCRT and IMRT plans for this study. Clinical target volume(CTV) was contoured on the individual axial CT slices of every patient. The CTV was then uniformly expanded by 1.0 cm to create the planning target volume (PTV). The small bowel, rectum, bladder, bone marrow, ovaries, and femoral heads were outlined for the organ at risk (OAR) evaluation. The CRT, 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated using commercial planning software. CRT plan was prescribed to deliver 45 Gy to the reference point, while IMRT and 3DCRT plans were 45 Gy to 95% of the PTV. Isodose line and dose volume histograms(DVH) were used to evaluate the dose distribution in CTV and OAR. Results: For 10 patients, the average volume of CTV receiving the prescribed dose of CRT was significantly lower than 3DCRT(Q=8.27, P<0.01) and IMRT(Q=8.37, P<0.01), respectively. Comparing with the CRT plan, the 3DCRT and IMRT plans notably reduced the volume of bowel at 30 and 45 Gy levels. The IMRT plan significantly spared rectum and bladder at 30 and 45 Gy levels comparing with the CRT (P<0.01) and 3DCRT(P<0.05) plans, while the 3DCRT plan significantly spared rectum and bladder at 45 Gy level comparing with the CRT(P<0.01) plans. For 4 patients with ovarian transposition, the average doses of ovary over 3 Gy were 2 patients with the 3 DCRT and IMRT plans, and 2 with all three plans. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCRT are superior to CRT in improving dose coverage of target volume and sparing of OAR, while IMRT being the best. The superiority of IMRT and 3DCRT is obvious in sparing

  14. A feasibility dosimetric study on prostate cancer. Are we ready for a multicenter clinical trial on SBRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Carmelo; Bonanno, Elisa [Humanitas C.C.O., Catania (Italy); Villaggi, Elena [AUSL, Piacenza (Italy); Maggi, Giulia; Mancosu, Pietro [IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Research Center, Milan (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria Firenze (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy). Lab. of Medical Physics and Expert Systems; Borzi, Giusi R. [REM Radioterapia, Catania (Italy); Carbonini, Claudia [A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Consorti, Rita [ACO S. Filippo Neri, Rome (Italy); Fedele, David [Casa di Cura Privata San Rossore s.r.l., Pisa (Italy); Fiandra, Christian [Torino Univ. (Italy). Radiation Oncology Unit; Ielo, Isidora [A.O.U. Policlinico G. Martino, Messina (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [' ' S. Giovanni Calibita' ' Fatebenefratelli, Rome (Italy); Malisan, Maria Rosa [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Udine (Italy); Martinotti, Anna [Centro Diagnostico Italiano, Milan (Italy); Moretti, Renzo [Az. Ospedaliera Spedali Civili di Brescia (Italy); Nardiello, Barbara [UPMC San Pietro FBF, Rome (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina; Clemente, Stefania [IRCCS CROB Rieonero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    The Italian Association of Medical Physics (AIFM) started a working group dedicated to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment. In this work, we performed a multicenter planning study on patients who were candidates for SBRT in the treatment of prostate cancer with the aim of evaluating the dosimetric consistency among the different hospitals. Fourteen centers were provided the contours of 5 patients. Plans were performed following the dose prescription and constraints for organs at risk (OARs) of a reference paper. The dose prescription was 35 Gy in five fractions for the planning target volume (PTV). Different techniques were used (3D-CRT, fixed-Field IMRT, VMAT, CyberKnife). Plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Furthermore, the median DVH was calculated and one patient was re-planned. A total of 70 plans were compared. The maximum dose to the body was 107.9 ± 4.5 % (range 101.5-116.3 %). Dose at 98 % (D{sub 98} {sub %}) and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) were 102.0 ± 0.9 % (global range 101.1-102.9 %) and 105.1 ± 0.6 % (range 98.6-124.6 %). Similar trends were found for D{sub 95} {sub %} and mean dose to the PTV. Important differences were found in terms of the homogeneity index. Doses to OARs were heterogeneous. The subgroups with the same treatment planning system showed differences comparable to the differences of the whole group. In the re-optimized plans, DVH differences among institutes were reduced and OAR sparing improved. Important dosimetric differences with possible clinical implications, in particular related to OARs, were found. Replanning allowed a reduction in the OAR dose and decreased standard deviations. Multicenter clinical trials on SBRT should require a preplanning study to standardize the optimization procedure. (orig.) [German] Der italienische Verband der Medizinphysiker (AIFM) hat eine Arbeitsgruppe gegruendet, die sich mit der Koerperstammstereotaxie (SBRT) befasst. Im Rahmen

  15. Development of a dosimetric system for the quality control of breast cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Roberio C.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Santos, Delano B.V.

    2013-01-01

    A system for evaluating the values of absorbed dose in breast teletherapy was developed, using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), to compare them to those provided by Therapy planning system. A breast phantom was made to distribute the dosimeters TL shaped chip in breast volume and irradiate it under the same conditions of planning. Three different techniques of teletherapy were considered: one with irradiation from a therapy unit of 60 Co and two with an X-ray beam coming from a 6 MV linear accelerator. Doses measures allowed checking that the performance of the quality control system used in breast cancer treatment is appropriate, since the planned doses differed about 1.5% of the responses provided by TL dosimeters

  16. RAPIDARC (RA) in the uterine cervical cancer; dosimetric gain vs 3D-Crt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.; Garcia, B.; Quispe, K.; Gonzales, A.; Marquina, J.

    2014-08-01

    This work aims to quantitatively assess RAPIDARC (RA) treatments versus three dimensional-Conformal Radiation Therapy with field to field technique (3D-Crt-Fin F). 11 patients with cervical cancer treated at our institution radically or adjuvant clinical stages I-III B were evaluated. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy (2 Gy / Fr). The RA plans consisted of two isocentric complete arcs and conformational plans of 4 isocentric fields (previous, subsequent, right side and left side) with 3D-Crt-Fin F technique; both cases carried out ??in the Eclipse version 10 planner with calculation algorithm analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and volumetric optimization software (for VMAT plans). Homogeneity indices (Hi), conformity indices (CI) Sigma indices (S-Index), monitor units (MU) and the time required for each treatment were compared. The mean age was 52 years (32-65) of the 11 patients 9 were clinical stages I-II B. The Hi varied from 0.052 for RA to 0.163 for 3D-Crt-Fin F (p = 0.009), and the CI between 1.005 and 1.35 (p = 0.26), the S-index from 1.2 to 3.7 (p = 0.001) and the H-index of 1.08 to 1.15 (p = 0.24). All dose limits in risk organs were met with a significant difference in the RA plans versus 3D-Crt-Fin F. In patients with cervical cancer the treatment plans quality with the indices aforementioned seems to be better with the RA technique, being observed a significant reduction of radiation to surrounding organs. (author)

  17. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: Edgar.Ben-Josef@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Mayekar, Sonal U. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Apisarnthanarax, Smith [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ∼30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  18. Dosimetric Comparison of Three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Radiotherapy and Helical Tomotherapy Partial Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Yun Kyeong; Kim, Jung Soo; Hwang, Jae Woong; Jeong, Kyeong Sik; Choi, Gye Suk

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation treatment is to deliver a prescribed radiation dose to the target volume accurately while minimizing dose to normal tissues. In this paper, we comparing the dose distribution between three dimensional conformal radiation radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and helical tomotherapy (TOMO) plan for partial breast cancer. Twenty patients were included in the study, and plans for two techniques were developed for each patient (left breast:10 patients, right breast:10 patients). For each patient 3D-CRT planning was using pinnacle planning system, inverse plan was made using Tomotherapy Hi-Art system and using the same targets and optimization goals. We comparing the Homogeneity index (HI), Conformity index (CI) and sparing of the organs at risk for dose-volume histogram. Whereas the HI, CI of TOMO was significantly better than the other, 3D-CRT was observed to have significantly poorer HI, CI. The percentage ipsilateral non-PTV breast volume that was delivered 50% of the prescribed dose was 3D-CRT (mean: 40.4%), TOMO (mean: 18.3%). The average ipsilateral lung volume percentage receiving 20% of the PD was 3D-CRT (mean: 4.8%), TOMO (mean: 14.2), concerning the average heart volume receiving 20% and 10% of the PD during treatment of left breast cancer 3D-CRT (mean: 1.6%, 3.0%), TOMO (mean: 9.7%, 26.3%) In summary, 3D-CRT and TOMO techniques were found to have acceptable PTV coverage in our study. However, in TOMO, high conformity to the PTV and effective breast tissue sparing was achieved at the expense of considerable dose exposure to the lung and heart.

  19. A study of the plan dosimetric evaluation on the rectal cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyun Hak; An, Beom Seok; Kim, Dae Il; Lee, Yang Hoon; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In order to minimize the dose of femoral head as an appropriate treatment plan for rectal cancer radiation therapy, we compare and evaluate the usefulness of 3-field 3D conformal radiation therapy(below 3fCRT), which is a universal treatment method, and 5-field 3D conformal radiation therapy(below 5fCRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). The 10 cases of rectal cancer that treated with 21EX were enrolled. Those cases were planned by Eclipse(Ver. 10.0.42, Varian, USA), PRO3(Progressive Resolution Optimizer 10.0.28) and AAA(Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Ver. 10.0.28). 3fCRT and 5fCRT plan has 0 degrees, 270 degrees, 90 degrees and 0 degrees, 95 degrees, 45 degrees, 315 degrees, 265 degrees gantry angle, respectively. VMAT plan parameters consisted of 15MV coplanar 360 degrees 1 arac. Treatment prescription was employed delivering 54Gy to recum in 30 fractions. To minimize the dose difference that shows up randomly on optimizing, VMAT plans were optimized and calculated twice, and normalized to the target V100%=95%. The indexes of evaluation are D of Both femoral head and aceta fossa, total MU, H.I.(Homogeneity index) and C.I.(Conformity index) of the PTV. All VMAT plans were verified by gamma test with portal dosimetry using EPID. D of Rt. femoral head was 53.08 Gy, 50.27 Gy, and 30.92 Gy, respectively, in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. Likewise, Lt. Femoral head showed average 53.68 Gy, 51.01 Gy and 29.23 Gy in the same order. D of Rt. aceta fossa was 54.86 Gy, 52.40 Gy, 30.37 Gy, respectively, in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. Likewise, Lt. Femoral head showed average 53.68 Gy, 51.01 Gy and 29.23 Gy in the same order. The maximum dose of both femoral head and aceta fossa was higher in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. C.I. showed the lowest VMAT treatment plan with an average of 1.64, 1.48, and 0.99 in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. There was no significant difference on H

  20. Small bowel protection in IMRT for rectal cancer. A dosimetric study on supine vs. prone position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Julia; Kromer, Katharina; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Mai, Sabine; Fleckenstein, Jens; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Unita Operativa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy); Baack, Tobias [GRN Clinic Weinheim, Department of Internal Medicine, Weinheim (Germany); Buettner, Sylvia [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    This treatment planning study analyzes dose coverage and dose to organs at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of rectal cancer and compares prone vs. supine positioning as well as the effect of dose optimization for the small bowel (SB) by additional dose constraints in the inverse planning process. Based on the CT datasets of ten male patients in both prone and supine position, a total of four different IMRT plans were created for each patient. OAR were defined as the SB, bladder, and femoral heads. In half of the plans, two additional SB cost functions were used in the inverse planning process. There was a statistically significant dose reduction for the SB in prone position of up to 41% in the high and intermediate dose region, compared with the supine position. Furthermore, the femoral heads showed a significant dose reduction in prone position in the low dose region. Regarding the additional active SB constraints, the dose in the high dose region of the SB was significantly reduced by up to 14% with the additional cost functions. There were no significant differences in the dose distribution of the planning target volume (PTV) and the bladder. Prone positioning can significantly reduce dose to the SB in IMRT for rectal cancer and therefore should not only be used in 3D conformal radiotherapy but also in IMRT of rectal cancer. Further protection of the SB can be achieved by additional dose constraints in inverse planning without jeopardizing the homogeneity of the PTV. (orig.) [German] Diese Planungsstudie analysiert die Dosisverteilung im Zielvolumen und in den Risikoorganen (''organs at risk'', OAR) bei der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (''intensity-modulated radiotherapy'', IMRT) des Rektumkarzinoms und vergleicht hierbei Bauch- und Rueckenlagerung sowie die Effekte der Dosisoptimierung fuer den Duenndarm (DD) durch zusaetzliche Dosiseinschraenkungen bei der inversen Planung. Anhand der

  1. Hematologic Nadirs During Chemoradiation for Anal Cancer: Temporal Characterization and Dosimetric Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew Y.; Golden, Daniel W. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bazan, Jose G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Kopec, Malgorzata; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Aggarwal, Sonya; Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Pelvic bone marrow (BM) constraints may offer a means to reduce the toxicity commonly associated with chemoradiation for anal cancer. We conducted a bi-institutional analysis of dose-volume metrics in a time-sensitive fashion to devise practical metrics to minimize hematologic toxicity. Methods and Materials: Fifty-six anal cancer patients from 2 institutions received definitive radiation therapy (median primary dose of 54 Gy) using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, n=49) or 3-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy (n=7) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C. Weekly blood counts were retrospectively plotted to characterize the time course of cytopenias. Dose-volume parameters were correlated with blood counts at a standardized time point to identify predictors of initial blood count nadirs. Results: Leukocytes, neutrophils, and platelets reached a nadir at week 3 of treatment. Smaller volumes of the pelvic BM correlated most strongly with lower week 3 blood counts, more so than age, sex, body mass index (BMI), or dose metrics. Patients who had ≥750 cc of pelvic BM spared from doses of ≥30 Gy had 0% grade 3+ leukopenia or neutropenia at week 3. Higher V40 Gy to the lower pelvic BM (LP V40) also correlated with cytopenia. Patients with an LP V40 >23% had higher rates of grade 3+ leukopenia (29% vs 4%, P=.02), grade 3+ neutropenia (33% vs 8%, P=.04), and grade 2+ thrombocytopenia (32% vs 7%, P=.04) at week 3. On multivariate analysis, pelvic BM volume and LP V40 remained associated with leukocyte count, and all marrow subsite volumes remained associated with neutrophil counts at week 3 (P<.1). Conclusions: Larger pelvic BM volumes correlate with less severe leukocyte and neutrophil nadirs, suggesting that larger total “marrow reserve” can mitigate cytopenias. Sparing a critical marrow reserve and limiting the V40 Gy to the lower pelvis may reduce the risk of hematologic toxicity.

  2. SU-F-J-67: Dosimetric Changes During Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer Patients with Atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, C; Weiss, E; Jan, N; Reshko, L; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Christensen, G [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Large geometric changes which occur during thoracic radiotherapy alter normal anatomy and target position and may induce clinically important dose changes. This study investigates variation of organ-at-risk (OAR) dose caused by atelectasis resolution during radiotherapy. Methods: 3D IMRT treatment plans were obtained for 14 non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Dose of the clinical plan was recalculated on a baseline scan in which lung was collapsed and on a midtreatment scan in which lung re-aeration had occurred. The changes in OAR doses were compared between the two time points. RTOG-0617 and inhouse dose-volume constraints were chosen for investigation and included spinal cord, esophagus, heart, and healthy lung. Results: 17 dose metrics were evaluated. The mean (SD) of change in mean lung dose, from baseline to mid-treatment (average taken across all patients), was 0.2 Gy (2.2 Gy) and ranged from −3.2 Gy to 6.0 Gy. 50% of patients experienced relative changes in mean lung dose of greater than 5% of baseline value. The mean (SD) of changes in heart V{sub 40}, V{sub 45}, and V{sup 60} were 3.2% (3.4%), 3.0% (2.9%), and 1.4% (2.1%), respectively, and were significant for the study cohort (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p=0.0107 for V{sub 40}, p=0.0052 for V{sub 45}, and p= 0.0353 for V{sub 60}. Ranges in changes of Heart V{sub 40}, V{sub 45}, and V{sub 60} were −1.9% to 8.6%, −1.7% to 7.5%, and −2.1% to 4.5%, respectively. The mean (SD) of changes in Esophagus PRV Dmean and V{sub 60} were 0.3 Gy (3.3 Gy) and 0.8% (7.7%), respectively, and ranged from −4.8 Gy to 6.8 Gy for Dmean and −15.2% to 14.6% for V{sub 60}. Conclusion: Patients with atelectasis present at the start of radiotherapy experience significant increases in heart dose. Substantial increases in mean lung dose also occur in a subset of patients. This work supported by the National Cancer Institute of National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01CA166119. Disclosures: Phillips

  3. SU-E-T-332: Dosimetric Impact of Photon Energy and Treatment Technique When Knowledge Based Auto-Planning Is Implemented in Radiotherapy of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Grow, A; Hayes, C; Balamucki, C [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salmon, H; Thompson, M [Lake City Cancer Center, Lake City, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of the combination of photon energy and treatment technique on radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer when knowledge based planning was used. Methods: A total of 16 patients with localized prostate cancer were retrospectively retrieved from database and used for this study. For each patient, four types of treatment plans with different combinations of photon energy (6X and 10X) and treatment techniques (7-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were created using a prostate DVH estimation model in RapidPlan™ and Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical System). For any beam arrangement, DVH objectives and weighting priorities were generated based on the geometric relationship between the OAR and PTV. Photon optimization algorithm was used for plan optimization and AAA algorithm was used for final dose calculation. Plans were evaluated in terms of the pre-defined dosimetric endpoints for PTV, rectum, bladder, penile bulb, and femur heads. A Student’s paired t-test was used for statistical analysis and p > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For PTV, V95 was statistically similar among all four types of plans, though the mean dose of 10X plans was higher than that of 6X plans. VMAT plans showed higher heterogeneity index than IMRT plans. No statistically significant difference in dosimetry metrics was observed for rectum, bladder, and penile bulb among plan types. For left and right femur, VMAT plans had a higher mean dose than IMRT plans regardless of photon energy, whereas the maximum dose was similar. Conclusion: Overall, the dosimetric endpoints were similar regardless of photon energy and treatment techniques when knowledge based auto planning was used. Given the similarity in dosimetry metrics of rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, the genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities should be comparable among the selections of photon energy and treatment techniques.

  4. Weekly Volume and Dosimetric Changes During Chemoradiotherapy With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective Observational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhide, Shreerang A [Institute of Cancer Research, 237 Fulham Road, London SW6 6JB (United Kingdom); Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom); Davies, Mark; Burke, Kevin; McNair, Helen A; Hansen, Vibeke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Barbachano, Y [Department of Statistics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); El-Hariry, I A [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom); Newbold, Kate [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J [Institute of Cancer Research, 237 Fulham Road, London SW6 6JB (United Kingdom); Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom); Nutting, Christopher M., E-mail: chris.nutting@rmh.nhs.u [Head and Neck Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the weekly volume changes in the target volumes and organs at risk and the resulting dosimetric changes during induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (C-IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving C-IMRT for head-and-neck cancer had repeat CT scans at weeks 2, 3, 4, and 5 during radiotherapy. The volume changes of clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) and CTV2 and the resulting dosimetric changes to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2 and the organs at risk were measured. Results: The most significant volume differences were seen at week 2 for CTV1 and CTV2. The reductions in the volumes of CTV1 and CTV2 at week 2 were 3.2% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). The volume changes resulted in a significant reduction in the minimum dose to PTV1 and PTV2 (2 Gy, p = 0.002, and 3.9 Gy, p = 0.03, respectively) and an increased dose range across PTV1 and PTV2 (2.5 Gy, p < 0.001, and 5.1 Gy, p = 0.008, respectively). There was a 15% reduction in the parotid volumes by week 2 (p < 0.001) and 31% by week 4 (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in the mean dose to the ipsilateral parotid only at week 4 (2.7 Gy, p = 0.006). The parotid glands shifted medially by an average of 2.3 mm (p < 0.001) by week 4. Conclusion: The most significant volumetric changes and dosimetric alterations in the tumor volumes and organs at risk during a course of C-IMRT occur by week 2 of radiotherapy. Further adaptive radiotherapy with replanning, if appropriate, is recommended.

  5. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David; Paly, Jon; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason

    2013-01-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p −5 ). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage

  6. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason, E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p<10{sup −5}). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage.

  7. Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB deterministic radiation transport algorithm for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Tao; Followill, David; Repchak, Roman; Molineu, Andrea; Howell, Rebecca; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mikell, Justin; Mourtada, Firas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The novel deterministic radiation transport algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), has shown great potential for accurate heterogeneous dose calculation. However, the clinical impact between AXB and other currently used algorithms still needs to be elucidated for translation between these algorithms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AXB for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The thorax phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) was used for this study. IMRT and VMAT plans were created for the phantom in the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system. Each plan was delivered to the phantom three times using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator to ensure reproducibility. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 film were placed inside the phantom to measure delivered doses. The measurements were compared with dose calculations from AXB 11.0.21 and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 11.0.21. Two dose reporting modes of AXB, dose-to-medium in medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water in medium (D w,m ), were studied. Point doses, dose profiles, and gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between measurements and calculations from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: For the RPC lung phantom, AAA and AXB dose predictions were found in good agreement to TLD and film measurements for both IMRT and VMAT plans. TLD dose predictions were within 0.4%–4.4% to AXB doses (both D m,m and D w,m ); and within 2.5%–6.4% to AAA doses, respectively. For the film comparisons, the gamma indexes (±3%/3 mm criteria) were 94%, 97%, and 98% for AAA, AXB Dm,m , and AXB Dw,m , respectively. The differences between AXB and AAA in dose–volume histogram mean doses were within 2% in the planning target volume, lung, heart, and within 5% in the spinal cord. However

  8. Dosimetric comparison between CT and X-ray simulation of radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kali Ayguli, Zhang Jinrong; Wang Juwu; Ge Feng; Wang Haifeng; Xu Suling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare radiotherapy plan of conventional X-ray simulation with CT simulation by 3D-TPS for lung cancer. Methods: Thirty-three patients were allotted to receive both conventional X-ray simulation and CT simulation in the same treatment position. 3D-TPS was used to design 4-field conventional plan of X-ray simulation (RT), 4-field two dimensional plan(2D)and three dimensional conformal radiation plan(3DCRT) of CT simulation for all patients. The total dose was 50 Gy. Dose volume histogram(DVH) was applied to evaluate the difference of target coverage, dose distribution and normal tissue protection among the three plans. Results: 3DCRT and 2D based on CT simulation were superior to RT in the target coverage, target conformity index (TCI) and target homogeneity (TH) (P 20 , V 30 and mean lung dose were similar among 3DCRT, 2D and RT plans. Moreover, the maximum doses of spinal cord were significantly different among the three plans. No statistical differences of doses to 30% of the heart and esophagus volume among the three plans were observed. Conclusions: There is significantly better tumour volume coverage in CT simulation when compared with X-ray conventional simulation. Target volume delineation by CT simulation is improved significantly. The dose distribution is improved by using three dimensional treatment planning system. 3DCRT plan is superior to 2D plans in target conformity index and target homogeneity. Doses delivered to organs surrounding the target such as lung and heart were reduced significantly in 3DCRT. (authors)

  9. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  10. Dosimetric model for intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer micrometastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syme, A M; McQuarrie, S A; Middleton, J W; Fallone, B G

    2003-01-01

    A simple model has been developed to investigate the dosimetry of micrometastases in the peritoneal cavity during intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy. The model is applied to free-floating tumours with radii between 0.005 cm and 0.1 cm. Tumour dose is assumed to come from two sources: free liposomes in solution in the peritoneal cavity and liposomes bound to the surface of the micrometastases. It is assumed that liposomes do not penetrate beyond the surface of the tumours and that the total amount of surface antigen does not change over the course of treatment. Integrated tumour doses are expressed as a function of biological parameters that describe the rates at which liposomes bind to and unbind from the tumour surface, the rate at which liposomes escape from the peritoneal cavity and the tumour surface antigen density. Integrated doses are translated into time-dependent tumour control probabilities (TCPs). The results of the work are illustrated in the context of a therapy in which liposomes labelled with Re-188 are targeted at ovarian cancer cells that express the surface antigen CA-125. The time required to produce a TCP of 95% is used to investigate the importance of the various parameters. The relative contributions of surface-bound radioactivity and unbound radioactivity are used to assess the conditions required for a targeted approach to provide an improvement over a non-targeted approach during intraperitoneal radiation therapy. Using Re-188 as the radionuclide, the model suggests that, for microscopic tumours, the relative importance of the surface-bound radioactivity increases with tumour size. This is evidenced by the requirement for larger antigen densities on smaller tumours to affect an improvement in the time required to produce a TCP of 95%. This is because for the smallest tumours considered, the unbound radioactivity is often capable of exerting a tumouricidal effect before the targeting agent has time to accumulate

  11. Dosimetric and motion analysis of margin-intensive therapy by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for resectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinzerling John H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroperitoneal margin is a common site of positive surgical margins in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Preoperative margin-intensive therapy (MIT involves delivery of a single high dose of ablative radiotherapy (30 Gy focused on this surgically inaccessible margin, utilizing stereotactic techniques in an effort to reduce local failure following surgery. In this study, we investigated the motion of regional organs at risk (OAR utilizing 4DCT, evaluated the dosimetric effects of abdominal compression (AC to reduce regional motion, and compared various planning techniques to optimize MIT. Methods 10 patients were evaluated with 4DCT scans. All 10 patients had scans using AC and seven of the 10 patients had scans both with and without AC. The peak respiratory abdominal organ and major vessel centroid excursion was measured. A "sub-GTV" region was defined by a radiation oncologist and surgical oncologist encompassing the retroperitoneal margin typically lateral and posterior to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA, and a 3-5 mm margin was added to constitute the PTV. Identical 3D non-coplanar SABR (3DSABR plans were designed for the average compression and non-compression scans. Compression scans were planned with 3DSABR, coplanar IMRT (IMRT, and Cyberknife (CK planning techniques. Dose volume analysis was undertaken for various endpoints, comparing OAR doses with and without AC and for different planning methods. Results The mean PTV size was 20.2 cm3. Regional vessel motion of the SMA, celiac trunk, and renal vessels was small ( 5 mm, so AC has been used in all patients enrolled thus far. AC did not significantly increase OAR dose including the stomach and traverse colon. There were several statistically significant differences in the doses to OARs as a function of the type of planning modality used. Conclusions AC does not significantly reduce the limited motion of structures in close proximity to the MIT target

  12. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland and Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the

  13. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, David; Cavillon, Fabrice; Lacornerie, Thomas; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 43.9 ± 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 49.1 ± 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 ± 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 ± 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 7.4 ± 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 ± 0.05 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  14. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, David, E-mail: d-pasquier@o-lambret.fr [Departement Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille (France); Cavillon, Fabrice [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Faculte Libre de Medecine, Lille (France); Lacornerie, Thomas [Departement Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Touzeau, Claire [Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille (France); Tresch, Emmanuelle [Unite de Methodologie et Biostatistique, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric [Departement Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  15. A dosimetric comparison of tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, David; Cavillon, Fabrice; Lacornerie, Thomas; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 43.9 ± 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 49.1 ± 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 ± 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 ± 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 7.4 ± 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 ± 0.05 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), DMlC (Dynamic IMRT), and 3DCRT in left breast cancer after breast conserving surgery receiving left breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratibha, Bauskar; Vibhay, Pareek; Rajendra, Bhalavat; Chandra, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the risk of ischemic heart disease is increased as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation in women treated for breast cancer. Alternative radiation techniques, such as dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DMLC), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), have been shown to improve dosimetric parameters of the heart and substructures. However, these techniques have not been compared with each other to potentially guide treatment decisions. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel extension of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT), in which an optimized three dimensional dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation. VMAT is the predecessor to Rapid-Arc (Varian Medical System). This study uses VMAT, DMLC and 3DCRT to compare target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs), especially lung and heart doses, using these three techniques in whole breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery in left breast cancer cases

  17. Single-fraction flattening filter–free volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung cancer: Dosimetric results and comparison with flattened beams technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbiero, Sara [Medical Physics Division, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy); Specialty School in Medical Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Rink, Alexandra [Radiation Physics Department, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Matteucci, Fabrizio [Radiation Oncology Department, S.Chiara University Hospital, Pisa (Italy); Fedele, David [Radiotherapy Department, Casa di Cura S. Rossore, Pisa (Italy); Paiar, Fabiola; Pasqualetti, Francesco [Radiation Oncology Department, S.Chiara University Hospital, Pisa (Italy); Avanzo, Michele, E-mail: mavanzo@cro.it [Medical Physics Division, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report on single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (RT) (SBRT) with flattening filter (FF)–free (FFF) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for lung cancer and to compare dosimetric results with VMAT with FF. Methods and materials: Overall, 25 patients were treated with 6-MV FFF VMAT (Varian TrueBeam STx LINAC) to a prescribed dose of 24 Gy in a single fraction. Treatment plans were recreated using FF VMAT. Dose-volume indices, monitor units (MU), and treatment times were compared between FFF and FF VMAT techniques. Results: Dose constraints to PTV, spinal cord, and lungs were reached in FFF and FF plans. In FFF plans, average conformity index was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.07 to1.38). Maximum doses to spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and trachea were 2.9 Gy (95% CI: 0.4 to 6.7 Gy), 0.8 Gy (95% CI: 0 to 3.6 Gy), 3.3 Gy (95% CI: 0.02 to 13.9 Gy), and 1.5 Gy (95% CI: 0 to 4.9 Gy), respectively. Average V7 Gy, V7.4 Gy, and mean dose to the healthy lung were 126.5 cc (95% CI: 41.3 to 248.9 cc), 107.3 cc (95% CI: 18.7 to 232.8 cc), and 1.1 Gy (95% CI: 0.3 to 2.2 Gy), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in dosimetric results and MU between FF and FFF treatments. Treatment time was reduced by an average factor of 2.31 (95% CI: 2.15 to 2.43) from FF treatments to FFF, and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusions: FFF VMAT for lung SBRT provides equivalent dosimetric results to the target and organs at risk as FF VMAT while significantly reducing treatment time.

  18. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V dose and absolute V dose ), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS dose ). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V dose or VS dose ) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5

  19. Comparison of dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer patients undergoing 3D conformal radiotherapy or VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stefan; Aichmeier, Sylvia; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Habermehl, Daniel [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Hapfelmeier, Alexander [TU Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology (IMSE), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Feith, Marcus [TU Muenchen, Department of Visceral Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) achieves high conformity to the planned target volume (PTV) and good sparing of organs at risk (OAR). This study compares dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2007 and 2014, 17 SC patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) with VMAT. Dose-volume histograms and toxicity were compared between these patients and 20 treated with 3D-CRT. All patients were irradiated with a total dose of 45 Gy. All VMAT patients received simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in treatment weeks 1 and 5. Of 20 patients treated with 3D-CRT, 13 (65 %) also received CRT with cisplatin and 5-FU, whereas 6 patients (30 %) received CRT with weekly oxaliplatin and cetuximab, and a continuous infusion of 5-FU (OE-7). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment groups. For the lungs, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 90.1 % vs. 79.7 %; p = 0.013) and V{sub 10} (68.2 % vs. 56.6 %; p = 0.014), but with a lower V{sub 30} (median 6.6 % vs. 11.0 %; p = 0.030). Regarding heart parameters, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 100.0 % vs. 91.0 %; p = 0.043), V{sub 10} (92.0 % vs. 79.2 %; p = 0.047), and D{sub max} (47.5 Gy vs. 46.3 Gy; p = 0.003), but with a lower median dose (18.7 Gy vs. 30.0 Gy; p = 0.026) and V{sub 30} (17.7 % vs. 50.4 %; p = 0.015). Complete resection was achieved in 16 VMAT and 19 3D-CRT patients. Due to systemic progression, 2 patients did not undergo surgery. The most frequent postoperative complication was anastomosis insufficiency, occurring in 1 VMAT (6.7 %) and 5 3D-CRT patients (27.8 %; p = 0.180). Postoperative pneumonia was seen in 2 patients of each group (p = 1.000). There was no significant difference in 3-year overall (65 % VMAT vs. 45 % 3D-CRT; p = 0.493) or 3-year progression-free survival (53 % VMAT vs. 35 % 3D-CRT; p = 0

  20. Cancer of the uterine cervix: dosimetric guidelines for prevention of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications as a result of radiotherapeutic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourquier, H.; Dubois, J.B.; Delard, R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is the report of a dosimetric study of 41 rectal and rectosigmoid complications after radiotherapeutic treatment (1974-1978) of 287 cervical uterine tumors. Treatment consisted of external irradiation (25 MeV linear accelerator) and intracavitary irradiation (Fletcher-Suit applicator) at different doses depending on tumor stage. Dosimetric measurements were expressed as the maximum rectal dose and mean rectal dose on the anterior surface of the rectum, as proposed by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie. Rectal doses were also studied as a function of intracavitary irradiation and intracavitary + external irradiation (maximum rectal and mean cummulative doses for each). The results show a significant difference in the state of the patients with and without complications, based on the dose reaching the rectum. The maximum and the mean cumulative rectal doses serve as one of the primary indicators for predicting complications. These values should therefore be determined before placement of intracavitary sources or, at the latest, before the second intracavitary applications. We have shown that there is no fixed threshold dose, but that it varies from one region to another, depending on level of external irradiation. Our results argue in favor of adapting individual patient therapy based on simple precautions, which are adjustable to all treatment modalities. This method could lead to complete elimination of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications arising from radiotherapeutic treatment of cervical uterine cancer

  1. Rectal bleeding after hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical and dosimetric parameters and the incidence of grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Harashima, Koichi; Miyazawa, Yasushi; Yamada, Masami; Ito, Kazuto; Kurokawa, Kouhei; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi; Nakano, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and severity of rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to explore the factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Methods and materials: The data of 52 patients who had been treated by external beam RT for localized prostate cancer between 1999 and 2002 were analyzed. All the patients had received hypofractionated external beam RT to a total dose of 69 Gy in 3-Gy fractions, three fractions weekly. The clinical and dosimetric factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse late rectal bleeding were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The effect of the percentage of the whole rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose (V 30 , V 50 , V 80 , and V 90 , respectively) on the incidence of rectal bleeding was evaluated. Results: Of the 52 patients, 13 (25%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. One patient who needed laser coagulation and blood transfusion for the treatment of rectal bleeding was classified as having Grade 3 rectal bleeding. The median time to the development of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding was 11 months. The results of the univariate analysis revealed that the presence of a history of diabetes mellitus (p 30 ≥ 60%, V 50 ≥ 40% (p 80 ≥ 25%, and V 90 ≥ 15% (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that a history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of rectal bleeding after hypofractionated RT for prostate cancer (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated RT, although dosimetric factors were also closely associated with the risk of rectal bleeding

  2. Correlations of post-implant regional dosimetric parameters at 24 hours and one month, with clinical results of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Okazaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the correlations of post-implant regional dosimetrics at 24 hours (24 h and 1 month after implant procedures, with clinical outcomes of low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods : Between January 2008 and December 2014, 130 consecutive patients treated for localized prostate cancer, receiving definitive iodine-125 ( 125 I brachytherapy treatment were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent post-implant CT imaging for dosimetric analysis at 24 h and 1 month after implantation procedure. Prostate contours were divided into quadrants: anterior-superior (ASQ, posterior-superior (PSQ, anterior-inferior (AIQ, and posterior-inferior (PIQ. Predictive factors and cut-off values of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS and toxicities of LDR brachytherapy were analyzed. Results : The median follow-up time was 69.5 months. Seven patients (5.4% had biochemical failure. The 3-year and 5-year BFFS rates were 96.7% and 93.1%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score were significant prognostic factors for biochemical failure. D 90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the volume of PSQ and PIQ at 24 h, and D 90 of PSQ at 1 month were also significant factors. The cut-off values of PSQ D 90 were 145 Gy at 24 h and 160 Gy at 1 month. D 90 of the whole prostate was not significant at 24 h and at 1 month. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month was a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage. Conclusions : Post-implant D 90 of PSQ is significantly associated with BFFS for localized prostate cancer not only at 1 month, but also at 24 hours. D 90 of PSQ at 1 month is also a significant factor for rectal hemorrhage.

  3. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm 3 of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10–50 Gy [V 10–50 ]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4–37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V 50 of ≥16 cm 3 of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V 50 3 of the stomach vs. those with V 50 of ≥16 cm 3 was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V 50 of ≥33 cm 3 of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V 50 3 of the StoDuo vs. those with V 50 ≥33 cm 3 was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, for the treatment of pancreatic

  4. SU-E-T-25: A Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimension Conformal and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, N; Maneru, F; Fuentemilla, N; Olasolo, J; Gracia, M; Pellejero, S; Bragado, L; Lozares, S; Miquelez, S; Martin, M [Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: dosimetric comparison of 3DCRT and IMRT in 9 esophageal cancer. The aim of this paper is to know which of these two techniques is dosimetrically more favorable dosimetrically at both the CTV coverage and dose obtained in the relevant organs at risk, in this case, lungs and heart, as the spinal cord received in all cases below 45 Gy. Methods: we chose 9 patients from our center (CHN) with the same type of esophageal cancer and in which the prescribed dose was the same, 54 Gy. For these treatments we have used the same fields and the same angles (AP (0 °), OPD (225°–240°) and OPI (125°–135°)).All plans have been implemented using Eclipse (version 11.0) with AAA( Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm )(Version 11.0.31). Results: To analyze the coverage of the CTV, we have evaluated the D99% and found that the average dose received by 99% of CTV with IMRT is 53.8 ± 0.4 Gy (99.6% of the prescribed dose) and the mean value obtained with 3DCRT is 52.3 ± 0.6 Gy (96.8% of the prescribed dose).The last data analyzed was the D2% of PTV, a fact that gives us information on the maximum dose received by our PTV. D2% of the PTV for IMRT planning is 55.4 ± 0.4 Gy (102.6% of the prescribed dose) and with 3DCRT is 56.8 ± 0.7 Gy (105.2% of the prescribed dose).All parameters analyzed at risk organs (V30, V40, V45 and V50 for the case of heart and V5, V10, V15 and V20 for the case of the lungs) provide us irradiated volume percentages lower in IMRT than 3DCRT. Conclusion: IMRT provides a considerable improvement in the coverage of the CTV and the doses to organs at risk.

  5. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of the feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer with lobe-specific selective elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kitahara, Tadashi; Akiba, Takeshi; Nagao, Ryuta; Fukuzawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    More than 10% of all patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary lung cancer develop regional lymph node recurrence. We evaluated the dosimetric feasibility of SBRT with lobe-specific selective elective nodal irradiation (ENI) on dose-volume histograms. A total of 21 patients were treated with SBRT for Stage I primary lung cancer between January 2010 and June 2012 at our institution. The extents of lobe-specific selective ENI fields were determined with reference to prior surgical reports. The ENI fields included lymph node stations (LNS) 3 + 4 + 11 for the right upper lobe tumors, LNS 7 + 11 for the right middle or lower lobe tumors, LNS 5 + 11 for the left upper lobe tumors, and LNS 7 + 11 for the left lower lobe tumors. A composite plan was generated by combining the ENI plan and the SBRT plan and recalculating for biologically equivalent doses of 2 Gy per fraction, using a linear quadratic model. The V20 of the lung, D(1cm3) of the spinal cord, D(1cm3) and D(10cm3) of the esophagus and D(10cm3) of the tracheobronchial wall were evaluated. Of the 21 patients, nine patients (43%) could not fulfill the dose constraints. In all these patients, the distance between the planning target volume (PTV) of ENI (PTVeni) and the PTV of SBRT (PTVsrt) was ≤2.0 cm. Of the three patients who developed regional metastasis, two patients had isolated lymph node failure, and the lymph node metastasis was included within the ENI field. When the distance between the PTVeni and PTVsrt is >2.0 cm, SBRT with selective ENI may therefore dosimetrically feasible. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K; Jang, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p 99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients.

  8. Anatomic and dosimetric changes in patients with head and neck cancer treated with an integrated MRI-tri-60Co teletherapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Govind; Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Chen, Allen M

    2016-11-01

    Prior studies have relied on CT to assess alterations in anatomy among patients undergoing radiation for head and neck cancer. We sought to determine the feasibility of using MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy to quantify these changes and to ascertain their potential dosimetric implications. 6 patients with head and neck cancer were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on a novel tri- 60 Co teletherapy system equipped with a 0.35-T MRI (VR, ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH) to 66-70 Gy in 33 fractions (fx). Pre-treatment MRIs on Fx 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 33 were imported into a contouring interface, where the primary gross tumour volume (GTV) and parotid glands were delineated. The centre of mass (COM) shifts for these structures were assessed relative to Day 1. Dosimetric data were co-registered with the MRIs, and doses to the GTV and parotid glands were assessed. Primary GTVs decreased significantly over the course of IMRT (median % volume loss, 38.7%; range, 29.5-72.0%; p < 0.05) at a median rate of 1.2%/fx (range, 0.92-2.2%/fx). Both the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands experienced significant volume loss (p < 0.05, for all) and shifted medially during IMRT. Weight loss correlated significantly with parotid gland volume loss and medial COM shift (p < 0.05). Integrated on-board MRI can be used to accurately contour and analyze primary GTVs and parotid glands over the course of IMRT. COM shifts and significant volume reductions were observed, confirming the results of prior CT-based exercises. Advances in knowledge: The superior resolution of on-board MRI may facilitate online adaptive replanning in the future.

  9. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richetti, Antonella; Fogliata, Antonella; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Pesce, Gianfranco; Salati, Emanuela; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2010-01-01

    To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc ® (RA) technology. Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts) were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions). Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC) is presented as well. From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI 95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC), presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects

  10. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Emanuela

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc® (RA technology. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC is presented as well. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC, presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. Conclusion RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects.

  11. SU-E-J-21: Setup Variability of Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated in the Prone Position and Dosimetric Comparison with the Supine Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A; Foster, J; Chu, W; Karotki, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre/Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cancer centers treat colorectal patients in the prone position on a belly board to minimize dose to the small bowel. That may potentially Result in patient setup instability with corresponding impact on dose delivery accuracy for highly conformal techniques such as IMRT/VMAT. Two aims of this work are 1) to investigate setup accuracy of rectum patients treated in the prone position on a belly board using CBCT and 2) to evaluate dosimetric impact on bladder and small bowel of treating rectum patients in supine vs. prone position. Methods: For the setup accuracy study, 10 patients were selected. Weekly CBCTs were acquired and matched to bone. The CBCT-determined shifts were recorded. For the dosimetric study, 7 prone-setup patients and 7 supine-setup patients were randomly selected from our clinical database. Various clinically relevant dose volume histogram values were recorded for the small bowel and bladder. Results: The CBCT-determined rotational shifts had a wide variation. For the dataset acquired at the time of this writing, the ranges of rotational setup errors for pitch, roll, and yaw were [−3.6° 4.7°], [−4.3° 3.2°], and [−1.4° 1.4°]. For the dosimetric study: the small bowel V(45Gy) and mean dose for the prone position was 5.6±12.1% and 18.4±6.2Gy (ranges indicate standard deviations); for the supine position the corresponding dose values were 12.9±15.8% and 24.7±8.8Gy. For the bladder, the V(30Gy) and mean dose for prone position were 68.7±12.7% and 38.4±3.3Gy; for supine position these dose values were 77.1±13.7% and 40.7±3.1Gy. Conclusion: There is evidence of significant rotational instability in the prone position. The OAR dosimetry study indicates that there are some patients that may still benefit from the prone position, though many patients can be safely treated supine.

  12. SU-E-J-170: Dosimetric Consequences of Uncorrected Rotational Setup Errors During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maso, L [Chicago, IL (United States); Forbang, R Teboh; Zhang, Y; Herman, J; Lee, J [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the dosimetric consequences of uncorrected rotational setup errors during SBRT for pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study utilizing data from ten (n=10) previously treated SBRT pancreas patients. For each original planning CT, we applied rotational transformations to derive additional CT images representative of possible rotational setup errors. This resulted in 6 different sets of rotational combinations, creating a total of 60 CT planning images. The patients’ clinical dosimetric plans were then applied to their corresponding rotated CT images. The 6 rotation sets encompassed a 3, 2 and 1-degree rotation in each rotational direction and a 3-degree in just the pitch, a 3-degree in just the yaw and a 3-degree in just the roll. After the dosimetric plan was applied to the rotated CT images, the resulting plan was then evaluated and compared with the clinical plan for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: PTV coverage, defined here by V33 throughout all of the patients’ clinical plans, ranged from 92–98%. After an n degree rotation in each rotational direction that range decreased to 68–87%, 85–92%, and 88– 94% for n=3, 2 and 1 respectively. Normal tissue sparing defined here by the proximal stomach V15 throughout all of the patients’ clinical plans ranged from 0–8.9 cc. After an n degree rotation in each rotational direction that range increased to 0–17 cc, 0–12 cc, and 0–10 cc for n=3, 2, and 1 respectively. Conclusion: For pancreatic SBRT, small rotational setup errors in the pitch, yaw and roll direction on average caused under dosage to PTV and over dosage to proximal normal tissue. The 1-degree rotation was on average the least detrimental to the normal tissue and the coverage of the PTV. The 3-degree yaw created on average the lowest increase in volume coverage to normal tissue. This research was sponsored by the AAPM Education Council through the AAPM Education and Research

  13. Dosimetric comparison of partial and whole breast external beam irradiation in the treatment of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Parda, David S.; Trombetta, Mark G.; Colonias, Athanasios; Werts, E. Day; Miller, Linda; Miften, Moyed

    2007-01-01

    A dosimetric comparison was performed on external-beam three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (PBI) and whole breast irradiation (WBI) plans for patients enrolled in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol at our institution. Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with either PBI (12 patients) or WBI (12 patients). In the PBI arm, the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 38.5 Gy at 3.85 Gy per fraction twice daily using a four-field noncoplanar beam setup. A minimum 6 h interval was required between fractions. In the WBI arm, the whole breast including the entirety of the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction daily using opposed tangential beams. The lumpectomy cavity volume, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV E VAL), and critical structure volumes were contoured for both the PBI and WBI patients. Dosimetric parameters, dose volume histograms (DVHs), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for target and critical structures were compared. Dosimetric results show the PBI plans, compared to the WBI plans, have smaller hot spots in the PTV E VAL (maximum dose: 104.2% versus 110.9%) and reduced dose to the ipsilateral breast (V50: 48.6% versus 92.1% and V100: 10.2% versus 50.5%), contralateral breast (V3: 0.16% versus 2.04%), ipsilateral lung (V30: 5.8% versus 12.7%), and thyroid (maximum dose: 0.5% versus 2.0%) with p values ≤0.01. However, similar dose coverage of the PTV E VAL (98% for PBI and 99% for WBI, on average) was observed and the dose difference for other critical structures was clinically insignificant in both arms. The gEUD data analysis showed the reduction of dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung, contralateral breast and thyroid. In addition, preliminary dermatologic adverse event assessment data suggested reduced skin toxicity for patients treated with the PBI technique

  14. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; D'Agostino, Harry; Pham, Dat C.; Bajwa, Abubakr A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  15. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated, conformal, and four-field pelvic radiotherapy boost plans for gynecologic cancer: a retrospective planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Philip; Yeo, Inhwan; Perkins, Gregory; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as an alternative to conformal radiotherapy (CRT) or 4-field box boost (4FB) in women with gynecologic malignancies who are unsuitable for brachytherapy for technical or medical reasons. Dosimetric and toxicity information was analyzed for 12 patients with cervical (8), endometrial (2) or vaginal (2) cancer previously treated with external beam pelvic radiotherapy and a CRT boost. Optimized IMRT boost treatment plans were then developed for each of the 12 patients and compared to CRT and 4FB plans. The plans were compared in terms of dose conformality and critical normal tissue avoidance. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 151 cm 3 (range 58–512 cm 3 ). The median overlap of the contoured rectum with the PTV was 15 (1–56) %, and 11 (4–35) % for the bladder. Two of the 12 patients, both with large PTVs and large overlap of the contoured rectum and PTV, developed grade 3 rectal bleeding. The dose conformity was significantly improved with IMRT over CRT and 4FB (p ≤ 0.001 for both). IMRT also yielded an overall improvement in the rectal and bladder dose-volume distributions relative to CRT and 4FB. The volume of rectum that received the highest doses (>66% of the prescription) was reduced by 22% (p < 0.001) with IMRT relative to 4FB, and the bladder volume was reduced by 19% (p < 0.001). This was at the expense of an increase in the volume of these organs receiving doses in the lowest range (<33%). These results indicate that IMRT can improve target coverage and reduce dose to critical structures in gynecologic patients receiving an external beam radiotherapy boost. This dosimetric advantage will be integrated with other patient and treatment-specific factors, particularly internal tumor movement during fractionated radiotherapy, in the context of a future image-guided radiation therapy study

  16. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org; D' Agostino, Harry [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Pham, Dat C. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Bajwa, Abubakr A. [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  17. SU-E-T-327: Dosimetric Impact of Beam Energy for Intrabeam Breast IORT with Different Residual Cancer Cell Distributions After Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwid, M; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of beam energy to the IORT treatment of residual cancer cells with different cancer cell distributions after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: The three dimensional (3D) radiation doses of IORT using a 4-cm spherical applicator at the energy of 40 keV and 50 keV were separately calculated at different depths of the postsurgical tumor bed. The modified linear quadratic model (MLQ) was used to estimate the radiobiological response of the tumor cells assuming different radio-sensitivities and density distributions. The impact of radiation was evaluated for two types of breast cancer cell lines (α /β=10, and α /β =3.8) at 20 Gy dose prescribed at the applicator surface. Cancer cell distributions in the postsurgical tissue field were assumed to be a Gaussian with the standard deviations of 0.5, 1 and 2 mm respectively, namely the cancer cell infiltrations of 1.5, 3, and 6 mm respectively. The surface cancer cell percentage was assumed to be 0.01%, 0.1%, 1% and 10% separately. The equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all the scenarios were calculated. Results: The EUDs were found to be dependent on the distributions of cancer cells, but independent of the cancer cell radio-sensitivities and the density at the surface. EUDs of 50 keV are 1% larger than that of 40 keV. For a prescription dose of 20 Gy, EUDs of 50 keV beam are 17.52, 16.21 and 13.14 Gy respectively for 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm of the standard deviation of cancer cell Gaussian distributions. Conclusion: The impact by selected energies of IORT beams is very minimal. When energy is changed from 50 keV to 40 keV, the EUDs are almost the same for the same cancer cell distribution. 40 keV can be safely used as an alternative of 50 keV beam in IORT

  18. SU-E-T-327: Dosimetric Impact of Beam Energy for Intrabeam Breast IORT with Different Residual Cancer Cell Distributions After Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwid, M; Zhang, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of beam energy to the IORT treatment of residual cancer cells with different cancer cell distributions after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: The three dimensional (3D) radiation doses of IORT using a 4-cm spherical applicator at the energy of 40 keV and 50 keV were separately calculated at different depths of the postsurgical tumor bed. The modified linear quadratic model (MLQ) was used to estimate the radiobiological response of the tumor cells assuming different radio-sensitivities and density distributions. The impact of radiation was evaluated for two types of breast cancer cell lines (α /β=10, and α /β =3.8) at 20 Gy dose prescribed at the applicator surface. Cancer cell distributions in the postsurgical tissue field were assumed to be a Gaussian with the standard deviations of 0.5, 1 and 2 mm respectively, namely the cancer cell infiltrations of 1.5, 3, and 6 mm respectively. The surface cancer cell percentage was assumed to be 0.01%, 0.1%, 1% and 10% separately. The equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all the scenarios were calculated. Results: The EUDs were found to be dependent on the distributions of cancer cells, but independent of the cancer cell radio-sensitivities and the density at the surface. EUDs of 50 keV are 1% larger than that of 40 keV. For a prescription dose of 20 Gy, EUDs of 50 keV beam are 17.52, 16.21 and 13.14 Gy respectively for 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm of the standard deviation of cancer cell Gaussian distributions. Conclusion: The impact by selected energies of IORT beams is very minimal. When energy is changed from 50 keV to 40 keV, the EUDs are almost the same for the same cancer cell distribution. 40 keV can be safely used as an alternative of 50 keV beam in IORT.

  19. Investigation of the dosimetric accuracy of the isocenter shifting method in prostate cancer patients with and without hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Kinsey, Erica; Xia Ping

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) enables compensation for prostate movement by shifting the treatment isocenter to track the prostate on a daily basis. Although shifting the isocenter can alter the source to skin distances (SSDs) and the effective depth of the target volume, it is commonly assumed that these changes have a negligible dosimetric effect, and therefore, the number of monitor units delivered is usually not adjusted. However, it is unknown whether or not this assumption is valid for patient with hip prostheses, which frequently contain high density materials. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective study to investigate dosimetric effect of the isocenter shifting method for prostate patients with and without hip prostheses. For each patient, copies of the prostate volume were shifted by up to 1.5 cm from the original position to simulate prostate movement in 0.5 cm increments. Subsequently, 12 plans were created for each patient by creating a copy of the original plan for each prostate position with the isocenter shifted to track the position of the shifted prostate. The dose to the prostate was then recalculated for each plan. For patients with hip prostheses, plans were created both with and without lateral beam angles entering through the prostheses. Results: Without isocenter shifting to compensate for prostate motion of 1.5 cm, the dose to the 95% of the prostate (D-95%) changed by an average of 30% and by up to 64%. This was reduced to less than 3% with the isocenter shifting method. It was found that for patients with hip prostheses, this technique worked best for treatment plans that avoided beam angles passing through the prostheses. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that the isocenter shifting method can accurately deliver dose to the prostate even in patients with hip prostheses.

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of a novel high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal / interstitial brachytherapy applicator for gastrointestinal and bladder cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamiri, Seyyed Mahmoud Reza; Najarian, Siamak; Jaberi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one of the accepted treatment modalities in gastro‐intestinal tract and bladder carcinomas. Considering the shortcoming of contact brachytherapy routinely used in gastrointestinal tract in treatment of big tumors or invasive method of bladder treatment, an intraluminal applicator with the capability of insertion into the tumor depth seems to be useful. This study presents some dosimetric evaluations to introduce this applicator to the clinical use. The radiation attenuation characteristics of the applicator were evaluated by means of two dosimetric methods including well‐type chamber and radiochromic film. The proposed 110 cm long applicator has a flexible structure made of stainless steel for easy passage through lumens and a needle tip to drill into big tumors. The 2 mm diameter of the applicator is thick enough for source transition, while easy passage through any narrow lumen such as endoscope or cystoscope working channel is ensured. Well‐chamber results showed an acceptably low attenuation of this steel springy applicator. Performing absolute dosimetry resulted in a correlation coefficient of R=0.9916(p‐value≈10−7) between standard interstitial applicator and the one proposed in this article. This study not only introduces a novel applicator with acceptable attenuation but also proves the response independency of the GAFCHROMIC EBT films to energy. By applying the dose response of the applicator in the treatment planning software, it can be used as a new intraluminal / interstitial applicator. PACS number: 87.53.Bn, 87.53.Jw, 29.40.Cs

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of 6 MV and 15 MV Single Arc Rapidarc to Helical TomoTherapy for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jing; Yue Jinbo; McLawhorn, Robert; Yang Wensha; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dunlap, Neal E.; Sheng Ke; Yin Fangfang; Benedict, Stanley H.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a planning study to compare Varian's RapidArc (RA) and helical TomoTherapy (HT) for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Three intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for 8 patients with pancreatic cancer: one using HT with 6-MV beam (Plan HT6 ), one using single-arc RA with 6-MV beam (Plan RA6 ), and one using single-arc RA with 15-MV beam (Plan RA15 ). Dosimetric indices including high/low conformality index (CI 100% /CI 50% ), heterogeneity index (HI), monitor units (MUs), and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The mean CI 100% was statistically equivalent with respect to the 2 treatment techniques, as well as beam energy (0.99, 1.01, and 1.02 for Plan HT6 , Plan RA6 , and Plan RA156, respectively). The CI 50% and HI were improved in both RA plans over the HT plan. The RA plans significantly reduced MU (MU RA6 = 697, MU RA15 = 548) compared with HT (MU HT6 = 6177, p = 0.008 in both cases). The mean maximum cord dose was decreased from 29.6 Gy in Plan H T6 to 21.6 Gy (p = 0.05) in Plan RA6 and 21.7 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan RA15 . The mean bowel dose decreased from 17.2 Gy in Plan HT6 to 15.2 Gy (p = 0.03) in Plan RA6 and 15.0 Gy (p = 0.03) Plan RA15 . The mean liver dose decreased from 8.4 Gy in Plan HT6 to 6.3 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan RA6 and 6.2 Gy in Plan RA15 . Variations of the mean dose to the duodenum, kidneys, and stomach were statistically insignificant. RA and HT can both deliver conformal dose distributions to target volumes while limiting the dose to surrounding OARs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Dosimetric advantages might be gained by using RA over HT by reducing the dose to OARs and total MUs used for treatment.

  2. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Shawn; Croke, Jennifer; Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Malone, Colin; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle; Nyiri, Balazs; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS

  3. Initial Report of a Prospective Dosimetric and Clinical Feasibility Trial Demonstrates the Potential of Protons to Increase the Therapeutic Ratio in Breast Cancer Compared With Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Julie A., E-mail: jbradley@floridaproton.org; Dagan, Roi; Ho, Meng Wei; Rutenberg, Michael; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between proton therapy (PT) and conventional radiation and determine the feasibility of PT for regional nodal irradiation (RNI) in women with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2012 to 2014, 18 women (stage IIA-IIIB) requiring RNI prospectively enrolled on a pilot study. Median age was 51.8 years (range, 42-73 years). The cohort included breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and mastectomy patients and right- and left-sided cancers. Treatment targets and organs at risk were delineated on computed tomography scans, and PT and conventional plans were developed. Toxicity was prospectively recorded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. A Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test compared the dose-volume parameters. The primary endpoint was a reduction in cardiac V5. Results: Median follow-up was 20 months (range, 2-31 months). For all patients, the PT plan better met the dosimetric goals and was used for treatment. Proton therapy alone was used for 10 patients (9 postmastectomy, 1 after BCT) and combined proton–photon in 8 (6 BCT, 2 postmastectomy with immediate expander reconstruction). Proton therapy improved coverage of level 2 axilla (P=.0005). Adequate coverage of internal mammary nodes was consistently achieved with PT (median D95, 50.3 Gy; range, 46.6-52.1 Gy) but not with conventional radiation therapy (median D95, 48.2 Gy; range, 40.8-55 Gy; P=.0005). Median cardiac V5 was 0.6% with PT and 16.3% with conventional radiation (P<.0001). Median ipsilateral lung V5 and V20 were improved with PT (median V5 35.3% vs 60.5% [P<.0001]; and median V20, 21.6% vs 35.5% [P<.0001]). Grade 3 dermatitis developed in 4 patients (22%), which was the only grade 3 toxicity. No grade 4+ toxicities developed. Conclusion: Proton therapy for RNI after mastectomy or BCT significantly improves cardiac dose, especially for left-sided patients, and lung V5 and V20 in all patients without excessive acute toxicity

  4. SU-E-P-58: Dosimetric Study of Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy for Postoperation of Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target can achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.

  5. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Kumar Rout

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the continual diversity between flattening photon beam (FB and Flattening Filter Free (FFF photon beams for localized prostate cancer; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beam for this type of treatment.Methods: Eight prostate cases including seminal vesicles selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 78 Gy (56 Gy to PTVP and an additional 22 Gy to PTVB. For all cases, treatment plans using 6MV with FB and FFF beams with identical dose-volume constraints, arc angles and number of arcs were developed. The dose volume histograms for both techniques were compared for primary target volume and critical structures.Results: A low Sigma index (FFF: 1.65 + 0.361; FB: 1.725 + 0.39 indicating improved dose homogeneity in FFF beam. Conformity index (FFF: 0.994 + 0.01; FB: 0.993 + 0.01 is comparable for both techniques. Minimal difference of Organ at risk mean dose was observed. Normal tissue integral dose in FB plan resulted 1.5% lower than FFF plan. All the plans displayed significant increase (1.18 times for PTVP and 1.11 for PTBB in the average number of necessary MU with FFF beam.Conclusion: Diversity between FB and FFF beam plans were found. FFF beam accelerator has been utilized to develop clinically acceptable Rapid Arc treatment plans for prostate cancer with 6 MV.---------------------------------Cite this article as: Rout BK, Muralidhar KR, Ali M, Shekar MC, Kumar A. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:02046.  DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.6

  6. SU-F-J-124: Reduction in Dosimetric Impact of Motion Using VMAT Compared to IMRT in Hypofractionated Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranath, B; Xiong, J; Happersett, L; Mageras, G; Zhang, P; Hunt, M [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the dosimetric impact of motion management correction strategies during VMAT and IMRT for hypofractionated prostate treatment. Methods: Two arc VMAT and 9 field IMRT plans were generated for two prostate cancer patients undergoing hypofractionated radiotherapy (7.5Gy × 5 and 8Gy × 5). 212 motion traces were retrospectively extracted from treatment records of prostate cancer patients with implanted Calypso beacons. Dose to the CTV and normal tissues was reconstructed for each trace and plan taking into account the actual treatment delivery time. Following motion correction scenarios were simulated: (1) VMAT plan – (a) No correction, (b) correction between arcs, (c) correction every 20 degrees of gantry rotation and (2) IMRT plan - (a) No correction,(b) correction between fields. Two mm action threshold for position correction was assumed. The 5–95% confidence interval (CI) range was extracted from the family of DVHs for each correction scenario. Results: Treatment duration for 8Gy plan (VMAT vs IMRT) was 3 vs 12 mins and for 7.5Gy plan was 3 vs 9 mins. In the absence of correction, the VMAT 5–−95% CI dose spread was, on average, less than the IMRT dose spread by 2% for CTVD95, 9% for rectalwall (RW) D1cc and 9% for bladderwall (BW) D53. Further, VMAT b/w arcs correction strategy reduced the spread about the planned value compared to IMRT b/w fields correction by: 1% for CTVD95, 2.6% for RW1cc and 2% for BWD53. VMAT 20 degree strategy led to greater reduction in dose spread compared to IMRT by: 2% for CTVD95, 4.5% for RW1cc and 6.7% for BWD53. Conclusion: In the absence of a correction strategy, the limited motion during VMAT’s shorter delivery times translates into less motion-induced dosimetric degradation than IMRT. Performing limited periodic motion correction during VMAT can yield excellent conformity to planned values that is superior to IMRT. This work was partially supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  7. SU-E-J-94: Geometric and Dosimetric Evaluation of Deformation Image Registration Algorithms Using Virtual Phantoms Generated From Patients with Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z; Greskovich, J; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To generate virtual phantoms with clinically relevant deformation and use them to objectively evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients undergoing adaptive 3DCRT planning were selected. For each patient, a pair of planning CT (pCT) and replanning CT (rCT) were used as the basis for virtual phantom generation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTV, lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart) on pCT and rCT. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was used to deform pCT to generate a simulated replanning CT (srCT) that was closely matched to rCT. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten virtual phantoms. The images, ROIs, and doses were mapped from pCT to srCT using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.85 to 0.96 for Demons, from 0.86 to 0.97 for intensity-based, and from 0.76 to 0.95 for B-Spline. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.2 to 5.4 mm for Demons, from 2.3 to 6.8 mm for intensity-based, and from 2.4 to 11.4 mm for B-Spline. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.2 to 0.6 Gy for Demons, from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy for intensity-based, and from 0.5 to 1.5 Gy for B-Spline. Conclusion: Virtual phantoms were modeled after patients with lung cancer and were clinically relevant for adaptive radiotherapy treatment replanning. Virtual phantoms with known DVFs serve as references and can provide a fair comparison when evaluating different DIRs. Demons and intensity-based DIRs were shown to have smaller geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than B-Spline. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; J Greskovich: None; P Xia

  8. Dosimetric comparison of three intensity-modulated radiation therapies for left breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huai-Wen; Hu, Bo; Xie, Chen; Wang, Yun-Lai

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate dosimetric differences of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in target and normal tissues after breast-conserving surgery. IMRT five-field plan I, IMRT six-field plan II, and field-in-field-direct machine parameter optimization-IMRT plan III were designed for each of the 50 patients. One-way analysis of variance was performed to compare differences, and P mean dose (D mean ) for the heart (P optimization-IMRT plans III can reduce doses and volumes to the lungs and heart better while maintaining satisfying conformity index and homogeneity index of target. Nevertheless, plan II neglects target movements caused by respiration. In the same manner, plan III can substantially reduce MU and shorten patient treatment time. Therefore, plan III, which considers target movement caused by respiration, is a more practical radiation mode. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Dosimetric comparison of field in field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique with conformal radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, T.; Alco, G.; Zengin, F.; Atilla, S.; Dincer, M.; Igdem, S.; Okkan, S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to be able to implement the field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (FiF) technique in our daily practice for breast radiotherapy. To do this, we performed a dosimetric comparison. Treatment plans were produced for 20 consecutive patients. FiF plans and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), doses in irradiated soft tissue outside the target volume (SST), ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts (MU) required for treatment. Averaged values were compared using Student's t-test. With FiF, the DHI is improved 7.0% and 5.7%, respectively (P<0.0001) over the bilateral and lateral wedge CRT techniques. When the targeted volumes received 105% and 110% of the prescribed dose in the PTV were compared, significant decreases are found with the FiF technique. With the 105% dose, the SST, heart, and ipsilateral lung doses and the MU counts were also significantly lower with the FiF technique. The FiF technique, compared to CRT, for breast radiotherapy enables significantly better dose distribution in the PTV. Significant differences are also found for soft tissue volume, the ipsilateral lung dose, and the heart dose. Considering the decreased MUs needed for treatment, the FiF technique is preferred over tangential CRT. (author)

  10. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D 90 of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD 2 ) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D mean (EQD 2 ) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD 2 ) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  11. Life-Time Dosimetric Assessment for Mice and Rats Exposed in Reverberation Chambers of the 2-Year NTP Cancer Bioassay Study on Cell Phone Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yijian; Capstick, Myles; Kuehn, Sven; Wilson, Perry; Ladbury, John; Koepke, Galen; McCormick, David L; Melnick, Ronald L; Kuster, Niels

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present the detailed life-time dosimetry analysis for rodents exposed in the reverberation exposure system designed for the two-year cancer bioassay study conducted by the National Toxicology Program of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study required the well-controlled and characterized exposure of individually housed, unrestrained mice at 1900 MHz and rats at 900 MHz, frequencies chosen to give best uniformity exposure of organs and tissues. The wbSAR, the peak spatial SAR and the organ specific SAR as well as the uncertainty and variation due to the exposure environment, differences in the growth rates, and animal posture were assessed. Compared to the wbSAR, the average exposure of the high-water-content tissues (blood, heart, lung) were higher by ~4 dB, while the low-loss tissues (bone and fat) were less by ~9 dB. The maximum uncertainty over the exposure period for the SAR was estimated to be <49% (k=2) for the rodents whereas the relative uncertainty between the group was <14% (k=1). The instantaneous variation (averaged over 1 min) was <13% (k=1), which is small compared to other long term exposure research projects. These detailed dosimetric results empowers comparison with other studies and provides a reference for studies of long-term biological effects of exposure of rodents to RF energy.

  12. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Pelvic Lymphocele After Surgery: Clinical and Dosimetric Data of 30 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Colangione, Sarah Pia; Fodor, Cristiana; Russo, Stefania; Cambria, Raffaella; Zerini, Dario; Bonora, Maria; Cecconi, Agnese; Vischioni, Barbara; Vavassori, Andrea; Matei, Deliu Victor; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Musi, Gennaro; Mazzoleni, Federica; Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of irradiation after prostatectomy in the presence of asymptomatic pelvic lymphocele. The inclusion criteria for this study were: (1) patients referred for postoperative (adjuvant or salvage) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; 66-69 Gy in 30 fractions); (2) detection of postoperative pelvic lymphocele at the simulation computed tomography [CT] scan; (3) no clinical symptoms; and (4) written informed consent. Radiotherapy toxicity and occurrence of symptoms or complications of lymphocele were analyzed. Dosimetric data (IMRT plans) and the modification of lymphocele volume during radiotherapy (cone beam CT [CBCT] scan) were evaluated. Between January 2011 and July 2013, in 30 of 308 patients (10%) treated with radiotherapy after prostatectomy, pelvic lymphocele was detected on the simulation CT. The median lymphocele volume was 47 cm(3) (range, 6-467.3 cm(3)). Lymphocele was not included in planning target volume (PTV) in 8 cases (27%). Maximum dose to lymphocele was 57 Gy (range, 5.7-73.3 Gy). Radiotherapy was well tolerated. In all but 2 patients, lymphoceles remained asymptomatic. Lymphocele drainage-because of symptom occurrence-had to be performed in 2 patients during IMRT and in one patient, 7 weeks after IMRT. CBCT at the end of IMRT showed reduction in lymphocele volume and position compared with the initial data (median reduction of 37%), more pronounced in lymphoceles included in PTV. Radiotherapy after prostatectomy in the presence of pelvic asymptomatic lymphocele is feasible with acceptable acute and late toxicity. The volume of lymphoceles decreased during radiotherapy and this phenomenon might require intermediate radiotherapy plan evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lessons from the Contraceptive CHOICE Project: The Hull LARC Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, James; Guthrie, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Aim To discover whether a hand-out explaining the benefits of intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs) and implants could increase their uptake in Hull, UK. Methods We developed a simple double-sided A4 hand-out. On one side was a script with pictures of copper and levonorgestrel IUCs beside a 20-pence coin and of an implant beside a hairgrip. On the other side was the three-tiered effectiveness chart published in the textbook Contraceptive Technology. We implemented the project in family planning (FP), abortion and antenatal clinics and GP practices. The plan was that the receptionist would give the hand-out to every woman and ask her to read it before seeing a clinician. We evaluated it in FP clinics and GP practices because routine electronic monitoring reports were available only for these. Results There was no impact in GP practices. There was no overall impact in FP clinics, with the exception of the service hub, in which there was an increase in the proportion of women receiving IUCs or implants of 15.0% between the periods October 2011-April 2012 and May 2012-November 2012 (p=0.0002). This clinic is open on six days per week and has permanent sexual health staff on the reception desk. Impact fell when a change in clinic procedure. The proportion returned to baseline in December 2012-November 2013, when a change in clinic procedure to reduce waiting times caused staff to stop dispensing handouts. Conclusion This was not a formal study, so there was no research coordinator to monitor the project. We think there was no impact among GPs because the project was never implemented by them. The project was poorly implemented at the four satellite FP clinics. Only the service hub implemented the project, where it had a clear impact. We conclude that when implemented as intended this simple extremely low-cost LARC intervention was highly effective and also extremely cost effective. PMID:25236471

  14. Evolution of dosimetric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this oration evolution of the dosimetric phantoms for radiation protection and for medical use is briefly reviewed. Some details of the development of Indian Reference Phantom for internal dose estimation are also presented

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  16. SU-E-T-125: Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Robotic Versus Traditional Linac Platform in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, T; Rella, J; Yang, J; Sims, C; Fung, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Recent development of an MLC for robotic external beam radiotherapy has the potential of new clinical application in conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. This study offers a dosimetric comparison of IMRT plans using Cyberknife with MLC versus conventional linac plans. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients treated on a traditional linac with IMRT to 7920cGy at 180cGy/fraction were randomly selected. GTVs were defined as prostate plus proximal seminal vesicles. PTVs were defined as GTV+8mm in all directions except 5mm posteriorly. Conventional IMRT planning was performed on Philips Pinnacle and delivered on a standard linac with CBCT and 10mm collimator leaf width. For each case a Cyberknife plan was created using Accuray Multiplan with same CT data set, contours, and dose constraints. All dosimetric data was transferred to third party software for independent computation of contour volumes and DVH. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using total MU, treatment time, number of beams, and number of segments. Results: Evaluation criteria including percent target coverage, homogeneity index, and conformity index were found to be comparable. All dose constraints from QUANTEC were found to be statistically similar except rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy. Average rectum V50Gy was lower for robotic IMRT (30.07%±6.57) versus traditional (34.73%±3.62, p=0.0130). Average bladder V65Gy was lower for robotic (17.87%±12.74) versus traditional (21.03%±11.93, p=0.0405). Linac plans utilized 9 coplanar beams, 48.9±3.8 segments, and 19381±2399MU. Robotic plans utilized 38.4±9.0 non-coplanar beams, 85.5±21.0 segments and 42554.71±16381.54 MU. The average treatment was 15.02±0.60 minutes for traditional versus 20.90±2.51 for robotic. Conclusion: The robotic IMRT plans were comparable to the traditional IMRT plans in meeting the target volume dose objectives. Critical structure dose constraints were largely comparable although statistically significant

  17. SU-F-T-14: Dosimetric Impacts of Various Uncertainties in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy: Are Conventional Point Doses Good Surrogates for 3D Dosimetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Li, Z [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Zheng, D [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Zhang, X; Narayanasamy, G; Morrill, S; Penagaricano, J; Paudel, N [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the context of evaluating dosimetric impacts of a variety of uncertainties involved in HDR Tandem-and-Ovoid treatment, to study the correlations between conventional point doses and 3D volumetric doses. Methods: For 5 cervical cancer patients treated with HDR T&O, 150 plans were retrospectively created to study dosimetric impacts of the following uncertainties: (1) inter-fractional applicator displacement between two treatment fractions within a single insertion by applying Fraction#1 plan to Fraction#2 CT; (2) positional dwell error simulated from −5mm to 5mm in 1mm steps; (3) simulated temporal dwell error of 0.05s, 0.1s, 0.5s, and 1s. The original plans were based on point dose prescription, from which the volume covered by the prescription dose was generated as the pseudo target volume to study the 3D target dose effect. OARs were contoured. The point and volumetric dose errors were calculated by taking the differences between original and simulated plans. The correlations between the point and volumetric dose errors were analyzed. Results: For the most clinically relevant positional dwell uncertainty of 1mm, temporal uncertainty of 0.05s, and inter-fractional applicator displacement within the same insertion, the mean target D90 and V100 deviation were within 1%. Among these uncertainties, the applicator displacement showed the largest potential target coverage impact (2.6% on D90) as well as the OAR dose impact (2.5% and 3.4% on bladder D2cc and rectum D2cc). The Spearman correlation analysis shows a correlation coefficient of 0.43 with a p-value of 0.11 between target D90 coverage and H point dose. Conclusion: With the most clinically relevant positional and temporal dwell uncertainties and patient interfractional applicator displacement within the same insertion, the dose error is within clinical acceptable range. The lack of correlation between H point and 3D volumetric dose errors is a motivator for the use of 3D treatment planning in

  18. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  19. Influence of jaw tracking in intensity-modulated and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for head and neck cancers: a dosimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Karthick Raj [Research and Development Centre, Bharathiar University, Tamilnadu (India); Upadhayay, Sagar [Radiation Oncology, Kathmandu Cancer Center, Bhaktapur (Nepal); Das, K. J. Maria [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2017-03-15

    To Study the dosimetric advantage of the Jaw tracking technique in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for Head and Neck Cancers. We retrospectively selected 10 previously treated head and neck cancer patients stage (T1/T2, N1, M0) in this study. All the patients were planned for IMRT and VMAT with simultaneous integrated boost technique. IMRT and VMAT plans were performed with jaw tracking (JT) and with static jaw (SJ) technique by keeping the same constraints and priorities for a particular patient. Target conformity, dose to the critical structures and low dose volumes were recorded and analyzed for IMRT and VMAT plans with and without JT for all the patients. The conformity index average of all patients followed by standard deviation (x¯x¯ ± σx¯σx¯) of the JT-IMRT, SJ-IMRT, JT-VMAT, and SJ-VMAT were 1.72 ± 0.56, 1.67 ± 0.57, 1.83 ± 0.65, and 1.85 ± 0.64, and homogeneity index were 0.059 ± 0.05, 0.064 ± 0.05, 0.064 ± 0.04, and 0.064 ± 0.05. JT-IMRT shows significant mean reduction in right parotid and left parotid shows of 7.64% (p < 0.001) and 7.45% (p < 0.001) compare to SJ-IMRT. JT-IMRT plans also shows considerable dose reduction to thyroid, inferior constrictors, spinal cord and brainstem compared to the SJ-IMRT plans. Significant dose reductions were observed for critical structure in the JT-IMRT compared to SJ-IMRT technique. In JT-VMAT plans dose reduction to the critical structure were not significant compared to the SJ-IMRT due to relatively lesser monitor units.

  20. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z; Shang, Q; Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice

  1. Potential dosimetric benefits of adaptive tumor tracking over the internal target volume concept for stereotactic body radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karava, Konstantina; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Riesterer, Oliver; Roesch, Johannes; Glatz, Stefan; Klöck, Stephan; Guckenberger, Matthias; Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie

    2017-11-09

    Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer has two major challenges: (I) the tumor is adjacent to several critical organs and, (II) the mobility of both, the tumor and its surrounding organs at risk (OARs). A treatment planning study simulating stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic tumors with both the internal target volume (ITV) concept and the tumor tracking approach was performed. The two respiratory motion-management techniques were compared in terms of doses to the target volume and organs at risk. Two volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans (5 × 5 Gy) were created for each of the 12 previously treated pancreatic cancer patients, one using the ITV concept and one the tumor tracking approach. To better evaluate the overall dose delivered to the moving tumor volume, 4D dose calculations were performed on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) size for each technique was analyzed. Target and OAR dose parameters were reported and analyzed for both 3D and 4D dose calculation. Tumor motion ranged from 1.3 to 11.2 mm. Tracking led to a reduction of PTV size (max. 39.2%) accompanied with significant better tumor coverage (p<0.05, paired Wilcoxon signed rank test) both in 3D and 4D dose calculations and improved organ at risk sparing. Especially for duodenum, stomach and liver, the mean dose was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tracking for 3D and 4D dose calculations. By using an adaptive tumor tracking approach for respiratory-induced pancreatic motion management, a significant reduction in PTV size can be achieved, which subsequently facilitates treatment planning, and improves organ dose sparing. The dosimetric benefit of tumor tracking is organ and patient-specific.

  2. Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Proton Beam-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Dosimetric Comparison With Photon Plans Highlights Importance of Range Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Panahandeh, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Westover, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; Willers, Henning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Proton beam radiotherapy has been proposed for use in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. In the present study, we sought to analyze how the range uncertainties for protons might affect its therapeutic utility for SBRT. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer received SBRT with two to three proton beams. The patients underwent repeat planning for photon SBRT, and the dose distributions to the normal and tumor tissues were compared with the proton plans. The dosimetric comparisons were performed within an operational definition of high- and low-dose regions representing volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In high-dose regions, the average volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescription dose was larger for proton than for photon SBRT (i.e., 46.5 cm{sup 3} vs. 33.5 cm{sup 3}; p = .009, respectively). The corresponding conformity indexes were 2.46 and 1.56. For tumors in close proximity to the chest wall, the chest wall volume receiving {>=}30 Gy was 7 cm{sup 3} larger for protons than for photons (p = .06). In low-dose regions, the lung volume receiving {>=}5 Gy and maximum esophagus dose were smaller for protons than for photons (p = .019 and p < .001, respectively). Conclusions: Protons generate larger high-dose regions than photons because of range uncertainties. This can result in nearby healthy organs (e.g., chest wall) receiving close to the prescription dose, at least when two to three beams are used, such as in our study. Therefore, future research should explore the benefit of using more than three beams to reduce the dose to nearby organs. Additionally, clinical subgroups should be identified that will benefit from proton SBRT.

  3. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  4. Optimal Patient Positioning (Prone Versus Supine) for VMAT in Gynecologic Cancer: A Dosimetric Study on the Effect of Different Margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T., E-mail: s.heijkoop@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Westerveld, Henrike; Bijker, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Feije, Raphael; Sharfo, Abdul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wieringen, Niek van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mens, Jan Willem M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose/Objective: It is unknown whether the historically found dosimetric advantages of treating gynecologic cancer with the patient in a prone position with use of a small-bowel displacement device (belly-board) remain when volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) is used and whether these advantages depend on the necessary margin between clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV). The aim of this study is to determine the best patient position (prone or supine) in terms of sparing organs at risk (OAR) for various CTV-to-PTV margins and VMAT dose delivery. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board—approved study, 26 patients with gynecologic cancer scheduled for primary (9) or postoperative (17) radiation therapy were scanned in a prone position on a belly-board and in a supine position on the same day. The primary tumor CTV, nodal CTV, bladder, bowel, and rectum were delineated on both scans. The PTVs were created each with a different margin for the primary tumor and nodal CTV. The VMAT plans were generated with our in-house system for automated treatment planning. For all margin combinations, the supine and prone plans were compared with consideration of all OAR dose-volume parameters but with highest priority given to bowel cavity V{sub 45Gy} (cm{sup 3}). Results: For both groups, the prone position reduced the bowel cavity V{sub 45Gy}, in particular for nodal margins ≥10 mm (ΔV{sub 45Gy} = 23.9 ± 10.6 cm{sup 3}). However, for smaller margins, the advantage was much less pronounced (ΔV{sub 45Gy} = 6.5 ± 3.0 cm{sup 3}) and did not reach statistical significance. The rectum mean dose (D{sub mean}) was significantly lower (ΔD{sub mean} = 2.5 ± 0.3 Gy) in the prone position for both patient groups and for all margins, and the bladder D{sub mean} was significantly lower in the supine position (ΔD{sub mean} = 2.6 ± 0.4 Gy) only for the postoperative group. The advantage of the prone position was not present if it

  5. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT and modulated arc-therapy techniques in the treatment of cervical cancers; Comparaison dosimetrique des techniques de RCMI et d'arctherapie modulee dans le traitement des cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard-Oldrini, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Huger, S.; Marchesi, V.; Bouziz, D.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the dosimetric comparison of two techniques used for the treatment of cervical cancers: the intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) with static beams and modulated arc-therapy with RapidArc. The treatment plans of 15 patients have been compared. The clinical target volume (CTV) comprises the gross target volume, the cervix, the upper third of the vagina, and ganglionary areas. The previsional target volume comprises the clinical target volume and a one centimetre margin. Organs at risk are rectum, bladder, intestine and bone marrow. Arc-therapy seems to provide a better sparing of intestine that IMRT, while maintaining a good coverage of the previsional target volume and decreasing treatment duration. Short communication

  6. Dosimetric comparison of standard bi-dimensional radiotherapy, mono-isocentric three-dimensional and arc-therapy for a bilateral breast cancer case with ganglionary attack; Comparaison dosimetrique pour un cas de cancer du sein bilateral avec atteinte ganglionnaire de la radiotherapie bidimensionnelle standard, la radiotherapie tridimensionnelle mono-isocentrique et l'arctherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, A. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Bodez, V.; Alric, K.; Chastel, D.; Mege, A. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Avignon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at determining the optimal radiotherapy technique for a patient operated from a bilateral breast cancer with ganglionary attack and peculiar thoracic conformation. A dosimetric study has been performed. Target volumes and lung and heart coverages have been compared for three techniques: bi-dimensional and three-dimensional radiotherapy, and arc-therapy. It appears that arc-therapy would allow a dosimetric and therapeutic duration gain without improving the target volume coverage while increasing doses delivered to organs at risk. Short communication

  7. Standardized Index of Shape (SIS): a quantitative DCE-MRI parameter to discriminate responders by non-responders after neoadjuvant therapy in LARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Mario; Granata, Vincenza [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Radiology; Sansone, Mario [Naples Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' (Italy). Dept. of Biomedical, Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering; Avallone, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology; Delrio, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Gastrointestinal surgical Oncology; Pecori, Biagio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy; Tatangelo, Fabiana [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Diagnostic Pathology; Ciliberto, Gennaro [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the potential of DCE-MRI to discriminate responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). We investigated several shape parameters for the time-intensity curve (TIC) in order to identify the best combination of parameters between two linear parameter classifiers. Seventy-four consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled in a prospective study approved by our ethics committee. Each patient gave written informed consent. After surgery, pathological TNM and tumour regression grade (TRG) were estimated. DCE-MRI semi-quantitative analysis (sqMRI) was performed to identify the best parameter or parameter combination to discriminate responders from non-responders in response monitoring to CRT. Percentage changes of TIC shape descriptors from the baseline to the presurgical scan were assessed and correlated with TRG. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and linear classifier were applied. Forty-six patients (62.2 %) were classified as responders, while 28 subjects (37.8 %) were considered as non-responders. sqMRI reached a sensitivity of 93.5 % and a specificity of 82.1 % combining the percentage change in Maximum Signal Difference (ΔMSD) and Wash-out Slope (ΔWOS), the Standardized Index of Shape (SIS). SIS obtains the best result in discriminating responders from non-responders after CRT in LARC, with a cut-off value of -3.0 %. (orig.)

  8. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent normal tissues comparing to 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT. Daily online image-guidance and better management of bladder and rectum could make a more precise treatment delivery.

  9. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie, E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5 mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78 Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D{sub 90} of 34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction, and 145 Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction, EQD{sub 2}) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of rectum decreased 22.36 Gy in HDR and 17.01 Gy in LDR from 30.24 Gy in VMAT, respectively. The D{sub mean} (EQD{sub 2}) of bladder decreased 6.91 Gy in HDR and 2.53 Gy in LDR from 13.46 Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD{sub 2}) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91 Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  10. SU-F-BRB-14: Dosimetric Effects at Air- Tissue Boundary Due to Magnetic Field in MR-Guided IMRT/VMAT Delivery for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, P; Chen, X; Schultz, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of the MR-Linac enables real-time and high soft tissue contrast image guidance in radiation therapy (RT) delivery. Potential hot-spots at air-tissue interfaces, such as the sphenoid sinus, in RT for head and neck cancer (HNC), could potentially occur due to the electron return effect (ERE). In this study, we investigate the dosimetric effects of ERE on the dose distribution at air-tissues interfaces in HNC IMRT treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on planning CT’s acquired for HNC cases (nasopharynx, base of skull and paranasal sinus) using a research planning system (Monaco, v5.09.06, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculations with or without the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF). The dose in the air cavity was calculated in a 1 & 2 mm thick tissue layer, while the dose to the skin was calculated in a 1, 3 and 5 mm thick tissue layer. The maximum dose received in 1 cc volume, D1cc, were collected at different TMF strengths. Plan qualities generated with or without TMF or with increasing TMF were compared in terms of commonly-used dose-volume parameters (DVPs). Results: Variations in DVPs between plans with and without a TMF present were found to be within 5% of the planning CT. The presence of a TMF results in <5% changes in sinus air tissue interface. The largest skin dose differences with and without TMF were found within 1 mm of the skin surface Conclusion: The presence of a TMF results in practically insignificant changes in HNC IMRT plan quality, except for skin dose. Planning optimization with skin DV constraints could reduce the skin doses. This research was partially supported by Elekta Inc. (Crowley, U.K.)

  11. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  12. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters

  13. Loading pattern calculated by inverse optimization vs traditional dosimetry systems of intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamema, S.V.; Deshpande, D.D.; Kirisits, C.; Trnkova, P.; Poetter, R.; Mahantshetty, U.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the recent past, inverse planning algorithms were introduced for intracavitary brachytherapy planning (ICBT) for cervical cancer. The loading pattern of these algorithms in comparison with traditional systems may not be similar. The purpose of this study was to objectively compare the loading patterns of traditional systems with the inverse optimization. Based on the outcome of the comparison, an attempt was made to obtain a loading pattern that takes into account the experience made with the inverse optimization

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of a combination of brachytherapy applicators for uterine cervix cancer with involvement of the distal vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an alternative brachytherapy technique for uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina, without increasing the risk of toxicity. Materials And Methods: Theoretical study comparing three different high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy applicators: intrauterine tandem and vaginal cylinder (TC); tandem/ring applicator combined with vaginal cylinder (TR+C); and a virtual applicator combining both the tandem/ring and vaginal cylinder in a single device (TRC). Prescribed doses were 7 Gy at point A, and 5 Gy on the surface or at a 5 mm depth of the vaginal mucosa. Doses delivered to the rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon were kept below the tolerance limits. Volumes covered by the isodoses, respectively, 50% (V50), 100% (V100), 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) were compared. Results: Both the combined TR+C and TRC presented a better dose distribution as compared with the TC applicator. The TR+C dose distribution was similar to the TRC dose, with V150 and V200 being about 50% higher for TR+C (within the cylinder). Conclusion: Combined TR+C in a two-time single application may represent an alternative therapy technique for patients affected by uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina. (author)

  15. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy has entered clinical practice at several major treatment centers. Treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy is one potential application of this modality, as some form of respiratory motion management is important to address. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy can be used to generate clinically acceptable stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Here, we report on a dosimetric comparison between magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy plans and internal target volume-based plans utilizing volumetric-modulated arc therapy. Ten patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy planning and treatment were studied. Following 4-dimensional computed tomography, patient images were used to generate clinically deliverable plans. For volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, the planning tumor volume was defined as an internal target volume + 0.5 cm. For magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans, a single mid-inspiratory cycle was used to define a gross tumor volume, then expanded 0.3 cm to the planning tumor volume. Treatment plan parameters were compared. Planning tumor volumes trended larger for volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans, with a mean planning tumor volume of 47.4 mL versus 24.8 mL for magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans ( P = .08). Clinically acceptable plans were achievable via both methods, with bilateral lung V20, 3.9% versus 4.8% ( P = .62). The volume of chest wall receiving greater than 30 Gy was also similar, 22.1 versus 19.8 mL ( P = .78), as were all other parameters commonly used for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The ratio of the 50% isodose volume to planning tumor volume was lower in volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, 4.19 versus 10.0 ( P guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy is capable of delivering lung high

  16. SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenafi, M; McDonald, D; Peng, J; Mart, C; Koch, N; Cooper, L; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Improved patient imaging used for planning the treatment of cervical cancer with Tandem and Ovoid (T&O) Intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) now allows for 3D delineation of target volumes and organs-at-risk. However, historical data relies on the conventional point A-based planning technique. A comparative dosimetric study was performed by generating both target-based (TBP) and point-based (PBP) plans for ten clinical patients. Methods: Treatment plans created using Elekta Oncentra v. 4.3 for ten consecutive cervical cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with HDR using the Utrecht T&O applicator. Both CT and MRI imaging modalities were utilized to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs-at-risk (rectum, sigmoid, bladder, and small bowel). Point A (left and right), vaginal mucosa, and ICRU rectum and bladder points were defined on CT. Two plans were generated for each patient using two prescription methods (PBP and TBP). 7Gy was prescribed to each point A for each PBP plan and to the target D90% for each TBP plan. Target V90%, V100%, and V200% were evaluated. In addition, D0.1cc and D2cc were analyzed for each organ-at-risk. Differences were assessed for statistical significance (p<0.05) by use of Student’s t-test. Results: Target coverage was comparable for both planning methods, with each method providing adequate target coverage. TBP showed lower absolute dose to the target volume than PBP (D90% = 7.0Gy vs. 7.4Gy, p=0.028), (V200% = 10.9cc vs. 12.8cc, p=0.014), (ALeft = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.009), and (ARight = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.013). TBP also showed a statistically significant reduction in bladder, rectum, small bowel, and sigmoid doses compared to PBP. There was no statistically significant difference in vaginal mucosa or ICRU-defined rectum and bladder dose. Conclusion: Target based prescription resulted in substantially lower dose to delineated organs-at-risk compared to point based prescription, while

  17. SU-C-210-05: Evaluation of Robustness: Dosimetric Effects of Anatomical Changes During Fractionated Radiation Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, A van der; Houweling, A C; Bijveld, M M C; Visser, J; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic tumors show large interfractional position variations. In addition, changes in gastrointestinal air volume and body contour take place during treatment. We aim to investigate the robustness of the clinical treatment plans by quantifying the dosimetric effects of these anatomical changes. Methods: Calculations were performed for up to now 3 pancreatic cancer patients who had intratumoral fiducials for daily CBCT-based positioning during their 3-week treatment. For each patient, deformable image registration of the planning CT was used to assign Hounsfield Units to each of the 13—15 CBCTs; air volumes and body contour were copied from CBCT. The clinical treatment plan was used (CTV-PTV margin = 10 mm; 36Gy; 10MV; 1 arc VMAT). Fraction dose distributions were calculated and accumulated. The V95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed, as well as the dose to stomach, duodenum and liver. Dose accumulation was done for patient positioning based on the fiducials (as clinically used) as well as for positioning based on bony anatomy. Results: For all three patients, the V95% of the CTV remained 100%, for both fiducial- and bony anatomy-based positioning. For fiducial-based positioning, dose to duodenum en stomach showed no discernable differences with planned dose. For bony anatomy-based positioning, the PTV V95% of the patient with the largest systematic difference in tumor position (patient 1) decreased to 85%; the liver Dmax increased from 33.5Gy (planned) to 35.5Gy. Conclusion: When using intratumoral fiducials, CTV dose coverage was only mildly affected by the daily anatomical changes. When using bony anatomy for patient positioning, we found a decline in PTV dose coverage due to the interfractional tumor position variations. Photon irradiation treatment plans for pancreatic tumors are robust to variations in body contour and gastrointestinal gas, but the use of fiducial-based daily position verification

  18. Clinical and dosimetric evaluation of RapidArc versus standard sliding window IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet, Stephanie; Lambrecht, Maarten; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-29

    Several planning studies have already proven the substantial dosimetric advantages of RapidArc (RA) over standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared RapidArc and standard sliding window IMRT (swIMRT) in locally advanced head and neck cancer, looking both at dosimetrics as well as toxicity and outcome. CT datasets of 78 patients treated with swIMRT and 79 patients treated with RA were included. To compare the resulting dose distributions, the dose-volume parameters were evaluated for the planning target volumes (PTVs), clinical target volumes (CTVs), and organs at risk (OARs), and the number of MU were calculated. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0. PTV coverage with the 95 % isodose was slightly better for RA. Dose distribution has proven to be significantly more homogenous with RA and led to a reduction of 62 % in MU with better OAR sparing. As for toxicity, more grade 3 mucositis and dysphagia was observed for swIMRT, though we observed more grade 3 dermatitis for RA. In our retrospective analysis, RA had better target coverage and better sparing of the OAR. Overall, the grade of acute toxicity was lower for RA than for swIMRT for the same types of tumor locations, except for the grade of dermatitis. (orig.) [German] Mehrere Studien haben die dosimetrische Ueberlegenheit der RapidArc (RA) gegenueber der intensitaetsmodulierten Standard-Radiotherapie (IMRT) bereits gezeigt. In unserer Studie verglichen wir retrospektiv die RapidArc und die dynamische (''standard sliding window'') IMRT (swIMRT) bei lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen sowohl hinsichtlich dosimetrischer Daten als auchEffektivitaet und Toxizitaet. Die CT-Datenanalysen von 78 Patienten, die mit swIMRT behandelt wurden, und von 79 Patienten, welche RA erhalten hatten, wurden in die Studie aufgenommen. Um die darauf resultierenden applizierten Dosen vergleichen zu koennen, wurden die Dosis-Volumen-Parameter fuer

  19. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shichao; Ai, Ping; Xie, Li; Xu, Qingfeng; Bai, Sen; Lu, You; Li, Ping; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p 10 , V 20 , V 30 , and V 40 , percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (D mean ) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p 30 and V 40 of the rectum and V 10 , V 20 , V 40 , and D mean of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer

  20. Solventless LARC-160 Polyimide Matrix Resin. [applied for use in aerospace engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stclair, T. L.; Jewell, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition polyimide, LARC-160, which was originally synthesized from low cost liquid monomers as a laminating resin in ethanol, was prepared as a solventless, high viscosity, neat liquid resin. The resin was processed by hot-melt coating techniques into graphite prepreg with excellent tack and drape. Comparable data on graphite reinforced laminates made from solvent-coated and various hot-melt coated prepreg were generated. LARC-160, because of its liquid nature, can be easily autoclave processed to produce low void laminates. Liquid chromatographic fingerprints indicate good reaction control on resin scale ups. Minor changes in monomer ratios were also made to improve the thermal aging performance of graphite laminates.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of using in-house BoS Frame Fixation Tool for the Head and Neck Cancer Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Suk; Jo, Kwang Hyun; Choi, Byeon Ki

    2016-01-01

    BoS(Base of Skull) Frame, the fixation tool which is used for the proton of brain cancer increases the lateral penumbra by increasing the airgap (the distance between patient and beam jet), due to the collision of the beam of the posterior oblique direction. Thus, we manufactured the fixation tool per se for improving the limits of BoS frame, and we'd like to evaluate the utility of the manufactured fixation tool throughout this study. We've selected the 3 patients of brain cancer who have received the proton therapy from our hospital, and also selected the 6 beam angles; for this, we've selected the beam angle of the posterior oblique direction. We've measured the planned BoS frame and the distance of Snout for each beam which are planned for the treatment of the patient using the BoS frame. After this, we've proceeded with the set-up that is above the location which was recommended by the manufacturer of the BoS frame, at the same beam angle of the same patient, by using our in-house Bos frame fixation tool. The set-up was above 21 cm toward the superior direction, compared to the situation when the BoS frame was only used with the basic couch. After that, we've stacked the snout to the BoS frame as much as possible, and measured the distance of snout. We've also measured the airgap, based on the gap of that snout distance; and we've proceeded the normalization based on each dose (100% of each dose), after that, we've conducted the comparative analysis of lateral penumbra. Moreover, we've established the treatment plan according to the changed airgap which has been transformed to the Raystation 5.0 proton therapy planning system, and we've conducted the comparative analysis of DVH(Dose Volume Histogram). When comparing the result before using the in-house Bos frame fixation tool which was manufactured for each beam angle with the result after using the fixation tool, we could figure out that airgap than when not used in accordance with the use of the in-house Bos

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of using in-house BoS Frame Fixation Tool for the Head and Neck Cancer Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Suk; Jo, Kwang Hyun; Choi, Byeon Ki [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    BoS(Base of Skull) Frame, the fixation tool which is used for the proton of brain cancer increases the lateral penumbra by increasing the airgap (the distance between patient and beam jet), due to the collision of the beam of the posterior oblique direction. Thus, we manufactured the fixation tool per se for improving the limits of BoS frame, and we'd like to evaluate the utility of the manufactured fixation tool throughout this study. We've selected the 3 patients of brain cancer who have received the proton therapy from our hospital, and also selected the 6 beam angles; for this, we've selected the beam angle of the posterior oblique direction. We've measured the planned BoS frame and the distance of Snout for each beam which are planned for the treatment of the patient using the BoS frame. After this, we've proceeded with the set-up that is above the location which was recommended by the manufacturer of the BoS frame, at the same beam angle of the same patient, by using our in-house Bos frame fixation tool. The set-up was above 21 cm toward the superior direction, compared to the situation when the BoS frame was only used with the basic couch. After that, we've stacked the snout to the BoS frame as much as possible, and measured the distance of snout. We've also measured the airgap, based on the gap of that snout distance; and we've proceeded the normalization based on each dose (100% of each dose), after that, we've conducted the comparative analysis of lateral penumbra. Moreover, we've established the treatment plan according to the changed airgap which has been transformed to the Raystation 5.0 proton therapy planning system, and we've conducted the comparative analysis of DVH(Dose Volume Histogram). When comparing the result before using the in-house Bos frame fixation tool which was manufactured for each beam angle with the result after using the fixation tool, we could figure out that airgap than when

  3. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P.; Yang, T. Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed

  4. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yang, T. Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Riedel, Elyn [Department of Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed.

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of a moving tumor target in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kang, Min Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2013-07-01

    Immobilization plays an important role in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The application of IMRT in lung cancer patients is very difficult due to the movement of the tumor target. Patient setup in radiation treatment demands high accuracy because IMRT employs a treatment size of a 1mm pixel unit. Hence, quality assurance of the dose delivered to patients must be at its highest. The radiation dose was evaluated for breathing rates of 9, 14, and 18 breaths per minute (bpm) for tumor targets moving up and down by 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. The dose of the moving planned target volume (PTV) was measured by using a thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD) and Gafchromic™ EBT film. The measurement points were 1.0 cm away from the top, the bottom and the left and the right sides of the PTV center. The evaluated dose differences ranged from 94.2 to 103.8%, from 94.4 to 105.4%, and from 90.7 to 108.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. The mean values of the doses were 101.4, 99.9, and 99.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. Meanwhile, the evaluated dose differences ranged from 93.6 to 105.8%, from 95.9 to 111.5%, and from 96.2 to 111.7% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. The mean values of the doses were 102.3, 103.4, and 103.1% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. Therefore, we suggest that IMRT can be used in the treatment of lung cancer patients with vertical target movements within the range of 1.0 to 1.5 cm.

  6. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Liu, Helen H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Rodhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade ≥3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in increments of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p 42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  7. Dosimetric selection for helical tomotherapy based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No selection criteria for helical tomotherapy (HT based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR to treat early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or solitary lung metastases has been established. In this study, we investigate the dosimetric selection criteria for HT based SABR delivering 70 Gy in 10 fractions to avoid severe toxicity in the treatment of centrally located lesions when adequate target dose coverage is desired. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 78 HT-SABR plans for solitary lung lesions were created to prescribe 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. The PTV was set to have ≥95% PTV receiving 70 Gy in each case. The cases for which dose constraints for ≥1 OAR could not be met without compromising the target dose coverage were compared with cases for which all target and OAR dose constraints were met. RESULTS: There were 23 central lesions for which OAR dose constraints could not be met without compromising PTV dose coverage. Comparing to cases for which optimal HT-based SABR plans were generated, they were associated with larger tumor size (5.72±1.96 cm vs. 3.74±1.49 cm, p<0.0001, higher lung dose, increased number of immediately adjacent OARs ( 3.45±1.34 vs. 1.66±0.81, p<0.0001, and shorter distance to the closest OARs (GTV: 0.26±0.22 cm vs. 0.88±0.54 cm, p<0.0001; PTV 0.19±0.18 cm vs. 0.48±0.36 cm, p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Delivery of 70 Gy in 10 fractions with HT to meet all the given OAR and PTV dose constraints are most likely when the following parameters are met: lung lesions ≤3.78 cm (11.98 cc, ≤2 immediately adjacent OARs which are ≥0.45 cm from the gross lesion and ≥0.21 cm from the PTV.

  8. Dosimetric study comparing volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and fixed dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Jian; Sun Yan; Gong Jian; Han Shukui; Jiang Fan; Wu Hao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric are modulation with RapidArc and fixed field dynamic IMRT for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with early left-sided breast cancer received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. After target definition, treatment planning was performed by RapidArc and two fixed fields dynamic IMRT respectively on the same CT scan. The target dose distribution, homogeneity of the breast, and the irradiation dose and volume for the lungs, heart, and contralateral breast were read in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and compared between RapidArc and IMRT. The treatment delivery time and monitor units were also compared. Results: In comparison with the IMRT planning,the homogeneity of clinical target volume (CTV), the volume proportion of 95% prescribed dose (V 95% ) was significantly higher by 0.65% in RapidArc (t=5.16, P=0.001), and the V 105% and V 110% were lower by 10.96% and 1.48 % respectively, however, without statistical significance (t=-2.05, P=0.055 and t=-1.33, P=0.197). The conformal index of planning target volume (PTV) by the RapidArc planning was (0.88±0.02), significantly higher than that by the IMRT planning [(0.74±0.03), t=18.54, P<0.001]. The homogeneity index (HI) of PTV by the RapidArc planning was 1.11±0.01, significantly lower than that by the IMRT planning (1.12±0.02, t=-2.44, P=0.02). There were no significant differences in the maximum dose (D max ) and V 20 for the ipsilateral lung between the RapidArc and IMRT planning, but the values of V 10 , V 5 , D min and D mean by RapidArc planning were all significantly higher than those by the IMRT planning (all P<0.01). The values of max dose and V 30 for the heart were similar by both techniques, but the values of V 10 and V 5 by the RapidArc planning were significantly higher (by 18% and 50%, respectively). The V 5 of the contralateral breast and lung by the RapidArc planning were

  9. Dosimetric verification of lung cancer treatment using the CBCTs estimated from limited-angle on-board projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, You; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer treatment is susceptible to treatment errors caused by interfractional anatomical and respirational variations of the patient. On-board treatment dose verification is especially critical for the lung stereotactic body radiation therapy due to its high fractional dose. This study investigates the feasibility of using cone-beam (CB)CT images estimated by a motion modeling and free-form deformation (MM-FD) technique for on-board dose verification. Both digital and physical phantom studies were performed. Various interfractional variations featuring patient motion pattern change, tumor size change, and tumor average position change were simulated from planning CT to on-board images. The doses calculated on the planning CT (planned doses), the on-board CBCT estimated by MM-FD (MM-FD doses), and the on-board CBCT reconstructed by the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm (FDK doses) were compared to the on-board dose calculated on the "gold-standard" on-board images (gold-standard doses). The absolute deviations of minimum dose (ΔDmin), maximum dose (ΔDmax), and mean dose (ΔDmean), and the absolute deviations of prescription dose coverage (ΔV100%) were evaluated for the planning target volume (PTV). In addition, 4D on-board treatment dose accumulations were performed using 4D-CBCT images estimated by MM-FD in the physical phantom study. The accumulated doses were compared to those measured using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors and radiochromic films. Compared with the planned doses and the FDK doses, the MM-FD doses matched much better with the gold-standard doses. For the digital phantom study, the average (± standard deviation) ΔDmin, ΔDmax, ΔDmean, and ΔV100% (values normalized by the prescription dose or the total PTV) between the planned and the gold-standard PTV doses were 32.9% (±28.6%), 3.0% (±2.9%), 3.8% (±4.0%), and 15.4% (±12.4%), respectively. The corresponding values of FDK PTV doses were 1.6% (±1

  10. Dosimetric study of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer and comparison with 3-dimensional conformal technique for definitive radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Falk, Alexander T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Auberdiac, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique Claude Bernard, Albi (France); Cartier, Lysian; Vallard, Alexis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Ollier, Edouard [Department of Pharmacology-Toxicology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Trone, Jane-Chloé; Khodri, Moustapha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital d’instruction de Armées du Val-de-Grâce, Paris (France); Magné, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@icloire.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France)

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: For patients with cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves target coverage and allows dose escalation while reducing the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). In this study, we compared dosimetric parameters among 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), “step-and-shoot” IMRT, and volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in a series of patients with cervical cancer receiving definitive radiotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) from December 2008 to March 2010 at our department were selected for this study. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated following the guidelines of the Gyn IMRT consortium that included cervix, uterus, parametrial tissues, and the pelvic nodes including presacral. The median age was 57 years (range: 30 to 85 years). All 10 patients had squamous cell carcinoma with Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB-IIIB. All patients were treated by VMAT. OAR doses were significantly reduced for plans with intensity-modulated technique compared with 3D-CRT except for the dose to the vagina. Between the 2 intensity-modulated techniques, significant difference was observed for the mean dose to the small intestine, to the benefit of VMAT (p < 0.001). There was no improvement in terms of OARs sparing for VMAT although there was a tendency for a slightly decreased average dose to the rectum: − 0.65 Gy but not significant (p = 0.07). The intensity modulation techniques have many advantages in terms of quality indexes, and particularly OAR sparing, compared with 3D-CRT. Following the ongoing technologic developments in modern radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the intensity-modulated techniques on prospective studies of a larger scale.

  11. Dosimetric calculation of I-131 activity for the treatment to patients having differentiated thyroid cancer. Benefits and limitations; Calculo dosimetrico de la actividad de I-131 para tratamiento de pacientes con cancer diferenciado de tiroides (CADT). Beneficios y limitaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, R. C.; Chebel, G. M.; Fadel, A. M.; Rojo, A. M.; Deluca, G.; Degross, O. J.; Valdivieso, C. M.; Carbejas, M. L.

    2006-07-01

    Maximum safe activity calculation, that has to be administered for treatment to patients having Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (CADT). No important side effects should be produced. Post treatment evolution was analysed. 23 Dosimetric studies were performed determining blood and whole body uptake curves (CE)during 5 days. Using the MIRDOSE software, the maximum safe activity in the whole body (CE)was calculated. The retained activity in the body (AR), 48 hs. post tracer dose. Should have been less than 2.96 GBq so as to avoid lung fibrosis. 17 patients that received activities<11.1 GBq, had no side effects. Three patients presents special situations: high AR, users in the mouth, and plaque to and leucopenia. This methodology has benefits because AT can be estimated. This was possible for 85% of the patients. When AR was high at 48 hr, AT was diminished to avoid pulmonary lesions. Tumor absorbed dose estimation, will allow the administration of AT>11.1 GBq in the future. (Author)

  12. Quality control of dosimetric systems using thermoluminescent crystals; Control de calidad de un sistema de planeacion dosimetrico utilizando cristales termoluminiscentes y su aplicacion en tratamientos de pacientes con cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahecha, L.; Plazas, M. C.; Machado, M.; Perea, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    To achieve an optimal tumoral control to prostate cancer in early and locally advanced stages, it is necessary to increase the dose with a low mobility probability at the vesicle an rectal level. This is achieved through conformal radiotherapy. The Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia uses this technique, but two questions arise from the medical-physicists and medical radio-oncologist: In accordance with clinical protocols, the conformal radiotherapy delivers a low dose to the adjacent healthy tissues. What experimental method exists that can prove with certainly the veracity of this affirmation?. And, Do the dosimetric simulation system calculate suitable the dose for each tissues?. Through thermoluminescent dosimetry and the use of a physical simulator,we measured the absorbed dose at the target volume and the adjacent tissues using conformal and conventional radiotherapy. We proved that organs such as the rectum and bladder, receiver a minor dose in conformal radiotherapy, hence reducing their mobility probability. In addition, the readings from the thermoluminescent dosimeters and the doses calculated by the ECLIPSE dosimetric system were compared, concluding that the patient's prescribed dose is effectively delivered as recommended by the quality control program in radiotherapy. (Author)

  13. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  14. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currier, Blake [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Munro, John J. III [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States); Medich, David C. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,θ), Λ, g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), φ{sub an}(r), and φ{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup −1} U{sup −1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,θ), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, φ{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup −2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose

  15. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic body radiotherapy using 4D CT and multiphase CT images for treatment planning of lung cancer: Evaluation of the impact on daily dose coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Hayes, Shelly; Paskalev, Kamen; Jin Lihui; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Feigenberg, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of using 4D CT and multiphase (helical) CT images for treatment planning target definition and the daily target coverage in hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Materials and methods: For 10 consecutive patients treated with SBRT, a set of 4D CT images and three sets of multiphase helical CT scans, taken during free-breathing, end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold, were obtained. Three separate planning target volumes (PTVs) were created from these image sets. A PTV 4D was created from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed 4D images by adding a 3 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV). A PTV 3CT was created by generating ITV from gross target volumes (GTVs) contoured from the three multiphase images. Finally, a third conventional PTV (denoted PTV conv ) was created by adding 5 mm in the axial direction and 10 mm in the longitudinal direction to the GTV (in this work, GTV = CTV = clinical target volume) generated from free-breathing helical CT scans. Treatment planning was performed based on PTV 4D (denoted as Plan-1), and the plan was adopted for PTV 3CT and PTV conv to form Plan-2 and Plan-3, respectively, by superimposing 'Plan-1' onto the helical free-breathing CT data set using modified beam apertures that conformed to either PTV 3CT or PTV conv . We first studied the impact of PTV design on treatment planning by evaluating the dosimetry of the three PTVs under the three plans, respectively. Then we examined the effect of the PTV designs on the daily target coverage by utilizing pre-treatment localization CT (CT-on-rails) images for daily GTV contouring and dose recalculation. The changes in the dose parameters of D 95 and D 99 (the dose received by 95% and 99% of the target volume, respectively), and the V p (the volume receiving the prescription dose) of the daily GTVs were compared under the three plans before and after setup error correction

  16. Dosimetric comparison in a cancer of the Cervix with different therapeutic modalities; Comparacion dosimetrica en un cancer de Cervix con distintas modalidades terapeuticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso Iracheta, L.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Samper Ots, P.; Penas Cabrera, M. D. de las; Jimenez Gonzalez, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    Cervical cancer is usually treated with radiotherapy composed of 3D (RC3D) and supine position, and is usually not usually outline the small intestine in cases of exclusively pelvic irradiation. In our Center we wanted to check what dose receives the small intestine in these cases and if the positioning of the patient or used irradiation technique influence the distribution of the histogram dose-volume. (Author)

  17. A new NASA LaRC Multi-Purpose Prepregging Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, S. P.; Marchello, J. M.; Dixon, D.; Johnston, N. J.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-purpose prepregging machine has been designed and built for NASA Langley Research Center. The machine has numerous advantages over existing units due to its various modular components. Each of these can be used individually or simultaneously depending on the required prepregging method. A reverse roll coater provides the ability to prepare thin films from typical hot-melt thermoset formulations. Also, if necessary, the design allows direct fiber impregnation within the reverse roll coater gap. Included in the impregnation module is a solution dip tank allowing the fabrication of thermoplastic prepregs from solution. The proceeding modules within the unit consist of four nip stations, two hot-plates, a hot-sled option and a high temperature oven. This paper describes the advantages of such a modular construction and discusses the various processing combinations available to the prepregger. A variety of high performance prepreg material systems were produced on IM7 (Hercules) carbon fiber. These included LaRC RP46, a PMR-type resin processed from methanol and two polyamide acids, LaRC IA and LaRC ITPI, prpregged from N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). Parameters involved in the production of these prepreg materials are presented as are the mechanical properties of the resulting good quality laminates. A brief introduction into the existing prepregging science is presented. Topics relating to solution prepregging are identified with a focus on the current research effort and its future development.

  18. Summary of LaRC 2-inch Erectable Joint Hardware Heritage Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    As the National Space Transportation System (STS, also known as the Space Shuttle) went into service during the early 1980's, NASA envisioned many missions of exploration and discovery that could take advantage of the STS capabilities. These missions included: large orbiting space stations, large space science telescopes and large spacecraft for manned missions to the Moon and Mars. The missions required structures that were significantly larger than the payload volume available on the STS. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted studies to design and develop the technology needed to assemble the large space structures in orbit. LaRC focused on technology for erectable truss structures, in particular, the joint that connects the truss struts at the truss nodes. When the NASA research in large erectable space structures ended in the early 1990's, a significant amount of structural testing had been performed on the LaRC 2-inch erectable joint that was never published. An extensive set of historical information and data has been reviewed and the joint structural testing results from this historical data are compiled and summarized in this report.

  19. SU-D-204-04: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices and Follow-Up Data for Salivary Glands Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chera, B; Price, A; Kostich, M; Green, R; Das, S; Mavroidis, P [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Amdur, R; Mendenhall, W [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sheets, N [University of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Marks, L [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between different dosimetric indices of salivary glands (as separate or combined structures) to patient-reported dry mouth 6 months post radiotherapy using the novel patient reported outcome version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE). Methods: Forty-three patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated on a prospective multi-institutional study. All patients received de-intensified 60 Gy intensity modulated radiotherapy. Dosimetric constraints were used for the salivary glands (e.g. mean dose to the contralateral-parotid < 26 Gy). We investigated correlations of individual patient dosimetric data of the parotid and submandibular glands (as separate or combined structures) to their self-reported 6 month post-treatment dry mouth responses. Moderate dry mouth responses were most prevalent and were used as the clinical endpoint indicating response. The correlation of Dmean, Dmax and a range of dosevolume (VD) points were assessed through the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and Odds Ratios (OR). Results: Patients reporting non/mild dry mouth response (N=22) had average Dmean = 19.6 ± 6.2Gy to the contralateral-parotid compared to an average Dmean = 28.0 ± 8.3Gy and an AUC = 0.758 for the patients reporting moderate/severe/very severe dry mouth (N=21). Analysis of the range of VD’s for patients who had reported dry mouth showed that for the contralateral-parotid the indices V18 through V22 had the highest area under the curves (AUC) (0.762 – 0.772) compared to a more traditional dosimetric index V30, which had an AUC = 0.732. The highest AUC was observed for the combination of contralateral parotid and contralateral submandibular glands, for which V16 through V28 had AUC = 0.801 – 0.834. Conclusion: Patients who report moderate/severe/very severe dry mouth 6 months post radiotherapy had on average higher Dmean. The V16-V28 of the combination of the contralateral glands showed the highest

  20. Dosimetric Predictors of Duodenal Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Treatment of the Para-aortic Nodes in Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sulman, Erik P.; Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rauch, Gaiane M. [Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of duodenal toxicity in patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of para-aortic nodes and to identify dosimetric parameters predictive of late duodenal toxicity. Methods and Materials: We identified 105 eligible patients with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with IMRT for gross metastatic disease in the para-aortic nodes from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. Patients were treated to a nodal clinical target volume to 45 to 50.4 Gy with a boost to 60 to 66 Gy. The duodenum was contoured, and dosimetric data were exported for analysis. Duodenal toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine associations between dosimetric variables and time to toxicity and to identify the optimal threshold that separated patients according to risk of toxicity. Results: Nine of the 105 patients experienced grade 2 to grade 5 duodenal toxicity, confirmed by endoscopy in all cases. The 3-year actuarial rate of any duodenal toxicity was 11.7%. A larger volume of the duodenum receiving 55 Gy (V55) was associated with higher rates of duodenal toxicity. The 3-year actuarial rates of duodenal toxicity with V55 above and below 15 cm{sup 3} were 48.6% and 7.4%, respectively (P<.01). In Cox univariate analysis of dosimetric variables, V55 was associated with duodenal toxicity (P=.029). In recursive partitioning analysis, V55 less than 13.94% segregated all patients with duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT can safely and effectively treat para-aortic nodal disease in gynecologic malignancies, provided that care is taken to limit the dose to the duodenum to reduce the risk of late duodenal toxicity. Limiting V55 to below 15 cm{sup 3} may reduce the risk of duodenal complications. In cases where the treatment cannot be delivered within these constraints

  1. Development of an application for the home acquisition of dosimetric data in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer undergoing "1"3"1I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contardi, M.; Namías, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop an application under the Android mobile operating system, which, together with a miniature solid-state detector, allows obtaining the necessary dosimetric data for estimation of absorbed dose in blood / marrow in patients treated with "1"3"1I. It is expected that from the development of this application can be counted on a greater amount of information on the doses received in blood / marrow by the patients and in this way help to establish better dose-effect correlations. (authors) [es

  2. Dosimetric approaches: pregnancy and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M.

    2001-01-01

    The female nuclear medicine patient is of special concern to the evaluation of radiation dose since radiation protection point of view: a)- The females overall body size and organ sizes are generally smaller than those of her male counterpart (thus her radiation doses will be higher, given the same amounts of administered activity and similar biokinetics), the effective doses could be 25 per cent higher than a man; b)- Female gonads are inside the body instead of outside and are near several organs often important as source organs in internal dosimetry; female gonads doses could be up to 10 or 30 higher than male gonads (usually 3 order); c)- Risk of breast cancer is significantly higher among females than males; d)- During the pregnancy due to placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals or radiation exposure from the urinary bladder the embryo/fetus could receive doses that must be avoid; e)- In the case of nursing infant is of special concern in such an analysis to determine the interruption period to avoid doses in the nursing infant. The dosimetric approaches to take account to assess internal doses in the pregnant woman and during the breast feeding are discussed. (author)

  3. Pulse dose-rate brachytherapy and treatment of uterine cervix cancer: impact of a 3D or a 2D dosimetric support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournat, H.; Chilles, A.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D.; Ahmad, F.; Metayer, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate two dosimetric supports used in pulse dose rate brachytherapy (P.D.R.): coverage of target volumes, dose to organs at risk, residual tumor after surgery, survival. Patients and methods Twenty patients treated for uterine cervix tumor first by brachytherapy P.D.R. had a dosimetric CT-scan after implantation. For 9 patients, the treatment was planned from standard radiographies and then reported on CT-scan images. For 11 patients, it was directly planned from CT-scan. Six weeks after, 18 patients underwent surgery. Results With a median follow-up of 22 months, 2 year actuarial survival was 89%. Six patients developed grade II urinary or gynecological complications (LENT SOMA scale). No residual tumor was found for 12 patients (7 with a 3D treatment and 5 a 2 D treatment). Ninety-five percent of C.T.V.H.R. received 53 Gy (2D treatment) or 63 Gy (3D treatment). Two cm 3 of bladder wall received 63 Gy (2D) or 74 Gy (3D) although 2 cm 3 of rectal wall received 37 Gy (2D) and 35 Gy (3D). Conclusion Using CT-scan made us improve the coverage of the uterine cervix but increase the dose received by the bladder, without increasing the rate of histological remission after surgery. We should be prudent before changing our practice. (authors)

  4. Dosimetric investigations in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metges, P.J.; Lorrain, S.

    1981-01-01

    The development film-screen detectors in radiological equipment has led us to study how to improve standard mammographic pictures (focus 0.3 x 0.3 mm, focus-film distance: 65) of thick and dense breasts by the use of an anti-scatter grid and by magnification. A dosimetric study was necessary to assess the doses delivered during mammographic examinations carried out according to various procedures. The results led to modify breast examination procedures and use an anti-scatter grid for breasts thicker than 4 cm or known as dense. The dose increase due to a better quality image is the lowest provided depth penetration is increased by 2 kV as compared to a standard picture. Absorbed doses on the X-ray axis, at 3 cm depth, are below 0.1 rad [fr

  5. Automatically gated image-guided breath-hold IMRT is a fast, precise, and dosimetrically robust treatment for lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Jahnke, Anika; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Stieler, Florian; Mai, Sabine; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Jahnke, Lennart [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    High-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer is challenging. Tumors may move by up to 2 cm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions as a function of breathing cycle. Tumor displacement increases with treatment time, which consequentially increases the treatment uncertainty. This study analyzed whether automatically gated cone-beam-CT (CBCT)-controlled intensity modulated fast deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in flattening filter free (FFF) technique and normofractionated lung DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments delivered with a flattening filter can be applied with sufficient accuracy within a clinically acceptable timeslot. Plans of 34 patients with lung tumors were analyzed. Of these patients, 17 received computer-controlled fast DIBH SBRT with a dose of 60 Gy (5 fractions of 12 Gy or 12 fractions of 5 Gy) in an FFF VMAT technique (FFF-SBRT) every other day and 17 received conventional VMAT with a flattening filter (conv-VMAT) and 2-Gy daily fractional doses (cumulative dose 50-70 Gy). FFF-SBRT plans required more monitor units (MU) than conv-VMAT plans (2956.6 ± 885.3 MU for 12 Gy/fraction and 1148.7 ± 289.2 MU for 5 Gy/fraction vs. 608.4 ± 157.5 MU for 2 Gy/fraction). Total treatment and net beam-on times were shorter for FFF-SBRT plans than conv-VMAT plans (268.0 ± 74.4 s vs. 330.2 ± 93.6 s and 85.8 ± 25.3 s vs. 117.2 ± 29.6 s, respectively). Total slot time was 13.0 min for FFF-SBRT and 14.0 min for conv-VMAT. All modalities could be delivered accurately despite multiple beam-on/-off cycles and were robust against multiple interruptions. Automatically gated CBCT-controlled fast DIBH SBRT in VMAT FFF technique and normofractionated lung DIBH VMAT can be applied with a low number of breath-holds in a short timeslot, with excellent dosimetric accuracy. In clinical routine, these approaches combine optimally reduced lung tissue irradiation with maximal

  6. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  7. Impact of post-implant dosimetric parameters on the quality of life of patients treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer: results of a single-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veccia, Antonello; Caffo, Orazio; Fellin, Giovanni; Mussari, Salvatore; Ziglio, Francesco; Maines, Francesca; Tomio, Luigi; Galligioni, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between dosimetric parameters and the quality of life (QL) outcomes of patients with low-intermediate-risk localised prostate cancer (LPC) treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT). We evaluated the participants in two consecutive prospective studies of the QL of patients treated with LDR-BT for LPC. QL was evaluated by means of a patient-completed questionnaire assessing non functional [physical (PHY) and psychological (PSY) well-being, physical autonomy (POW), social relationships (REL)] and functional scales [urinary (URI), rectal (REC), and sexual (SEX) function]; a scale for erectile function (ERE) was included in the second study. Urethra (D10 ≤ 210 Gy) and rectal wall constraints (V100 ≤ 0.5 cc) were used for pre-planning dosimetry and were assessed with post planning computerized tomography one month later for each patient. QL was assessed in 251 LPC patients. Dosimetry did not influence the non-functional scales. As expected, a progressive impairment in sexual and erectile function was reported one month after LDR-BT, and became statistically significant after the third year. Rectal function significantly worsened after LDR-BT, but the differences progressively decreased after the 1-year assessment. Overall urinary function significantly worsened immediately after LDR-BT and then gradually improved over the next three years. Better outcomes were reported for V100 rectal wall volumes of ≤ 0.5 cc and D10 urethra values of ≤ 210 Gy. The findings of this study show that dosimetric parameters influence only functional QL outcomes while non-functional outcomes are only marginally influenced

  8. SU-F-T-449: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB, Adaptive Convolve in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, R [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There have been several publications focusing on dose calculation in lung for a new dose calculation algorithm of Acuros XB (AXB). AXB could contribute to dose calculation for high-density media for bone and dental prosthesis rather than in lung. We compared the dosimetric performance of AXB, Adaptive Convolve (AC) in head and neck IMRT plans. Methods: In a phantom study, the difference in depth profile between AXB and AC was evaluated using Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched with tough water phantoms. 6 MV x-ray using the TrueBeam was irradiated. In a patient study, 20 head and neck IMRT plans had been clinically approved in Pinnacle3 and were transferred to Eclipse. Dose distribution was recalculated using AXB in Eclipse while maintaining AC-calculated monitor units and MLC sequence planned in Pinnacle. Subsequently, both the dose-volumetric data obtained using the two different calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results in the phantom evaluation for the shallow area ahead of the build-up region shows over-dose for AXB and under-dose for AC, respectively. In the patient plans, AXB shows more hot spots especially around the high-density media than AC in terms of PTV (Max difference: 4.0%) and OAR (Max. difference: 1.9%). Compared to AC, there were larger dose deviations in steep dose gradient region and higher skin-dose. Conclusion: In head and neck IMRT plans, AXB and AC show different dosimetric performance for the regions inside the target volume around high-density media, steep dose gradient regions and skin-surface. There are limitations in skin-dose and complex anatomic condition using even inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom Thus, there is the potential for an increase of hot-spot in AXB, and an underestimation of dose in substance boundaries and skin regions in AC.

  9. SU-F-T-449: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB, Adaptive Convolve in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, R; Tachibana, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There have been several publications focusing on dose calculation in lung for a new dose calculation algorithm of Acuros XB (AXB). AXB could contribute to dose calculation for high-density media for bone and dental prosthesis rather than in lung. We compared the dosimetric performance of AXB, Adaptive Convolve (AC) in head and neck IMRT plans. Methods: In a phantom study, the difference in depth profile between AXB and AC was evaluated using Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched with tough water phantoms. 6 MV x-ray using the TrueBeam was irradiated. In a patient study, 20 head and neck IMRT plans had been clinically approved in Pinnacle3 and were transferred to Eclipse. Dose distribution was recalculated using AXB in Eclipse while maintaining AC-calculated monitor units and MLC sequence planned in Pinnacle. Subsequently, both the dose-volumetric data obtained using the two different calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results in the phantom evaluation for the shallow area ahead of the build-up region shows over-dose for AXB and under-dose for AC, respectively. In the patient plans, AXB shows more hot spots especially around the high-density media than AC in terms of PTV (Max difference: 4.0%) and OAR (Max. difference: 1.9%). Compared to AC, there were larger dose deviations in steep dose gradient region and higher skin-dose. Conclusion: In head and neck IMRT plans, AXB and AC show different dosimetric performance for the regions inside the target volume around high-density media, steep dose gradient regions and skin-surface. There are limitations in skin-dose and complex anatomic condition using even inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom Thus, there is the potential for an increase of hot-spot in AXB, and an underestimation of dose in substance boundaries and skin regions in AC.

  10. SU-F-J-64: Comparison of Dosimetric Robustness Between Proton Therapy and IMRT Plans Following Tumor Regression for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the light of tumor regression and normal tissue changes, dose distributions can deviate undesirably from what was planned. As a consequence, replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continued tumor coverage or to avoid overdosing organs at risk (OARs). Proton plans are generally thought to be less robust than photon plans because of the proton beam’s higher sensitivity to changes in tissue composition, suggesting also a higher likely replanning rate due to tumor regression. The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric deviations between forward-calculated double scattering (DS) proton plans with IMRT plans upon tumor regression, and assesses their impact on clinical replanning decisions. Methods: Ten consecutive locally advanced NSCLC patients whose tumors shrank > 50% in volume and who received four or more CT scans during radiotherapy were analyzed. All the patients received proton radiotherapy (6660 cGy, 180 cGy/fx). Dosimetric robustness during therapy was characterized by changes in the planning objective metrics as well as by point-by-point root-mean-squared differences for the entire PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs) DVHs. Results: Sixty-four pairs of DVHs were reviewed by three clinicians, who requested a replanning rate of 16.7% and 18.6% for DS and IMRT plans, respectively, with a high agreement between providers. Robustness of clinical indicators was found to depend on the beam orientation and dose level on the DVH curve. Proton dose increased most in OARs distal to the PTV along the beam path, but these changes were primarily in the mid to low dose levels. In contrast, the variation in IMRT plans occurred primarily in the high dose region. Conclusion: Robustness of clinical indicators depends where on the DVH curves comparisons are made. Similar replanning rates were observed for DS and IMRT plans upon large tumor regression.

  11. SU-E-T-310: Dosimetric Comparison of Tandem and Ovoid (TO) Vs. Tandem and Ring (TR) Applicators in High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy (BT) for the Treatment of Locally-Advanced Cervical-Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, L; Viswanathan, A; Damato, A [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences associated with the use of TO or TR applicators for cervical-cancer HDR BT. Methods: The records of all cervical-cancer patients treated with image-guided HDR BT in 2013 were reviewed. Image-based planning based on isodose line and DVH metrics inspections was performed following the GEC-ESTRO recommendations. CTV volume, CTV D90, and rectum, bladder and sigmoid D2cc were collected as % of the prescription dose (80Gy EQD2). Patients receiving both TO and TR were identified and plans were compared (paired analysis). A Student T-test was used to evaluate statistical significance (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Twenty-eight patients were identified (20 TR only, 4 TO only, 4 TO and TR), associated with 116 plans (109 TR, 7 TO). Overall metrics: CTV volume, 26.5±10.4 cm3 (TR) and 39.1±14.0 cm3 (TO, p < 0.01); CTV D90, 126±28% (TR) and 110±15% (TO, p = 0.15); rectum D2cc, 56±11% (TR) and 58±19% (TO, p = 0.91); bladder D2cc, 74±20% (TR) and 88±19% (TO, p = 0.09); sigmoid D2cc, 52±17% (TR) and 49±20% (TO, p = 0.63). The paired analysis results were: CTV volume, 37.3±11.9 cm3 (TR) and 51.0±23.1 cm3 (TO, p = 0.23); CTV D90, 111±12% (TR) and 101±17% (TO, p = 0.50); rectum D2cc, 56±12% (TR) and 53±16% (TO, p = 0.71); bladder D2cc, 73±14% (TR) and 90±20% (TO, p = 0.22); sigmoid D2cc, 59±10% (TR) and 59±22% (TO, p = 0.98). Conclusion: TR and TO were both used with good dosimetric results. TO were used for patients with larger CTV volumes than TR, although paired analysis suggest that tissue distortion and contouring bias may partially explain this Result. CTV D90 on average > 80 Gy EQD2 were achieved in both groups despite the different CTV volume. Higher bladder D2cc for TO than TR was observed.

  12. The frequencies and clinical implications of mutations in 33 kinase-related genes in locally advanced rectal cancer: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, Khairun I

    2014-08-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3\\/4 and\\/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative\\/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes.

  13. Parotid gland-sparing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy results in less severe dry mouth in nasopharyngeal cancer patients: A dosimetric and clinical comparison with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, Y.-M.; Shih Rompin; Lin, Y.-S.; Su, W.-F.; Ku, C.-H.; Chang, C.-S.; Shueng, P.-W.; Hwang, J.-M.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, H.-Y.; Chang, L.-P.; Shum, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study examined the efficacy of parotid gland sparing of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) compared with conventional radiotherapy for NPC patients. Both the dose given to the parotids and clinical assessment of dry mouth were conducted. Materials and methods: Dry mouth was assessed for 108 patients treated with conventional technique and 72 treated with 3DCRT. Dose analysis was performed in 48 patients of the 3DCRT group. A dose of 70 Gy was given to the midplane in conventional radiotherapy and to 90% isodose volume in 3DCRT. Prognostic factors affecting the severity of dry mouth were analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE). Results: In the 3DCRT group about 50% of the patients' parotid glands received less than 25 Gy. Parallel analysis of dry mouth shows a significant decrease in the incidence of severe xerostomia after 3DCRT. The proportion of patients without dry mouth was also significantly higher in the 3DCRT group than the conventional group at 1-3 years after completion of radiotherapy. Although 3DCRT delivered a higher dose to the tumor, it spared the parotid gland significantly better than the conventional treatment. Late toxicities were mostly similar between the 2 groups while local control in T4 patients and survival were improved for 3DCRT. Conclusion: Dosimetrically and clinically 3DCRT is better than conventional technique regarding parotid gland protection

  14. Dosimetric system for prolonged manned flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, E.E.; Sakovich, V.A.; Deme, Sh.; Fekher, I.; Nguen, V.D.

    1991-01-01

    Comments for the All-Union state standard 25645.202-83 named Radiation safety of a spacecraft crew during space flight. Requirements for personnel dosimetric control, are given. Devices for the dosimetric control used in manned space flights nowadays are reviewed. The performance principle and structure of the FEDOR dosimetric complex under development are discussed

  15. Dosimetric essay in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Salaberry, M.

    1998-01-01

    A neck study was observated in the tiroids glands,laryngeal zone, sensitive organs for the ionizing radiation for increase dental xray exams. Was selected 29th patients with radiography prescription complete (in the Odontology Faculty Clinics Uruguaian). It took radiographies with and without tiroids necklace and apron lead using dosemeters. Dosimetric studies had demonstrated good dose between patients. For measuring the radiation dose have been used TLD thermoluminescence dosimetric and Harshaw 6600 for read it. The thyroids necklace use and odontology postgrading for training course for dentistry was the two recommendations advised

  16. The dosimetric control in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, A.

    2009-01-01

    The author first presents the thermoluminescent dosimetry method developed by the Equal-Estro Laboratory to control radiotherapy systems, according to which dosimeters are mailed by the radiotherapy centres to the laboratory, and then analyzed with respect to the level of dose bias. In a second part, he discusses the different techniques used for the dosimetric control of new radiotherapy methods (intensity-modulated radiation therapy, tomo-therapy) for which film dosimetry is applied. He also evokes the development of new phantoms and the development of a method for the dosimetric control of proton beams

  17. SU-F-19A-03: Dosimetric Advantages in Critical Structure Dose Sparing by Using a Multichannel Cylinder in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy to Treat Vaginal Cuff Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Zhang, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The multichannel cylindrical vaginal applicator is a variation of traditional single channel cylindrical vaginal applicator. The multichannel applicator has additional peripheral channels that provide more flexibility in the planning process. The dosimetric advantage is to reduce dose to adjacent organ at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum while maintaining target coverage with the dose optimization from additional channels. Methods: Vaginal HDR brachytherapy plans are all CT based. CT images were acquired in 2 mm thickness to keep integrity of cylinder contouring. The CTV of 5mm Rind with prescribed treatment length was reconstructed from 5mm expansion of inserted cylinder. The goal was 95% of CTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose in both single channel planning (SCP)and multichannel planning (MCP) before proceeding any further optimization for dose reduction to critical structures with emphasis on D2cc and V2Gy . Results: This study demonstrated noticeable dose reduction to OAR was apparent in multichannel plans. The D2cc of the rectum and bladder were showing the reduced dose for multichannel versus single channel. The V2Gy of the rectum was 93.72% and 83.79% (p=0.007) for single channel and multichannel respectively (Figure 1 and Table 1). To assure adequate coverage to target while reducing the dose to the OAR without any compromise is the main goal in using multichannel vaginal applicator in HDR brachytherapy. Conclusion: Multichannel plans were optimized using anatomical based inverse optimization algorithm of inverse planning simulation annealing. The optimization solution of the algorithm was to improve the clinical target volume dose coverage while reducing the dose to critical organs such as bladder, rectum and bowels. The comparison between SCP and MCP demonstrated MCP is superior to SCP where the dwell positions were based on geometric array only. It concluded that MCP is preferable and is able to provide certain features superior to SCP.

  18. Correlation of Osteoradionecrosis and Dental Events With Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Estilo, Cherry L.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P.; Mechalakos, James G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Materials: From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. Results: With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8–89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. Conclusions: ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions.

  19. Correlation of osteoradionecrosis and dental events with dosimetric parameters in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniel R; Estilo, Cherry L; Wolden, Suzanne L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Kraus, Dennis H; Wong, Richard J; Shaha, Ashok R; Shah, Jatin P; Mechalakos, James G; Lee, Nancy Y

    2011-11-15

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8-89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation of Osteoradionecrosis and Dental Events With Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Estilo, Cherry L. [Dental Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mechalakos, James G.; Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Materials: From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. Results: With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8-89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. Conclusions: ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions.

  1. The impact of induction chemotherapy on the dosimetric parameters of subsequent radiotherapy: an investigation of 30 consecutive patients with locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer and modern radiation planning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Jonathan D; Sobremonte, Angela; Hillebrandt, Evangeline; Allen, Pamela K; Gomez, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influence of induction chemotherapy (ICT) on dosimetric outcomes in patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive chemoradiation (CRT). 30 patients with inoperable stage II-III NSCLC treated with 2–4 cycles of ICT followed by definitive CRT to ≥ 60 Gy were selected. Tumor response to chemotherapy was scored by RECIST criteria. Treatment plans based on tumor extent prior to chemotherapy were generated based on equivalent planning constraints and techniques as the original post-chemotherapy plans. Dosimetric parameters predictive of toxicity for lung, esophagus, heart, and spinal cord were compared amongst the pre- and post-ICT plans. The majority of patients (70%) experienced an overall reduction in GTV size between the pre-ICT imaging and the time of simulation. Comparing pre-and post-ICT diagnostic imaging, 5 patients met the RECIST criteria for response, 23 were classified as stable, and 2 experienced disease progression on diagnostic imaging. Despite a significantly reduced GTV size in the post-ICT group, no systematic improvements in normal tissue doses were seen amongst the entire cohort. This result persisted amongst the subgroup of patients with larger pre-ICT GTV tumor volumes (>100 cc 3 ). Among patients with RECIST-defined response, a significant reduction in lung mean dose (1.9 Gy absolute, median 18.2 Gy to 16.4 Gy, p = 0.04) and V 20, the percentage of lung receiving 20 Gy (3.1% absolute, median 29.3% to 26.3%, p = 0.04) was observed. In the non-responding group of patients, an increased esophageal V 50 was found post-chemotherapy (median 28.9% vs 30.1%, p = 0.02). For patients classified as having a response by RECIST to ICT, modest improvements in V 20 and mean lung dose were found. However, these benefits were not realized for the cohort as a whole or for patients with larger tumors upfront. Given the variability of tumor response to ICT, the a priori impact of induction chemotherapy to

  2. Evaluating a LARC Expansion Program in 14 Sub-Saharan African Countries: A Service Delivery Model for Meeting FP2020 Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thoai D; Nuccio, Olivia; Pereira, Shreya K; Footman, Katharine; Reiss, Kate

    2017-09-01

    Objectives In many sub-Saharan African countries, the use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is low while unmet need for family planning (FP) remains high. We evaluated the effectiveness of a LARC access expansion initiative in reaching young, less educated, poor, and rural women. Methods Starting in 2008, Marie Stopes International (MSI) has implemented a cross-country expansion intervention to increase access to LARCs through static clinics, mobile outreach units, and social franchising of private sector providers. We analyzed routine service statistics for 2008-2014 and 2014 client exit interview data. Indicators of effectiveness were the number of LARCs provided and the percentages of LARC clients who had not used a modern contraceptive in the last 3 months ("adopters"); switched from a short-term contraceptive to a LARC ("switchers"); were aged <25; lived in extreme poverty; had not completed primary school; lived in rural areas; and reported satisfaction with their overall experience at the facility/site. Results Our annual LARC service distribution increased 1037 % (from 149,881 to over 1.7 million) over 2008-2014. Of 3816 LARC clients interviewed, 46 % were adopters and 46 % switchers; 37 % were aged 15-24, 42 % had not completed primary education, and 56 % lived in a rural location. Satisfaction with services received was rated 4.46 out of 5. Conclusions The effectiveness of the LARC expansion in these 14 sub-Saharan African FP programs demonstrates vast untapped potential for wider use of LARC methods, and suggests that this service delivery model is a plausible way to support FP 2020 goals of reaching those with an unmet need for FP.

  3. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  4. Clinical and dosimetric results of three-dimensional image-guided and pulsed dose rate curie-therapy in locally advanced cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, R.; Gilmore, J.; Dumas, I.; Abrous-Anane, S.; Haberer, S.; Verstraet, R.; Champoudry, J.; Martinetti, F.; Morice, P.; Haie-Meller, C.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a review of data obtained between 2004 and 2009 on 130 women who had been treated by optimized pulsed-rate curie-therapy for a locally advanced cervical cancer. Results are discussed in terms of cancer stage, treatment (with or without concomitant chemotherapy), planning method (MRI, scanography), delivered doses in the clinical target volumes, surgery, relapse occurrence and localizations, global survival probability, local control, undesirable side effects, occurrence of intestine or urinary toxicity. It appears that the association of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy and optimized curie-therapy results in a good local-regional control and a low toxicity level. Short communication

  5. Dosimetric assessment of an Atlas based automated segmentation for loco-regional radiation therapy of early breast cancer in the Skagen Trial 1: A multi-institutional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Ramadan Mohammed E; Francolini, Giulio; Thomsen, Mette Skovhus

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Atlas-based automated segmentation (ABAS) on dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters compared to manual segmentation (MS) in loco-regional radiotherapy (RT) of early breast cancer was investigated in patients included in the Skagen Trial 1. This analysis supports implementation of ABAS...

  6. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Douglas W., E-mail: darthur@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas B. [Allegheny General Hospital, Temple University School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  7. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon breast brachytherapy catheter: comparative dosimetric findings of a phase 4 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Douglas W; Vicini, Frank A; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Cuttino, Laurie W; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D

    2013-06-01

    Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥ 95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤ 125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤ 145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤ 10 cc. Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P ≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. SU-E-T-338: Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Early Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I; Quinn, K; Seebach, A; Wang, H [OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center, Rockford, IL (United States); Yah, R [University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected for the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.

  9. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. Methods This study is a narrative non-systematic review. Results We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Conclusion Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck

  10. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological assessment among a nonstandard RapidArc, standard RapidArc, classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 3D brachytherapy for the treatment of the vaginal vault in patients affected by gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Strigari, Lidia; Califano, Giorgia; Barbieri, Viviana; Sanpaolo, Piero; Castaldo, Giovanni; Benassi, Marcello; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a nonstandard RapidArc (RA) modality as alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) or IMRT treatments of the vaginal vault in patients with gynecological cancer (GC). Nonstandard (with vaginal applicator) and standard (without vaginal applicator) RapidArc plans for 27 women with GC were developed to compare with HDR-BRT and IMRT. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison were performed by means of dose-volume histogram and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). In addition, the integral dose and the overall treatment times were evaluated. RA, as well as IMRT, results in a high uniform dose on PTV compared with HDR-BRT. However, the average of EUD for HDR-BRT was significantly higher than those with RA and IMRT. With respect to the OARs, standard RA was equivalent of IMRT but inferior to HDR-BRT. Furthermore, nonstandard RA was comparable with IMRT for bladder and sigmoid and better than HDR-BRT for the rectum because of a significant reduction of d 2cc , d 1cc , and d max (p < 0.01). Integral doses were always higher than HDR-BRT, although the values were very low. Delivery times were about the same and more than double for HDR-BRT compared with IMRT and RA, respectively. In conclusion, the boost of dose on vaginal vault in patients affected by GC delivered by a nonstandard RA technique was a reasonable alternative to the conventional HDR-BRT because of a reduction of delivery time and rectal dose at substantial comparable doses for the bladder and sigmoid. However HDR-BRT provides better performance in terms of PTV coverage as evidenced by a greater EUD.

  11. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hans T.; Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives ≥45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans, With or Without Anterior Myocardial Territory and Left Ventricle as Organs at Risk, in Early-Stage Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Wenyong; Wang Xiaohong; Qiu Dasheng; Liu Dong; Jia Shaohui; Zeng Fanyu; Chen Zhengwang; Li Beihui; Xu Jiaozhen; Wei Lai; Hu Desheng

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated heart sparing using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with the left ventricle (LV) and/or the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as additional organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer were selected for dosimetric planning. Both lungs, the right breast, heart, LV, and AMT were defined as OARs. We generated one tangential field plan and four IMRT plans for each patient. We examined the dose–volume histogram parameters of the planning target volume and OARs. Results: Compared with the tangential field plan, the mean dose to the heart in the IMRT plans did not show significant differences; however, the dose to the AMT and LV decreased by 18.7–45.4% and 10.8–37.4%, respectively. The maximal dose to the heart decreased by 18.6–35.3%, to the AMT by 22.0–45.1%, and to the LV by 23.5–45.0%, And the relative volumes of the heart (V ≥12 ), AMT (V >11 ) and LV (V >10 ) decreased significantly with different levels, respectively. The volume of the heart, AMT, LV, both lungs, and right breast receiving ≥5 Gy showed a significant increase. Compared with the IMRT (H) plan, the mean dose to the heart, AMT, and LV decreased by 17.5–21.5%, 25.2–29.8%, and 22.8–29.8% and the maximal dose by 13.6–20.6%, 23.1–29.6%, and 17.3–29.1%, respectively. The IMRT plans for both lungs and the right breast showed no significant differences. Conclusions: The IMRT plans with the addition of the AMT and/or LV as OARs considerably increased heart sparing. We recommend including the LV as an additional OAR in such plans.

  13. IPIP: A new approach to inverse planning for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing dosimetric indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean; Goldberg, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Many planning methods for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy require an iterative approach. A set of computational parameters are hypothesized that will give a dose plan that meets dosimetric criteria. A dose plan is computed using these parameters, and if any dosimetric criteria are not met, the process is iterated until a suitable dose plan is found. In this way, the dose distribution is controlled by abstract parameters. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing the dose distribution based on dosimetric criteria. Methods: The authors developed inverse planning by integer program (IPIP), an optimization model for computing HDR brachytherapy dose plans and a fast heuristic for it. They used their heuristic to compute dose plans for 20 anonymized prostate cancer image data sets from patients previously treated at their clinic database. Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to dosimetric criteria. Results: Dose plans computed from IPIP satisfied all given dosimetric criteria for the target and healthy tissue after a single iteration. The average target coverage was 95%. The average computation time for IPIP was 30.1 s on an Intel(R) Core TM 2 Duo CPU 1.67 GHz processor with 3 Gib RAM. Conclusions: IPIP is an HDR brachytherapy planning system that directly incorporates dosimetric criteria. The authors have demonstrated that IPIP has clinically acceptable performance for the prostate cases and dosimetric criteria used in this study, in both dosimetry and runtime. Further study is required to determine if IPIP performs well for a more general group of patients and dosimetric criteria, including other cancer sites such as GYN.

  14. Effect of Deploying Trained Community Based Reproductive Health Nurses (CORN) on Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) Use in Rural Ethiopia: A Cluster Randomized Community Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerfu, Taddese Alemu; Ayele, Henok Taddese; Bogale, Tariku Nigatu

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the effect of innovative means to distribute LARC on contraceptive use, we implemented a three arm, parallel groups, cluster randomized community trial design. The intervention consisted of placing trained community-based reproductive health nurses (CORN) within health centers or health posts. The nurses provided counseling to encourage women to use LARC and distributed all contraceptive methods. A total of 282 villages were randomly selected and assigned to a control arm (n = 94) or 1 of 2 treatment arms (n = 94 each). The treatment groups differed by where the new service providers were deployed, health post or health center. We calculated difference-in-difference (DID) estimates to assess program impacts on LARC use. After nine months of intervention, the use of LARC methods increased significantly by 72.3 percent, while the use of short acting methods declined by 19.6 percent. The proportion of women using LARC methods increased by 45.9 percent and 45.7 percent in the health post and health center based intervention arms, respectively. Compared to the control group, the DID estimates indicate that the use of LARC methods increased by 11.3 and 12.3 percentage points in the health post and health center based intervention arms. Given the low use of LARC methods in similar settings, deployment of contextually trained nurses at the grassroots level could substantially increase utilization of these methods. © 2018 The Population Council, Inc.

  15. SU-E-T-492: The Dosimetric and Clinical Impact of the Metallic Dental Implants on Radiation Dose Distributions in IMRT Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Xing, L; Le, Q

    2012-06-01

    In H&N cancer patients, the development of oral mucositis is related closely to the radiation dose to the oral cavity. It is generally presumed that the existence of metallic dental implants makes it worse due to the scattering effect of the metal. This study investigates the effects of the dental implants on radiation doses to PTV, tongue mucosa, and other structures for IMRT H&N cancer patients by Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Two H&N cancer patients who have dental implant and are treated by IMRT technique are selected for the purpose. The BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC codes are employed for the CT-image based dose calculations. The radiation sources are the validated Varian phase-space files for 6MV linac beams. The CT image artifacts caused by the dental fillings are replaced by tissue material. Two sets of MC calculations for each patient are performed at a calculation statistics of 1%: one treats all dental implants as bones, the other substitutes the implants by metal of either titanium or gold with correct density. Doses in PTV and various tissue structures are compared for the two scenarios. With titanium implant, there is no significant difference in doses to PTV and tongue mucosa from that when treating implant as bone. With gold implant, the mean dose to PTV is slightly lowered by 1%; the mean dose to tongue mucosa is reduced by less than 0.5%, although the maximum dose is increased by 5%. The scattering dose from titanium implants is not of concern for H&N patients irradiated by 6MV IMRT beams. For gold implants, the scattering dose to tongue mucosa is not as severe as presumed; and the dose to PTV could be slightly compromised due to the attenuation effect of the metal. This work was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  17. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  18. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Jianghong; Li, Yan; Jiang, Qingfeng; Sun, Lan; Henderson Jr, Fraser; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Li, Guangjun; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p <0.05) minimum absorbed doses covering 98%, 95%, 50% and 2% of PTV (D98%, D95%, D50% and D2%) than those calculated from non-enhanced CT. The mean differences between PVP or HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT

  19. Procedure for image acquisition and dosimetric planning for prostate cancer with 3D-CRT in the MIRS 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Velasquez, Reytel; Alvarez Zaldivar, Junior; Gonzalez Lopez, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    For over 30 years in the department of Radiotherapy of the Lenin Hospital has been doing conventional radiotherapy. In this paper we describe the dose planning procedure for patients with prostate cancer with 3D-CRT in the MIRS RTPS 3.0. The work ranges from imaging in the TAC including quality control of this, the definition of bodies radio therapists medical risk to the data to be transferred to processing machine. With this procedure we have established guidelines for planning 3D-CRT treatments for other locations. (author)

  20. Symptomatic cardiac toxicity is predicted by dosimetric and patient factors rather than changes in 18F-FDG PET determination of myocardial activity after chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Li Tianyu; Christensen, Michael; Cheng, Jonathan D.; Yu, Jian Q.; Crawford, Kevin; Haluszka, Oleh; Tokar, Jeffrey; Scott, Walter; Meropol, Neal J.; Cohen, Steven J.; Maurer, Alan; Freedman, Gary M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with symptomatic cardiac toxicity in patients with esophageal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. Material and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 102 patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer. Our primary endpoint was symptomatic cardiac toxicity. Radiation dosimetry, patient demographic factors, and myocardial changes seen on 18 F-FDG PET were correlated with subsequent cardiac toxicity. Cardiac toxicity measured by RTOG and CTCAE v3.0 criteria was identified by chart review. Results: During the follow up period, 12 patients were identified with treatment related cardiac toxicity, 6 of which were symptomatic. The mean heart V20 (79.7% vs. 67.2%, p = 0.05), V30 (75.8% vs. 61.9%, p = 0.04), and V40 (69.2% vs. 53.8%, p = 0.03) were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic cardiac toxicity than those without. We found the threshold for symptomatic cardiac toxicity to be a V20, V30 and V40 above 70%, 65% and 60%, respectively. There was no correlation between change myocardial SUV on PET and cardiac toxicity, however, a greater proportion of women suffered symptomatic cardiac toxicity compared to men (p = 0.005). Conclusions: A correlation did not exist between percent change in myocardial SUV and cardiac toxicity. Patients with symptomatic cardiac toxicity received significantly greater mean V20, 30 and 40 values to the heart compared to asymptomatic patients. These data need validation in a larger independent data set.

  1. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  2. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), stomach (mean and V 20 Gy ), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V 20 Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V 15 Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing

  3. Using generalized equivalent uniform dose atlases to combine and analyze prospective dosimetric and radiation pneumonitis data from 2 non-small cell lung cancer dose escalation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Yorke, Ellen D; Belderbos, José S A; Borst, Gerben R; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Lebesque, Joos V; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate≥20% were plotted. The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of a dosimetric system using a SMT phototransistor in the measurement for some dosimetric parameters in conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.O. da; Magalhaes, C.M.S. de; Santos, L.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    For monitoring the delivered dose in the patient undergoing a cancer treatment with high-energy ionizing radiation beams is necessary to use appropriate dosimeters for the beam control quality and if it is possible, to obtain the dose information during the treatment. For this, semiconductor-based devices are used because of their high spatial resolution and to be easy to handle in spite of the ionization chambers. Nowadays the bipolar phototransistors are being proposed as ionizing radiation detectors for presenting, beyond these characteristics, the signal amplification factor (gain). So, the aim of this work is to present the use of a dosimetric system using a SMT phototransistor in the measurement for some dosimetric parameters in conventional radiotherapy: the field factor and the off-axis ratio. The phototransistors readings were compared with ones obtained from a PTW 23343 Markus chamber, under the same conditions. (author)

  5. Dosimetric feasibility of using tungsten-based functional paper for flexible chest wall protectors in intraoperative electron radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Monzen, Hajime; Kawamura, Mariko; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Nakaya, Takayoshi; Mukoyama, Takashi; Miyake, Yoshikazu; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2018-01-01

    Intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT), which is an accelerated partial breast irradiation method, has been used for early-stage breast cancer treatment. In IOERT, a protective disk is inserted behind the target volume to minimize the dose received by normal tissues. However, to use such a disk, the surgical incision must be larger than the field size because the disk is manufactured from stiff and unyielding materials. In this study, the applicability of newly developed tungsten-based functional paper (TFP) was assessed as an alternative to the existing protective disk. The radiation-shielding performance of the TFP was verified through experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles with and without TFPs were measured and simulated on a dedicated IOERT accelerator. The number of piled-up TFPs was changed from 1 to 40. In the experimental measurements, the relative doses at the exit plane of the TFPs for 9 MeV were 42.7%, 9.2%, 0.2%, and 0.1% with 10, 20, 30, and 40 TFPs, respectively, whereas those for 12 MeV were 63.6%, 27.1%, 8.6%, and 0.2% with 10, 20, 30, and 40 TFPs, respectively. Slight dose enhancements caused by backscatter radiation from the TFPs were observed at the entrance plane of the TFPs at both beam energies. The results of the Monte Carlo simulation indicated the same tendency as the experimental measurements. Based on the experimental and simulated results, the radiation-shielding performances of 30 TFPs for 9 MeV and 40 TFPs for 12 MeV were confirmed to be acceptable and close to those of the existing protective disk. The findings of this study suggest the feasibility of using TFPs as flexible chest wall protectors in IOERT for breast cancer treatment.

  6. Dosimetric comparison to the heart and cardiac substructure in a large cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with proton beam therapy or Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Xu, Cai; Yang, Jinzhong; Komaki, Ritsuko; Lin, Steven H

    2017-10-01

    To compare heart and cardiac substructure radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with mid- to distal esophageal cancer who received chemoradiation therapy. We identified 727 esophageal cancer patients who received IMRT (n=477) or PBT (n=250) from March 2004 to December 2015. All patients were treated to 50.4Gy with IMRT or to 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalents with PBT. IMRT and PBT dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the whole heart, atria, ventricles, and four coronary arteries were compared. For PBT patients, passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT; n=237) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT; n=13) DVHs were compared. Compared with IMRT, PBT resulted in significantly lower mean heart dose (MHD) and heart V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40as well as lower radiation exposure to the four chambers and four coronary arteries. Compared with PSPT, IMPT resulted in significantly lower heart V20, V30, and V40 but not MHD or heart V5 or V10. IMPT also resulted in significantly lower radiation doses to the left atrium, right atrium, left main coronary artery, and left circumflex artery, but not the left ventricle, right ventricle, left anterior descending artery, or right coronary artery. Factors associated with lower MHD included PBT (Pheart and cardiac substructures than IMRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this cardiac sparing effect impacts the development of coronary artery disease and other cardiac complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric factors predictive of late toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy; Radiotherapie prostatique: prediction de la toxicite tardive a partir des donnees dosimetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevoisier, R. de [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Inserm, U 642, 35 - Rennes (France); Fiorino, C. [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Melghera, Milan (Italy); Dubray, B. [Departement de radiotherapie et de physique medicale, centre Henri-Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); EA 4108, UFR de medecine-pharmacie, QuantIF-LITIS, 76 - Rouen (France)

    2010-10-15

    Dose escalation in prostate cancer is made possible due to technological advances and to precise dose-volume constraints to limit normal tissue damage. This article is a literature review focusing on the correlations between exposure (doses and volumes) of organs at risk (OAR) and rectal, urinary, sexual and bone toxicity, as well as on mathematical models aiming at toxicity prediction. Dose-volume constraint recommendations are presented that have been shown to be associated with reduced rectal damage. Indeed, the clinical data is relatively strong for late rectal toxicity (bleeding), with constraints put on both the volume of the rectum receiving high doses ({>=}70 Gy) and the volume receiving intermediate doses (40 to 60 Gy). Predictive models of rectal toxicity (Normal Tissue Complication Probability) appear to accurately estimate toxicity risks. The correlations are much weaker for the bulb and the femoral heads, and nearly do not exist for the bladder. Further prospective studies are required, ideally taking into account patient-related risk factors (co-morbidities and their specific treatments), assays of normal tissue hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and mathematical models applied on 3D images acquired under the treatment machine (e.g. Cone Beam CT). (authors)

  8. Can cost make a difference dosimetrically? Volumetric modulated arc therapy study for multileaf collimators of various widths for head and neck and prostate cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Jong-Han, E-mail: jonghanho@gmail.com; Hagler, Shane; Lujano, Carrie; Seng, Sopaul; Starks, Christine; Perrin, Kelly; Turner, Lehendrick; Court, Laurence

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a global health issue that disproportionately kills based on stage of disease, cellular pathology, and genetics, to name a few. Another variable to consider in this ongoing fight is treatment machine complexity that leads to elevated development and purchasing cost, leading to a reduced use. Reducing the complexity (in hopes of lowering costs) would benefit underdeveloped, low- and middle-income countries by introducing newer treatment technology, as their currently accepted standards do not meet standards of more advanced, developed countries. In this study, unilateral head and neck (H&N), and prostate cases using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were tested with multiple segment widths of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm to create treatable plans. Pinnacle 9.10v was used for planning purposes. A total of 12 cases were planned with varying multileaf collimator (MLC) widths. Treatment plans were evaluated retrospectively. Results show that altering the MLC widths from 5 through 20 mm produces both comparable and treatable plans up to 99% and 98% target coverage for H&N and prostate, respectively, albeit clinically significant hot spots were shown to increase with increasing segment width. Furthermore, the results show that increasing widths can produce comparable treatment plans as measured against our current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved treatment devices—leading to an increase in treatment efficacy in economically underdeveloped countries.

  9. A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Adjuvant 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Operable Stomach Cancer Versus AP-PA Conventional Radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossiny, H.A.; Diab, N.A.; El-Taher, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to compare this multiple field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with stages II-III denocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between February 2009 to March 2010 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a mono isocentric arrangement employing 4-6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an antroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D and 2D) plans while the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses on using the conformal technique. The liver doses is higher in the 3D tecq, but still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and AP-PA conventional techniques doses are within range of normal tissues tolerance. Regarding the left kidney and spinal cord the 3D conformal radiotherapy is superior than the AP-PA conventional techniques but with higher doses to the liver in the 3D conformal radiotherapy compared to the AP-PA conventional techniques

  10. Dosimetric methodology of the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1994-01-01

    Establishment of guidance for the protection of workers and members of the public from radiation exposures necessitates estimation of the radiation dose to tissues of the body at risk. The dosimetric methodology formulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to be responsive to this need. While developed for radiation protection, elements of the methodology are often applied in addressing other radiation issues; e.g., risk assessment. This chapter provides an overview of the methodology, discusses its recent extension to age-dependent considerations, and illustrates specific aspects of the methodology through a number of numerical examples

  11. Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in left-sided breast cancer. Dosimetrical comparison and clinical feasibility in 20 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Ammerpohl, Mark; Morgenstern, Christina; Erichsen, Patricia; Nielinger, Lisa; Abdallah, Abdallah; Galalae, Razvan

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer (BC) is a well-established indication. The risk of ischaemic heart disease after radiotherapy for BC increases linearly with the heart mean dose with no apparent threshold. Radiotherapy to the left breast in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) reduces the dose to the heart. A new linac system with an integrated surface scanner (SS) for DIBH treatments was recently installed in our department. We tested it for potential benefits, safety, patients' acceptance/compliance and associated additional workload. Twenty consecutive patients following BCS for breast carcinoma of the left side were enrolled in our institutional DIBH protocol. We compared dose to the heart and ipsilateral lung (IL) between plans in DIBH and free breathing (FB) using standard defined parameters: mean dose, maximal dose to a volume of 2 cm 3 (D 2 cm 3 ), volume receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), 10 Gy (V 10 ), 15 Gy (V 15 ) and 20 Gy (V 20 ). Comparison of median calculated dose values was performed using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. DIBH was associated with a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in all studied parameters for the heart and the IL. In 16 of 20 patients the heart D 2 cm 3 was less than 42 Gy in DIBH. In FB the heart D 2 cm 3 was ≥ 42 Gy in 17 of 20 patients. The median daily treatment time was 9 min. Radiotherapy of the left breast in DIBH using a SS could easily be incorporated into daily routine and is associated with significant dose reduction to the heart and IL. (orig.) [de

  12. LaRC Modeling of Ozone Formation in San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, F.; Griffin, R. J.; Bui, A.; Schulze, B.; Wallace, H. W., IV; Flynn, J. H., III; Erickson, M.; Kotsakis, A.; Alvarez, S. L.; Usenko, S.; Sheesley, R. J.; Yoon, S.

    2017-12-01

    Ozone (O3) is one of the most important trace species within the troposphere and results from photochemistry involving emissions from a complex array of sources. Ground-level O3 is detrimental to ecosystems and causes a variety of human health problems including respiratory irritation, asthma and reduction in lung capacity. However, the O3 Design Value in San Antonio, Texas, was in violation of the federal threshold set by the EPA (70 ppb, 8-hr max) based on the average for the most recent three-year period (2014-2016). To understand the sources of high O3 concentrations in this nonattainment area, we assembled and deployed a mobile air quality laboratory and operated it in two locations in the southeast (Traveler's World RV Park) and northwest (University of Texas at San Antonio) of downtown San Antonio during summer 2017 to measure O3 and its precursors, including total nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Additional measurements included temperature, relative humidity, pressure, solar radiation, wind speed, wind direction, total reactive nitrogen (NOy), carbon monoxide (CO), and aerosol composition and concentration. We will use the campaign data and the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Zero-Dimensional Box Model (Crawford et al., 1999; Olson et al., 2006) to calculate O3 production rate, NOx and hydroxyl radical chain length, and NOx versus VOCs sensitivity at different times of a day with different photochemical and meteorological conditions. A key to our understanding is to combine model results with measurements of precursor gases, particle chemistry and particle size to support the identification of O3 sources, its major formation pathways, and how the ozone production efficiency (OPE) depends on various factors. The resulting understanding of the causes of high O3 concentrations in the San Antonio area will provide insight into future air quality protection.

  13. Dosimetric improvements following 3D planning of tangential breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aref, Amr; Thornton, Dale; Youssef, Emad; He, Tony; Tekyi-Mensah, Samuel; Denton, Lori; Ezzell, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric difference between a simple radiation therapy plan utilizing a single contour and a more complex three-dimensional (3D) plan utilizing multiple contours, lung inhomogeneity correction, and dose-based compensators. Methods and Materials: This is a study of the radiation therapy (RT) plans of 85 patients with early breast cancer. All patients were considered for breast-conserving management and treated by conventional tangential fields technique. Two plans were generated for each patient. The first RT plan was based on a single contour taken at the central axis and utilized two wedges. The second RT plan was generated by using the 3D planning system to design dose-based compensators after lung inhomogeneity correction had been made. The endpoints of the study were the comparison between the volumes receiving greater than 105% and greater than 110% of the reference dose, as well as the magnitude of the treated volume maximum dose. Dosimetric improvement was defined to be of significant value if the volume receiving > 105% of one plan was reduced by at least 50% with the absolute difference between the volumes being 5% or greater. The dosimetric improvements in 49 3D plans (58%) were considered of significant value. Patients' field separation and breast size did not predict the magnitude of improvement in dosimetry. Conclusion: Dose-based compensator plans significantly reduced the volumes receiving > 105%, >110%, and volume maximum dose.

  14. Rapid Arc, helical tomotherapy, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy and three dimensional conformal radiation for localized prostate cancer: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Kinhikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of RapidArc (RA compared with helical tomotherapy (HT, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SW IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Prescription doses ranged from 60 Gy to planning target volume (PTV and 66.25 Gy for clinical target volume prostate (CTV-P over 25-30 fractions. PTV and CTV-P coverage were evaluated by conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Organ sparing comparison was done with mean doses to rectum and bladder. Results: CI 95 were 1.0 ± 0.01 (RA, 0.99 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.97 ± 0.02 (IMRT, 0.98 ± 0.02 (3D CRT for PTV and 1.0 ± 0.00 (RA, HT, SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. HI was 0.11 ± 0.03 (RA, 0.16 ± 0.08 (HT, 0.12 ± 0.03 (IMRT, 0.06 ± 0.01 (3D CRT for PTV and 0.03 ± 0.00 (RA, 0.05 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.03 ± 0.01 (SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. Mean dose to bladder were 23.68 ± 13.23 Gy (RA, 24.55 ± 12.51 Gy (HT, 19.82 ± 11.61 Gy (IMRT and 23.56 ± 12.81 Gy (3D CRT, whereas mean dose to rectum was 36.85 ± 12.92 Gy (RA, 33.18 ± 11.12 Gy (HT, IMRT and 38.67 ± 12.84 Gy (3D CRT. Conclusion: All studied intensity-modulated techniques yield treatment plans of significantly improved quality when compared with 3D CRT, with HT providing best organs at risk sparing and RA being the most efficient treatment option, reducing treatment time to 1.45-3.7 min and monitor unit to <400 for a 2 Gy fraction.

  15. Comparative study of reference points by dosimetric analyses for late complications after uniform external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.-W.; Liang, J.-A.; Yeh, L.-S.; Yang, S.-N.; Shiau, A.-C.; Lin, F.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to correlate and compare the predictive values of rectal and bladder reference doses of uniform external beam radiotherapy without shielding and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) with late sequelae in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Methods and materials: Between September 1992 and December 1998, 154 patients who survived more than 12 months after treatment were studied. Initially, they were treated with 10-MV X-rays (44 to 45 Gy/22 to 25 fractions over 4 to 5 weeks) to the whole pelvis, after which HDRICB was performed using 192 Ir remote afterloading at 1-week intervals for 4 weeks. The standard prescribed dose for each HDRICB was 6.0 Gy to point A. Patient- and treatment-related-factors were evaluated for late rectal complications using logistic regression modeling. Results: The probability of rectal complications showed better correlation of dose-response with increasing total ICRU (International Committee on Radiotherapy Units and Measurements) rectal dose. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a high risk of late rectal sequelae in patients who developed rectal complications (p 0.0001;relative risk, 15.06;95% CI, 2.89∼43.7) and total ICRU rectal dose greater than 16 Gy (p = 0.02;relative risk, 2.07;95% CI, 1.13∼4.55). The high risk factors for bladder complications were seen in patients who developed rectal complications (p = 0.0001;relative risk, 15.2;95% CI, 2.81∼44.9) and total ICRU bladder dose greater than 24 Gy (p = 0.02;relative risk, 8.93;95% CI, 1.79∼33.1). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the predictive value of ICRU rectal and bladder reference dosing in HDRICB for patients receiving uniform external beam radiation therapy without central shielding. Patients who had a total ICRU rectal dose greater than 16 Gy, or a total ICRU bladder dose over 24 Gy, were at risk of late sequelae

  16. NTCP models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: The role of dosimetric and clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetz, Ivo; Schilstra, Cornelis; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Heuvel, Edwin R. van den; Doornaert, Patricia; Luijk, Peter van; Vissink, Arjan; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Leemans, Charles R.; Bijl, Henk P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this multicentre prospective study was to develop multivariable logistic regression models to make valid predictions about the risk of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia (XER M6 ) and sticky saliva 6 months (STIC M6 ) after primary treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and materials: The study population was composed of 178 consecutive HNC patients treated with IMRT. All patients were included in a standard follow up programme in which acute and late side effects and quality of life were prospectively assessed, prior to, during and after treatment. The primary endpoints were XER M6 and STIC M6 as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 after completing IMRT. Organs at risk (OARs) potentially involved in salivary function were delineated on planning-CT, including the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands and the minor glands in the soft palate, cheeks and lips. Patients with moderate-to-severe xerostomia or sticky saliva, respectively, at baseline were excluded. The optimal number of variables for a multivariate logistic regression model was determined using a bootstrapping method. Results: Eventually, 51.6% of the cases suffered from XER M6 . The multivariate analysis showed that the mean contralateral parotid gland dose and baseline xerostomia (none vs. a bit) were the most important predictors for XER M6 . For the multivariate NTCP model, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was 0.68 (95% CI 0.60–0.76) and the discrimination slope was 0.10, respectively. Calibration was good with a calibration slope of 1.0. At 6 months after IMRT, 35.6% of the cases reported STIC M6 . The mean contralateral submandibular gland dose, the mean sublingual dose and the mean dose to the minor salivary glands located in the soft palate were most predictive for STIC M6 . For this model, the AUC was 0.70 (95% CI 0.61–0.78) and the discrimination slope

  17. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Gòra, Joanna; Kuess, Peter; Kragl, Gabriele; Berger, Daniel; Hegazy, Neamat; Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ( 192 Ir) and LDR-BT ( 125 I) were D 90% ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D 90% ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D mean around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques were clearly superior in

  18. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V 30 (%) and V 10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V 20 (%), V 10 (%) and the right lung V 5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time

  19. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmar.Georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hopfgartner, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gòra, Joanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kuess, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kragl, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ({sup 192}Ir) and LDR-BT ({sup 125}I) were D{sub 90%} ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D{sub 90%} ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D{sub mean} around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques

  20. Incidental dose to coronary arteries is higher in prone than in supine whole breast irradiation. A dosimetric comparison in adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuerschmidt, Florian; Stoltenberg, Solveigh; Kretschmer, Matthias; Petersen, Cordula

    2014-06-15

    Sparing of normal lung is best achieved in prone whole breast irradiation (WBI). However, exposure of the heart and coronary arteries might increase due to anterior movement of the heart in prone WBI. Treatment plans of 46 patients with large breasts irradiated for mammary cancer after breast-conserving surgery were retrospectively analyzed. The average treated breast volume of right-sided breasts (n = 33) was 1,804 ccm and 1,500 ccm for left-sided breasts (n = 13). The majority had invasive cancer (96 %) of which 61 % were pT1 and 39 % pT2 tumors. All patients received radiation therapy to the breast only. For three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning, all patients underwent a noncontrast-enhanced CT in the supine position with a wingboard and a second CT in the prone position using a prone breastboard. Nontarget volumes of the lung, heart, and coronary arteries were contoured. A total dose of 50.4 Gy was prescribed to the breast only. Differences were calculated for each patient and compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Treatment of left-sided breasts resulted in similar average mean heart doses in prone versus supine WBI (4.16 vs. 4.01 Gy; p = 0.70). The left anterior descending artery (LAD) had significantly higher dose exposure in left versus right WBI independent of position. Prone WBI always resulted in significantly higher exposures of the right circumflex artery (RCA) and LAD as compared to supine WBI. In left WBI, the mean LADprone was 33.5 Gy vs. LADsupine of 25.6 Gy (p = 0.0051). The V20prone of the LAD was 73.6 % vs. V20supine 50.4 % (p = 0.0006). The heart dose is not different between supine and prone WBI. However, in left WBI the incidental dose to the LAD with clinically relevant doses can be significantly higher in prone WBI. This is discussed controversially in the literature as it might depend on contouring and treatment techniques. We recommend contouring of LAD if patients are treated in prone WBI and evaluation of alternative

  1. Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in left-sided breast cancer. Dosimetrical comparison and clinical feasibility in 20 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Ammerpohl, Mark; Morgenstern, Christina; Erichsen, Patricia [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Nielinger, Lisa [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Hochschule Hamm-Lippstadt, Lippstadt (Germany); Abdallah, Abdallah [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Senologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Galalae, Razvan [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Medizinische Fakultaet, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer (BC) is a well-established indication. The risk of ischaemic heart disease after radiotherapy for BC increases linearly with the heart mean dose with no apparent threshold. Radiotherapy to the left breast in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) reduces the dose to the heart. A new linac system with an integrated surface scanner (SS) for DIBH treatments was recently installed in our department. We tested it for potential benefits, safety, patients' acceptance/compliance and associated additional workload. Twenty consecutive patients following BCS for breast carcinoma of the left side were enrolled in our institutional DIBH protocol. We compared dose to the heart and ipsilateral lung (IL) between plans in DIBH and free breathing (FB) using standard defined parameters: mean dose, maximal dose to a volume of 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3}), volume receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V{sub 5}), 10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}). Comparison of median calculated dose values was performed using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. DIBH was associated with a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in all studied parameters for the heart and the IL. In 16 of 20 patients the heart D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3} was less than 42 Gy in DIBH. In FB the heart D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3} was ≥ 42 Gy in 17 of 20 patients. The median daily treatment time was 9 min. Radiotherapy of the left breast in DIBH using a SS could easily be incorporated into daily routine and is associated with significant dose reduction to the heart and IL. (orig.) [German] Die adjuvante Strahlentherapie nach brusterhaltener Operation (BCS) bei Brustkrebs (BC) ist eine seit langem anerkannte Behandlungsform. Das postradiogene Risiko einer kardialen Ischaemie steigt linear ohne erkennbaren Schwellenwert mit der mittleren Herzdosis. Die Bestrahlung der linken Brust in tiefer Inspiration unter Anhalten der

  2. Dosimetric system for measurement of radioactive contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litynski, Z.; Pienkos, J.P.; Witkowski, J.; Zadrozny, S.

    1985-01-01

    A dosimetric system for personnel dosimetry and monitoring measuring a contamination without time delay and dead time is described. The system ensures many-point measurement and minimalization of background radiation influence. 1 fig. (A.S.)

  3. SU-F-T-107: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices of Pharyngeal Constrictors and Proximal Esophagus with Associated Patient-Reported Outcomes Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chera, B; Price, A; Kostich, M; Green, R; Das, S; Mavroidis, P [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Amdur, R; Mendenhall, W [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sheets, N [University of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Marks, L [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the correlations between different dosimetric indices derived from the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and proximal esophagus with patient-reported difficulty in swallowing 6 months post radiotherapy using a novel patient reported outcome version of CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE). Methods: Forty-three patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated on a prospective multi-institutional study. All patients received de-intensified 60 Gy intensity modulated radiotherapy. We investigated correlations of individual patient dosimetric data of the superior (SPC), middle (MPC), inferior (IPC) pharyngeal constrictor muscles, the superior esophagus (SES), and the inferior esophagus (IES) to their self-reported 6 month post-treatment swallowing difficulty responses. Mild (≥ Grade 1) swallowing difficulty responses were used as the clinical endpoint indicating response. The predictive efficacy of Dmean and dose-volume (VD) points were assessed through the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and Odds Ratio (OR). Results: The SES and SPC had more favorable area under the curves (AUC) for the Dmean (0.62 and 0.70) while the Dmean to the IPC, MPC, and IES produced suboptimal AUCs (0.42, 0.48, and 0.52). Additionally, over the range of VD, the V54 and V55 for the SES and SPC demonstrated the highest AUCs: AUC(SES) = 0.76–0.73 and AUC(SPC) = 0.72–0.69, respectively. The IES, IPC, and MPC had worse AUC results over the range of VD. An optimal OR can be found when V54 = 96% for the SPC, where OR = 3.96 (1.07–14.62). Conclusion: The V45 and V55 of the SES and SPC had the highest correlation to the clinical endpoint compared to the commonly used dosimetric index, Dmean for both the esophagus and constrictor muscles. The reported dosimetric data demonstrates that new dosimetric indices may need to be considered in the setting of dose de-escalation and self-reported outcomes.

  4. Cytogenetic and dosimetric effects of 131I in lymphocyte of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer with and without r-hTSH stimulation. Study in thyroid tumor cells (WRO) treated with 131I and 60Co in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valgode, Flavia Gomes Silva

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) represents about 90% of thyroid malignancies with increasing incidence in the recent decades. Treatment modalities include thyroidectomy, 131 I therapy (with or without r-hTSH), radio and chemotherapy. Little is known about the effects of these treatments at the cellular level. This work was proposed in order to assess to what extent radioiodine therapy can cause damage in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with DTC, preceded or not by r-hTSH, taking into account acute, slow and dosimetric effects of 131 I (in vivo study). An in vitro study was also carried out on thyroid tumor target cells (WRO) by cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis and radioiodine uptake. For this, blood samples from patients divided into two groups (group A, r-hTSH + 131 I and group B, 131 I only) were collected before, 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month and 1 year after 131 I administration for aberration chromosome analysis (CA). A dose-response curve for 131 I in vitro was developed for estimating the absorbed dose in patients, comparing the dicentric frequencies obtained in vitro with in vivo data by Monte Carlo program. Radioiodine therapy induced an increase in the number of CA in lymphocytes of patients peaking 24 hours after treatment, with gradual decline over time and with more chromosomal damage in group B than in group A, reaching baseline levels one year after radioiodine administration. The frequency of dicentric found inpatient lymphocytes, 24h after treatment, was equivalent to that induced in vitro (0.354 ± 0.153 MBq / mL for group A and 0.309 ± 0.154 MBq / mL for group B), which corresponds to absorbed doses of 0.8 ± 0.3 Gy and 0.7 ± 0.3 Gy for groups A and B, respectively, with no significant difference between the groups. WRO cells showed a cell cycle relatively slow: 96,3h with an unstable karyotype. The genotoxic test showed a relatively high radioresistance (0.07 to 3.70 MBq/mL), with no statistical significance, with or without r

  5. Dosimetric studies in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadain, K. E. M.

    2004-04-01

    A dosimetric study in pediatric radiology and adult patients was currently being carried out at the pediatrics units of two large hospitals in Rio de Janeiro city: IPPMG (Instituto de Pediatric e Puericultura Martagao Gesteira, University hospital of federal University of Rio de Janeiro), IFF (Instituto Fernandes Figueira, FIOCRUZ) and Hospital Geral de Bonsucesso, a large public hospital in Rio de Janeiro city (HGB) Brazil. The dosimetric study was also performed at three pediatrics units in Sudan, namely, Ahmed Gasim, Khartoum and Omdurman hospitals. For chest x-ray examination the entrance skin dose(ESD) for AP, PA and LAT projections of pediatric patients, and the scattered dose at the thyroid, ovary and gonads have been obtained with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and with use of a software package Dosecal in thr Brazilian hospitals, and with the software dosecal in the Sudanese hospitals.The aim of this work was to estimate the entrance skin dose (ESD), the effective dose (ED) and the body organ dose (BOD) for chest x-ray exposure in pediatric patients, and different exams for adults patients, and to compare the results obtained in the tow Countries Sudan and Brazil with the reference dose level. For ESD evaluation of the chest x-ray, three different TL dosimeters have been used, namely LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD 100) CaSo 4 : Dy and LiF:Mg, Cu,P (TLD 100 H). The age intervals considered were: 0-1 years, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. The results obtained with all dosimeters were in good agreement with, those obtained by the dosecal software, especially for AP and PA projection. However, some discrepancies were found for the LAT projection. The results within Brazil were some what consistent while in Sudan, large difference were observed, it was also noted that the doses in Brazil hospitals were less than the reference dose levels while in Sudanese hospitals the doses were higher than the reference dose levels. For adult patients only the software dosecal

  6. Dosimetric properties of MOS transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.; Petr, I.

    1977-01-01

    The structure of MOS transistors is described and their characteristics given. The experiments performed and data in the literature show the following dosimetric properties of MOS transistors: while for low gamma doses the transistor response to exposure is linear, it shows saturation for higher doses (exceeding 10 3 Gy in tissue). The response is independent of the energy of radiation and of the dose rate (within 10 -2 to 10 5 Gy/s). The spontaneous reduction with time of the spatial charge captured by the oxide layer (fading) is small and acceptable from the point of view of dosimetry. Curves are given of isochronous annealing of the transistors following irradiation with 137 Cs and 18 MeV electrons for different voltages during irradiation. The curves show that in MOS transistors irradiated with high-energy electrons the effect of annealing is less than in transistors irradiated with 137 Cs. In view of the requirement of using higher temperatures (approx. 400 degC) for the complete ''erasing'' of the captured charge, unsealed systems must be used for dosimetric purposes. The effect was also studied of neutron radiation, proton radiation and electron radiation on the MOS transistor structure. For MOS transistor irradiation with 14 MeV neutrons from a neutron generator the response was 4% of that for gamma radiation at the same dose equivalent. The effect of proton radiation was studied as related to the changes in MOS transistor structure during space flights. The response curve shapes are similar to those of gamma radiation curves. The effect of electron radiation on the MOS structure was studied by many authors. The experiments show that for each thickness of the SiO 2 layer an electron energy exists at which the size of the charge captured in SiO 2 is the greatest. All data show that MOS transistors are promising for radiation dosimetry. The main advantage of MOS transistors as gamma dosemeters is the ease and speed of evaluation, low sensitivity to neutron

  7. Dosimetric verification of IMRT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulski, W.; Cheimicski, K.; Rostkowska, J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a complex procedure requiring proper dosimetric verification. IMRT dose distributions are characterized by steep dose gradients which enable to spare organs at risk and allow for an escalation of the dose to the tumor. They require large number of radiation beams (sometimes over 10). The fluence measurements for individual beams are not sufficient for evaluation of the total dose distribution and to assure patient safety. The methods used at the Centre of Oncology in Warsaw are presented. In order to measure dose distributions in various cross-sections the film dosimeters were used (radiographic Kodak EDR2 films and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT films). The film characteristics were carefully examined. Several types of tissue equivalent phantoms were developed. A methodology of comparing measured dose distributions against the distributions calculated by treatment planning systems (TPS) was developed and tested. The tolerance level for this comparison was set at 3% difference in dose and 3 mm in distance to agreement. The so called gamma formalism was used. The results of these comparisons for a group of over 600 patients are presented. Agreement was found in 87 % of cases. This film dosimetry methodology was used as a benchmark to test and validate the performance of commercially available 2D and 3D matrices of detectors (ionization chambers or diodes). The results of these validations are also presented. (authors)

  8. Dosimetric comparison between techniques for irradiation of breast plastron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinca, W.C.; Bruning, F.F.; Caldeira, F A.M.; Silveira, T.B da; Batista, D.V.S.; Andrade, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer undergoing radical mastectomy has as an indication of adjuvancy the irradiation of the breast plastron. This paper makes a comparison between different techniques for treatment of breast plastron routinely used in the National Cancer Institute of Brazil (INCA): The irradiation with tangential fields of photons at 6 MV linear accelerator and irradiation with direct angled fields of electron beams of 6 and 9 MeV. We performed dosimetric comparisons in a tissue-equivalent phantom with the use of radiochromic films for verification of coverage and homogeneity of dose for all technical requirements. Tangential fields in the coverage and homogeneity were satisfactory and well cover the clinical aspects as well as beam 9 MeV, despite a small loss at the edge of the external field. Already in 6 MeV beam, there was significant loss in the end, with significant subdoses of 3 cm in the last field. (author)

  9. Dosimetric results in implant and post-implant and low rate in brachytherapy prostate cancer with loose seeds and attached; Resultados dosimetricos en el implante y post-impante en braquiterapia de baja tasa en cancer de prostata con semillas sueltas y unidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan-Senabre, X. J.; Albert Antequera, M.; Lopez-Tarjuelo, J.; Santos Serra, A.; Perez-Mestre, M.; Sanchez Iglesias, A. L.; Conde Moreno, A. J.; Gonzalez Vidal, V.; Beltran Persiva, J.; Muelas Soria, R.; Ferrer Albiach, C.

    2015-07-01

    The objective is determine differences dosimetry statistics on the dosimetry of the implant and post-implant in brachytherapy of low rate with implants permanent in prostate using seed of 125-I loose and attached Both in lives and in the post-prostatic plans dosimetric coverage is good and restrictions in urethra and rectum for both groups of patients are met. Not migrating with joined is evident, as well as better dosimetric homogeneity. (Author)

  10. Dosimetric implications associated to heterogeneity dose correction in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer; Implicaciones dosimetricas asociadas al calculo de dosis con correccion de heterogeneidad en radioterapia estereotaxica extracraneal (SBRT) de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of lung lesions using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires algorithms with corrections that adequately model the behavior of narrow beams in the presence of tissue heterogeneities, although protocols such as RTOG 0236 excluded these kind of corrections. 100 cases were evaluated retrospectively following the RTOG 0813 and RTOG 0915 guidelines, by obtaining the deviations of the relevant dosimetric indicators from Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB), maintaining the same configuration and monitor units (MU). Deviations between MC and PB have been classified according to the volume and density of the lesion. The greatest variations (up to 45% difference in D50%) are found for cases with lower volume and density, where the lesion is almost equivalent to lung tissue, given the higher proportion of air surrounding the periphery of the tumor, and the reduction of the radiation fields, resulting in a lack of electronic equilibrium that must be properly considered in the treatment planning system. These deviations involve dosimetric implications which are observable in clinical outcomes, determining how to proceed in treatment planning, to ensure that the actual dose delivered is performed accordingly to the prescription dose, while requiring the use of algorithms with a proper heterogeneity correction. (Author)

  11. Assessment of the secondary dosimetric benefit due to the implementation of the IMRT technique for an anal canal cancer; Evaluation du benefice dosimetrique secondaire a la mise en oeuvre de la technique de RCMI dans le cancer du canal anal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau-Claeys, M.V.; Huger, S.; Lostette, J.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Boutenbat, G.; Marchesi, V.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a prospective comparison, for a same patient, of delivered doses for the coverage of target volumes and for the protection of organs at risk within the frame of an intensity-modulated conformational irradiation (IMRT) with respect to a conventional conformational radiotherapy for an anal canal cancer. The tumour conformity indexes are compared for the different target volumes. The average received doses are also compared for different organs and bones about the treated area. IMRT ensures a better protection of organs. The authors are developing a dynamic arc therapy approach. Short communication

  12. Quality control of dosimetric systems using thermoluminescent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahecha, L.; Plazas, M. C.; Machado, M.; Perea, M. D.

    2006-01-01

    To achieve an optimal tumoral control to prostate cancer in early and locally advanced stages, it is necessary to increase the dose with a low mobility probability at the vesicle an rectal level. This is achieved through conformal radiotherapy. The Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia uses this technique, but two questions arise from the medical-physicists and medical radio-oncologist: In accordance with clinical protocols, the conformal radiotherapy delivers a low dose to the adjacent healthy tissues. What experimental method exists that can prove with certainly the veracity of this affirmation?. And, Do the dosimetric simulation system calculate suitable the dose for each tissues?. Through thermoluminescent dosimetry and the use of a physical simulator,we measured the absorbed dose at the target volume and the adjacent tissues using conformal and conventional radiotherapy. We proved that organs such as the rectum and bladder, receiver a minor dose in conformal radiotherapy, hence reducing their mobility probability. In addition, the readings from the thermoluminescent dosimeters and the doses calculated by the ECLIPSE dosimetric system were compared, concluding that the patient's prescribed dose is effectively delivered as recommended by the quality control program in radiotherapy. (Author)

  13. Development of a dosimetric system for the quality control of breast cancer treatments; Desenvolvimento de um sistema dosimetrico para o controle de qualidade nos tratamentos de cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Roberio C.; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: rchaves@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: verginia@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/lUFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Nuclear; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da, E-mail: Irosa@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Delano B.V., E-mail: delano@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA/MS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    A system for evaluating the values of absorbed dose in breast teletherapy was developed, using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), to compare them to those provided by Therapy planning system. A breast phantom was made to distribute the dosimeters TL shaped chip in breast volume and irradiate it under the same conditions of planning. Three different techniques of teletherapy were considered: one with irradiation from a therapy unit of {sup 60}Co and two with an X-ray beam coming from a 6 MV linear accelerator. Doses measures allowed checking that the performance of the quality control system used in breast cancer treatment is appropriate, since the planned doses differed about 1.5% of the responses provided by TL dosimeters.

  14. RAPIDARC (RA) in the uterine cervical cancer; dosimetric gain vs 3D-Crt; RAPIDARC (RA) en el cancer de cervix uterino; ganancia dosimetrica vs 3D-CRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, J.; Garcia, B.; Quispe, K.; Gonzales, A.; Marquina, J., E-mail: jose.ramirez@aliada.com.pe [Clinica Aliada, Oncologia Integral, Av. Jose Galvez Barrenechea 1044, San Isidro, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    This work aims to quantitatively assess RAPIDARC (RA) treatments versus three dimensional-Conformal Radiation Therapy with field to field technique (3D-Crt-Fin F). 11 patients with cervical cancer treated at our institution radically or adjuvant clinical stages I-III B were evaluated. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy (2 Gy / Fr). The RA plans consisted of two isocentric complete arcs and conformational plans of 4 isocentric fields (previous, subsequent, right side and left side) with 3D-Crt-Fin F technique; both cases carried out ??in the Eclipse version 10 planner with calculation algorithm analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and volumetric optimization software (for VMAT plans). Homogeneity indices (Hi), conformity indices (CI) Sigma indices (S-Index), monitor units (MU) and the time required for each treatment were compared. The mean age was 52 years (32-65) of the 11 patients 9 were clinical stages I-II B. The Hi varied from 0.052 for RA to 0.163 for 3D-Crt-Fin F (p = 0.009), and the CI between 1.005 and 1.35 (p = 0.26), the S-index from 1.2 to 3.7 (p = 0.001) and the H-index of 1.08 to 1.15 (p = 0.24). All dose limits in risk organs were met with a significant difference in the RA plans versus 3D-Crt-Fin F. In patients with cervical cancer the treatment plans quality with the indices aforementioned seems to be better with the RA technique, being observed a significant reduction of radiation to surrounding organs. (author)

  15. Internal dosimetric evaluation due to uranium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Aguilar Juan; Delgado Avila Gustavo

    1991-01-01

    The present work has like object to carry out the internal dosimetric evaluation to the occupationally exposed personnel, due to the inhalation of aerosols of natural uranium and enriched in the pilot plant of nuclear fuel production of the National Institute of Nuclear Research

  16. ESR dosimetric properties of some biomineral materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Gamal M.; Sharaf, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of g-irradiated modern coral and bioactive glass (Bio-G) samples analyzed with electron spin resonance (ESR) have been separately reported (Hassan et al., 2004; Sharaf and Hassan, 2004) and compared with alanine. These are combined here to allow a three-way comparison between these materials

  17. ESR dosimetric properties of some biomineral materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Gamal M. [Department of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Tersa Street, El-Haram, El-Giza, P.O. Box 136 Giza, El-Giza (Egypt)]. E-mail: gamalhassan65@hotmail.com; Sharaf, M.A. [Department of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Tersa Street, El-Haram, El-Giza, P.O. Box 136 Giza, El-Giza (Egypt)

    2005-02-01

    Dosimetric properties of g-irradiated modern coral and bioactive glass (Bio-G) samples analyzed with electron spin resonance (ESR) have been separately reported (Hassan et al., 2004; Sharaf and Hassan, 2004) and compared with alanine. These are combined here to allow a three-way comparison between these materials.

  18. Dosimetric analysis of radiation sources to use in dermatological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions undergoing therapy with radiation sources may have different patterns of malignancy. Malignant lesions or cancer most commonly found in radiotherapy services are carcinomas. Radiation therapy in skin lesions is performed with low penetration beams and orthovoltage X-rays, electron beams and radioactive sources ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, e 90 Sr) arranged on a surface mold or in metal applicator. This study aims to analyze the therapeutic radiation dose profile produced by radiation sources used in skin lesions radiotherapy procedures. Experimental measurements for the analysis of dosimetric radiation sources were compared with calculations obtained from a computer system based on the Monte Carlo Method. Computational results had a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Experimental measurements and computational results by the MCNP4C code have been used to validate the calculations obtained by MCNP code and to provide a reliable medical application for each clinical case. (author)

  19. Radiation hazards in uranium mining. Epidemiological and dosimetric approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Johnson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Potential health hazards resulting from exposure to various sources of radiation associated with uranium mining have been reviewed: 1) epidemiological observations on groups of miners exposed in the past to high concentrations of radon progeny have been interpreted to suggest a lifetime risk of about 3 x 10 -4 lung cancers per WLM; 2) the total risk of serious health effects resulting from exposure of workers to whole body gamma-radiation might be taken to be about 2 x 10 -2 per Sv; and 3) the potential health effects of inhalation of thoron progeny or of radioactive ore dusts can only be estimated from dosimetric calculations. A review of the uncertainties involved in these calculations suggests that ICRP estimates of the potential toxicity of inhaled thoron progeny are as good as those for inhaled radon progeny. However, the potential health hazards from inhaled uranium and thorium ore dusts have probably been overestimated by a factor of 2 to 10-fold

  20. Dosimetric properties of the fast neutron therapy beams at TAMVEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.; Smith, A.R.; Smathers, J.R.; Otte, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    In October 1972, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute of the University of Texas System Cancer Center initiated a clinical trial of fast neutron radiotherapy using the cyclotron at Texas A and M University. Initially, the study used neutrons produced by bombarding beryllium with 16 MeV deuterons, but since March, 1973, neutrons from 50 MeV deuterons have been used. The dosimetric properties of the 30 MeV beams have also been measured for comparison with the neutron beams from D-T generators. The three beams are compared in terms of dose rate, skin sparing, depth dose and field flatness. Isodose curves for treatment planning were generated using the decrement line method and compared to curves measured by a computer controlled isodose plotter. This system was also used to measure the isodose curves for wedge fields. Dosimetry checks on various patients were made using silicon diodes as in vivo fast neutron dosimeters

  1. Dosimetric and patient correlates of quality of life after prostate stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Evelyn; Helou, Joelle; Zhang, Liying; Cheung, Patrick; Deabreu, Andrea; D’Alimonte, Laura; Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Mamedov, Alexandre; Cardoso, Marlene; Loblaw, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Initial results of Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer appear promising however long-term quality of life (QOL) outcomes and dosimetric correlates are necessary. Material and methods: A phase I/II study was performed where low risk prostate cancer patients received SABR 35 Gy in 5 fractions, once weekly. Patient self-reported QOL was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) at baseline and q6 month up to 5 years. Urinary, bowel and sexual domains were analyzed. A minimally clinical important change (MCIC) was defined as 0.5 ∗ standard deviation of the baseline. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify dosimetric predictors of MCIC. Results: 84 patients were included. The median follow-up was 50.8 months (interquartile range [IQR], 44.7–56.3). 17.9%, 26.2% and 37.5% of patients reported worse QOL on follow up in the urinary, bowel and sexual domains respectively. On univariate analysis Rectal V31.8 > 10%, D1cc > 35 Gy were associated with bowel MCIC, penile bulb (PB) V35 > 4%, V20 > 40% with sexual MCIC. Of these factors only rectal D1cc and PB V35 were predictors of worse QOL on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Long-term single-institution QOL outcomes are encouraging. Rigorous dosimetric constraints are needed to keep bothersome side effects low

  2. Model dosimetric for Radon and Daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puerta, J.A.; Cardenas, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    You elaborates a model dosimetric for radon and their products of decline of short half life starting from the new model of the breathing tract of the publication 66 of the ICRP and the use of the systemic models proposed in the publication 67, 68 and 69 of the same commission. The correlated used methodology the incorporation of these radionuclides with the activity in organs and you excrete, considering the difference of metabolic behavior of the products of decline and of their predecessor

  3. Comparison of Cloud Detection Using the CERES-MODIS Ed4 and LaRC AVHRR Cloud Masks and CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, Q. Z.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Bedka, K. M.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate detection of cloud amount and distribution using satellite observations is crucial in determining cloud radiative forcing and earth energy budget. The CERES-MODIS (CM) Edition 4 cloud mask is a global cloud detection algorithm for application to Terra and Aqua MODIS data with the aid of other ancillary data sets. It is used operationally for the NASA's Cloud and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project. The LaRC AVHRR cloud mask, which uses only five spectral channels, is based on a subset of the CM cloud mask which employs twelve MODIS channels. The LaRC mask is applied to AVHRR data for the NOAA Climate Data Record Program. Comparisons among the CM Ed4, and LaRC AVHRR cloud masks and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask (VFM) constitute a powerful means for validating and improving cloud detection globally. They also help us understand the strengths and limitations of the various cloud retrievals which use either active and passive satellite sensors. In this paper, individual comparisons will be presented for different types of clouds over various surfaces, including daytime and nighttime, and polar and non-polar regions. Additionally, the statistics of the global, regional, and zonal cloud occurrence and amount from the CERES Ed4, AVHRR cloud masks and CALIPSO VFM will be discussed.

  4. SOCIAL FRANCHISING IN CONTEXT OF MARKETING LONG-TERM AND REVERSIBLE CONTRACEPTIVES (LARCS IN UGANDA: ANALYSIS OF PACE SOCIAL FRANCHISE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon SENSALIRE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uganda is TFR is among the world’s highest at six children per woman, and contributes to the rising rate of poverty and maternal and infant mortality across the country. A social franchise model was adopted in Uganda to market and scale up contraceptive prevalence through the private sector. In 2008 PACE launched the Women’s Health Project, a core component of their reproductive health strategy to increase access to and demand for affordable, quality long‐term Family Planning (FP services, through the setup of a network of private healthcare providers, branded as “ProFam” social franchise health facilities. The program expanded and included services aimed to offer and improve reproductive health services, limiting births through increased use of IUDs and implants as well change negative perceptions to FP. Until 2014, this network consisted of 189 private facilities spread out in 56 districts, following a business model of social franchising. Methods: The multifaceted effect of the social franchise intervention under PACE was then measured through a longitudinal cross sectional survey on perceptions towards Long-Term and Reversible Contraceptives (LARCs use among the target population through a cross-sectional studies over two periods. The studies covered 53 districts hosting 194 privately owned health facilities branded Profam. Multi-stage cluster sampling approaches was used to draw a representative sample of women of reproductive age group. However, for Kampala (capital city, given its population size, the catchment area was restricted to a parish/Ward. Findings: There is an evident rise in current use of FP methods among WRA. Availability of LARCs particularly IUCDs significantly increased over the two time periods. Use of FP services among WRA is a socially sanctioned behavior/practice. There was reported increase in social support for FP services. There were high levels of correct knowledge about FP services and

  5. Hot pixel generation in active pixel sensors: dosimetric and micro-dosimetric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheick, Leif; Novak, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The dosimetric response of an active pixel sensor is analyzed. heavy ions are seen to damage the pixel in much the same way as gamma radiation. The probability of a hot pixel is seen to exhibit behavior that is not typical with other microdose effects.

  6. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crijns, Wouter; Van Herck, Hans; Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin; Slagmolen, Pieter; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  7. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); iMinds-KU Leuven Medical IT Department, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven and iMinds, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  8. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a

  9. ESR dosimetric properties of modern coral reef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf, M.A. E-mail: mokhtar_sharaf@yahoo.com; Hassan, Gamal M

    2004-06-01

    Modern coral reef samples from Egypt were irradiated with {sup 60}Co{gamma}-rays to study radicals for dosimetric materials with electron spin resonance (ESR). The ESR spectrum for the radical species in unirradiated coral is characterized by four signals with spectroscopic splitting factors of g=2.0056, 2.0030, 2.0006 and 1.997. The signal at g=2.0006{+-}0.0005 is ascribed to free rotation CO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals and used as a dosimetric one. The response to {gamma}-ray doses ranging from 5 to 10{sup 3} Gy and the thermal stability has been studied. The number of free radicals per 100 eV (G-value) was found to be 0.45 {+-} 0.1 and 0.9 {+-} 0.18 for coral and alanine, respectively. The lifetime of radicals and the activation energy were estimated from Arrhenius plots to be approximately 8 x 10{sup 5} {+-} 1.6 x 10{sup 5} years, and 1.12 eV, respectively.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and 3-dimensional conformal therapy for the treatment of T1N0 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekici, Kemal; Pepele, Eda K.; Yaprak, Bahaddin; Temelli, Oztun; Eraslan, Aysun F.; Kucuk, Nadir; Altınok, Ayse Y.; Sut, Pelin A.; Alpak, Ozlem D.; Colak, Cemil; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2016-01-01

    Various radiotherapy planning methods for T1N0 laryngeal cancer have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compare helical tomotherapy (HT), linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques for T1N0 laryngeal cancer. Overall, 10 patients with T1N0 laryngeal cancer were selected and evaluated. Furthermore, 10 radiotherapy treatment plans have been created for all 10 patients, including HT, IMRT, VMAT, and 3D-CRT. IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans vs 3D-CRT plans consistently provided superior planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Similar target coverage was observed between the 3 IMRT modalities. Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, HT, and VMAT significantly reduced the mean dose to the carotid arteries. VMAT resulted in the lowest mean dose to the submandibular and thyroid glands. Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, HT, and VMAT significantly increased the maximum dose to the spinal cord It was observed that the 3 IMRT modalities studied showed superior target coverage with less variation between each plan in comparison with 3D-CRT. The 3D-CRT plans performed better at the D max of the spinal cord. Clinical investigation is warranted to determine if these treatment approaches would translate into a reduction in radiation therapy–induced toxicities.

  11. Development of optimized dosimetric models for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayalan, K.; Jagadeesan, M.

    2003-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) systems are in clinical use for more than four decades particularly in cervical cancer. Optimization is the method to produce dose distribution which assures that doses are not compromised at the treatment sites whilst reducing the risk of overdosing critical organs. Hence HDRB optimization begins with the desired dose distribution and requires the calculations of the relative weighting factors for each dwell position with out changing the source activity. The optimization for Ca. uterine cervix treatment is simply duplication of the dose distribution used for Low dose rate (LDR) applications. In the present work, two optimized dosimetric models were proposed and studied thoroughly, to suit the local clinical conditions. These models are named as HDR-C and HDR-D, where C and D represent configuration and distance respectively. These models duplicate exactly the LDR pear shaped dose distribution, which is a golden standard. The validity of these models is tested in different clinical situations and in actual patients (n=92). These models: HDR-C and HDR-D reduce bladder dose by 11.11% and 10% and rectal dose by 8% and 7% respectively. The treatment time is also reduced by 12-14%. In a busy hospital setup, these models find a place to cater large number of patients, while addressing individual patients geometry. (author)

  12. Dosimetric intercomparison between protons and electrons therapies applied to retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Flavia Vieira

    2008-01-01

    In this work we propose a construction of a simple human eye model in order to simulate the dosimetric response for a treatment with protons and electrons in a retinoblastoma cancer. The computational tool used in this simulation was the Geant4 code, in the version 4.9.1, all these package are free and permit simulate the interaction of radiation with matter. In our simulation we use a box with 4 cm side, with water, for represent the human eye. The simulation was performed considering mono energetics beams of protons and electrons with energy range between 50 and 70 MeV for protons and 2 and 10 MeV for electrons. The simulation was based on the advanced hadron therapy example of the Geant 4 code. In these example the phantom is divided in voxels with 0.2 mm side and it is generated the energy deposited in each voxel. The simulation results show the energy deliver in each voxel, with these energie we can calculate the dose deposited in that region. We can see the dose profile of, proton and electron, and we can see in both cases that for protons the position of delivered dose is well know, that happen in the position where the proton stop, for electrons the energies is delivered along the way and pass the desired position for high dose deposition. (author)

  13. Dosimetric analysis of radiation sources for use dermatological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions undergoing therapy with radiation sources may have different patterns of malignancy. Malignant lesions or cancer most commonly found in radiotherapy services are carcinomas. Radiation therapy in skin lesions is performed with low penetration beams and orthovoltage X-rays, electron beams and radioactive sources ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, e 90 Sr) arranged on a surface mold or in metal applicator. This study aims to analyze the therapeutic radiation dose profile produced by radiation sources used in skin lesions radiotherapy procedures . Experimental measurements for the analysis of dosimetric radiation sources were compared with calculations obtained from a computer system based on the Monte Carlo Method. Computational results had a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Experimental measurements and computational results by the MCNP4C code were both physically consistent as expected. These experimental measurements compared with calculations using the MCNP-4C code have been used to validate the calculations obtained by MCNP code and to provide a reliable medical application for each clinical case. (author)

  14. Applications of sensitivity function to dosimetric data adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1984-01-01

    Sensitivity functions are applied to the dosimetric field in the spectrum unfolding technique, also called as the data adjustment technique which are statistical estimation procedures of the neutron spectrum or relating dosimetric quantities basing on the reaction-rate data measurements. Using the practical formulae and numerical examples of the sensitivity functions in the dosimetric data adjustments, two comments are made that (1) present sensitivity values are highly depending on the initial spectrum inputs and (2) more attention should be paid to the dependency of the sensitivity on the very uncertain covariance data inputs of the initial neutron spectrum. (author)

  15. Establishment of a dosimetric system for high doses using glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Quezada, Valeria de la Asuncion

    1997-01-01

    A routine dosimetric system was developed using commercial glass samples. The dosimetric characteristics of national and imported samples were studied: batch uniformity, response repeatability, reutilization, absorbed dose response, detection range, response stability as a function of absorbed dose, storage temperature and thermal treatments pre- and post-irradiation, using the optical absorption technique. As an application, the dosimetric system was tested in a flower irradiation process at IPEN. All the obtained results show the usefulness of the proposed system for high dose dosimetry. (author)

  16. Dosimetric evaluation program for dental radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, B.; Milat, J.; Fernandez, J.; Micinquevich, S.; Andrieu, J.

    1992-01-01

    The preliminary results of a program undertaken to estimate the doses to patients associated with dental radiology practices in Argentine, are presented. Information collected from the search demonstrated that the Dieck and coronal techniques are the most commonly used practices, while all the examinations are performed by using a circular collimator. For both practices, the dosimetric studies were carried out on a Rando Alderson phantom. All dose measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors LiF and Ca 2 F. In addition, a mathematical model was developed by applying the Monte Carlo method to a MIRD-V phantom. Circular and rectangular collimators were used. Absorbed dose distribution on head and neck, as well as surface dose distribution, were estimated. The comparison of the performance of both collimators shows that the use of the rectangular one allows for a dose reduction of 80%. Besides, a good correlation between the physical and mathematical models applied was found. (author)

  17. Dosimetric management during a criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Fottorino, R.; Racine, Y.; Miele, A.; Barbry, F.; Briot, F.; Distinguin, S.; Le Goff, J.P.; Berard, P.; Boisson, P.; Cavadore, D.; Lecoix, G.; Persico, M.H.; Rongier, E.; Challeton-De Vathaire, C.; Medioni, R.; Voisin, P.; Exmelin, L.; Flury-Herard, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Lemaire, G.; Gonin, M.; Riasse, C.

    2008-01-01

    A working group from health occupational and clinical biochemistry services on French sites has issued essential data sheets on the guidelines to follow in managing the victims of a criticality accident. Since the priority of the medical management after a criticality accident is to assess the dose and the distribution of dose, some dosimetric investigations have been selected in order to provide a prompt response and to anticipate the final dose reconstruction. Comparison exercises between clinical biochemistry laboratories on French sites were carried out to confirm that each laboratory maintained the required operational methods for hair treatment and the appropriate equipment for 32 P activity in hair and 24 Na activity in blood measurements, and to demonstrate its ability to rapidly provide neutron dose estimates after a criticality accident. As a result, a relation has been assessed to estimate the dose and the distribution of dose according to the neutron spectrum following a criticality accident. (authors)

  18. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2006-01-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ( 60 Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  19. ARDENT to develop advanced dosimetric techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Earlier this week, the EU-supported Marie Curie training network ARDENT kicked off at a meeting held at CERN. The overall aim of the project is the development of advanced instrumentation for radiation dosimetry. The applications range from radiation measurements around particle accelerators, onboard commercial flights and in space, to the characterization of radioactive waste and medicine, where accurate dosimetry is of vital importance.   The ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) project is both a research and a training programme, which aims at developing new dosimetric techniques while providing 15 Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) with state-of-the-art training. The project, coordinated by CERN, is funded by the European Union with a contribution of about 3.9 million euros over four years. The ARDENT initiative will focus on three main technologies: gas detectors, in particular Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) and Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPC); solid stat...

  20. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E

    2006-07-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ({sup 60} Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  1. Clinical-dosimetric analysis of measures of dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube dependence among head and neck cancer patients treated definitively by intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Baoqing; Chen, Allen M; Li, Dan; Lau, Derick H; Farwell, D Gregory; Luu, Quang; Rocke, David M; Newman, Kathleen; Courquin, Jean; Purdy, James A

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the association between dose to various anatomical structures and dysphagia among patients with head and neck cancer treated by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-nine patients with squamous cancer of the head and neck were treated by definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 68 to 72). In each patient, a gastrostomy tube (GT) was prophylacticly placed prior to starting treatment. Prolonged GT dependence was defined as exceeding the median GT duration of 192 days. Dysphagia was scored using standardized quality-of-life instruments. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data incorporating the superior/middle pharyngeal constrictors (SMPC), inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), cricoid pharyngeal inlet (CPI), and cervical esophagus (CE) were analyzed in relation to prolonged GT dependence, dysphagia, and weight loss. At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, 87% and 44% of patients, respectively, were GT dependent. Spearman's ρ analysis identified statistical correlations (p < 0.05) between prolonged GT dependence or high grade dysphagia with IPC V65, IPC V60, IPC Dmean, and CPI Dmax. Logistic regression model showed that IPC V65 > 30%, IPC V60 > 60%, IPC Dmean > 60 Gy, and CPI Dmax > 62 Gy predicted for greater than 50% probability of prolonged GT dependence. Our analysis suggests that adhering to the following parameters may decrease the risk of prolonged GT dependence and dysphagia: IPC V65 < 15%, IPC V60 < 40%, IPC Dmean < 55 Gy, and CPI Dmax < 60 Gy

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of a combination of brachytherapy applicators for uterine cervix cancer with involvement of the distal vagina; Avaliacao dosimetrica de uma combinacao de aplicadores para braquiterapia de tumores do colo uterino com acometimento da porcao distal da vagina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues [Real e Benemerita Sociedade Portuguesa de Beneficencia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia Estereotactica; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Rubo, Rodrigo Augusto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia], e-mail: handrade@hcnet.usp.br; Seraide, Rodrigo Migotto [Centro de Oncologia Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate an alternative brachytherapy technique for uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina, without increasing the risk of toxicity. Materials And Methods: Theoretical study comparing three different high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy applicators: intrauterine tandem and vaginal cylinder (TC); tandem/ring applicator combined with vaginal cylinder (TR+C); and a virtual applicator combining both the tandem/ring and vaginal cylinder in a single device (TRC). Prescribed doses were 7 Gy at point A, and 5 Gy on the surface or at a 5 mm depth of the vaginal mucosa. Doses delivered to the rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon were kept below the tolerance limits. Volumes covered by the isodoses, respectively, 50% (V50), 100% (V100), 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) were compared. Results: Both the combined TR+C and TRC presented a better dose distribution as compared with the TC applicator. The TR+C dose distribution was similar to the TRC dose, with V150 and V200 being about 50% higher for TR+C (within the cylinder). Conclusion: Combined TR+C in a two-time single application may represent an alternative therapy technique for patients affected by uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina. (author)

  3. A national dosimetric audit of IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budgell, Geoff; Berresford, Joe; Trainer, Michael; Bradshaw, Ellie; Sharpe, Peter; Williams, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: A dosimetric audit of IMRT has been carried out within the UK between June 2009 and March 2010 in order to provide an independent check of safe implementation and to identify problems in the modelling and delivery of IMRT. Methods and materials: A mail based audit involving film and alanine dosimeters was utilized. Measurements were made for each individual field in an IMRT plan isocentrically in a flat water-equivalent phantom at a depth of 5 cm. The films and alanine dosimeters were processed and analysed centrally; additional ion chamber measurements were made by each participating centre. Results: 57 of 62 centres participated, with a total of 78 plans submitted. For the film measurements, all 176 fields from the less complex IMRT plans (including prostate and breast plans) achieved over 95% pixels passing a gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm within the 20% isodose. For the more complex IMRT plans (mainly head and neck) 8/245 fields (3.3%) achieved less than 95% pixels passing a 4%/4 mm gamma criterion. Of the alanine measurements, 4/78 (5.1%) of the measurements differed by >5% from the dose predicted by the treatment planning system. Three of these were large deviations of -77.1%, -29.1% and 14.1% respectively. Excluding the three measurements outside 10%, the mean difference was 0.05% with a standard deviation of 1.5%. The out of tolerance results have been subjected to further investigations. Conclusions: A dosimetric audit has been successfully carried out of IMRT implementation by over 90% of UK radiotherapy departments. The audit shows that modelling and delivery of IMRT is accurate, suggesting that the implementation of IMRT has been carried out safely.

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-01-01

    Surgical excision, conventional external radiotherapy, and chemotherapy could prolong survival in patients with small intracranial tumors. However, surgical excision for meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull or re-resection is often difficult. Moreover, treatment is needed for patients with recurrent tumors or postoperative residual tumors. Conventional external radiotherapy is popular and has significantly increased for treating brain tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective alternative treatment technique to microsurgical resection such as benign brain tumor or vestibular Schwannomas. In general, the dose to OAR of 3D conformal plan is lower than that of conformal arc and dynamic conformal arc plans. However, any of OARs was not reached to tolerance dose. Although mean dose of the healthy brain tissue for 3D conformal plan was slightly higher than that of arc plans, the doses of the healthy brain tissue at V10 and V20 were significantly low for dynamic conformal arc plan. The dosimetric differences were the greatest at lower doses. In contrast, 3D conformal plan was better spare at higher doses. In this study, a dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery for brain lesion tumors was using fixed and arc beams. A brass block fitted to the PTV structure was modeled for dynamic conformal collimator. Although all treatment plans offer a very good coverage of the PTV, we found that proton arc plans had significantly better conformity to the PTV than static 3D conformal plan. The V20 dose of normal brain for dynamic conformal arc therapy is dramatically reduced compare to those for other therapy techniques.

  5. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  6. Computerized dosimetric system for studying radiation fields of afterloading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, O.S.; Gorshkov, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Works on designing a computerized dosimetric scanner (CODOS) for studying radiation fields of remote therapeutic apparatus, providing dosimetric data input from semiconductor transducers and ionization chambers directly into the computer memory were carried out. The basic problems were to provide reproducibility and accuracy of the initial dosimetric data, formation of the data bank on LUEhV-15M1 accelerator bremsstrahlung and electron radiation fields. An extra problem was to provide isodose curves for manual scheduling of radiotherapy. The 15 VUMS-28-025 complex based on Elektronika-60 computer was chosen as a host computer, photodiodes were used as a semiconductor detector, the 70108 rod chamber and VA-J-18 dosemeters were used as an ionization chamber. The results of studies with the CODOS system have been shown that it meets the dosimetric requirements for therapeutic apparatus

  7. Determination of Absorbed Dose Using a Dosimetric Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Oane, M.; Badita, E.; Mitru, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the absorbed dose measurements by means of the irradiated dosimetric reference films. The dose distributions were made by MULTIDATA film densitometer using RTD-4 software, in INFLPR Linear Accelerator Department

  8. Dosimetric characterization of a 2-D array of 223 solid state detectors for daily morning checks in Tomo Therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes S, U.; Sosa A, M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    Tomo Therapy is a new technique for the cancer treatment; however, the equipment must meet nearly all mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of a conventional linear accelerator for medical use. Daily quality controls are vital to the good operation of the equipment and thus guarantee excellent quality in the daily delivery of treatments. This paper presents the procedure of the dosimetric characterization of a two-dimensional array of 223 solid state detectors, called TomoDose of the Sun Nuclear Company. Dosimetric important criteria are established to perform these checks quickly and accurately. Dosimetric tests proposed are: repeatability, linearity, dependence of Sad and SSD. Some results are compared with readings of the ionization chamber Exradim A1SL. Finally the results of 30 consecutive days are presented to establish criteria for evidence of dose, field size, symmetry and flattening of the radiation beam on Tomo Therapy equipment. Expected values for daily verification are: Dose constancy of 194.89 c Gy, σ= 1.31 c Gy, symmetry in the X axis of -0.19 %, σ=0.08 %, symmetry in the Y axis of 1.66 %, σ= 0.05 %, flattened in the X axis of 25.71 %, σ= 0.05 % and flattened in the Y axis of 6.41 %, σ= 10.23 %. Field sizes obtained were 40.45 cm in the X axis and 5.10 on the Y axis, with standard deviations of 0.02 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. TomoDose dosimetric values, compared to the values obtained with ionization chamber, presented differences smaller than 2%. (Author)

  9. Dosimetric characteristics of biological effect of sulfur-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental materials related to evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of sulfur-35 are presented. Hemogenic organs are subjected to greatest influence especially in the first hours after radionuclide entry into the organism. Comparison is made of absorbed doses in blood with observed blastomogen effect of hemogenic organs. It is noted, that quantitative evaluation of relative biological efficiency of low energy beta-emitters should be performed with account of dosimetric peculiarities of the nuclides mentioned above. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  10. Radiation process control, study and acceptance of dosimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radak, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    The methods of primary dosimetric standardization and the calibration of dosimetric monitors suitable for radiation process control were outlined in the form of a logical pattern in which they are in current use on industrial scale in Yugoslavia. The reliability of the process control of industrial sterilization of medical supplies for the last four years was discussed. The preparatory works for the intermittent use of electron beams in cable industry were described. (author)

  11. Computerized tomography in Community of Madrid. Reference dosimetric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Sanz, S.; Calzado, A.; Melchor, M.; Marco, M.

    1994-01-01

    A total of about 43 computed tomography scanners were operating in the Autonomous Community of Madrid during 1991. A sample of 14 facilities was selected to perform dosimetric measurements in order to obtain characteristic dose profiles. From these, some quantities as the computed tomography dose index and the enhancement factor were calculated and analysed for the most common technique settings. Relations were established between the dosimetric results and technical characteristics of the scanners. (Author)

  12. Intensity-modulated proton therapy for elective nodal irradiation and involved-field radiation in the definitive treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwala, Aparna H; Ko, Christine J; Ning, Holly; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Haglund, Karl E; O'Meara, William P; Simone, Charles B; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-05-01

    Photon involved-field (IF) radiation therapy (IFRT), the standard for locally advanced (LA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), results in favorable outcomes without increased isolated nodal failures, perhaps from scattered dose to elective nodal stations. Because of the high conformality of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), proton IFRT could increase nodal failures. We investigated the feasibility of IMPT for elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in LA-NSCLC. IMPT IFRT plans were generated to the same total dose of 66.6-72 Gy received by 20 LA-NSCLC patients treated with photon IFRT. IMPT ENI plans were generated to 46 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to elective nodal planning treatment volumes (PTV) plus 24 CGE to IF-PTVs. Proton IFRT and ENI improved the IF-PTV percentage of volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (D95) by 4% (P ENI. The mean esophagus dose decreased 16% with IFRT and 12% with ENI; heart V25 decreased 63% with both (all P ENI. Potential decreased toxicity indicates that IMPT could allow ENI while maintaining a favorable therapeutic ratio compared with photon IFRT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Elective Nodal Irradiation and Involved-Field Radiation in the Definitive Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Dosimetric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Ko, Christine J.; Ning, Holly; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Haglund, Karl E.; O’Meara, William P.; Simone, Charles B.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Photon involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT), the standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), results in favorable outcomes without increased isolated nodal failures, perhaps from scattered dose to elective nodal stations. Given the high conformality of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), proton IFRT could increase nodal failures. We investigated the feasibility of IMPT for elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in LA-NSCLC. Materials and Methods IMPT IFRT plans were generated to the same total dose of 66.6–72 Gy received by 20 LA-NSCLC patients treated with photon IFRT. IMPT ENI plans were generated to 46 CGE to elective nodal (EN) planning treatment volumes (PTV) plus 24 CGE to involved field (IF)-PTVs. Results Proton IFRT and ENI both improved D95 involved field (IF)-PTV coverage by 4% (pENI. Mean esophagus dose decreased 16% with IFRT and 12% with ENI; heart V25 decreased 63% with both (all pENI. Potential decreased toxicity indicates IMPT could allow ENI while maintaining a favorable therapeutic ratio compared to photon IFRT. PMID:25604729

  14. Correlation between gamma index passing rate and clinical dosimetric difference for pre-treatment 2D and 3D volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetric verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Yan, H; Han, C; Zhou, Y; Yi, J; Xie, C

    2015-03-01

    To investigate comparatively the percentage gamma passing rate (%GP) of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) pre-treatment volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetric verification and their correlation and sensitivity with percentage dosimetric errors (%DE). %GP of 2D and 3D pre-treatment VMAT quality assurance (QA) with different acceptance criteria was obtained by ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) for 20 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and 20 patients with oesophageal cancer. %DE were calculated from planned dose-volume histogram (DVH) and patients' predicted DVH calculated by 3DVH® software (Sun Nuclear Corporation). Correlation and sensitivity between %GP and %DE were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) and receiver operating characteristics (ROCs). Relatively higher %DE on some DVH-based metrics were observed for both patients with NPC and oesophageal cancer. Except for 2%/2 mm criterion, the average %GPs for all patients undergoing VMAT were acceptable with average rates of 97.11% ± 1.54% and 97.39% ± 1.37% for 2D and 3D 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. The number of correlations for 3D was higher than that for 2D (21 vs 8). However, the general correlation was still poor for all the analysed metrics (9 out of 26 for 3D 3%/3 mm criterion). The average area under the curve (AUC) of ROCs was 0.66 ± 0.12 and 0.71 ± 0.21 for 2D and 3D evaluations, respectively. There is a lack of correlation between %GP and %DE for both 2D and 3D pre-treatment VMAT dosimetric evaluation. DVH-based dose metrics evaluation obtained from 3DVH will provide more useful analysis. Correlation and sensitivity of %GP with %DE for VMAT QA were studied for the first time.

  15. Intraoperative real-time planned conformal prostate brachytherapy: Post-implantation dosimetric outcome and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Sharma, Neha; Shippy, Alison M.; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the dosimetric outcome of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and materials: Five hundred and sixty-two patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning software that incorporates inverse planning optimization was used. Dose-volume constraints for this inverse-planning system included: prostate V100 ≥95%, maximal urethral dose ≤120%, and average rectal dose 3 of the rectum was exposed to the prescription dose, the incidence of late grade 2 toxicity rectal toxicity was 9% compared to 4% for smaller volumes of the rectum exposed to similar doses (p = 0.003). No dosimetric parameter in these patients with tight dose confines for the urethra influenced acute or late urinary toxicity. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning was associated with a 90% consistency of achieving the planned intraoperative dose constraints for target coverage and maintaining planned urethral and rectal constraints in a high percentage of implants. Rectal volumes of ≥2.5 cm 3 exposed to the prescription doses were associated with an increased incidence of grade 2 rectal bleeding. Further enhancements in imaging guidance for optimal seed deposition are needed to guarantee optimal dose distribution for all patients. Whether such improvements lead to further reduction in acute and late morbidities associated with therapy requires further study

  16. Design and development of spine phantom to verify dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy using 3D prnter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seu Ran; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Min Joo; Park, So Hyun; Song Ji Hye; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Jason W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to verify dosimetric accuracy of delivered dose in spine SBRT as highly precise radiotherapy depending on cancer position using dedicated spine phantom based on 3D printer. Radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 0631 suggest different planning method in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) according to location of cancer owing to its distinct shape. The developed phantom especially using DLP method can be utilized as spine SBRT dosimetry research. Our study was able to confirm that the phantom was indeed similar with HU value of human spine as well as its shape.

  17. Development of NTCP models for head and neck cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for xerostomia and sticky saliva: The role of dosimetric and clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetz, Ivo; Schilstra, Cornelis; Burlage, Fred R.; Koken, Phil W.; Doornaert, Patricia; Bijl, Henk P.; Chouvalova, Olga; Leemans, C. René; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Vissink, Arjan; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this multicentre prospective study was to investigate the significance of the radiation dose in the major and minor salivary glands, and other pre-treatment and treatment factors, with regard to the development of patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with primary (chemo-) radiotherapy ((CH)RT). Methods and materials: The study population was composed of 167 consecutive HNC patients treated with three-dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) (CH) RT. The primary endpoint was moderate to severe xerostomia (XER6m) as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 at 6 months after completing (CH)RT. The secondary endpoint was moderate to severe sticky saliva at 6 months (STIC6 m). All organs at risk (OARs) potentially involved in salivary function were delineated on planning-CT, including the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands and the minor glands in the soft palate, cheeks and lips. Patients with moderate to severe xerostomia or sticky saliva at baseline were excluded. The optimum number of variables for a multivariate logistic regression model was determined using a bootstrapping method. Results: The multivariate analysis showed the mean parotid dose, age and baseline xerostomia (none versus a bit) to be the most important predictors for XER6m. The risk of developing xerostomia increased with age and was higher when minor baseline xerostomia was present in comparison with patients without any xerostomia complaints at baseline. Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82. For STIC6m, the mean submandibular dose, age, the mean sublingual dose and baseline sticky saliva (none versus a bit) were most predictive for sticky saliva. The risk of developing STIC6 m increased with age and was higher when minor baseline sticky saliva was present in comparison with patients without any sticky saliva complaints at baseline. Model performance was good with an AUC of 0.84. Conclusions

  18. SU-F-T-106: A Dosimetric Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Decrease Radiation Dose to the Thoracic Vertebral Bodies in Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiation for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCostanzo, Dominic; Barney, Christian L.; Bazan, Jose G. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent clinical studies have shown a correlation between radiation dose to the thoracic vertebral bodies (TVB) and the development of hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients receiving chemoradiation (CRT) for lung cancer (LuCa). The feasibility of a bone-marrow sparing (BMS) approach in this group of patients is unknown. We hypothesized that radiation dose to the TVB can be reduced with an intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)/volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy(VMAT) without affecting plan quality. Methods: We identified LuCa cases treated with curative intent CRT using IMRT/VMAT from 4/2009 to 2/2015. The TVBs from T1–T10 were retrospectively contoured. No constraints were placed on the TVB structure initially. A subset were re-planned with BMS-IMRT/VMAT with an objective or reducing the mean TVB dose to <23 Gy. The following data were collected on the initial and BMS plans: mean dose to planning target volume (PTV), lungs-PTV, esophagus, heart; lung V20; cord max dose. Pairwise comparisons were performed using the signed rank test. Results: 94 cases received CRT with IMRT/VMAT. We selected 11 cases (7 IMRT, 4 VMAT) with a range of initial mean TVB doses (median 35.7 Gy, range 18.9–41.4 Gy). Median prescription dose was 60 Gy. BMS-IMRT/VMAT significantly reduced the mean TVB dose by a median of 10.2 Gy (range, 1.0–16.7 Gy, p=0.001) and reduced the cord max dose by 2.9 Gy (p=0.014). BMS-IMRT/VMAT had no impact on lung mean (median +17 cGy, p=0.700), lung V20 (median +0.5%, p=0.898), esophagus mean (median +13 cGy, p=1.000) or heart mean (median +16 cGy, p=0.365). PTV-mean dose was not affected by BMS-IMRT/VMAT (median +13 cGy, p=0.653). Conclusion: BMS-IMRT/VMAT was able to significantly reduce radiation dose to the TVB without compromising plan quality. Prospective evaluation of BMS-IMRT/VMAT in patients receiving CRT for LuCa is warranted to determine if this approach results in clinically significant reductions in HT.

  19. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non–small-cell lung cancer (≥60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7–22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  20. Dosimetric assessment of swallowing examinations with videofluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.M.B.; Canevaro, L.V.; Azevedo, A.C.P.

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetric analysis measurements of the Dose-Area-Product (DAP) of 7 individuals were estimated for the deglutition dynamic using the videofluoroscopic method. The aim of this study is to establish in a preliminary way, typical DAP values for this kind of study. The DAP values were obtained attaching to the X ray tube exit, an ionization chamber from PTW and a Diamentor M4 meter. The typical DAP values obtained during the videofluoroscopic evaluation of the deglutition dynamic, including its three phases, was: 4101 ± 881 cGy.cm 2 and the typical DAP rate was 577 ± 94 cGy.cm 2 /min. These values refer to a standard patient (1.57 cm height, 56 kg. weight) and a protocol that can be performed in about 7 minutes. The values, defined herein as typical refer to the used protocol. To our knowledge, the mean DAP rate is a good parameter to estimate radiation exposure from videofluoroscopic study of swallowing process. (author)

  1. Dosimetric feature of natural biotite mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, J.M.; Wary, G.

    2015-01-01

    A thermoluminescence (TL) study relevant to radiation dosimetry has been carried out for X-ray irradiated biotite mineral under un-annealed and different annealed (473, 573, 673 and 773 K) conditions. Some significant variations in dosimetric characteristics have been observed with annealing treatment. Due to generation of an additional shallow trap level at depth 0.78 eV in 673 and 773 K annealed samples, the dose response is found to improve. For the 773 K annealed sample, a linear dose response has been observed from 10 to 1100 mGy. The fading is ∼13 % within 5 d after irradiation and onward it reduces to 7 % up to 60 d. Reproducibility of this (773 K) sample is excellent. After 10 recycles the coefficient of variations in the results for the 60, 180 and 1000 mGy dose-irradiated samples are found to be 0.97, 1.31 and 1.03 %, respectively. The potential use of biotite as a natural X-ray dosemeter is discussed. (authors)

  2. Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission dosimetric information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Vallejos, Patricia Andrea

    1997-01-01

    This thesis discusses the nuclear radiation that people who work with radioactive material is exposed to and its control by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. A full analysis of the System is presented with information about the Commission and the Department of Nuclear and Radiological Safety which runs the System. Ana analysis of the System is presented in order to obtain requirements. Management flow diagrams, the processes involved and current problems experienced by the users are described. A design logic is modeled producing Data Flow Diagrams (DFD). based on this physical design, or, Model of Physical Data, is prepared including tables, attributes, types of data, primary and foreign keys. A description is presented of how the System is implemented, the tools that are used and how the testing phase is carried out. The Dosimetry System meets the criteria for a Software Engineering project, where the basic cycle was used as a working methodology. The System developed supports the dosimetric control of people exposed to radioactive material. (author)

  3. Neutron sources and its dosimetric characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Mercado S, G.A.; Gallego D, E.; Lorente F, A.

    2005-01-01

    By means of Monte Carlo methods the spectra of the produced neutrons 252 Cf, 252 Cf/D 2 O, 241 Am Be, 239 Pu Be, 140 La Be, 239 Pu 18 O 2 and 226 Ra Be have been calculated. With the information of the spectrum it was calculated the average energy of the neutrons of each source. By means of the fluence coefficients to dose it was determined, for each one of the studied sources, the fluence factors to dose. The calculated doses were H, H * (10), H p,sIab (10, 0 0 ), E AP and E ISO . During the phase of the calculations the sources were modeled as punctual and their characteristics were determined to 100 cm in the hole. Also, for the case of the sources of 239 Pu Be and 241 Am Be, were carried out calculations modeling the sources with their respective characteristics and the dosimetric properties were determined in a space full with air. The results of this last phase of the calculations were compared with the experimental results obtained for both sources. (Author)

  4. Acute toxicity after a diverting stoma and spacer prior to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Voort Van Zyp, Jochem R N; Ceha, Heleen M.; Niehe, Valerie; Marinelli, Andreas W K S; Putter, Hein; Marijnen, Corrie A M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). For grade ≥3 acute diarrhea there is a relationship between dose and irradiated small bowel volume. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether combined

  5. Prospective assessment of dosimetric/physiologic-based models for predicting radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, Zafer; Borst, Gerben R.; Zeng Jing; Zhou Sumin; Hollis, Donna R.; Zhang Junan; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Folz, Rodney J.; Wong, Terrence; Kahn, Daniel; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical and 3D dosimetric parameters are associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis rates in retrospective studies. Such parameters include: mean lung dose (MLD), radiation (RT) dose to perfused lung (via SPECT), and pre-RT lung function. Based on prior publications, we defined pre-RT criteria hypothesized to be predictive for later development of pneumonitis. We herein prospectively test the predictive abilities of these dosimetric/functional parameters on 2 cohorts of patients from Duke and Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI). Methods and Materials: For the Duke cohort, 55 eligible patients treated between 1999 and 2005 on a prospective IRB-approved study to monitor RT-induced lung injury were analyzed. A similar group of patients treated at the NKI between 1996 and 2002 were identified. Patients believed to be at high and low risk for pneumonitis were defined based on: (1) MLD; (2) OpRP (sum of predicted perfusion reduction based on regional dose-response curve); and (3) pre-RT DLCO. All doses reflected tissue density heterogeneity. The rates of grade ≥2 pneumonitis in the 'presumed' high and low risk groups were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results: In the Duke group, pneumonitis rates in patients prospectively deemed to be at 'high' vs. 'low' risk are 7 of 20 and 9 of 35, respectively; p = 0.33 one-tailed Fisher's. Similarly, comparable rates for the NKI group are 4 of 21 and 6 of 44, respectively, p = 0.41 one-tailed Fisher's. Conclusion: The prospective model appears unable to accurately segregate patients into high vs. low risk groups. However, considered retrospectively, these data are consistent with prior studies suggesting that dosimetric (e.g., MLD) and functional (e.g., PFTs or SPECT) parameters are predictive for RT-induced pneumonitis. Additional work is needed to better identify, and prospectively assess, predictors of RT-induced lung injury

  6. Benchmarking Dosimetric Quality Assessment of Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthi, Sashendra, E-mail: sasha.senthi@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Gill, Suki S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Rolfo, Aldo [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Thomas, Jessica [Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher H.; Joon, Daryl Lim [Radiation Oncology Department, Austin Repatriation Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Bowden, Patrick [Radiation Oncology Department, Tattersall' s Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}, respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. Results: The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V{sub 95%}, PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V{sub 95%} was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3-93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90-2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p < .0001). The planning system independently influenced homogeneity (p = .038) and conformity (p = .021). The treatment date independently influenced the PTV V{sub 95%} only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Conclusion: Our study has benchmarked measures

  7. Benchmarking Dosimetric Quality Assessment of Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthi, Sashendra; Gill, Suki S.; Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim; Rolfo, Aldo; Thomas, Jessica; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Hamilton, Christopher H.; Joon, Daryl Lim; Bowden, Patrick; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V 95% and V 100% , respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. Results: The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V 95% , PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V 95% was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3–93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90–2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p 95% only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Conclusion: Our study has benchmarked measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity for the treatment of prostate cancer using IMRT. The differences seen between centers and planning systems and the coverage

  8. Study of dosimetric parameters for iodine-125 brachytherapy sources development from IPEN-CNEN/SP using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Tiago Batista de

    2016-01-01

    Expectations of the World Health Organization for the year 2030 are that the number of cancer deaths is approximately 13.2 million, reflecting the high proportion of this disease in global health issue. With respect to prostate cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute, the number of cases diagnosed worldwide in 2012 was approximately 1.1 million, while in Brazil the data demonstrated the incidence of 68,000 new cases. The treatment of cancer can be performed with surgery (prostatectomy) or radiation therapy. Among radiotherapy, we can highlight the brachytherapy technique, which consists in the introduction of small radioactive sources (seeds) within the prostate, which is delivered a high dose value in the treatment volume and low dose in the surrounding tissues. In Brazil, the medical profession estimates a demand of approximately 8000 seeds / month, and the unit cost of each seed at least US $ 26.00. The AAPM protocol TG-43 recommend the dose-rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function for dosimetric analysis LDR brachytherapy seeds. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to assess the dosimetric parameters of the OncoSeed-6711, manufactured by Oncura-GEHealthcare, and a seed developed by Radiation Technology Center, using the MCNP5 code. A 6711 seed, an IPEN seed and the 30 x 30 x 30cm 3 phantom filled with water were modeled to simulate the dose distribution. The 6711 seed parameters were compared with literature, and the results presented relative error less than 0.1% for Λ. In comparison with the 6711 seed, the IPEN model seed dosimetric parameters were similar, account the statistical uncertainty. (author)

  9. SU-G-TeP3-11: Radiobiological-Cum-Dosimetric Quality Assurance of Complex Radiotherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, N; Narayanasamy, G; Zhang, X; Penagaricano, J; Morrill, S [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mavroidis, P [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Pyakuryal, A [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Han, E [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liang, X [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Kim, D [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seol (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric gamma-analysis used for QA of complex radiotherapy plans tests the dosimetric equivalence of a delivered plan with the treatment planning system (TPS) optimized plan. It does not examine whether a dosimetric difference results in any radiobiological difference. This study introduces a method to test the radiobiological and dosimetric equivalence between a delivered and the TPS optimized plan. Methods: Six head and neck and seven lung cancer VMAT or IMRT plans optimized for patient treatment were calculated and delivered to an ArcCheck phantom. ArcCheck measured dose distributions were compared with the TPS calculated dose distributions using a 2-D gamma-analysis. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) for various patient structures were obtained by using measured data in 3DVH software and compared against the TPS calculated DVHs using 3-D gamma analysis. DVH data were used in the Poisson model to calculate tumor control probability (TCP) for the treatment targets and in the sigmoid dose response model to calculate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the normal structures. Results: Two-D and three-D gamma passing rates among six H&N patient plans differed by 0 to 2.7% and among seven lung plans by 0.1 to 4.5%. Average ± SD TCPs based on measurement and TPS were 0.665±0.018 and 0.674±0.044 for H&N, and 0.791±0.027 and 0.733±0.031 for lung plans, respectively. Differences in NTCPs were usually negligible. The differences in dosimetric results, TCPs and NTCPs were insignificant. Conclusion: The 2-D and 3-D gamma-analysis based agreement between measured and planned dose distributions may indicate their dosimetric equivalence. Small and insignificant differences in TCPs and NTCPs based on measured and planned dose distributions indicate the radiobiological equivalence between the measured and optimized plans. However, patient plans showing larger differences between 2-D and 3-D gamma-analysis can help us make a more definite conclusion

  10. Dosimetry through the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar M, V.M.; Alvarez R, J.T.; Medina O, V.P.; Vergara M, F.; Anaya M, R.; Cejudo A, J.; Salinas L, B.

    2004-01-01

    In the beginnings of the sixty years an urgent necessity is presented mainly in the developing countries, of improving in important form the accuracy in the dosimetry of external faces in therapy of radiations (radiotherapy centers), mainly in the calibration of c linical dosemeters . In 1976 the International Atomic Energy Agency, (IAEA), and the World Health Organization, (WHO), they carried out a mutual agreement with regard to the establishment and operation of a net of Secondary Patron Laboratories of Dosimetry, (LSCD). The necessity to establish measure patterns in the field of the dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, is necessary, to have an accuracy but high in the dosimetry of the radiation beams in therapy which is highly dependent of the dose given to the tumor of those patient with cancer. Similar levels of accuracy are required in protection measures to the radiation with an acceptable smaller accuracy, however, when the personal dosemeters are used to determine the doses received by the individuals under work conditions, such mensurations in therapy of radiations and radiological protection will have traceability through a chain of comparisons to primary or national patterns. The traceability is necessary to assure the accuracy and acceptability of the dosimetric measures, as well as, the legal and economic implications. The traceability is also necessary in the dosimetry of high dose like in the sterilization of different products. The main function of the LSCD is to provide a service in metrology of ionizing radiations, maintaining the secondary or national patterns, which have a traceability to the International System of measures, which is based for if same in the comparison of patterns in the Primary Laboratories of Dosimetry (LPD) under the auspice of the International Office of Weights and Measure (BIPM). The secondary and national patterns in the LSCD constitute in Mexico, the national patterns of the magnitudes in the dosimetry of the

  11. Post-pneumonectomy empyema and dosimetric CT scan. Report of two cases and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorzeff, I.; Bachaud, J.M.; Aziza, R.; Arboucalot, F.; Berjaud, J.; Dahan, M.; Giron, J.

    1999-01-01

    Following a pneumonectomy for cancer, the patients are classically observed by clinical examination and standard chest X-ray. However, torpid empyemas can be missed when they occur after the period of hospitalization and when they are not accompanied by a fever, At the time of postoperative radiotherapy, the dosimetric CT scan constitutes the first examination providing objective information of the endo-thoracic content. It is therefore necessary on this occasion to assure the normality of the post-pneumonectomy pleural space while checking that the substituted liquid is homogeneous and above all that the internal mediastinal part of the cavity has a concave appearance. If that is not the case, an empyema should be suspected. The diagnosis, confirmed by a cyto-bacteriological examination of the pleural fluid, constitutes a counter-indication of the radiotherapy. We present two cases of post-pneumonectomy pauci-symptomatic empyema which were diagnosed during the course of postoperative radiotherapy when the initial dosimetric CT scan was pathologic and could have allowed an earlier diagnosis. (author)

  12. Adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer—Dosimetric results from a prospective clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Shah, Shalin J.; Chronowski, Gregory; Sejpal, Samir; Rosenthal, David I.; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Lifei; Wong, Pei-Fong; Garcia, John A.; Kian Ang, K.; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct a clinical trial evaluating adaptive head and neck radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively enrolled. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted mapping of dose to avoidance structures and CTVs. We compared four planning scenarios: (1) original IMRT plan aligned daily to marked isocenter (BB); (2) original plan aligned daily to bone (IGRT); (3) IGRT with one adaptive replan (ART1); and (4) actual treatment received by each study patient (IGRT with one or two adaptive replans, ART2). Results: All 22 study patients underwent one replan (ART1); eight patients had two replans (ART2). ART1 reduced mean dose to contralateral parotid by 0.6 Gy or 2.8% (paired t-test; p = 0.003) and ipsilateral parotid by 1.3 Gy (3.9%) (p = 0.002) over the IGRT alone. ART2 further reduced the mean contralateral parotid dose by 0.8 Gy or 3.8% (p = 0.026) and ipsilateral parotid by 4.1 Gy or 9% (p = 0.001). ART significantly reduced integral body dose. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggests that head and neck ART dosimetrically outperforms IMRT. IGRT that leverages conventional PTV margins does not improve dosimetry. One properly timed replan delivers the majority of achievable dosimetric improvement. The clinical impact of ART must be confirmed by future trials

  13. Dosimetric investigation depending on tumor location in patient breast in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Joo; Park, So Hyun; Jung, Joo Young; Woong, Cho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2012-01-01

    The Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique, which involves radiation beam delivery techniques that use a limited range of treatment volumes, has been a challenging approach that is worthy of consideration compared to whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Because of a small target volumes used in the PBI technique, the radiation dose can be safely delivered to the targeted tissue without the unwanted delivery of radiation to normal breast tissues and organ at risk (OAR), such as contralateral breast, lung and heart.Through PBI technique, better cosmetic outcomes and minimizing damages to OARs could be expected and also the daily dose can be increased with smaller number of fractionation in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects according to tumor locations in patient's breast for Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique using three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT), Electron Beam Radiation therapy (EBRT) and Helical-tomotherapy (H-TOMO). Dosimetric comparisons of PBI technique for 3DCRT, EBRT, and H-TOMO depending on the classified tumor locations were performed. H-TOMO delivered the low dose to lager volume to surrounding normal tissue, such as the heart and lungs compared to 3DCRT and EBRT although it had the same degree of target coverage as the other methods (3DCRT, EBRT). EBRT had a curative effect for early-stage breast cancers located in the lower and inner sections (LIQ-S, LIQ-D)

  14. Dosimetric essay in dental radiology; Experiencia dosimetrica en radiologia odontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Salaberry, M [Ministerio de Industria, Energia y Mineria, Montevideo (Uruguay). Direccion Nacional de Tecnologia Nuclear; Dato Carfagna, A; Rodriguez Dorgia, R [Universidad de la Republica, Facultad de Odontologia , Montevideo (Uruguay)

    1999-12-31

    A neck study was observated in the tiroids glands,laryngeal zone, sensitive organs for the ionizing radiation for increase dental xray exams. Was selected 29th patients with radiography prescription complete (in the Odontology Faculty Clinics Uruguaian). It took radiographies with and without tiroids necklace and apron lead using dosemeters. Dosimetric studies had demonstrated good dose between patients. For measuring the radiation dose have been used TLD thermoluminescence dosimetric and Harshaw 6600 for read it. The thyroids necklace use and odontology postgrading for training course for dentistry was the two recommendations advised

  15. In vivo dosimetric control for the management of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Lopez, Jorge L.; Piquet del Castillo, Pedro; Garcia Riveron, Juan W.; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Alonso Samper, Jose L.; Frank Castillo, Luis; Almiral Gomez, Jorge

    1996-01-01

    A detailed study has been carried out on the possibilities of LiF encapsulated powder, for in vivo dosimetry in intracavitary implants by means of the Amersham manual afterloading system. In vivo dosimetry was carried out in 40 patients randomly selected, which were treated as for their clinical stage. The absorbed dose was measured in points of interest placed in the urinary bladder and the rectum by thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD); the results of these measures were compared with the calculated values, using perpendicular plates and the isodose curves given by Amersham

  16. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuremsky, Jeffrey G.; Tepper, Joel E.; McLeod, Howard L. Phar

    2009-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  17. CT and MR image fusion using two different methods after prostate brachytherapy: impact on post-implant dosimetric assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servois, V.; El Khoury, C.; Lantoine, A.; Ollivier, L.; Neuenschwander, S.; Chauveinc, L.; Cosset, J.M.; Flam, T.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    To study different methods of CT and MR images fusion in patient treated by brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. To compare the results of the dosimetric study realized on CT slices and images fusion. Fourteen cases of patients treated by 1125 were retrospectively studied. The CT examinations were realized with continuous section of 5 mm thickness, and MR images were obtained with a surface coil with contiguous section of 3 mm thickness. For the images fusion process, only the T2 weighted MR sequence was used. Two processes of images fusion were realized for each patient, using as reference marks the bones of the pelvis and the implanted seeds. A quantitative and qualitative appreciation was made by the operators, for each patient and both methods of images fusion. The dosimetric study obtained by a dedicated software was realized on CT images and all types of images fusion. The usual dosimetric indexes (D90, V 100 and V 150) were compared for each type of image. The quantitative results given by the software of images fusion showed a superior accuracy to the one obtained by the pelvic bony reference marks. Conversely, qualitative and quantitative results obtained by the operators showed a better accuracy of the images fusion based on iodine seeds. For two patients out of three presenting a D90 inferior to 145 Gy on CT examination, the D90 was superior to this norm when the dosimetry was based on images fusion, whatever the method used. The images fusion method based on implanted seed matching seems to be more precise than the one using bony reference marks. The dosimetric study realized on images fusion could allow to rectify possible errors, mainly due to difficulties in surrounding prostate contour delimitation on CT images. (authors)

  18. TL dosimetric properties BAM:EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Bellam N.; Murthy, K.V.R.; Subba Rao, B.; Saiprasad, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    In phosphor area today top priority is the replacement of the high performance but very expensive rare earth activated phosphors with cheaper materials. This essentially means replacing the rare earth ions with transition metal ions or post transition ions. Now a day's phosphors are used in various fields. After World War II, the advances in the optical spectroscopy of solids, especially those of transition metals ions help to evolve research on phosphor and solid state luminescence. In 1960 efficient rare earth activated phosphors were developed for use in color TV (Tb 3+ green, Eu 3+ red, and Dy 3+ yellow). In 1970 tricolor lamp was introduced blue emission from Ce 3+ + Tb 3+ pair was used in tricolor lamps. At present combination of halo phosphor and tri-band phosphor blend is used in many lamp as a compromise between performance, phosphor cost and the lamp making Cost. Thermo luminescence of 0.5 Gy X-ray irradiated BAM.Eu has been studied. The irradiated phosphor has been studied for its TL dosimetric properties one week after irradiation and after 100 weeks of storage. Interesting TL results are reported in the present paper. Heating rate used in the present experiment is 6.6 deg C/Sec. The following two figures are on TL recorded 100 weeks after irradiation and TL recorded after 235 weeks of storage. Before storage for 100 weeks the TL glow curve with a hump around 180 deg C followed by a peak at 273 deg C. After storage for 100 weeks the TL pattern changes entirely. i.e. the composite TL peak structure emerged as two well resolved peaks and with slightly higher TL peak temperatures at 215 deg C and 300 deg C. Normally after storage for 100 weeks the peak at 190 deg C reduces in its intensity or disappears in some cases, instead of that the peak appears at 215 deg C as well resolved peak and its intensity is almost comparable to that of 300 deg C peak. Since the TL phenomenon observed is interesting the two well resolved, isolated, high intensity peaks

  19. Dose reader of dosimetric foil; Czytnik dawki folii dozymetrycznej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaj, B.; Strzalkowski, J.; Smolko, K.

    1997-12-31

    Read out the absorbance of a dosimetric foil is accomplished by two beam spectrophotometer. Such a solution makes possible the compensation of light source instabilities and ensures higher stability of the dose reader. The error of absorbance measurement caused by the instabilities does not exceed 0.0004 A. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs.

  20. Study of a new dosimetric radio-thermoluminescent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazac, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    This is the first Romanian study to investigate conditions to obtain the radio-thermo-luminescent systems: MgB 4 O 7 :A(A-Nd,Sm,Eu,Dy,Tb,Dy+Sm and Tb+Sm) MgF 2 A (A=Mn,Dy,Tb,Sm,Li), their essential dosimetric characters, as well as the (MgF 2 =Mn) thermophosphorus mixture with a ( 6 LiF) lithium target. An investigation was developed upon a new category of radio-thermoluminescent detectors with low radiation energy dependence and fading, magnesjum boride activated by several elements of the lanthanides class (Nd,Sm,Eu,Dy,Tb). A new radio-thermoluminescent dosimetric system with high sensitivity and moderate dependence on energy radiation - (Mnsup(2+)) manganese activated magnesium fluoride - was also studied. The author explored application of investigated detectors MgF 2 =Mn, MgB 4 O 7 =Dy and MgB 4 O 7 :Tb in neutron dosimetry in complex gamma-neutron fields. It is deemed that by using the dosimetric systems reported in the thesis in order to measure gamma, beta and neutron radiation doses, dosimetric control can be ensured both in professional dosimetry and in nuclear accident dosimetry, as well as in various basic and applicative investigations. A modest contribution is thus made towards achieving the national nuclear program through an extension of the thermophosphorus range with practical applications in nuclear radiation dosimetry. (author)

  1. Dosimetric and clinical experience in eye proton treatment at INFN-LNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.; Lojacono, P.; Mongelli, V.; Patti, I. V.; Pittera, S.; Russo, G.; Valastro, L. M.; Lo Nigro, S.; Ott, J.; Reibaldi, A.; Privitera, G.; Raffaele, L.; Salamone, V.; Spatola, C.; Sabini, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    After six years of activity 155 patients have been treated inside the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility. CATANA is the first and unique proton therapy facility in which the 62 MeV proton beams, accelerated by a Superconducting Cyclotron, are used for the radio-therapeutic treatments of choroidal and iris melanomas. Inside CATANA new absolute and relative dosimetric techniques have been developed in order to achieve the best results in terms of treatment precision and dose release accuracy. The follow-up results for 42 patients demonstrated the efficacy of high energy protons in the radiotherapeutic field and encouraged us in our activity in the battle against cancer

  2. Dosimetric and clinical experience in eye proton treatment at INFN-LNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.; Lojacono, P.; Mongelli, V.; Lo Nigro, S.; Ott, J.; Patti, I. V.; Pittera, S.; Privitera, G.; Raffaele, L.; Reibaldi, A.; Russo, G.; Salamone, V.; Sabini, M. G.; Spatola, C.; Valastro, L. M.

    2009-05-01

    After six years of activity 155 patients have been treated inside the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility. CATANA is the first and unique proton therapy facility in which the 62 MeV proton beams, accelerated by a Superconducting Cyclotron, are used for the radio-therapeutic treatments of choroidal and iris melanomas. Inside CATANA new absolute and relative dosimetric techniques have been developed in order to achieve the best results in terms of treatment precision and dose release accuracy. The follow-up results for 42 patients demonstrated the efficacy of high energy protons in the radiotherapeutic field and encouraged us in our activity in the battle against cancer

  3. Case Report and Dosimetric Analysis of an Axillary Recurrence After Partial Breast Irradiation with Mammosite Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Anand P.; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael C.; Chen, Sea S.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Coon, Alan B.; Turian, Julius V.; Siziopikou, Kalliopi; Dowlat, Kambiz; Griem, Katherine L.

    2008-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) was designed in part to decrease overall treatment times associated with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). WBRT treats the entire breast and usually portions of the axilla. The goal of PBI is to treat a smaller volume of breast tissue in less time, focusing the dose around the lumpectomy cavity. The following is a case of a 64-year-old woman with early-stage breast cancer treated with PBI who failed regionally in the ipsilateral axilla. With our dosimetric analysis, we found that the entire area of this axillary failure would have likely received at least 45 Gy if WBRT had been used, enough to sterilize microscopic disease. With PBI, this area received a mean dose of only 2.8 Gy, which raises the possibility that this regional failure may have been prevented had WBRT been used instead of PBI

  4. Determination of Dosimetric Parameters of the Second Model of Pd-103 Seed Manufactured at Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Raisali; Mahdi Sadeghi; Vahideh Ataeinia; Arjang Shahvar; Maryam Ghasemi Ghonchehnazi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The use of low energy isotopes such as  103 Pd in brachytherapy for the treatment of cancers  such as prostate, eye, head, neck, breast and cervix is increasing. In this regard, different models of Pd- 103  seeds  have  been  designed  and  manufactured  at  the  Agricultural,  Medical  and  Industrial  Research  School (AMIRS) of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. In this research, the dosimetric parameters of  the second model of Pd-103 seed manufactured at AMIRS have been ca...

  5. Our experience with the acceptance and dosimetric validation of Somatom Force dual head MDCT in the Royal Hospital, Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Harthi, Ruqaia; Al-Kalbani, Munira; Arun Kumar, L.S.; Al-Shanfari, Jamal

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has revolutionized diagnostic imaging since its discovery in early 70's. In Oman; 70,353 CT examinations were carried out in the year 2015. The increase in CT examinations will eventually result in the increase of population dose and the consequent risk of cancer in adults and particularly in children. Here, we discuss and share our experience with the acceptance and dosimetric validation of second Dual Head Somatom Force MDCT installed in the Royal Hospital, Oman using Ministry of Health's radiation acceptance and quality assurance protocol, before handing over for routine patient care work

  6. Study of dosimetric effects due to metallic heterogeneity of tissue expanders in post-mastectomy radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trombetta, Debora M.; Silva, Ademir X. da; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In each year approximately 20% of the new cases of cancer in women are breast cancers. Despite the increase in the use of breast-conserving treatment, some women still require mastectomy as their primary surgical management. A large part of these women, whom undergo a mastectomy, realize a breast reconstruction afterwards. The most common options for reconstruction include autogenous tissue techniques and tissue expansion followed by breast implant placement. Many trials have demonstrated a survival benefit associated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy mainly if the treatment starts right after the mastectomy. In such case patients whom were realizing the breast reconstruction using tissue expanders can be irradiated using this. These patients posses a material with high atomic number within the irradiated area, so this metallic port becomes an heterogeneity which can modify the calculated doses distribution for the treatment. The study was due through the quantification of the relative transmission of 6MV and 15MV radiotherapy beam, making use of computer simulations with Monte Carlo method implemented by the MCNPX code. The results show that the presence of this metallic heterogeneity changes the transmission of the beam, causing a reduction up to 13% in the geometric shadowed region. According to dosimetric protocols, which recommend that the reduction in the dose should be bellow of 5%, the difference found in the study could be significant. (author)

  7. Personal dosimetric monitoring in Ukraine: current status and further development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, V. V.; Musijachenkom, A. V.; Boguslavskaya, A. I.

    2003-01-01

    Presently Ukraine has mixed system for dosimetric monitoring. Nuclear power plants and some major nuclear facilities have their own dosimetry services, which are responsible for regular dosimetric monitoring of workers. Rest of occupationally exposed persons is monitored by dosimetry laboratories affiliated to the territorial authorities for sanitary and epidemiology supervision. In 2002-2003 Ukrainian Ministry of Health performed survey of the status of dosimetric monitoring and inventory of critical groups requiring such monitoring. Dosimetry services in Ukraine cover about 38,000 occupationally exposed workers, including 9,100 medical professionals, 16,400 employees of 5 nuclear power plants and ca.12,400 workers dealing with other sources of occupational exposure (industry, research). Territorial dosimetry services operate in 13 of 24 regions of Ukraine, using DTU-01 manual TLD readers produced with one exception in 1988-1990. The coverage of critical groups by dosimetric monitoring is variable and ranges from 38% to 100% depending on the region. Personnel of nuclear power plants (about 16,400 workers) is monitored by their own dosimetry services achieving absolute coverage of the main staff and temporary workers. Current inadequate status of dosimetric monitoring infrastructure in Ukraine demands an urgent elaboration of the united state system for monitoring and recording of individual doses. The proposed plan would allows to bring dosimetry infrastructure in Ukraine to the modern state which would be compatible with existing and future European and international radiation protection networks. Unitary structure of Ukraine, strong administrative command and good communications between regions of the country are positive factors in favour of efficient implementation of the proposed plan. Deficiencies are associated with limited funding of this effort. (authors)

  8. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes

  9. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genebes, Caroline, E-mail: genebes.caroline@claudiusregaud.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Jonca, Frédéric [Department of Urology, Clinique Ambroise Paré, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard [Department of Urology and Andrology, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  10. The choice of statistical methods for comparisons of dosimetric data in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Perrin, Emmanuel; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Balosso, Jacques

    2014-09-18

    Novel irradiation techniques are continuously introduced in radiotherapy to optimize the accuracy, the security and the clinical outcome of treatments. These changes could raise the question of discontinuity in dosimetric presentation and the subsequent need for practice adjustments in case of significant modifications. This study proposes a comprehensive approach to compare different techniques and tests whether their respective dose calculation algorithms give rise to statistically significant differences in the treatment doses for the patient. Statistical investigation principles are presented in the framework of a clinical example based on 62 fields of radiotherapy for lung cancer. The delivered doses in monitor units were calculated using three different dose calculation methods: the reference method accounts the dose without tissues density corrections using Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm, whereas new methods calculate the dose with tissues density correction for 1D and 3D using Modified Batho (MB) method and Equivalent Tissue air ratio (ETAR) method, respectively. The normality of the data and the homogeneity of variance between groups were tested using Shapiro-Wilks and Levene test, respectively, then non-parametric statistical tests were performed. Specifically, the dose means estimated by the different calculation methods were compared using Friedman's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In addition, the correlation between the doses calculated by the three methods was assessed using Spearman's rank and Kendall's rank tests. The Friedman's test showed a significant effect on the calculation method for the delivered dose of lung cancer patients (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test of paired comparisons indicated that the delivered dose was significantly reduced using density-corrected methods as compared to the reference method. Spearman's and Kendall's rank tests indicated a positive correlation between the doses calculated with the different methods

  11. The impact of body mass index on dosimetric quality in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I. Echevarria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy has been established as an effective and safe treatment option for men with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer. In this retrospective analysis, we sought to study the effect of body mass index (BMI on post-implant dosimetric quality. Material and methods : After institutional approval, records of patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer treated in Puerto Rico with LDR brachytherapy during 2008-2013 were reviewed. All patients were implanted with 125I seeds to a prescription dose of 145 Gy. Computed tomography (CT based dosimetry was performed 1 month after implant. Patients with at least 1 year of prostate-specific antigen (PSA follow-up were included. Factors predictive of adequate D90 coverage (≥ 140 Gy were compared via the Pearson χ2 or Wilcoxon rank-sum test as appropriate. Results : One-hundred and four patients were included in this study, with 53 (51% patients having a D90 ≥ 140 Gy. The only factor associated with a dosimetric coverage detriment (D90 < 140 Gy was BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (p = 0.03. Prostate volume (p = 0.26, initial PSA (p = 0.236, age (p = 0.49, hormone use (p = 0.93, percent of cores positive (p = 0.95, risk group (p = 0.24, tumor stage (p = 0.66, and Gleason score (p = 0.61 did not predict D90. Conclusions : In this study we show that BMI is a significant pre-implant predictor of D90 (< 140 Gy vs. ≥ 140 Gy. Although other studies have reported that prostate volume also affects D90, our study did not find this correlation to be statistically significant, likely because all of our patients had a prostate volume 140 Gy.

  12. Correlation of dosimetric parameters obtained with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and toxicity of chest chemoradiation in lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, Lysian; Auberdiac, Pierre; Khodri, Mustapha; Malkoun, Nadia [Departement de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Service d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Thorin, Julie [Departement de Sante Publique, Unite de Statistique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Melis, Adrien [Departement d' Oncologie Medicale, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Talabard, Jean-Noeel; Laroche, Guy de [Departement de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Fournel, Pierre [Departement d' Oncologie Medicale, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Tiffet, Olivier [Service de Chirurgie Thoracique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne (France); Schmitt, Thierry [Departement de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); and others

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and revisit toxicity related to chest chemoradiotherapy and to correlate these side effects with dosimetric parameters obtained using analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) in locally unresectable advanced lung cancer. We retrospectively analyzed data from 47 lung cancer patients between 2005 and 2008. All received conformal 3D radiotherapy using high-energy linear accelerator plus concomitant chemotherapy. All treatment planning data were transferred into Eclipse 8.05 (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and dosimetric calculations were performed using AAA. Thirty-three patients (70.2%) developed acute pneumopathy after radiotherapy (grades 1 and 2). One patient (2.1%) presented with grade 3 pneumopathy. Thirty-one (66%) presented with grades 1-2 lung fibrosis, and 1 patient presented with grade 3 lung fibrosis. Thirty-four patients (72.3%) developed grade 1-2 acute oesophagic toxicity. Four patients (8.5%) presented with grades 3 and 4 dysphagia, necessitating prolonged parenteral nutrition. Median prescribed dose was 64 Gy (range 50-74) with conventional fractionation (2 Gy per fraction). Dose-volume constraints were respected with a median V20 of 23.5% (maximum 34%) and a median V30 of 17% (maximum 25%). The median dose delivered to healthy contralateral lung was 13.1 Gy (maximum 18.1 Gy). At univariate analysis, larger planning target volume and V20 were significantly associated with the probability of grade {>=}2 radiation-induced pneumopathy (p = 0.022 and p = 0.017, respectively). No relation between oesophagic toxicity and clinical/dosimetric parameters could be established. Using AAA, the present results confirm the predictive value of the V20 for lung toxicity as already demonstrated with the conventional pencil beam convolution approach.

  13. Comparison of dosimetric methods for virtual wedge analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.; Nelson, V.; Collins, O.; West, M.; Holloway, L.; Rajapaske, S.; Arts, J.; Varas, J.; Cho, G.; Hill, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Siemens Virtual Wedge (Concord, USA) creates wedged beam profile by moving a single collimator jaw across the specified field size whilst varying the dose rate and jaw speed for use in the delivery of radiotherapy treatments. The measurement of the dosimetric characteristics of the Siemens Virtual Wedge poses significant challenges to medical physicists. This study investigates several different methods for measuring and analysing the virtual wedge for data collection for treatment planning systems and ongoing quality assurance. The beam profiles of the Virtual Wedge (VW) were compared using several different dosimetric methods. Open field profiles were measured with Kodak X-Omat V (Rochester, NY, USA) radiographic film and compared with measurements made using the Sun Nuclear Profiler with a Motorized Drive Assembly (MDA) (Melbourne, FL, USA) and the Scanditronix Wellhofer CC13 ionisation chamber and 24 ion Chamber Array (CA24) (Schwarzenbruck, Germany). The resolution of each dosimetric method for open field profiles was determined. The Virtual Wedge profiles were measured with radiographic film the Profiler and the Scanditronix Wellhofer CA 24 ion Chamber Array at 5 different depths. The ease of setup, time taken, analysis and accuracy of measurement were all evaluated to determine the method that would be both appropriate and practical for routine quality assurance of the Virtual Wedge. The open field profiles agreed within ±2% or 2mm for all dosimetric methods. The accuracy of the Profiler and CA24 are limited to half of the step size selected for each of these detectors. For the VW measurements a step size of 2mm was selected for the Profiler and the CA24. The VW profiles for all dosimetric methods agreed within ±2% or 2mm for the main wedged section of the profile. The toe and heel ends of the wedges showed the significant discrepancies dependent upon the dosimetry method used, up to 7% for the toe end with the CA24. The dosimetry of the

  14. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  15. Dosimetric effect on pediatric conformal treatment plans using dynamic jaw with Tomotherapy HDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Liang, Xiaoying; Hardee, Matthew; Morrill, Steve; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-10-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose delivered to healthy tissues in pediatric cancer treatment because of the risk of secondary malignancies. Tomotherapy HDA provides a dynamic jaw (DJ) delivery mode that creates a sharper penumbra at the craniocaudal ends of a target in addition to a fixed jaw (FJ) delivery mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its dosimetric effect on the pediatric cancer cases. We included 6 pediatric cases in this study. The dose profiles and plan statistics—target dose conformity, uniformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose, beam-on time, and integral dose—were compared for each case. Consequently, the target dose coverage and uniformity were similar for different jaw settings. The OAR dose sparing depended on its relative location to the target and disease sites. For example, in the head and neck cancer cases, the brain stem dose using DJ 2.5 was reduced by more than two-fold (2.4 Gy vs. 6.3 Gy) than that obtained with FJ 2.5. The integral dose with DJ 2.5 decreased by more than 9% compared with that with FJ 2.5. Thus, using dynamic jaw in pediatric cases could be critical to reduce a probability of a secondary malignancy.

  16. Dosimetric effect on pediatric conformal treatment plans using dynamic jaw with Tomotherapy HDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Kim, Dong-Wook; Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Liang, Xiaoying; Hardee, Matthew; Morrill, Steve; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2015-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose delivered to healthy tissues in pediatric cancer treatment because of the risk of secondary malignancies. Tomotherapy HDA provides a dynamic jaw (DJ) delivery mode that creates a sharper penumbra at the craniocaudal ends of a target in addition to a fixed jaw (FJ) delivery mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its dosimetric effect on the pediatric cancer cases. We included 6 pediatric cases in this study. The dose profiles and plan statistics—target dose conformity, uniformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose, beam-on time, and integral dose—were compared for each case. Consequently, the target dose coverage and uniformity were similar for different jaw settings. The OAR dose sparing depended on its relative location to the target and disease sites. For example, in the head and neck cancer cases, the brain stem dose using DJ 2.5 was reduced by more than two-fold (2.4 Gy vs. 6.3 Gy) than that obtained with FJ 2.5. The integral dose with DJ 2.5 decreased by more than 9% compared with that with FJ 2.5. Thus, using dynamic jaw in pediatric cases could be critical to reduce a probability of a secondary malignancy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  18. Computational model for dosimetric purposes in dental procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Renato H.; Campos, Tarcisio R.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to develop a computational model for dosimetric purposes the oral region, based on computational tools SISCODES and MCNP-5, to predict deterministic effects and minimize stochastic effects caused by ionizing radiation by radiodiagnosis. Based on a set of digital information provided by computed tomography, three-dimensional voxel model was created, and its tissues represented. The model was exported to the MCNP code. In association with SICODES, we used the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP-5) method to play the corresponding interaction of nuclear particles with human tissues statistical process. The study will serve as a source of data for dosimetric studies in the oral region, providing deterministic effect and minimize the stochastic effect of ionizing radiation

  19. Radiometric and dosimetric characteristics of HgI2 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaletin, V.M.; Krivozubov, O.V.; Torlin, M.A.; Fomin, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of HgI 2 detectors in x-ray and gamma detection in applications to radiometric and dosimetric monitoring and as portable instruments for such purposes was considered. Blocks with mosaic and sandwich structures were prepared and tested against each other and, for comparative purposes, against CdTe detectors for relative sensitivities at various gamma-quanta energies. Sensitivity dependencies on gamma radiation energy were plotted for the detector materials and structures as were current dependencies on the dose rate of x rays. Results indicated that the mercury iodide detectors could be used in radiometric and dosimetric measurements at gamma quantum energies up to and in excess of 1000 KeV

  20. Dosimetric considerations and radiation protection of patients in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.; Loncar, B.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of measurements of relevant dosimetric quantities in interventional cardiology. Dosimetric data were collected for 117 coronary angiography (CA) procedures, 69 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and 41 combined procedures (CA+PCI), taking into account two quantities: air kerma area product (KAP) d air kerma in international reference point (K IRP ). Mean KAP values were 78 Gy·cm 2 , 113 Gy·cm 2 and 141 Gy·cm 2 for CA, PCI i CA+PCI, respectively. Corresponding mean K IRP values were 1.2 Gy, 1.8 Gy and 2.2 Gy. With respect to high dose values, risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions, dose management methods were proposed. (author) [sr

  1. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lima Souza Castro, Andre [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Institute of Radiation San Francisco, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto [Cancer Hospital in Uberlandia, Uberlandia (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  2. Cytogenetic and dosimetric effects of {sup 131}I in lymphocyte of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer with and without r-hTSH stimulation. Study in thyroid tumor cells (WRO) treated with {sup 131}I and {sup 60}Co in vitro; Efeitos citogenetico e dosimetrico do {sup 131}I em pacientes com cancer diferenciado da tireoide com e sem estimulacao com r-hTSH. Estudo em celulas tumorais tireoidianas (WRO) tratadas com {sup 131}I e {sup 60}Co in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valgode, Flavia Gomes Silva

    2015-11-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) represents about 90% of thyroid malignancies with increasing incidence in the recent decades. Treatment modalities include thyroidectomy, {sup 131}I therapy (with or without r-hTSH), radio and chemotherapy. Little is known about the effects of these treatments at the cellular level. This work was proposed in order to assess to what extent radioiodine therapy can cause damage in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with DTC, preceded or not by r-hTSH, taking into account acute, slow and dosimetric effects of {sup 131}I (in vivo study). An in vitro study was also carried out on thyroid tumor target cells (WRO) by cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis and radioiodine uptake. For this, blood samples from patients divided into two groups (group A, r-hTSH + {sup 131}I and group B,{sup 131}I only) were collected before, 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month and 1 year after {sup 131}I administration for aberration chromosome analysis (CA). A dose-response curve for {sup 131}I in vitro was developed for estimating the absorbed dose in patients, comparing the dicentric frequencies obtained in vitro with in vivo data by Monte Carlo program. Radioiodine therapy induced an increase in the number of CA in lymphocytes of patients peaking 24 hours after treatment, with gradual decline over time and with more chromosomal damage in group B than in group A, reaching baseline levels one year after radioiodine administration. The frequency of dicentric found inpatient lymphocytes, 24h after treatment, was equivalent to that induced in vitro (0.354 ± 0.153 MBq / mL for group A and 0.309 ± 0.154 MBq / mL for group B), which corresponds to absorbed doses of 0.8 ± 0.3 Gy and 0.7 ± 0.3 Gy for groups A and B, respectively, with no significant difference between the groups. WRO cells showed a cell cycle relatively slow: 96,3h with an unstable karyotype. The genotoxic test showed a relatively high radioresistance (0.07 to 3.70 MBq/mL), with no statistical

  3. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration using the NASA LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter using internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% ± 2.1% (CALIOP lower at night and within 2.9% ± 3.9% (CALIOP lower during the day, demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3.01 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential biases and uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 4.5% ± 3.2% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared with prior assessments of the CALIOP 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration.

  4. Sensitivity of postplanning target and OAR coverage estimates to dosimetric margin distribution sampling parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huijun; Gordon, J James; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2011-02-01

    A dosimetric margin (DM) is the margin in a specified direction between a structure and a specified isodose surface, corresponding to a prescription or tolerance dose. The dosimetric margin distribution (DMD) is the distribution of DMs over all directions. Given a geometric uncertainty model, representing inter- or intrafraction setup uncertainties or internal organ motion, the DMD can be used to calculate coverage Q, which is the probability that a realized target or organ-at-risk (OAR) dose metric D, exceeds the corresponding prescription or tolerance dose. Postplanning coverage evaluation quantifies the percentage of uncertainties for which target and OAR structures meet their intended dose constraints. The goal of the present work is to evaluate coverage probabilities for 28 prostate treatment plans to determine DMD sampling parameters that ensure adequate accuracy for postplanning coverage estimates. Normally distributed interfraction setup uncertainties were applied to 28 plans for localized prostate cancer, with prescribed dose of 79.2 Gy and 10 mm clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. Using angular or isotropic sampling techniques, dosimetric margins were determined for the CTV, bladder and rectum, assuming shift invariance of the dose distribution. For angular sampling, DMDs were sampled at fixed angular intervals w (e.g., w = 1 degree, 2 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees). Isotropic samples were uniformly distributed on the unit sphere resulting in variable angular increments, but were calculated for the same number of sampling directions as angular DMDs, and accordingly characterized by the effective angular increment omega eff. In each direction, the DM was calculated by moving the structure in radial steps of size delta (=0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 mm) until the specified isodose was crossed. Coverage estimation accuracy deltaQ was quantified as a function of the sampling parameters omega or omega eff and delta. The

  5. Dosimetric study of optimal beam number and arrangement for treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrukkar, Ashwini; Corry, June; Peters, Lester J.; Hope, Geoff; Cramb, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this dosimetric study was to evaluate the effect of beam number and arrangement on the dose distribution with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer. Computed tomography data sets of seven patients who were treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre were used for the present dosimetric study. The dose planned was 70 Gy in 7 weeks for the gross nasopharyngeal and nodal disease and the biological equivalents of 60 Gy in 6 weeks for the high-risk and 50 Gy in 5 weeks for the low-risk nodal disease. A plan using seven fields was compared to that using nine fields in all patients. Plans were assessed on the dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and the degree of parotid sparing achieved by evaluating both dose-volume histograms (DVH) and axial slices. Seven fields (three anterior and four posterior) provide good PTV coverage and satisfactory parotid sparing in patients with localized nasopharyngeal lesions. Nine fields appear to be better for tumours with significant posterolateral parapharyngeal extension. Parotid sparing is consistently better with nine fields. Both DVH and axial slices need to be evaluated before accepting any plan Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  6. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... and abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated...

  7. Clinical and dosimetric results of three-dimensional image-guided and pulsed dose rate curie-therapy in locally advanced cervical cancers; Resultats cliniques et dosimetriques de la curietherapie de debit de dose pulse guidee par imagerie tridimensionnelle dans les cancers du col de l'uterus localement evolues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, R.; Gilmore, J.; Dumas, I.; Abrous-Anane, S.; Haberer, S.; Verstraet, R.; Champoudry, J.; Martinetti, F.; Morice, P.; Haie-Meller, C. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a review of data obtained between 2004 and 2009 on 130 women who had been treated by optimized pulsed-rate curie-therapy for a locally advanced cervical cancer. Results are discussed in terms of cancer stage, treatment (with or without concomitant chemotherapy), planning method (MRI, scanography), delivered doses in the clinical target volumes, surgery, relapse occurrence and localizations, global survival probability, local control, undesirable side effects, occurrence of intestine or urinary toxicity. It appears that the association of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy and optimized curie-therapy results in a good local-regional control and a low toxicity level. Short communication

  8. Influence of lucite phantoms on calibration of dosimetric pens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, E.C.; Xavier, M.; Caldas, L.E.V.

    1992-01-01

    Dosimetrical pens were studied for the answer repetition and were tested in gamma radiation fields ( 60 Co and 137 Cs) in air and in front of a lucite phantom, obtaining a backscattering contribution. The medium backscattering factors were 1,053 and 1,108 for respectively 60 Co and 137 Cs. The pens were placed behind the phantom for verifying the radiation attenuation. (C.G.C.)

  9. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    Indications and contraindications for radiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The role of chemoradiation among esophagus cancer treatment methods is determined.Thechnical, dosimetric and clinical data are sequently delivered. Preparation of a patient for chemoradiation is described. Recommendations on their most efficient use are given

  10. Comparing Effectiveness of Active and Passive Client Follow-Up Approaches in Sustaining the Continued Use of Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) in Rural Punjab: A Multicentre, Non-Inferiority Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Waqas; Azmat, Syed Khurram; Ali, Moazzam; Ishaque, Muhammad; Abbas, Ghazunfer; Munroe, Erik; Harrison, Rebecca; Shamsi, Wajahat Hussain; Mustafa, Ghulam; Khan, Omar Farooq; Ali, Safdar; Ahmed, Aftab

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods is very low in Pakistan with high discontinuation rates mainly attributed to method-related side effects. Mixed evidence is available on the effectiveness of different client follow-up approaches used to ensure method continuation. We compared the effectiveness of active and passive follow-up approaches in sustaining the use of LARC—and within ‘active’ follow-up, we further compared a telephone versus home-based approach in rural Punjab, Pakistan. Methods This was a 12-month multicentre non-inferiority trial conducted in twenty-two (16 rural- and 6 urban-based) franchised reproductive healthcare facilities in district Chakwal of Punjab province, between November 2013 and December 2014. The study comprised of three groups of LARC clients: a) home-based follow-up, b) telephone-based follow-up, and c) passive or needs-based follow-up. Participants in the first two study groups received counselling on scheduled follow-up from the field workers at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 month post-insertion whereas participants in the third group were asked to contact the health facility if in need of medical assistance relating to LARC method use. Study participants were recruited with equal allocation to each study group, but participants were not randomized. The analyses are based on 1,246 LARC (intra-uterine contraceptive device and implant) users that completed approximately 12-months of follow-up. The non-inferiority margin was kept at five percentage points for the comparison of active and passive follow-up and six percentage points for telephone and home-based approach. The primary outcome was cumulative probability of method continuation at 12-month among LARC users. Results Women recruited in home-based, telephone-based, and passive groups were 400, 419 and 427, respectively. The cumulative probability of LARC continuation at 12 month was 87.6% (95% CI 83.8 to 90.6) among women who received home

  11. Contemporary management of locally advanced rectal cancer: Resolving issues, controversies and shifting paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacion, Aeris Jane D; Park, Youn Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2018-02-01

    Advancements in rectal cancer treatment have resulted in improvement only in locoregional control and have failed to address distant relapse, which is the predominant mode of treatment failure in rectal cancer. As the efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) reaches a plateau, the need for alternative strategies in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has grown in relevance. Several novel strategies have been conceptualized to address this issue, including: 1) neoadjuvant induction and consolidation chemotherapy before CRT; 2) neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone to avoid the sequelae of radiation; and 3) nonoperative management for patients who achieved pathological or clinical complete response after CRT. This article explores the issues, recent advances and paradigm shifts in the management of LARC and emphasizes the need for a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on tumor stage, location, gene expression and quality of life.

  12. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  13. Gamma dosimetric parameters in some skeletal muscle relaxants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the attenuation of gamma radiation of energy ranging from 84 keV to 1330 keV (^{170}Tm, ^{22}Na,^{137}Cs, and ^{60}Co) in some commonly used skeletal muscle relaxants such as tubocurarine chloride, gallamine triethiodide, pancuronium bromide, suxamethonium bromide and mephenesin. The mass attenuation coefficient is measured from the attenuation experiment. In the present work, we have also proposed the direct relation between mass attenuation coefficient (μ /ρ ) and mass energy absorption coefficient (μ _{en}/ρ ) based on the nonlinear fitting procedure. The gamma dosimetric parameters such as mass energy absorption coefficient (μ _{en}/ρ ), effective atomic number (Z_{eff}), effective electron density (N_{el}), specific γ-ray constant, air kerma strength and dose rate are evaluated from the measured mass attentuation coefficient. These measured gamma dosimetric parameters are compared with the theoretical values. The measured values agree with the theoretical values. The studied gamma dosimetric values for the relaxants are useful in medical physics and radiation medicine.

  14. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% {gamma} criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  15. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  16. Dosimetric implications of inter- and intrafractional prostate positioning errors during tomotherapy : Comparison of gold marker-based registrations with native MVCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wust, Peter; Joswig, Marc; Graf, Reinhold; Böhmer, Dirk; Beck, Marcus; Barelkowski, Thomasz; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2017-09-01

    For high-dose radiation therapy (RT) of prostate cancer, image-guided (IGRT) and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) approaches are standard. Less is known regarding comparisons of different IGRT techniques and the resulting residual errors, as well as regarding their influences on dose distributions. A total of 58 patients who received tomotherapy-based RT up to 84 Gy for high-risk prostate cancer underwent IGRT based either on daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) alone (n = 43) or the additional use of gold markers (n = 15) under routine conditions. Planned Adaptive (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) software was used for elaborated offline analysis to quantify residual interfractional prostate positioning errors, along with systematic and random errors and the resulting safety margins after both IGRT approaches. Dosimetric parameters for clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and exposition of organs at risk (OAR) were also analyzed and compared. Interfractional as well as intrafractional displacements were determined. Particularly in the vertical direction, residual interfractional positioning errors were reduced using the gold marker-based approach, but dosimetric differences were moderate and the clinical relevance relatively small. Intrafractional prostate motion proved to be quite high, with displacements of 1-3 mm; however, these did not result in additional dosimetric impairments. Residual interfractional positioning errors were reduced using gold marker-based IGRT; however, this resulted in only slightly different final dose distributions. Therefore, daily MVCT-based IGRT without markers might be a valid alternative.

  17. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle copyright planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% γ criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  18. Dosimetric Effects of Air Pockets Around High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Vaginal Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most physicians use a single-channel vaginal cylinder for postoperative endometrial cancer brachytherapy. Recent published data have identified air pockets between the vaginal cylinders and the vaginal mucosa. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence, size, and dosimetric effects of these air pockets. Methods and Materials: 25 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff brachytherapy with a high-dose rate vaginal cylinders were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 200 to 400 cGy per fraction prescribed at 5 mm depth. Computed tomography simulation for brachytherapy treatment planning was performed for each fraction. The quantity, volume, and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the cylinder were quantified. Results: In 25 patients, a total of 90 air pockets were present in 150 procedures (60%). Five patients had no air pockets present during any of their treatments. The average number of air pockets per patient was 3.6, with the average total air pocket volume being 0.34 cm 3 (range, 0.01-1.32 cm 3 ). The average dose reduction to the vaginal mucosa at the air pocket was 27% (range, 9-58%). Ten patients had no air pockets on their first fraction but air pockets occurred in subsequent fractions. Conclusion: Air pockets between high-dose rate vaginal cylinder applicators and the vaginal mucosa are present in the majority of fractions of therapy, and their presence varies from patient to patient and fraction to fraction. The existence of air pockets results in reduced radiation dose to the vaginal mucosa.

  19. SU-F-T-240: EPID-Based Quality Assurance for Dosimetric Credentialing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miri, N [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel dosimetric audit method for clinical trials using EPID measurements at each center and a standardized EPID to dose conversion algorithm. The aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the EPID method to different linear accelerator, EPID and treatment planning system (TPS) combinations. Methods: Combination of delivery and planning systems were three Varian linacs including one Pinnacle and two Eclipse TPS and, two ELEKTA linacs including one Pinnacle and one Monaco TPS. All Varian linacs had the same EPID structure and similarly for the ELEKTA linacs. Initially, dose response of the EPIDs was investigated by acquiring integrated pixel value (IPV) of the central area of 10 cm2 images versus MUs, 5-400 MU. Then, the EPID to dose conversion was investigated for different system combinations. Square field size images, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 15, 20, 25 cm2 acquired by all systems were converted to dose at isocenter of a virtual flat phantom then the dose was compared to the corresponding TPS dose. Results: All EPIDs showed a relatively linear behavior versus MU except at low MUs which showed irregularities probably due to initial inaccuracies of irradiation. Furthermore, for all the EPID models, the model predicted TPS dose with a mean dose difference percentage of 1.3. However the model showed a few inaccuracies for ELEKTA EPID images at field sizes larger than 20 cm2. Conclusion: The EPIDs demonstrated similar behavior versus MU and the model was relatively accurate for all the systems. Therefore, the model could be employed as a global dosimetric method to audit clinical trials. Funding has been provided from Department of Radiation Oncology, TROG Cancer Research and the University of Newcastle. Narges Miri is a recipient of a University of Newcastle postgraduate scholarship.

  20. Design, manufacture, and evaluation of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom purpose-built for radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, K. M.; Ebert, M. A.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Hamilton, C. S.; Denham, J. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Physics, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia, Australia and School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria 8006 (Australia); Australiasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales 2020 (Australia); Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Calvary Mater Newcastle, New South Wales 2298 (Australia); Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Medicine and Population Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was designed and constructed to meet specific criteria for multicenter radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison. Methods: Three dimensional external and organ outlines were generated from a computed tomography image set of a male pelvis, forming the basis of design for an anatomically realistic phantom. Clinically relevant points of interest were selected throughout the dataset where point-dose values could be measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters and a small-volume ionization chamber. Following testing, three materials were selected and the phantom was manufactured using modern prototyping techniques into five separate coronal slices. Time lines and resource requirements for the phantom design and manufacture were recorded. The ability of the phantom to mimic the entire treatment chain was tested. Results: The phantom CT images indicated that organ densities and geometries were comparable to those of the original patient. The phantom proved simple to load for dosimetry and rapid to assemble. Due to heat release during manufacture, small air gaps and density heterogeneities were present throughout the phantom. The overall cost for production of the prototype phantom was comparable to other commercial anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantom was shown to be suitable for use as a ''patient'' to mimic the entire treatment chain for typical external beam radiotherapy for prostate and rectal cancer. Conclusions: The phantom constructed for the present study incorporates all characteristics necessary for accurate Level III intercomparison studies. Following use in an extensive Level III dosimetric comparison over a large time scale and geographic area, the phantom retained mechanical stability and did not show signs of radiation-induced degradation.

  1. DARTAB: a program to combine airborne radionuclide environmental exposure data with dosimetric and health effects data to generate tabulations of predicted health impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begovich, C.L.; Eckerman, K.F.; Schlatter, E.C.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

    1981-08-01

    The DARTAB computer code combines radionuclide environmental exposure data with dosimetric and health effects data to generate tabulations of the predicted impact of radioactive airborne effluents. DARTAB is independent of the environmental transport code used to generate the environmental exposure data and the codes used to produce the dosimetric and health effects data. Therefore human dose and risk calculations need not be added to every environmental transport code. Options are included in DARTAB to permit the user to request tabulations by various topics (e.g., cancer site, exposure pathway, etc.) to facilitate characterization of the human health impacts of the effluents. The DARTAB code was written at ORNL for the US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation Programs

  2. The role of the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric calibration in the implementation of the dosimetric magnitudes with radiological protection aims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Medina O, V.; Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    It is very well-known the paper of the net of secondary laboratories of dosimetric calibration of the OAS in the dissemination of the traceability of the dosimetric magnitudes: kerma in air and absorbed dose in water, to the radiotherapy departments, given the high accuracy and precision that require the radiotherapy treatments. However the LSCD has other important areas at least for the development, implementation and evaluation of dosimetric magnitudes denominated operative magnitudes with ends of radiological protection: environmental equivalent dose H*(10), directional equivalent dose H'(0.07) and personal equivalent dose Hp. In the case of radiological protection the LSCD-ININ has been implementing the infrastructure to give service of personal dosimetry for photons and beta particles in terms of the operative magnitudes. For photons: X and gamma rays, it account with a secondary pattern camera PTW T34035 gauged in H * and Hp in the primary laboratory of Germany PTB. For the case of beta radiation its account with an extrapolation camera PTW 23392 with a secondary pattern kit of sources of the type I, gauged in terms of H'(0.07) in the PTB. (Author)

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of whole-breast radiation therapy: Clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; White, Jana; Kiciak, Alexander; Redekop, Rachel; Gopaul, Darin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the intact breast is the standard therapy for preventing local recurrence of early-stage breast cancer following breast conservation surgery. To improve patient standard of care, there is a need to define a consistent and transparent treatment path for all patients that reduces significance variations in the acceptability of treatment plans. There is lack of consistency among institutions or individuals about what is considered an acceptable treatment plan: target coverage vis-à-vis dose to organs at risk (OAR). Clinical trials usually resolve these issues, as the criteria for an acceptable plan within the trial (target coverage and doses to OAR) are well defined. We developed an institutional criterion for accepting breast treatment plans in 2006 after analyzing treatment data of approximately 200 patients. The purpose of this article is to report on the dosimetric review of 623 patients treated in the last 18 months to evaluate the effectiveness of the previously developed plan acceptability criteria and any possible changes necessary to further improve patient care. The mean patient age is 61.6 years (range: 25.2 to 93.0 years). The mean breast separation for all the patients is 21.0 cm (range: 12.4 to 34.9 cm), and the mean planning target volume (PTV-eval) (breast volume for evaluation) is 884.0 cm"3 (range: 73.6 to 3684.6 cm"3). Overall, 314 (50.4%) patients had the disease in the left breast and 309 (49.6%) had it in the right breast. A total of 147 (23.6%) patients were treated using the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 92% (V_9_2_% _P_D) and 95% (V_9_5_% _P_D) of the prescribed dose (PD) are more than 99% and 97%, respectively, for all patients. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 105% (V_1_0_5_% _P_D) of the PD is less than 1% for all groups. The mean homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), and conformity index (CI) for the PTV-eval are 0.09 (range: 0

  4. Dosimetric study of a new polymer encapsulated palladium-103 seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, S; Vynckier, S

    2005-01-01

    The use of low-energy photon emitters for brachytherapy applications, as in the treatment of prostate or ocular tumours, has increased significantly over the last few years. Several new seed models utilizing 103 Pd and 125 I have recently been introduced. Following the TG43U1 recommendations of the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633), dose distributions around these low-energy photon emitters are characterized by the dose rate constant, the radial dose function and the anisotropy function in water. These functions and constants can be measured for each new seed in a solid phantom (i.e. solid water such as WT1) using high spatial resolution detectors such as very small thermoluminescent detectors. These experimental results in solid water must then be converted into liquid water by using Monte Carlo simulations. This paper presents the dosimetric parameters of a new palladium seed, OptiSeed TM (produced by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium), made with a biocompatible polymeric shell and with a design that differs from the hollow titanium encapsulated seed, InterSource 103 , produced by the same company. A polymer encapsulation was chosen by the company IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate, and to improve the symmetry of the radiation field around the seed. The necessary experimental data were obtained by measurements with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm 3 ) in a solid water phantom (WT1) and then converted to values in liquid water using Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP-4C). Comparison of the results with a previous study by Reniers et al (2002 Appl. Radiat. Isot. 57 805) shows very good agreement for the dose rate constant and for the radial dose function. In addition, the results also indicate an improvement in isotropy compared to a conventional titanium encapsulated seed. The relative dose (anisotropy value relative to 90 deg.) from

  5. SU-C-BRB-06: Dosimetric Impact of Breast Contour Reconstruction Errors in GammaPod Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Y; Becker, S; Mutaf, Y; Yu, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The first GammaPod™ unit, a dedicated prone stereotactic treatment device for early stage breast cancer, has been installed and commissioned at University of Maryland School of Medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate potential dosimetric impact of inaccurate breast contour. Methods: In GammaPod treatments, patient’s beast is immobilized by a breast cup device (BCID) throughout the entire same-day imaging and treatment procedure. 28 different BICD sizes are available to accommodate patients with varying breast sizes. A mild suction helps breast tissue to conform to the shape of the cup with selected size. In treatment planning, dose calculation utilizes previously calculated dose distributions for available cup geometry rather than the breast shape from CT image. Patient CT images with breast cups indicate minor geometric discrepancy between the matched shape of the cup and the breast contour, i.e., the contour size is larger or smaller. In order to investigate the dosimetric impact of these discrepancies, we simulated such discrepancies and reassessed the dose to target as well as skin. Results: In vicinity of skin, hot/cold spots were found when matched cup size was smaller/larger than patient’s breast after comparing the corrected dose profiles from Monte Carlo simulation with the planned dose from TPS. The overdosing/underdosing of target could yield point dose differences as large as 5% due to these setup errors (D95 changes within 2.5%). Maximal skin dose was overestimated/underestimated up to 25%/45% when matched cup size was larger/smaller than real breast contour. Conclusion: The dosimetric evaluation suggests substantial underdosing/overdosing with inaccurate cup geometry during planning, which is acceptable for current clinical trial. Further studies are needed to evaluate such impact to treating small volume close to skin.

  6. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within ±1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 ± 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 ± 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  7. SU-C-BRB-06: Dosimetric Impact of Breast Contour Reconstruction Errors in GammaPod Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Y [Xcision Medical Systems LLC, Columbia, MD (United States); Becker, S; Mutaf, Y [University Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yu, C [Xcision Medical Systems LLC, Columbia, MD (United States); University Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The first GammaPod™ unit, a dedicated prone stereotactic treatment device for early stage breast cancer, has been installed and commissioned at University of Maryland School of Medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate potential dosimetric impact of inaccurate breast contour. Methods: In GammaPod treatments, patient’s beast is immobilized by a breast cup device (BCID) throughout the entire same-day imaging and treatment procedure. 28 different BICD sizes are available to accommodate patients with varying breast sizes. A mild suction helps breast tissue to conform to the shape of the cup with selected size. In treatment planning, dose calculation utilizes previously calculated dose distributions for available cup geometry rather than the breast shape from CT image. Patient CT images with breast cups indicate minor geometric discrepancy between the matched shape of the cup and the breast contour, i.e., the contour size is larger or smaller. In order to investigate the dosimetric impact of these discrepancies, we simulated such discrepancies and reassessed the dose to target as well as skin. Results: In vicinity of skin, hot/cold spots were found when matched cup size was smaller/larger than patient’s breast after comparing the corrected dose profiles from Monte Carlo simulation with the planned dose from TPS. The overdosing/underdosing of target could yield point dose differences as large as 5% due to these setup errors (D95 changes within 2.5%). Maximal skin dose was overestimated/underestimated up to 25%/45% when matched cup size was larger/smaller than real breast contour. Conclusion: The dosimetric evaluation suggests substantial underdosing/overdosing with inaccurate cup geometry during planning, which is acceptable for current clinical trial. Further studies are needed to evaluate such impact to treating small volume close to skin.

  8. Internal Dosimetric Calculations for Occupationally Exposed Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.T.; Farag, H.I.

    2005-01-01

    The Internal radiation dosimetry calculations are very important to estimate the benefit and the risk of radiation in nuclear medicine field for both patient and worker. MIRD scheme and ICRP model have valid methods in this type of calculations. In this work, a new program called WIRDST the Workers Internal Radiation Dosimetry Simulation for Thyroid gland has been built up by using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate the internal exposure of sodium iodide by inhalation for workers. The working conditions have been taken as the same as found in the hot laboratory of nuclear medicine unit in the National Cancer Institute in Cairo University. The point source equivalent model as a parameterization equation has developed newly by using the fitting model of MC method for uniform distribution of radioactive sodium iodide in the thyroid gland. This model is used for the first time in this type of calculation, and then applied on 3 D coordinates of mathematical geometry for the adult phantom of the reference man. The latest parameters (anatomical data and inhalation metabolic data) of ICRP pamphlets and recommendations have been used in this purpose. Moreover, the latest scheme for iodine decay mode and the latest geometry model for thyroid gland are used also. The results showed that the specific effective energy and the effective dose decrease from the thyroid gland to the nearest organs then decrease gradually until terminated in the organs that have large distance from the thyroid. The Annual Limit of Intake (ALI) has been calculated for a wide range of thyroid uptake (5%, 15%, 25%, 35%, 45%, and 55%) in addition to change of the working time order per week in one year. The results showed that the critical point of intake limits are decreased when the thyroid uptake is increased and/or the number of working time in the hot laboratory per week is increased

  9. Peripheral myeloid-derived suppressor and T regulatory PD-1 positive cells predict response to neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Maria; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Cardone, Eleonora; Trotta, Anna Maria; Pecori, Biagio; Rega, Daniela; Pace, Ugo; Scala, Dario; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Cacciapuoti, Carmela; Pacelli, Roberto; Delrio, Paolo; Scala, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SC-RT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is one therapeutic option for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. Since radio-induced DNA damage may affect tumor immunogenicity, Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T regulatory cells (Tregs) were evaluated in 13 patients undergoing SC-RT and TME for LARC. Peripheral Granulocytic-MDSCs (G-MDSC) [LIN−/HLA-DR−/CD11b+/CD14−/CD15+/CD33+], Monocytic (M-MDSC) [CD14+/HLA-DR−/lowCD11b+/CD33+] and Tregs [CD4+/CD25hi+/FOXP3+- CTLA-4/PD1] basal value was significantly higher in LARC patients compared to healthy donors (HD). Peripheral MDSC and Tregs were evaluated at time 0 (T0), after 2 and 5 weeks (T2-T5) from radiotherapy; before surgery (T8) and 6–12 months after surgery (T9, T10). G-MDSC decreased at T5 and further at T8 while M-MDSC cells decreased at T5; Tregs reached the lowest value at T5. LARC poor responder patients displayed a major decrease in M-MDSC after SC-RT and an increase of Treg-PD-1. In this pilot study MDSCs and Tregs decrease during the SC-RT treatment could represent a biomarker of response in LARC patients. Further studies are needed to confirm that the deepest M-MDSC reduction and increase in Treg-PD1 cells within 5–8 weeks from the beginning of treatment could discriminate LARC patients poor responding to SC-RT. PMID:25823653

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of the conformation of the multileaf collimator to irregularly shaped fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, Arthur; Du, Maria; Wong, John; Vicini, Frank; Taylor, Roy; Yu, Cedric; Matter, Richard; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of geometric MLC prescription strategies and compare them to those of conventional shielding block. Methods and Materials: Circular fields, square fields, and 12 irregular fields for patients with cancer of the head and neck, lung, and pelvis were included in this study. All fields were shaped using the MLC and conventional blocks. A geometric criterion was defined as the amount of area discrepancy between the MLC and the prescription outline. The 'least area discrepancy' (LAD) of the MLC conformation was searched by selecting the collimator angle, meanwhile keeping a preselected position along the width of the leaf into the prescribed field. Five LAD conventions were studied. These included the LAD-0, LAD-(1(3)), LAD-(1(2)), and LAD-(2(3)) that inserted the leaves at the 0, (1(3)), (1(2)), and (2(3)) of the leaf end into the prescription field, respectively. In addition, the LAD optimization was applied to the transecting (TRN) approach for leaf conformation that prescribed an equal area of overblocking and underblocking under each leaf. Film dosimetry was performed in a 20 cm polystyrene phantom at 10 cm depth 100 cm from source to axis distance (SAD) for both 6 and 18 MV photons with each of the above MLC conformations and conventional blocks. The field penumbra width, defined as the mean of the separation between the 20% and 80% isodose lines along the normal of the prescription field edge, was calculated using both the MLC and conventional block film dosimetry and compared. In a similar way, the d20 is defined as the mean separation between the 20% isodose line and the prescription field edge, and the d80 is defined as the mean separation between the 80% isodose line and the prescription field edge. Results: The field penumbra width for all MLC conventions was approximately 2 mm larger than that of the conventional block. However, there was a larger variation of the separation

  11. Radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Ph.; Beaugelin, K.; Maubert, H.; Ledenvic, Ph.

    1997-11-01

    This study has as objective a survey of the radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France, as well as a prognosis for the years to come. It was requested by the Direction of Nuclear Installation Safety (DSIN) in relation to different organisms which effected measurements after this accident. It is based on the use of combined results of measurements and modelling by means of the code ASTRAL developed at IPSN. Various measurements obtained from five authorities and institutions, were made available, such as: activity of air and water, soil, processed food, agricultural and natural products. However, to achieve the survey still a modelling is needed. ASTRAL is a code for evaluating the ecological consequences of an accident. It allows establishing the correspondence between the soil Remnant Surface Activities (RSA, in Bq.m -2 ), the activity concentration of the agricultural production and the individual and collective doses resulting from external and internal exposures (due to inhalation and ingestion of contaminated nurture). The results of principal synthesis documents on the Chernobyl accident and its consequences were also used. The report is structured in nine sections, as follows: 1.Introduction; 2.Objective and methodology; 3.Characterization of radioactive depositions; 4;Remnant surface activities; 5.Contamination of agricultural products and foods; 6.Contamination of natural, semi-natural products and of drinking water; 7.Dosimetric evaluations; 8.Proposals for the environmental surveillance; 9.Conclusion. Finally, after ten years, one concludes that at present the dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France were rather limited. For the period 1986-2046 the average individual effective dose estimated for the most struck zone is lower than 1500 μSv, which represents almost 1% of the average natural exposure for the same period. At present, the cesium 137 levels are at often inferior to those recorded before

  12. Monte Carlo generation of dosimetric parameters for eye plaque dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutajar, D.L.; Green, J.A.; Guatelli, S.; Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Centre for Medical Radiation Physics have undertaken the dcvelopment of a quality assurance tool, using silicon pixelated detectors, for the calibration of eye plaques prior to insertion. Dosimetric software to correlate the measured and predicted dose rates has been constructed. The dosimetric parameters within the software, for both 1-125 and Ru-I 06 based eye plaques, were optimised using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Methods For 1-125 based plaques, an novel application was developed to generate TG-43 parameters for any seed input. TG-43 parameters were generated for an Oncura model 6711 seed, with data points every millimetre up to 25 mm in the radial direction, and every 5 degrees in polar angle, and correlated to published data. For the Ru106 based plaques, an application was developed to generate dose rates about a Bebig model CCD plaque. Toroids were used to score the deposited dose, taking advantage of the cylindrical symmetry of the plaque, with radii in millimetre increments up to 25 mm, and depth from the plaque surface in millimetre increments up to 25 mm. Results TheTG43 parameters generated for the 6711 seed correlate well with published TG43 data at the given intervals, with radial dose function within 3%, and anisotropy function within 5% for angles greater than 30 degrees. The Ru-l 06 plaque data correlated well with the Bebig protocol of measurement. Conclusion Geant4 is a useful Monte Carlo tool for the generation of dosimetric data for eye plaque dosimetry. which may improve the quality assurance of eye plaque treatment. (author)

  13. Dosimetric study in iodine-125 seeds for brachytherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeituni, Carlos Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The demand for iodine-125 seeds for use in brachytherapy treatments has experienced an increase along recent years in Brazil and all over the world. All iodine-125 seed must have its operational parameters measured and/or calculated every time changes in the production process are carried out. A complete dosimetric measurement is very expensive, and it is recommended that this procedure must be repeated at least once a year. Thus, this work developed a methodology for the entire dosimetric process. This methodology is based on the scarce information available in the literature, once almost all the methodology used in large industrial laboratories is commercial secret. The proposed methodology was tested using seeds of Amersham-Oncura-Ge Healthcare, which is the largest seed manufactory in the world. In this new methodology, an automatic reader was employed in order to reduce the time required in the selection process of the TLD-100 dosimeters used and a postprocessing of the obtained spectra was carried out. A total of 142 dosimeters were used and only 29 have been selected using the new methodology. Measurements were performed using slabs of Solid Water RW1 to simulate measuring in the 'water', using three different experimental apparatus and each measurement was repeated at least three times. The TLD-100 calibration was performed using a Dermopan II - Siemens. The measured values showed a good agreement with the ones available in the literature. Finally, these measured values were compared with calculated ones obtained by a semiempirical simulation program, showing a good agreement and, therefore, demonstrating the validity of the proposed methodology regarding dosimetric calculations. (author)

  14. A comparison of the quality assurance of four dosimetric tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jaeman; Baek, Taesung; Lee, Boram; Shin, Dongho; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Jeonghoon; Lim, Young Kyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Jooyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the quality assurance (QA) results of four dosimetric tools used for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to suggest universal criteria for the passing rate in QA, irrespective of the dosimetric tool used. Thirty fields of IMRT plans from five patients were selected, followed by irradiation onto radiochromic film, a diode array (Mapcheck), an ion chamber array (MatriXX) and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for patient-specific QA. The measured doses from the four dosimetric tools were compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system. The passing rates of the four dosimetric tools were calculated using the gamma index method, using as criteria a dose difference of 3% and a distance-to-agreement of 3 mm. The QA results based on Mapcheck, MatriXX and EPID showed good agreement, with average passing rates of 99.61%, 99.04% and 99.29%, respectively. However, the average passing rate based on film measurement was significantly lower, 95.88%. The average uncertainty (1 standard deviation) of passing rates for 6 intensity modulated fields was around 0.31 for film measurement, larger than those of the other three dosimetric tools. QA results and consistencies depend on the choice of dosimetric tool. Universal passing rates should depend on the normalization or inter-comparisons of dosimetric tools if more than one dosimetric tool is used for patient specific QA

  15. A comparison of the quality assurance of four dosimetric tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaeman; Baek, Taesung; Lee, Boram; Shin, Dongho; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Jeonghoon; Lim, Young Kyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Jooyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the quality assurance (QA) results of four dosimetric tools used for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to suggest universal criteria for the passing rate in QA, irrespective of the dosimetric tool used. Thirty fields of IMRT plans from five patients were selected, followed by irradiation onto radiochromic film, a diode array (Mapcheck), an ion chamber array (MatriXX) and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for patient-specific QA. The measured doses from the four dosimetric tools were compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system. The passing rates of the four dosimetric tools were calculated using the gamma index method, using as criteria a dose difference of 3% and a distance-to-agreement of 3 mm. The QA results based on Mapcheck, MatriXX and EPID showed good agreement, with average passing rates of 99.61%, 99.04% and 99.29%, respectively. However, the average passing rate based on film measurement was significantly lower, 95.88%. The average uncertainty (1 standard deviation) of passing rates for 6 intensity modulated fields was around 0.31 for film measurement, larger than those of the other three dosimetric tools. QA results and consistencies depend on the choice of dosimetric tool. Universal passing rates should depend on the normalization or inter-comparisons of dosimetric tools if more than one dosimetric tool is used for patient specific QA.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiosurgery with dynamic conformal arc radiosurgery for small cranial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Calvo-Ortega

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We have shown that IMRS provides the dosimetric advantages compared with DCARS. Based on the dosimetric findings in this study, fixed gantry IMRS technique can be adopted as a standard procedure for cranial SRS when micro-MLC technology is not available on the linear accelerator.

  17. Dosimetric confirmation of a software for the design of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, R.; Huerta, U.; Torres, M.; Alonso, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    A software for radiotherapy treatment has been recently designed by specialists in medical physics form Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical and Surgical Hospital. Several locations in the distributions of dose calculations. The results of dosimetric measurements with TLD-700 powder in a human-like manikin were taken as reference. The different options available for the entry of patients shape data are explained. A comparison of the results of measurements with calculations, is presented. Causes of discrepancies are analyzed and recommendations regarding the usefulness of the different for the collection of data from patients are made

  18. Dosimetric measurement of the disintegration rate of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solymosi, J.; Nagy, L.G.; Zagyvai, P.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations on the disintegration rate of fission products of 238 U and 239 Pu are presented. The intensity of the β-and γ-radiation of fission products were measured continously in an interval of 1-1300 hours following the fission, offering the possibility for determining the general and specific characteristics of the individual fission products. A universal measuring procedure was elaborated for the rapid in situ determination of the dosimetric features of fission products, which is suitable for the accurate evaluation and prediction of external absorbed dose even in case of fission products of various origin and unknown composition. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  19. On the set up of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furetta, C.

    2000-01-01

    In this work are treated the following features: Introduction to the thermoluminescent dosimetric systems, their prerequisites, Initialisation procedure, Batch homogeneity, Procedure for batch homogeneity (IEC), Reference and field dosimeters, Thermal treatments and its general considerations, as well as its initialisation treatment, erasing treatment or standard annealing (also called pre-irradiation annealing), post-irradiation or pre-readout annealing. Also is presented the performance of the annealing study, with its suggested procedures such as: a first and second procedures. Finally, it is showed about experimental data of the annealing treatments and its diagrams. (Author)

  20. Dosimetric characteristics of a TLD dosemeter with extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina P, D.; Diaz B, E.; Lien V, R.

    1999-01-01

    It was designed a TLD dosemeter for the monitoring of the extremities. This one consists in a metallic ring with a circular orifice where is arranged a T L detector of LiF: Mg,Ti (Model JR1152C) 5 x 5 x 0.8 mm 3 covered by a polyethylene fine layer. In this work were studied the dosimetric properties of the dosemeter for its application in the dosimetry of extremities for photonic radiation. the results obtained allow conclude that the designed dosemeter can be used for the extremities monitoring. (Author)

  1. Radioecological and dosimetric consequences of Chernobyl accident in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Ph.; Beaugelin, K.; Maubert, H.; Ledenvic, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    After ten years and the taking in account of numerous data, it can be affirmed that the dosimetric consequences of Chernobyl accident will have been limited in France. for the period 1986-2046, the individual middle efficient dose commitment, for the area the most reached by depositing is inferior to 1500 μSv, that represents about 1% of middle natural exposure in the same time. but mountains and forests can have more important surface activities than in plain. Everywhere else, it can be considered that the effects of Chernobyl accident are disappearing. the levels of cesium 137 are now often inferior to what they were before the accident. (N.C.)

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of Radiotherapy units wit 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, B. Salinas de; Tovar M, V.; Becerril V, A.

    2000-01-01

    The SSDL network of the IAEA performs, every year, quality audit tests for radiotherapy services ( 60 Co units and linear accelerators), and for national SSDL as well. Because of the SSDL-Mexico results in these tests and due to our enthusiasm and confidence in our work, a parallel test has been done , which is described in this talk as well as the results. Nowadays, a second parallel test goes up, which could confirm our optimism and open the possibility to our country to start a national dosimetric audit of 60 Co radiotherapy units. (Author)

  3. Dosimetry in radiodiagnosis. Individual irradiation card. Dosimetric application of electrets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisbona, Albert.

    1981-09-01

    This study deals with a radiodiagnosis dosimetry, and contains two parts. First of all, the combination between a dosimetric data acquisition from an ionization chamber and a micro-computer allows the realization of individual irradiation card for a well established examination. The method is extensible to almost totality of radiological examinations. The second part describes the following of an original work about the application of electrets in radiodiagnosis dosimetry. At least a theorical study is shown; it takes account of different involving phenomena and allows a starting interpretation of experimental results [fr

  4. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)

  5. Method of accounting and suppressing the instability of dosimetric information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejtek, Ya.

    1977-01-01

    To account for dosimetric information instability differential and integral correcting factors are proposed. The differential factor converts signals of dosimeters irradiated during short but different periods of time into equivalent signals related to a certain period of time. The factor excludes the effect of signal instability in the case of short exposures. The integral factor represents a generalization of the differential one for prolonged exposures. The statistical integral factor is derived. An example of processing experimental data using the analytical method developed is presented. The method is pointed out to have been introduced in the state personal dosimetry service in Czechoslovakia [ru

  6. Dosimetric properties of a novel brachytherapy balloon applicator for the treatment of malignant brain-tumor resection-cavity margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, James F.; Williams, Jeffery A.; Stubbs, James B.; Patrick, Timothy J.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1998-01-01

    -seed implants in several respects. Manipulation of the dosimetric properties of the device can improve its characteristics for brain tumor treatment and may make it suitable for boosting the lumpectomy margins in conservative breast cancer treatment

  7. Dosimetric impact of interplay effect in lung IMRT and VMAT treatment using in-house dynamic thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhlisin; Pawiro, S A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor motion due to patient's respiratory is a significant problem in radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this project is to study the interplay effect through dosimetry verification between the calculated and delivered dose, as well as the dosimetric impact of leaf interplay with breathing-induced tumor motion in IMRT and VMAT treatment. In this study, a dynamic thorax phantom was designed and constructed for dosimetry measurement. The phantom had a linear sinusoidal tumor motion toward superior-inferior direction with variation of amplitudes and periods. TLD-100 LiF:Mg,Ti and Gafchromic EBT2 film were used to measure dose in the midpoint target and the spinal cord. The IMRT and VMAT treatment had prescription dose of 200 cGy per fraction. The dosimetric impact due to interplay effect during IMRT and VMAT treatment were resulted in the range of 0.5% to -6.6% and 0.9% to -5.3% of target dose reduction, respectively. Meanwhile, mean dose deviation of spinal cord in IMRT and VMAT treatment were around 1.0% to -6.9% and 0.9% to -6.3%, respectively. The results showed that if respiratory management technique were not implemented, the presence of lung tumor motion during dose delivery in IMRT and VMAT treatment causes dose discrepancies inside tumor volume. (paper)

  8. Dosimetric comparison between RapidArc and fixed gantry intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Changsheng; Yin Yong; Liu Tonghai; Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Lin Xiutong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference of RapidArc and fixed gantry IMRT for liver carcinoma. Methods: The CT data of 10 liver cancer patients were used to design 3 groups of treatment plan: IMRT plan, single arc RapidArc plan (RA1), and dual arc RapidArc plan (RA2). The planning target volume (PTV) dosimetric distribution, the organs at risk (OAR) dose, the normal tissue dose, mornitor units (MU) and treatment time were compared. Results: The maximum dose of PTV in RA1 and RA2 plans were lower than that of IMRT (Z=-2.0990, -2.666, P 40 of stomach small bowel than IMRT plan, but higher in mean dose of left kidney (Z=-1.988, -2.191, P 5 , V 10 and 15 of healthy tissue in RapidArc plan groups were higher than those in IMRT plan, while the values of V 20 , V 25 and V 30 of healthy tissue in RapidArc plan groups were than those in IMRT plan. The number of computed MU/fraction of Rapid Arc plan was 40% or 46% of IMRT plan and the treatment time was 30% and 40% of IMRT. Conclusions: RapidArc showed improvements in conformity index and healthy tissue sparing with uncompromised target coverage. RapidArc could lead to the less MU and shorter delivery time compared to IMRT. (authors)

  9. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Desmond, Renee A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V 60 ) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V 60 greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V 65 greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  10. Online dosimetric evaluation of larynx SBRT: A pilot study to assess the necessity of adaptive replanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Rozario, Timothy; Lu, Weiguo; Gu, Xuejun; Yan, Yulong; Jia, Xun; Sumer, Baran; Schwartz, David L

    2017-01-01

    We have initiated a multi-institutional phase I trial of 5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage III-IVa laryngeal cancer. We conducted this pilot dosimetric study to confirm potential utility of online adaptive replanning to preserve treatment quality. We evaluated ten cases: five patients enrolled onto the current trial and five patients enrolled onto a separate phase I SBRT trial for early-stage glottic larynx cancer. Baseline SBRT treatment plans were generated per protocol. Daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) or diagnostic CT images were acquired prior to each treatment fraction. Simulation CT images and target volumes were deformably registered to daily volumetric images, the original SBRT plan was copied to the deformed images and contours, delivered dose distributions were re-calculated on the deformed CT images. All of these were performed on a commercial treatment planning system. In-house software was developed to propagate the delivered dose distribution back to reference CT images using the deformation information exported from the treatment planning system. Dosimetric differences were evaluated via dose-volume histograms. We could evaluate dose within 10 minutes in all cases. Prescribed coverage to gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) was uniformly preserved; however, intended prescription dose coverage of planning treatment volume (PTV) was lost in 53% of daily treatments (mean: 93.9%, range: 83.9-97.9%). Maximum bystander point dose limits to arytenoids, parotids, and spinal cord remained respected in all cases, although variances in carotid artery doses were observed in a minority of cases. Although GTV and CTV SBRT dose coverage is preserved with in-room three-dimensional image guidance, PTV coverage can vary significantly from intended plans and dose to critical structures may exceed tolerances. Online adaptive treatment re-planning is potentially necessary and clinically applicable to fully preserve treatment

  11. The dosimetric effects of photon energy on the quality of prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Tai, Cyril; Lee, Alvin; Ashamalla, Hani; Ikoro, N C

    2014-01-01

    Studies comparing the dosimetric effects of high- and low-energy photons to treat prostate cancer using 3-dimensional conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy have yielded mixed results. With the advent of newer radiation delivery systems like volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the impact of changing photon energy is readdressed. Sixty-five patients treated for prostate cancer at our institution from 2011 to 2012 underwent CT simulation. A target volume encompassing the prostate and entire seminal vesicles was treated to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to a total dose of 81 Gy. The VMAT plans were generated for 6-MV and 10-MV photons under identical optimization conditions using the Eclipse system version 8.6 (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The analytical anisotropic algorithm was used for all dose calculations. Plans were normalized such that 98% of the planning target volume (PTV) received 100% of the prescribed dose. Dose-volumetric data from the treatment planning system was recorded for both 6-MV and 10-MV plans, which were compared for both the entire cohort and subsets of patients stratified according to the anterior-posterior separation. Plans using 10-MV photons had statistically significantly lower relative integral dose (4.1%), gradient measure (4.1%), skin Dmax (16.9%), monitor units (13.0%), and bladder V(30) (3.1%) than plans using 6-MV photons (P photons was more pronounced for thicker patients (anterior-posterior separation >21 cm) for most parameters, with statistically significant differences in bladder V(30), bladder V(65), integral dose, conformity index, and monitor units. The main dosimetric benefits of 10-MV as compared with 6-MV photons are seen in thicker patients, though for the entire cohort 10-MV plans resulted in a lower integral dose, gradient measure, skin Dmax, monitor units, and bladder V(30), possibly at the expense of higher rectum V(81). Copyright © 2014

  12. SU-F-T-443: Quantification of Dosimetric Effects of Dental Metallic Implant On VMAT Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C; Jiang, W; Feng, Y; Huang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of metallic implant that correlates with the size of targets and metallic implants and distance in between on volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for head and neck (H&N) cancer patients with dental metallic implant. Methods: CT images of H&N cancer patients with dental metallic implant were used. Target volumes with different sizes and locations were contoured. Metal artifact regions excluding surrounding critical organs were outlined and assigned with CT numbers close to water (0HU). VMAT plans with half-arc, one-full-arc and two-full-arcs were constructed and same plans were applied to structure sets with and without CT number assignment of metal artifact regions and compared. D95% was utilized to investigate PTV dose coverage and SNC Patient− Software was used for the analysis of dose distribution difference slice by slice. Results: For different targets sizes, variation of PTV dose coverage (Delta_D95%) with and without CT number replacement reduced with larger target volume for all half-arc, one-arc and two-arc VMAT plans even though there were no clinically significant differences. Additionally, there were no significant variations of the maximum percent difference (max.%diff) of dose distribution. With regard to the target location, Delta_D95% and max. %diff dropped with increasing distance between target and metallic implant. Furthermore, half-arc plans showed greater impact than one-arc plans, and two-arc plans had smallest influence for PTV dose coverage and dose distribution. Conclusion: The target size has less correlation of doseimetric impact than the target location relative to metallic implants. Plans with more arcs alleviate the dosimetric effect of metal artifact because of less contribution to the target dose from beams going through the regions with metallic artifacts. Incorrect CT number causes inaccurate dose distribution, therefore appropriately overwriting metallic artifact regions with

  13. SU-F-T-443: Quantification of Dosimetric Effects of Dental Metallic Implant On VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C; Jiang, W [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Feng, Y [East Carolina University (United States); Huang, Z [East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of metallic implant that correlates with the size of targets and metallic implants and distance in between on volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for head and neck (H&N) cancer patients with dental metallic implant. Methods: CT images of H&N cancer patients with dental metallic implant were used. Target volumes with different sizes and locations were contoured. Metal artifact regions excluding surrounding critical organs were outlined and assigned with CT numbers close to water (0HU). VMAT plans with half-arc, one-full-arc and two-full-arcs were constructed and same plans were applied to structure sets with and without CT number assignment of metal artifact regions and compared. D95% was utilized to investigate PTV dose coverage and SNC Patient− Software was used for the analysis of dose distribution difference slice by slice. Results: For different targets sizes, variation of PTV dose coverage (Delta-D95%) with and without CT number replacement reduced with larger target volume for all half-arc, one-arc and two-arc VMAT plans even though there were no clinically significant differences. Additionally, there were no significant variations of the maximum percent difference (max.%diff) of dose distribution. With regard to the target location, Delta-D95% and max. %diff dropped with increasing distance between target and metallic implant. Furthermore, half-arc plans showed greater impact than one-arc plans, and two-arc plans had smallest influence for PTV dose coverage and dose distribution. Conclusion: The target size has less correlation of doseimetric impact than the target location relative to metallic implants. Plans with more arcs alleviate the dosimetric effect of metal artifact because of less contribution to the target dose from beams going through the regions with metallic artifacts. Incorrect CT number causes inaccurate dose distribution, therefore appropriately overwriting metallic artifact regions with

  14. The choice of statistical methods for comparisons of dosimetric data in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Perrin, Emmanuel; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Balosso, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Novel irradiation techniques are continuously introduced in radiotherapy to optimize the accuracy, the security and the clinical outcome of treatments. These changes could raise the question of discontinuity in dosimetric presentation and the subsequent need for practice adjustments in case of significant modifications. This study proposes a comprehensive approach to compare different techniques and tests whether their respective dose calculation algorithms give rise to statistically significant differences in the treatment doses for the patient. Statistical investigation principles are presented in the framework of a clinical example based on 62 fields of radiotherapy for lung cancer. The delivered doses in monitor units were calculated using three different dose calculation methods: the reference method accounts the dose without tissues density corrections using Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm, whereas new methods calculate the dose with tissues density correction for 1D and 3D using Modified Batho (MB) method and Equivalent Tissue air ratio (ETAR) method, respectively. The normality of the data and the homogeneity of variance between groups were tested using Shapiro-Wilks and Levene test, respectively, then non-parametric statistical tests were performed. Specifically, the dose means estimated by the different calculation methods were compared using Friedman’s test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In addition, the correlation between the doses calculated by the three methods was assessed using Spearman’s rank and Kendall’s rank tests. The Friedman’s test showed a significant effect on the calculation method for the delivered dose of lung cancer patients (p <0.001). The density correction methods yielded to lower doses as compared to PBC by on avera