WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer intensity modulated

  1. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objective: To analyze the feasibility of high dose assessing acute and late toxicities both rectal and genitourinary in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Between April 2006 and April 2008 90 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with MRT technique in the Department of Radiotherapy. The analysis included 80 patients, 10 of them in treatment. The total dose received was 80 Gy. One patient received 70.2 Gy (because of previous pelvic radiotherapy). Age average: 65 (r 43-85 years). Stage: T1c: 43 p (53.75%), T2: 35 p (43.75%), T3: 1 p (1.25%). Score of Gleason 10 ng/ml and < ng / ml: 7 (8.75%). Hormone therapy: 34 p (42.5%). Results: Acute rectal toxicity: grade 0: 46 p (57.5%), grade 1: 23 p (28.75%), grade 2: 9 p (11.25%), grade 3: 1 p (1.25%). Acute genitourinary toxicity: Grade 0: 26 p (32.5%) Grade 1: 36 p (45%), Grade 2: 17 p (21.25%), Grade 3: 1 p (1.25%). Chronic toxicity (RTOG) (considering patients evaluated more than 6 months after the end of treatment): 19 patients showed no rectitis and 1 patient had mild symptoms. Urethritis: 19 patients had no symptoms, 1 patient grade 1. The PSA pretreatment average: 9.5 ng / ml (80 p). One month after treatment: 4.6 ng / ml. With an average follow-up of 8 m (r 2-22), there were no biochemical recurrence. One patient had bone metastases one year after the end of the treatment. No deaths for prostate cancer were noticed. Conclusions: IMRT is a safe and effective therapy with more precision than the 3D-CRT, which allows increase the dose without increasing the risk of complications. (authors)

  2. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an established standard in radical treatment of localized prostate cancer: During conventional radiotherapy total doses of 70 Gy are applied as the safe upper limit due to an acceptable risk of normal tissue complications within the treated volume. Several clinical studies revealed that doses higher than prescribed in conventional radiotherapy may be desirable to improve local control in prostate cancer: Technical developments in radiotherapy, together with the implementation of conformal techniques, have allowed dose escalation within tumor volume while sparing surrounding normal tissues. With the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) it is expected to escalate the dose to the target yet further; while maintaining the risk of normal tissue complications or to reduce the dose within critical structures without comprising the dose to the target. The paper presents the spectrum of bibliography regarding the use of IMRT in computer treatment planning of prostate cases. The results of clinical trials and studies concerning IMRT in the management of prostate cancer are presented. (author)

  3. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    KR Muralidhar; Bhudevi Soubhagya; Shabbir Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS) between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plan...

  4. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: emerging cancer treatment technology

    OpenAIRE

    T.S. Hong; Ritter, M. A.; Tomé, W. A.; Harari, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is rapidly advancing in the field of radiation oncology. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy allows for improved dose conformality, thereby affording the potential to decrease the spectrum of normal tissue toxicities associated with IMRT. Preliminary results with IMRT are quite promising; however, the clinical data is relatively immature and overall patient numbers remain small. High-quality IMRT requires intensive physics support and ...

  5. Risk of second cancer from scattered radiation of intensity-modulated radiotherapies with lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dongoh; Hong, Seongeon; Park, Sung Ho; Park, Sung-Yong; Chung, Kwangzoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Lee, Hyun-ho; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the risk of secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy (TOMO) in patients with lung cancer. Methods IMRT, VMAT and TOMO were planned for five lung cancer patients. Organ equivalent doses (OEDs) are estimated from the measured corresponding secondary doses during irradiation at various points 20 to 80 cm from the iso-center by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter ...

  6. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost

  7. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field 'box' pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate

  8. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Stewart, James [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, Valerie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xie, Jason [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moseley, Joanne [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan [RaySearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael, E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lung cancer: current status and future developments

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, C; Lang, S.; Rowbottom, C; Guckenberger, M.; Faivre-Finn, C

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of lung cancer, with over 50% of patients receiving this modality at some point during their treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique that adds fluence modulation to beam shaping, which improves radiotherapy dose conformity around the tumor and spares surrounding normal structures. Treatment with IMRT is becoming more widely available for the treatment of lung cancer, despite the paucity of high level evidence sup...

  10. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Ming; Yuanming Feng; Huan Liu; Ying Zhang; Li Zhou; Jun Deng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our institution in the past seven years. Methods and Materials A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercia...

  11. Risk of second cancer from scattered radiation of intensity-modulated radiotherapies with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the risk of secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy (TOMO) in patients with lung cancer. IMRT, VMAT and TOMO were planned for five lung cancer patients. Organ equivalent doses (OEDs) are estimated from the measured corresponding secondary doses during irradiation at various points 20 to 80 cm from the iso-center by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD). The secondary dose per Gy from IMRT, VMAT and TOMO for lung cancer, measured 20 to 80 cm from the iso-center, are 0.02~2.03, 0.03~1.35 and 0.04~0.46 cGy, respectively. The mean values of relative OED of secondary dose of VMAT and TOMO, which is normalized by IMRT, ranged between 88.63% and 41.59% revealing 88.63% and 41.59% for thyroid, 82.33% and 41.85% for pancreas, 77.97% and 49.41% for bowel, 73.42% and 72.55% for rectum, 74.16% and 81.51% for prostate. The secondary dose and OED from TOMO became similar to those from IMRT and VMAT as the distance from the field edge increased. OED based estimation suggests that the secondary cancer risk from TOMO is less than or comparable to the risks from conventional IMRT and VMAT

  12. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KR Muralidhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plans were planned for 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT and IMRT plans were compared using the planning target volume (PTV dose and doses to the other organs at risk (OARs. Results: For the PTV, comparable minimum, mean, maximum, median, and modal dose as well equivalent sphere diameter of the structure (Equis were observed between VMAT and IMRT plans and found that these values were significantly equal in both techniques. The right lung mean and modal doses were considerably higher in VMAT plans while maximum value was considerably lower when compared with IMRT plans. The left lung mean and modal doses were higher with VMAT while maximum doses were higher in IMRT plans. The mean dose to the heart and maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT. The mean dose to the body was higher in VMAT plans while the maximum dose was higher in IMRT plans. Conclusion: Four field tangential IMRT delivered comparable PTV dose with generally less dose to normal tissues in our breast cancer treatment study. The IMRT plans typically had more favourable dose characteristics to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and body dose when compared with VMAT. The only minor advantage of VMAT for breast cases was slightly better PTV coverage.

  13. Fatal pneumonitis associated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: Case report and review

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yan; Li, Jingjing; SU, XIAOYAN

    2012-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is the most significant complication of acute treatment-related toxicities in lung cancer. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with inverse planning enables us to achieve the desired dose distribution. However, there are many high-risk procedures associated with lung irradiation, including chemotherapy and surgery. We report a case of fatal treatment-related pneumonitis, where the patient had undergone postoperative IMRT for lung cancer. Following completion of ...

  14. The radiation techniques of tomotherapy & intensity-modulated radiation therapy applied to lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhengfei; Fu, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the management of lung cancer. Development of radiation techniques is a possible way to improve the effect of RT by reducing toxicities through better sparing the surrounding normal tissues. This article will review the application of two forms of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), fixed-field IMRT and helical tomotherapy (HT) in lung cancer, including dosimetric and clinical studies. The advantages and potential disadvantages of these t...

  15. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Li, Fengyan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast in...

  16. Implementation of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy for cervical cancers at the Alexis Vautrin Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As platinum salt based concomitant conformational radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been used as a standard treatment for cervical cancers but resulted in digestive and haematological toxicities, this research thesis reports the application of intensity-modulated conformational radiation therapy. After having recalled some epidemiological, anatomical aspects, diagnosis and treatments aspects regarding cervical cancer, the author presents this last treatment technique (principles, benefits, practical implementation). The author discusses results obtained by an experiment during which seven patients have been treated by simple conformational radiation therapy, and four by intensity-modulated conformational radiation therapy. Results are discussed in terms of volumes (clinical target volume, growth target volume, planned target volume), dosimetric results, toxicities (urine and skin), weight loss

  17. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Hsing-Lung; Chang Ying-Nan; Lin Yaoh-Shiang; Lin Chun-Shu; Su Yu-Fu; Chen Chang-Ming; Jen Yee-Min; Huang Wen-Yen; Lin Kuen-Tze; Chang Li-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate wer...

  18. Intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Yeo, Seung-Gu; KIM, EUN SEOK; MIN, CHUL KEE; SE AN, PYUNG

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A prospective database of 16 consecutive patients receiving SBRT for pathologically-proven and peripherally-located stage I NSCLC was reviewed. Fifteen patients were medically inoperable and one patient refused to undergo surgery. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 69–86). Tre...

  19. Preliminary Treatment Results of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kang-Hsing Fan; Yen-Chao Chen; Cheng-Keng Chuang; Min-Li Hsieh; Ji-Hong Hong

    2006-01-01

    Background: To review the initial treatment results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) for prostate cancer.Methods: Ninety-two patients treated with IMRT before July 2003 were included inthis study. The median follow-up was 32 months. The indications for IMRTincluded primary, adjuvant, and salvage treatment. Combined treatment withandrogen suppression therapy was variable. The primary study endpointswere chronic adverse events which were subjectively reported. Only patientswith an aden...

  20. Evaluation of salivary function by sialoscintigraphy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer patients after intensity modulated radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    T. L. Chuang; Y.F. Wang; C H Tsai; J E Chiu; Lee, M. S.; W Y Chiou; Lin, H Y; W T Tsai; S K Hung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the salivary gland function changes by sialoscintigraphy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials And Methods: Salivary function was assessed by sialoscintigraphy. Quantitative sialoscintigraphy was performed in 24 NPC patients prior to and after IMRT. Results were categorized in four groups according to the duration of treatment. The sialoscintigraphy parameters were examined. Results: Sialo...

  1. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Wonmo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for t...

  2. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kooy, H. M.; Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radio...

  3. Racial Differences in Diffusion of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobran, Ewan K; Chen, Ronald C; Overman, Robert; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; O'Brien, Jonathon; Sturmer, Til; Sheets, Nathan C; Goldin, Gregg H; Penn, Dolly C; Godley, Paul A; Carpenter, William R

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), an innovative treatment option for prostate cancer, has rapidly diffused over the past decade. To inform our understanding of racial disparities in prostate cancer treatment and outcomes, this study compared diffusion of IMRT in African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) prostate cancer patients during the early years of IMRT diffusion using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. A retrospective cohort of 947 AA and 10,028 CA patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer from 2002 through 2006, who were treated with either IMRT or non-IMRT as primary treatment within 1 year of diagnoses was constructed. Logistic regression was used to examine potential differences in diffusion of IMRT in AA and CA patients, while adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical covariates. A significantly smaller proportion of AA compared with CA patients received IMRT for localized prostate cancer (45% vs. 53%, p significance, as time and factors associated with race (socioeconomic, geographic, and tumor related factors) explained the preponderance of variance in use of IMRT. Further research examining improved access to innovative cancer treatment and technologies is essential to reducing racial disparities in cancer care. PMID:25657192

  4. Optimal beam arrangement for pulmonary ventilation image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ruihao; Zhang, Shuxu; YU, HUI; Lin, Shengqu; Zhang, Guoqian; Tang, Rijie; Qi, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating four-dimensional (4D)-computed tomography (CT)-based functional information into treatment planning and to evaluate the potential benefits of individualized beam setups to better protect lung functionality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Peak-exhale and peak-inhale CT scans were carried out in 16 patients with NSCLC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 4D-C...

  5. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Haneefa, K.; K. K. Shakir; Siddhartha, A.; T. Siji Cyriac; Musthafa, M. M.; R. Ganapthi Raman

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3) are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV). Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters...

  6. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy in lung cancer: Current literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT is a novel radiation technique that delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target by allowing the simultaneous variation of gantry rotation speed, dose rate and multiple-leaf collimators leaf positions. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on two VMAT systems, RapidArc and SmartArc with main focus on planning studies of lung cancer. A systematic review of available data was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed with the keywords ′′lung′′ and "VMAT". The published data show that VMAT techniques have clear superiority over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with regard to improving dose conformity and sparing of organs at risks (OARs. The data indicates that for lung tumor VMAT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT provide equivalent dose homogeneity, dose conformity and target volume coverage; however, contradictory results were obtained in terms of OARs sparing. The major advantages of VMAT over IMRT are the reduction in the number of monitor units and faster treatment delivery times without compromising the quality of the treatment plans. Moreover, faster delivery time is more patient-friendly and it minimizes intra-fractional patient motion allowing treatment volumes stay within their respective treatment margins. Current literature data shows that VMAT can be a good option to treat lung cancer; however, data on clinical trials are still lacking. The clinical trials are essential to confirm the safety and efficacy of VMAT techniques.

  7. Clinical results of intensity modulated radiotherapy for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the efficacy and cosmetic results of intensity modulate radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: From 2003 to 2006, 117 patients with breast cancer, after breast-conserving surgery followed by 4 - 6 cycles of chemotherapy, received intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The radiation dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast and 10 Gy boost to the tumor bed. Patients with positive hormone receptors then received endocrine treatment. Results: The follow-up rate was 94.0% until September 2009. 114 and 91 patients were followed up to 3 and 5 years, respectively. The 3-and 5-year overall survival rates were 99.1% and 96%. The 5-year disease free survival and local recurrence rates were 88% and 3.6%. Cosmetic results were satisfied. Severe radiation toxicities, such as radiation pneumonitis, pulmonary fibrosis and heart injury were not found. Conclusions: Patients treated with IMRT after breast-conserving surgery have a satisfied prognosis as well as cosmetic results. (authors)

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  9. Intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer, first experience in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is an important step forward in cancer treatment. Aim: To report the first experience in Chile with IMRT for prostate cancer and compare the results obtained with different doses. Patients and Methods: From January 1997 through June 2008, 156 patients with a mean age of 70 years, were treated with radiotherapy and 121 with IMRT. Patients were staged according to American Commission on Cancer Staging. Their biochemical relapse risk was classified according to the MD Anderson classification. Patients were routinely checked during and after therapy to evaluate side effects and relapse. Results: Median follow up was 46 months (4-120). Overall five years survival was 85%. Biochemical relapse free five years survival for low, intermediate and high risk patients was 100, 82 and 70%, respectively. Biochemical relapse free survival for patients receiving radiotherapy doses over 76 Gy was 83%, compared to 30% for those receiving lower doses (p < 0.05). Urinary and gastrointestinal acute toxicity was low in 80% and 90% of patients respectively. Late toxicity developed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: IMRT for prostate cancer is readily available and safe in Chile. Biochemical disease free survival improved with higher doses with low toxicity rates Background: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is an important step forward in cancer treatment. Aim: To report the first experience in Chile with IMRT for prostate cancer and compare the results obtained with different doses. Patients and Methods: From January 1997 through June 2008, 156 patients with a mean age of 70 years, were treated with radiotherapy and 121 with IMRT. Patients were staged according to American Commission on Cancer Staging. Their biochemical relapse risk was classified according to the MD Anderson classification. Patients were routinely checked during and after therapy to evaluate side effects and relapse. Results: Median follow up was 46 months

  10. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  11. Application of intensity modulated radiation therapy for the cancer patients treatment in Bach Mai Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern techniques in cancer treatment, in which dose is delivered optimally into the shape of the tumor and minimally in surround benign tissues. In developed countries, this technique has been performed routinely by Linacs with MLC for tumors at the critical areas. In Vietnam, because of the wet climate, the use of Linacs with MLC is difficult to operate and maintain. However, IMRT can be implemented by Linacs without MLC via independent jaws, Jaws-only IMRT (JO-IMRT), in which beams are separated into many segments with different weights to optimize highest dose in the tumor and lowest dose in the surrounding health organs. Methods: We describe the new treatment technic application and compare it with normal radiotherapy method (3D-CRT). Results: From 7/2008, the Dep of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology at Bach Mai Hospital has been conducting JO-IMRT to treat cancer patients. Up to now, we have 81 cases treated by IMRT including head and neck cancers (NPC, larynx cancer, maxillary sinus cancer, brain tumor), cancers in the thorax (esophagus cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer), cancers in the pelvis (prostate cancer, cervical cancer, rectal cancer). On the average, beam number is from 5 to 9 and 5-9 segments per beam. Treatment time for a fraction is from 6 to 12 minutes with 2.25 Gy for CTV1 per day. Discrepancies of doses were below 3% (0.15 to 2.84%) between planning and practice. In plan, the preeminences with IMRT are clearly superior to 3D radiation therapy. In clinical, almost patients had good respond, whereas side effects were quite less than conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: JO-IMRT is a modern technic with more advantage than normal 3D-CRT. It help radiation dose to concentrate maximally in treatment target while influence minimally for sensitive surrounding tissues. Another, it is a high technic to appropriate with the climatic condition in Vietnam. (author)

  12. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment.

  13. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Cao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment.

  14. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  15. A methodology for automatic intensity-modulated radiation treatment planning for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Pan, Xiaoning; Li, Yupeng

    2011-07-01

    In intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the quality of the treatment plan, which is highly dependent upon the treatment planner's level of experience, greatly affects the potential benefits of the radiotherapy (RT). Furthermore, the planning process is complicated and requires a great deal of iteration, and is often the most time-consuming aspect of the RT process. In this paper, we describe a methodology to automate the IMRT planning process in lung cancer cases, the goal being to improve the quality and consistency of treatment planning. This methodology (1) automatically sets beam angles based on a beam angle automation algorithm, (2) judiciously designs the planning structures, which were shown to be effective for all the lung cancer cases we studied, and (3) automatically adjusts the objectives of the objective function based on a parameter automation algorithm. We compared treatment plans created in this system (mdaccAutoPlan) based on the overall methodology with plans from a clinical trial of IMRT for lung cancer run at our institution. The 'autoplans' were consistently better, or no worse, than the plans produced by experienced medical dosimetrists in terms of tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. We conclude that the mdaccAutoPlan system can potentially improve the quality and consistency of treatment planning for lung cancer.

  16. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  17. Patterns of relapse following surgery and postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. To investigate the patterns of relapse following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) given after radical surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Patients and methods. One hundred and two patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer were treated with radical surgery followed by IMRT up to a mean total dose of 60 Gy between years 2001 and 2007. Thirty-nine of the patients (%) also received concomitant weekly cisplatin. Forty of the patients had oral and 62 had oropharyngeal cancer. Data on the tumour, patient and treatment factors were collected. Following therapy the patients were followed by clinical examination, endoscopy and MRI/CT at 2- to 3-months interval up to 2 years and thereafter at 6-month intervals. Results. The mean follow-up time of the patients was 55 months (range, 26-106 months). The rate for local tumour control for the whole cohort was 92.2%: 87.5% for oral cancer patients and 96.7% for oropharyngeal cancer patients. The 5-year disease specific survival was 90.2% and 5-year overall survival 84.3%. During the follow-up eight locoregional recurrences were observed, three at the primary tumour site and one at regional nodal site and four at both sites. The mean time to primary tumour recurrence was seven months (range, 2-10 months) and to nodal recurrence seven months (range, 2-12 months). Distant metastasis occurred in six (6%) patients. The factors associated with poor prognosis were the primary tumour size and tumour site with oral cancers having worse outcome. The treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. The most frequent late toxicity was dysphagia necessitating permanent PEG in five patients. This was correlated with the advanced primary tumour size and resulting in wide tumour excision and reconstruction. Conclusions. Surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy given as IMRT results in low level of tumour recurrence

  18. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  19. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for breast and head-and-neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselen, B. (Bram) van

    2003-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is an advanced form of radiotherapy; the beam intensity can thereby be modulated. IMRT can be used to create a highly conformal dose distribution around a tumor, while reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue. IMRT can also be used to deliver a heter

  20. Risk of secondary cancers from scattered radiation during intensity-modulated radiotherapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate and compare the risks of secondary cancers from therapeutic doses received by patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), and tomotherapy (TOMO). Treatments for five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were planned using IMRT, VMAT, and TOMO. Based on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII method, the excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were evaluated from therapeutic doses, which were measured using radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGDs) for each organ inside a humanoid phantom. The average organ equivalent doses (OEDs) of 5 patients were measured as 0.23, 1.18, 0.91, 0.95, 0.97, 0.24, and 0.20 Gy for the thyroid, lung, stomach, liver, small intestine, prostate (or ovary), and rectum, respectively. From the OED measurements, LAR incidence were calculated as 83, 46, 22, 30, 2 and 6 per 104 person for the lung, stomach, normal liver, small intestine, prostate (or ovary), and rectum. We estimated the secondary cancer risks at various organs for patients with HCC who received different treatment modalities. We found that HCC treatment is associated with a high secondary cancer risk in the lung and stomach

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides the possibility of dose-escalation with better normal tissue sparing. This study was performed to assess whether IMRT can improve clinical outcomes when compared with two-dimensional (2D-RT) or three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: Only prospective phase III randomized trials comparing IMRT with 2D-RT or 3D-CRT were eligible. Combined surgery and/or chemotherapy were allowed. Two authors independently selected and assessed the studies regarding eligibility criteria and risk of bias. Results: Five studies were selected. A total of 871 patients were randomly assigned for 2D-RT or 3D-CRT (437), versus IMRT (434). Most patients presented with nasopharyngeal cancers (82%), and stages III/IV (62.1%). Three studies were classified as having unclear risk and two as high risk of bias. A significant overall benefit in favor of IMRT was found (hazard ratio – HR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.87; p < 0.0001) regarding xerostomia scores grade 2–4, with similar loco-regional control and overall survival. Conclusions: IMRT reduces the incidence of grade 2–4 xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancers without compromising loco-regional control and overall survival

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Community Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review outcomes with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the community setting for the treatment of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and April 2007, 69 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the nasopharynx and oropharynx underwent IMRT in our practice. The primary sites included nasopharynx (11), base of tongue (18), and tonsil (40). The disease stage distribution was as follows: 2 Stage I, 11 Stage II, 16 Stage III, and 40 Stage IV. All were treated with a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT technique. The median prescribed doses were 70 Gy to the planning target volume, 59.4 Gy to the high-risk subclinical volume, and 54 Gy to the low-risk subclinical volume. Forty-five patients (65%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria. Progression-free and overall survival rates were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: Median duration of follow-up was 18 months. The estimated 2-year local control, regional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 98%, 100%, 98%, and 90%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were dermatitis (32 Grade 1, 32 Grade 2, 5 Grade 3), mucositis (8 Grade 1, 33 Grade 2, 28 Grade 3), and xerostomia (0 Grade 1, 29 Grade 2, 40 Grade 3). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the community setting can be accomplished safely and effectively. Systematic internal review systems are recommended for quality control until sufficient experience develops

  3. Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Late Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicities of patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer treated using a concomitant hypofractionated, intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I-II study of patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8–10. A dose of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) was delivered to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost, to a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy/fraction) in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scores were used to assess the acute and late toxicities, respectively. Biochemical failure was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 97 patients were treated and followed up for a median of 39 months, with 88% having a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The maximal toxicity scores were recorded. The grade of acute gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 0 in 4%, 1 in 59%, and 2 in 37%. The grade of acute urinary toxicity was Grade 0 in 8%, 1 in 50%, 2 in 39%, and 3 in 4%. The grade of late gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 0 in 54%, 1 in 40%, and 2 in 7%. No Grade 3 or greater late gastrointestinal toxicities developed. The grade of late urinary toxicity was Grade 0 in 82%, 1 in 9%, 2 in 5%, 3 in 3%, and 4 in 1% (1 patient). All severe toxicities (Grade 3 or greater) had resolved at the last follow-up visit. The 4-year biochemical disease-free survival rate was 90.5%. Conclusions: A hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost delivering 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks combined with pelvic nodal radiotherapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated, with low rates

  4. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE–BH conditions (BH–CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH–CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH–CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH–CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose–volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within ±3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm3 and 1.8 cm3, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the negligible

  5. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shiinoki, Takehiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nakata, Manabu [Clinical Radiology Service Division, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the

  6. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol for patients with low risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most common non-dermatological malignant disease in men. The aim is to create a protocol for intensity modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer in patients with low risk. These are patients with primary tumor T1- 2a, Gleason score ≤ 6 , iPSA < 10 ng / ml. What you will learn: The main treatment strategies for locally limited prostate cancer with a life expectancy of over 10 years are percutaneous radiotherapy (RT) , brachytherapy , radical prostatectomy and active tracking. NCCN recommends RT in these patients to consist higher Total Focal Doses (TFD) (75,6 to 79,2 Gy) to implement them if possible by second-generation three-dimensional technique - modulated by intensity radiation therapy (MIRT) . It makes it possible to achieve conformity with the target distribution in an irregular shape. The main characteristic of MIRT is that each field consists of multiple segments that provide optimal allocation of police investigations in the target volume and limit the realized dose in critical organs. Discussion: Patients are scanned with immobilization of the lower extremities in the supine position with slice thickness 3 mm and preliminary preparation for performing CT of the pelvis. A clinical target volume includes CTV76 - the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles base, and PTV76 - CTV76 with a security zone 5 mm in all directions except for the rectal wall - 3 mm. Ltd. The prescribed Total Focal Dose is 76 Gy at Dally Focal Dose (DFD) 2 Gy. As a critical organs are set rectum, bladder, root penis and hips. Dosimetric plan is developed based on the segmentation of stationary radiation fields and rules for verification and implementation. Conclusion: As a technique that provides uniform distribution of the dose in the treated volume, simultaneously by lowering the dose in critical organs, MIRT decreased early and late toxicity that in the patients with prostate cancer is usually not life-threatening, but

  7. Inversely planned intensity modulated radiotheraphy for irradiation of a woman with breast cancer and funnel chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: A 44-year old woman with breast cancer was transferred to our institution for irradiation. Due to a pronounced funnel chest no satisfying dose distribution was obtained by conventional techniques. Thus an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) based on inverse optimisation was carried out. IMRT was compared to conventional techniques regarding dose distribution and feasibility. Patient and Methods: Tumor site was in the right middle lower quadrant. Target volume included the right breast and the parasternal lymph nodes. Target dose was 50.4 Gy. Based on inverse optimisation irradiation was carried out in 'step-and-short'-technique with twelve intensity modulated beams with six intensity steps. Additionally, treatment plans were calculated using conventional techniques (technique A with two tangential wedged 6-MV photon beams, technique B with additional oblique 15-MeV electron portal). We analysed conformality and homogeneity of target volume and dose distribution within normal tissue. Results: Dose conformality was substantially improved by IMRT. Dose homogeneity was slightly decreased compared to technique A. Lung volume irradiated with a dose higher than 20 Gy was reduced from 56.8% with technique A and 40.1% with technique B, respectively to 22.1% with IMRT. Treatment was tolerated well by the patient without relevant side effects. Mean treatment time was 19.5 min. Conclusion: The inversely planned IMRT using multiple beam directions is suitable for breast irradiation following breast conserving surgery. In the present case of a woman with funnel chest lung dose was substantially reduced without reduction of target dose. In which way the complex treatment technique leads to a clinically detectable advantage is examined at present, in the context of a study. (orig.)

  8. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Elyn H. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Mougalian, Sarah S. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  9. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status

  10. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage

  11. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64–0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83–1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83–1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14–1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  12. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  13. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between RapidArc and fixed gantry angle dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (dIMRT) in developing the pre-operative radiotherapy for rectal cancer patients. Methods: Two techniques, RapidArc and dIMRT, were used respectively to develop the synchronous intensity modulated plans for 10 stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ rectal cancer patients at the dose of gross tumor volume (GTV) of 50.6 Gy divided into 22 fractions and planning target volume (PTV) of 41.8 Gy divided into 22 fractions. Both plans satisfied the condition of 95% of PTV covered by 41.8 Gy. The dose-volume histogram data, isodose distribution, monitor units, and treatment time were compared. Results: The two kinds of dose volume histogram (DVH) developed by these two techniques were almost the same. The conformal indexes of GTV and PTV by RapidArc were better than those by dIMRT (t=7.643, 8.226, P<0.05), while the homogeneity of target volume by dIMRT was better (t=-10.065, -4.235, P<0.05). The dose of rectum and small bowel planned by RapidArc was significantly lower than that by dIMRT (t=2.781, P<0.05). There were no significant differences in the mean doses of bladder and femoral head between these two techniques. The mean monitor units of RapidArc was 475.5, fewer by 48.5% in comparison with that by the dIMRT (924.6). The treatment mean time by RapidArc was 1.2 min, shorter by 79.5% in comparison with that by dIMRT (5.58 min). Conclusions: There is no significant dosimetric difference between the two plans of RapidArc and dIMRT. Compared with dIMRT, RapidArc achieves equal target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing while using fewer monitor units and less time during radiotherapy for patient with rectal cancer. (authors)

  15. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; ten Haken, Bennie; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van ‘t Veld, Aart A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT) with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors. Methods and Materials For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields), minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields) plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm) and range error (±3%) combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT. Results The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10) patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0–21.1) and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9–11.2) on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing. Conclusions The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax) IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans. PMID:27030987

  16. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Aznar, Marianne C; Nygaard, Ditte E;

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour...

  17. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Aznar, Marianne; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund;

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour mot...

  18. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, S.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Schuurbiers, O.C.J.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Termeer, A.; Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS AND MATERIAL

  19. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2014-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published fin...

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns. PMID:12071811

  1. Intensity modulated radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Results of feasibility study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Rui Bai; Guo-Hua Wu; Wei-Jian Guo; Xu-Dong Wu; Yuan Yao; Yin Chen; Ren-Hua Zhou; Dong-Qin Lu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in combination with chemotherapy could increase radiation dose to gross tumor volume without severe acute radiation related toxicity by decreasing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Twenty-one patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were evaluated in this clinical trial,Patients would receive the dose of IMRT from 21Gy to 30Gy in 7 to 10 fractions within two weeks after conventional radiotherapy of 30Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. The total escalation tumor dose would be 51, 54,57, 60Gy, respectively. 5-fluororacil (5-FU) or gemcitabine was given concurrently with radiotherapy during the treatment course.RESULTS: Sixteen patients who had completed the radiotherapy plan with doses of 51Gy (3 cases), 54Gy (3 cases), 57Gy (3 cases) and 60Gy (7 cases) were included for evaluation. The median levels of CA19-9 prior to and after radiotherapy were 716 U/ml and 255 U/ml respectively (P<0.001) in 13 patients who demonstrated high levels of CA19-9 before radiotherapy. Fourteen patients who suffered from pain could reduce at least 1/3-1/2 amount of analgesic intake and 5 among these patients got complete relief of pain. Ten patients improved in Kamofsky performance status (KPS). The median follow-up period was 8 months and one-year survival rate was 35 %. No patient suffered more than grade Ⅲ acute toxicities induced by radiotherapy.CONCLUSION: Sixty Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks with late course IMRT technique combined with concurrent 5-FU chemotherapy can provide a definitely palliative benefit with tolerable acute radiation related toxicity for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: evidence for preserved salivary gland function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To investigate the salivary gland function following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Seventeen patients with oropharyngeal (n=11) or nasopharyngeal (n=6) carcinoma located adjacent to the major salivary glands were treated with IMRT with an emphasis to spare the salivary glands from high-dose irradiation and to reduce the risk of postirradiation xerostomy. Three patients had stage 2, 4 stage III, and 10 stage IVA cancer. The total basal and stimulated saliva flow rates were measured before the treatment, and 6 and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results: The median basal saliva flow rate measured before radiation treatment was 0.13 mL/min, and at 6 and 12 months after the completion of IMRT 0.04 mL/min and 0.07 mL/min, respectively. The corresponding median stimulated saliva flow rates were 0.49 mL/min, 0.33 mL/min, and 0.45 mL, respectively. The D 50 for an impaired stimulated parotid gland saliva flow rate was 25.5 Gy. Only two (12%) patients developed grade 3 and none grade 4 xerostomia during a median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-40 months). No patients had locoregional cancer recurrence following IMRT. Conclusions: The results suggest that much of the salivary gland function can be maintained with IMRT without jeopadizing the local control rate in the treatment of locally advanced oropharynx or nasopharynx carcinoma

  3. 3D radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer: the Shanghai Cancer Hospital experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the outcomes of irradiation by using three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer. Between 2007 and 2010, 50 patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were treated using 3D-RT or IMRT. The median time interval between the initial treatment and the start of irradiation was 12 (6-51 months. Salvage surgery was performed before irradiation in 5 patients, and 38 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent 3D-RT, and 34 patients received IMRT. Median follow-up for all the patients was 18.3 months. Three-year overall survival and locoregional control were 56.1% and 59.7%, respectively. Three-year progression-free survival and disease-free survival were 65.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Nine patients developed grade 3 leukopenia. Grade 5 acute toxicity was not observed in any of the patients; however, 2 patients developed Grade 3 late toxicity. 3D-RT or IMRT is effective for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer, with the 3-year overall survival of 56.1%, and its complications are acceptable. Long-term follow-up and further studies are needed to confirm the role of 3D-RT or IMRT in the multimodality management of the disease.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity

  5. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing-Lung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788. The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2 and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3 were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential.

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788). The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2) and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3) were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential

  7. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with chemotherapy for postoperative esophageal cancer patients with regional relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and morbidity of image-guided mage-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with chemotherapy for postoperative esophageal cancer patients with regional relapse. Between April 2010 and July 2013, 21 patients who previously treated with radical surgery were irradiated with Novalis Tx for regional relapse. Twenty-eight lesions were treated with IG-IMRT with chemotherapy. Seven patients have already had chemoradiotherapy for preoperative or salvage intervention. The median dose of radiation was 66 Gy/4.5 weeks. Nineteen patients had received the pre/post operative chemo (radio) therapy (standard FP). Three patients refused chemotherapy and 18 patients have received concomitant weekly DOC + CDGP chemotherapy. The responses were evaluated according to RECIST criteria. Acute toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE 3.0 criteria. Median follow-up was 18 months (3 to 42 months). The initial response rate and CR rate was 89% and 61%, respectively. The actuarial 3-year survival rate was 71%. Acute toxicity was limited to grade 2 toxicity including anorexia (14%), pain (25%) and leukopenia (25%). More than G2 late toxicity has not observed. IG-IMRT with chemotherapy can offer a short and well-tolerated treatment for regional relapse after radically operated patients. Efficacy and toxicity need to be evaluated over the long term, but initial results are encouraging. (author)

  8. Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

  9. Intensity modulated whole pelvic radiotherapy in patients with cervix cancer: analysis of acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Min; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo; Cha, Moon Seok; Kim, Hyun Ho [School of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate acute toxicities in cervix cancer patients receiving intensity modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy (IM-WPRT). Between August 2004 and April 2006, 17 patients who underwent IM-WPRT were analysed. An intravenous contrast agent was used for radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT). The central clinical target volume (CTV) included the primary tumor, uterus, vagina, and parametrium. The nodal CTV was defined as the lymph nodes larger than 1 cm seen on CT and the contrased-enhanced pelvic vessels. The planning target volume (PTV) was the 1-cm expanded volume around the central CTV, except for a 5-mm expansion from the posterior vagina, and the nodal PTV was defined as the nodal CTV plus a 1.5 cm margin. IM-WPRT was prescribed to deliver a dose of 50 Gy to more than 95% of the PTV. Acute toxicity was assessed with common toxicity criteria up to 60 days after radiotherapy. Grade 1 nausea developed in 10 (58.9%) patients, and grade 1 and 2 diarrhea developed in 11 (64.7%) and 1 (5.9%) patients, respectively. No grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia occurred in 15 (88.2%). 7 (41.2%), and 2 (11.8%) patients, respectively, as hematologic toxicities. Grade 3 leukopenia developed in 2 patients who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. IM-WPRT can be a useful treatment for cervix cancer patients with decreased severe acute toxicities and a resultant improved compliance to whole pelvic irradiation.

  10. Whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Young Seok [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-15

    To assess the clinical efficacy and toxicity of whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for high-risk prostate cancer. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated between 2008 and 2013 were reviewed. The study included patients who had undergone WP-IMRT with image guidance using electronic portal imaging devices and/or cone-beam computed tomography. The endorectal balloon was used in 93% of patients. Patients received either 46 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 76 Gy to the prostate in 2 Gy daily fractions, or 44 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 72.6 Gy to the prostate in 2.2 Gy fractions. The study cohort included 70 patients, of whom 55 (78%) had a Gleason score of 8 to 10 and 50 (71%) had a prostate-specific antigen level > 20 ng/mL. The androgen deprivation therapy was combined in 62 patients. The biochemical failure-free survival rate was 86.7% at 2 years. Acute any grade gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates were 47% and 73%, respectively. The actuarial rate of late grade 2 or worse toxicity at 2 years was 12.9% for GI, and 5.7% for GU with no late grade 4 toxicity. WP-IMRT was well tolerated with no severe acute or late toxicities, resulting in at least similar biochemical control to that of the historic control group with a small field. The long-term efficacy and toxicity will be assessed in the future, and a prospective randomized trial is needed to verify these findings.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT

  13. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer: a mono-institutional retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the role of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC), and the prognostic factors in the setting of multidisciplinary approach strategies. 63 patients with LAPC and MPC receiving IMRT in our institution were retrospectively identified. Information on patient baseline, treatment characteristics and overall survival (OS) time were collected. Data of pain relief and toxicity were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to investigate the prognostic factors. All patients received IMRT with a median dose of 46.0 Gy. The median OS for LAPC and MPC patients were 15.7 months and 8.0 months, respectively (p = 0.029). Symptomatic improvements were observed in the 44 patients with abdominal/back pain after radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), particularly in those with severe pain. Only 13.9% and 14.8% cases presented Grade ≥ 3 hematologic toxicities in RT and CCRT group, while no cases developed Grade ≥ 3 non-hematologic toxicities in both groups. Multivariate analysis indicated that tumors located in pancreas body/tail (HR 0.28, p = 0.008), pretreatment CA19-9 < 1000 U/mL (HR 0.36, p = 0.029) and concurrent chemotherapy (HR 0.37, p = 0.016) were independent favorable predictors for OS. CCRT further improved OS for LAPC and MPC with acceptable toxicities, and use of RT markedly alleviated pain. Tumors located in pancreas body/tail, pretreatment CA19-9 level of < 1000 U/mL and CCRT were associated with better OS. However, regional intra-arterial chemotherapy did not show any survival benefit in our study

  14. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Won Mo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for the target coverage, dose conformity, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and normal tissue integral dose. Regardless of the energies chosen at the plans, the target coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the plans were similar. However, there was a significant dose increase in rectal wall and femoral heads for 6-MV compared to those for 10-MV and 15-MV. The V20 Gy of rectal wall with 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV were 95.6%, 88.4%, and 89.4% while the mean dose to femoral heads were 31.7, 25.9, and 26.3 Gy, respectively. Integral doses to the normal tissues in higher energy (10-MV and 15-MV) plans were reduced by about 7%. Overall, integral doses in mid and low dose regions in 6-MV plans were increased by up to 13%. In this study, 10-MV prostate IMRT plans showed better OAR sparing and less integral doses than the 6-MV. The biological and clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined afterward, considering neutron dose contribution.

  15. Promising results with image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the feasibility of image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using daily soft tissue matching in the treatment of bladder cancer. Twenty-eight patients with muscle-invasive carcinoma of the bladder were recruited to a protocol of definitive radiation using IMRT with accelerated hypofractionation with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Isotropic margins of .5 and 1 cm were used to generate the high risk and intermediate risk planning target volumes respectively. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired daily and a soft tissue match was performed. Cystoscopy was scheduled 6 weeks post treatment. The median age was 83 years (range 58-92). Twenty patients had stage II or III disease, and eight were stage IV. Gross disease received 66 Gy in 30 fractions in 11 patients (ten with concurrent chemotherapy) or 55 Gy in 20 fractions for those of poorer performance status or with palliative intent. All patients completed radiation treatment as planned. Three patients ceased chemotherapy early due to toxicity. Six patients (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and six (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Five patients (18 %) developed Grade ≥2 late GU toxicity and no ≥2 late GI toxicity was observed. Nineteen patients underwent cystoscopy following radiation, with complete response (CR) in 16 cases (86 %), including all patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients relapsed, four of which were local relapses. Of the patients with local recurrence, one underwent salvage cystectomy. For patients treated with definitive intent, freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR) and overall survival (OS) was 90 %/100 % for chemoradiotherapy versus 86 %/69 % for radiotherapy alone. IG- IMRT using daily soft tissue matching is a feasible in the treatment of bladder cancer, enabling the delivery of accelerated synchronous integrated boost with good early local control outcomes and low toxicity

  16. Proton therapy versus intensity modulated x-ray therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: Estimating secondary cancer risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Jonas David

    External beam radiation therapy is used to treat nearly half of the more than 200,000 new cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in the United States each year. During a radiation therapy treatment, healthy tissues in the path of the therapeutic beam are exposed to high doses. In addition, the whole body is exposed to a low-dose bath of unwanted scatter radiation from the pelvis and leakage radiation from the treatment unit. As a result, survivors of radiation therapy for prostate cancer face an elevated risk of developing a radiogenic second cancer. Recently, proton therapy has been shown to reduce the dose delivered by the therapeutic beam to normal tissues during treatment compared to intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT, the current standard of care). However, the magnitude of stray radiation doses from proton therapy, and their impact on this incidence of radiogenic second cancers, was not known. The risk of a radiogenic second cancer following proton therapy for prostate cancer relative to IMXT was determined for 3 patients of large, median, and small anatomical stature. Doses delivered to healthy tissues from the therapeutic beam were obtained from treatment planning system calculations. Stray doses from IMXT were taken from the literature, while stray doses from proton therapy were simulated using a Monte Carlo model of a passive scattering treatment unit and an anthropomorphic phantom. Baseline risk models were taken from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to characterize the uncertainty of risk calculations to uncertainties in the risk model, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons for carcinogenesis, and inter-patient anatomical variations. The risk projections revealed that proton therapy carries a lower risk for radiogenic second cancer incidence following prostate irradiation compared to IMXT. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the results of the risk analysis depended only

  17. Dose escalation for maxillary sinus cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy for maxillary sinus cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and to compare the resulting dose distribution, dose-volume histogram, and TCP/NTCP data to those obtained with standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) at our institution. Methods and Materials: Five cases of locally advanced or unresectable maxillary sinus cancer were selected for analysis. All patients had previously been treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy at our institution. With 3D-CRT, the prescription dose to the PTV was generally limited by the tolerance of the optic chiasm to approximately 54 Gy or slightly higher. The contralateral eye was always spared, while the ipsilateral eye was usually sacrificed. These cases were then replanned with an inverse planning algorithm developed at our institution which employs an iterative conjugate gradient search method to generate optimized intensity-modulated beams. Beam fluences were simulated using a multileaf collimator (MLC) with a 1.0 cm leaf width, or a mini-multileaf collimator (mini-MLC) with a 0.5 cm leaf width. Maximal dose escalation was attempted, again with the optic chiasm tolerance as the dose-limiting constraint. Attempts were made to spare the ipsilateral eye as well, where doing so did not preclude adequate coverage of the PTV. Dose distribution and dose-volume histogram data resulting from these attempts were then compared to those from 3D-CRT plans. TCPs and NTCPs were calculated based upon available data and compared. The effect of using a mini-MLC versus a standard MLC was also compared. Results: In all five cases, dose escalation of 5 to 10 Gy above the prescription doses allowed by 3D-CRT plans was achieved. IMRT allowed for tighter conformation of isodose lines around the PTV and away from critical normal tissues, thereby permitting this dose escalation. The improved conformality of dose distributions was further demonstrated by the following

  18. Optimisation of conformal radiation therapy by intensity modulation Cancer of the larynx and salivary gland function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prevention of damage to critical normal tissues is of paramount importance for the quality of life of patients irradiated for cancers in the head and neck. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the parotid gland sparing 3D conformal radiation therapy technique (3DCRT) in a prospective study in node negative cancer of the larynx. Materials and methods: Twenty-six patients with node negative squamous cell cancer of the larynx were irradiated by a 3DCRT technique (class solution) to both sides of the neck (elective dose 46 Gy to levels II, III and IV) and primary tumour (70 Gy). Dose distributions of the major salivary glands were correlated with objective (stimulated whole saliva flow, WS) and subjective (questionnaire; visual analogue scale, VAS) salivary gland function. Apart from the clinically used 3DCRT technique, in order to optimise 3DCRT dose distributions, intensity modulated (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for the same patient population. Dose-volume histograms of 3DCRT and IMRT treatment plans were analysed and compared. Results: For the 26 patients irradiated with the 3DCRT class solution technique: VAS scores and questionnaires reached their nadir 3 months post-radiotherapy; WS reached its nadir 6 months post-radiotherapy. WS flow rates improved significantly, but never normalised; 2 years post-treatment WS measurements were 48% of the pre-treatment values. VAS scores deteriorated during ERT from 0 pre-treatment to 6.1 immediately post-treatment. Compared to pre-treatment, questionnaires were answered affirmative by increasing numbers of patients. For all patients, IMRT treatment plans resulted in a significant reduction of the dose delivered to the parotid glands compared to the 3DCRT-treatment technique. Conclusions: The class solution for the 3DCRT salivary gland sparing technique is inadequate for fully preserving salivary gland function, given the dose distributions (DVHs) as well as the subjective- and objective salivary gland

  19. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to

  20. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  2. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade ≥3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose

  3. Retrospective estimate of the quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jihye; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-07-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared by using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), the OAR-PTV distance and the OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10 Gy , V20 Gy , and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54-0.89 (0.77 ± 0.08), 0.90-1.00 (0.98 ± 0.02), and 0.11-0.41, (0.15 ± 0.05), respectively. The mean EUDs (V10 Gy , V20 Gy ) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectively. EUDs tended to decrease as the OAR-PTV distance increased and the OAR-PTV overlap volume decreased. Because the plans in this study were from a single department, relatively few people were involved in treatment planning. Differences in treatment results for a given patient would be much more pronounced if many departments were involved.

  4. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  5. Dosimetric effects of endorectal balloons on intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, In-Ah; Eom, Keun-Yong

    2013-10-01

    We used an endorectal balloon (ERB) for prostate immobilization during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatment. To investigate the dosimetric effects of ERB-filling materials, we changed the ERB Hounsfield unit (HU) from 0 to 1000 HU in 200-HU intervals to simulate the various ERB fillings; 0 HU simulated a water-filled ERB, and 1000 HU simulated the densest material-filled ERB. Dosimetric data (coverage, homogeneity, conformity, maximal dose, and typical volume dose) for the tumor and the organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated in prostate IMRT treatment plans with 6-MV and 15-MV beams. The tumor coverage appeared to differ by approximately 1%, except for the clinical target volume (CTV) V100% and the planning target volume (PTV) V100%. The largest difference for the various ERB fillings was observed in the PTV V100%. In spite of increasing HU, the prostate IMRT plans at both energies had relatively low dosimetric effects on the PTV and the CTV. However, the maximal and the typical volume doses (D25%, D30%, and D50%) to the rectal wall and the bladder increased with increasing HU. For an air-filled ERB, the maximal doses to the rectal wall and the monitor units were lower than the corresponding values for the water-filled and the densest material-filled ERBs. An air-filled ERB spared the rectal wall because of its dosimetric effect. Thus, we conclude that the use of an air-filled ERB provides a dosimetric benefit to the rectal wall without a loss of target coverage and is an effective option for prostate IMRT treatment.

  6. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) to treat nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in a Caucasian cohort. Outcome was analyzed with respect to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values. Patients and Methods: Between 03/2002 and 01/2008, 39 NPC patients underwent SIB-IMRT (37 Caucasians; 31 males; mean age 53 years [16-78 years]). 41% presented with WHO (World Health Organization) type 1 unfavorable histology, 85% with stage III/IV disease. 19 patients had total gross tumor volume (GTV) 16-70 cm3 (mean 36 cm3), while 16 had GTV > 70 cm3 (73-217 cm3; mean 115 cm3). All patients with stage II-IV disease received concomitant cisplatin. The prescribed SIB dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70 Gy (2.00 Gy/fraction) in 17, 69.6 Gy (2.11 Gy/fraction) in 19, and 66 Gy (2.20 Gy/fraction) in three patients. Results: 3-year local relapse-free, nodal relapse-free, distant metastases-free, disease-free rates and overall survival were 86%, 89%, 85%, 72%, and 85% (median follow-up 30 months [8-71 months]). Histology was a significant prognostic factor concerning overall survival, with worst prognosis in WHO type 1 compared to type 2/3 (75% vs. 93%; p = 0.03). There was a trend in favor of WHO type 2/3 regarding local control (74% vs. 94%; p = 0.052). The PTV DVHs showed a slight left shift compared to reported series. Three patients developed grade 3 late effects (xerostomia [n=2], dysphagia [n=1], hearing loss [n=1]). Conclusion: In comparison with predominantly Asian NPC IMRT series in the literature, chemo-IMRT in the own Caucasian cohort, characterized by less radioresponsive WHO type 1, was equally effective. Treatment tolerance was excellent. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy with conformal radiotherapy in cancer on anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: The aim of the Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) use is homogeneous irradiation of volume for radiotherapy and preservation of critical organs and normal healthy tissues. The aim of the study is to develop a protocol for radiotherapy of cancer of the anal canal with IMRT, evaluation of dosimetric plans by comparison with analogous obtained with conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: The protocol was developed using data of 10 patients with carcinoma of the anal canal in clinical stage T3 -4N1-3M0, as 5 patients were treated with CRT, and 5 of them were treated on this protocol. Planned target volumes are: PTV A - perineum with anal opening and anal canal, rectum and all lymph chains in the pelvis (pre-sacral, perirectal, internal iliac, external iliac and obturator) and PTV B - inguinal lymph nodes. Planned total therapeutic dose is 50 Gy, fractionated 2 Gy per day. Critical organs are small intestinal loops, bladder, and hips. Through the dose- volume histograms analysis of the results in the two groups are compared. Results: The results of the analysis of the dose - volume histograms show the following advantages of IMRT over CRT: Better homogeneity of the dose distribution, particularly for PTV B, where for the IMRT plan only 2% of the volume receive a dose > 52 Gy, while on CRT 15% receive a dose > 60Gy; average dose in IMRT plan for intestinal loops, bladder and femoral is with 7 Gy lower and the maximum dose for the critical organs is low and substantially less volume from the critical organs receive it . Conclusion: IMRT protocol offers better homogeneity in the planned target volumes and lower doses to critical organs. Time for planning, verification and simulation of plan for radiotherapy is doubled compared to CRT. The time for irradiation of a patient is similar to this for CRT - about 10 minutes

  8. Optimal beam arrangement for pulmonary ventilation image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating four-dimensional (4D)-computed tomography (CT)-based functional information into treatment planning and to evaluate the potential benefits of individualized beam setups to better protect lung functionality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Peak-exhale and peak-inhale CT scans were carried out in 16 patients with NSCLC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 4D-CT-based ventilation information was generated from the two sets of CT images using deformable image registration. Four kinds of IMRT plans were generated for each patient: two anatomic plans without incorporation of ventilation information, and two functional plans with ventilation information, using either five equally spaced beams (FESB) or five manually optimized beams (FMOB). The dosimetric parameters of the plans were compared in terms of target and normal tissue structures, with special focus on dose delivered to total lung and functional lung. In both the anatomic and functional plans, the percentages of both the functional and total lung regions irradiated at V5, V10, and V20 (percentage volume irradiated to >5, >10 and >20 Gy, respectively) were significantly lower for FMOB compared with FESB (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference for V30 (P > 0.05). Compared with FESB, a greater degree of sparing of the functional lung was achieved in functional IMRT plans with optimal beam arrangement, without compromising target volume coverage or the irradiated volume of organs at risk, such as the spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. Pulmonary ventilation image-guided IMRT planning with further optimization of beam arrangements improves the preservation of functional lung in patients with NSCLC

  9. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  10. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abdul Haneefa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB and collapsed cone convolution (CCC algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3 are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV. Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters and constraints except the beam energy. For each patient’s plan of high energy photons, one set of photoneutron measurements using solid state neutron track detector (SSNTD was taken for this study. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in the rectum is 18.55±2.8, 14.58±2.1, and 16.77±4.7 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in bladder is 16.54±2.1, 17.42±2.1, and 16.94±41.9 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mixed fields neutron contribution at the beam entrance surface is 45.62% less than at 15 MV photon beam. Our result shows that, with negligible neutron contributions, mixed field IMRT has considerable dosimetric advantage.

  11. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN RADIATION THERAPY FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER: INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY AND HYPOXIA TARGETING

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2008-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has revolutionized radiation treatment for head and neck cancers (HNC). When compared to the traditional techniques, IMRT has the unique ability to minimize the dose delivered to normal tissues without compromising tumor coverage. As a result, side effects from high dose radiation have decreased and patient quality of life has improved. In addition to toxicity reduction, excellent clinical outcomes have been reported for IMRT. The first part of thi...

  12. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tiefenbacher Uta; Hüsing Johannes; Sohn Christof; Heil Joerg; Sterzing Florian; Fetzner Leonie; Häfner Matthias F; Jensen Alexandra D; Askoxylakis Vasileios; Wenz Frederik; Debus Jürgen; Hof Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost s...

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Selek, Uğur; Bölükbaşı, Yasemin; Welsh, James W.; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage confor...

  14. Dosimetric Evaluation of Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast Cancer After Conservative Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuli; Wang, Yadi; Xu, Weidong; Jiang, Huayong; Liu, Qingzhi; Gao, Junmao; Yao, Bo; Hou, Jun; He, Heliang

    2015-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) potentially leads to a more favorite dose distribution compared to 3-dimensional or conventional tangential radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer after conservative surgery or mastectomy. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among helical tomotherapy (HT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT), and forward-planned field in field (FP-FIF) IMRT techniques after breast-conserving surgery. Computed tomography scans from 20 patients (12 left sided and 8 right sided) previously treated with T1N0 carcinoma were selected for this dosimetric planning study. We designed HT, IP-IMRT, and FP-FIF plans for each patient. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of PTV homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as well as OARs dose and volume parameters. Both HI and CI of the PTV showed statistically significant difference among IP-IMRT, FP-FIF, and HT with those of HT were best (P IMRT showed smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and breast, while HT indicated smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung but larger exposed volumes of contralateral lung and breast as well as heart. In addition, HT demonstrated an increase in exposed volume of ipsilateral lung (except for fraction of lung volume receiving >30 Gy and 20 Gy), heart, contralateral lung, and breast compared with IP-IMRT. For breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery, HT provides better dose homogeneity and conformity of PTV compared to IP-IMRT and FP-FIF techniques, especially for patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes involved. Meanwhile, HT decreases the OAR volumes receiving higher doses with an increase in the volumes receiving low doses, which is known to lead to an increased rate of radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Hence, composite factors including dosimetric advantage, clinical effect, and economic

  15. Evaluation of xerostomia following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done to evaluate xerostomia following intensity modulated radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer, and to analyze the correlation between the dosimetric parameters and xerostomia parameters. From February till October 2003, 13 patients with 3 months of follow-up were evaluated for xerostomia after being treated for head and neck cancer with IMRT. Their median age was 57 years (range:43 ∼ 77). Xerostomia were assessed with a 4-question xerostomia questionnaire score (XQS) and a test for salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated). The patients were also given a validated LENT SOMA scale (LSC) questionnaire. The evaluations were completed before radiation therapy (pre-RT) and at 1 and. 3 months after radiation therapy (RT). We evaluated xerostomia at pre-RT, 1 and, 3 months after RT. The association between the xerostomia parameters (XQS and LSC) and salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated: USFR and SSFR) was assessed at 1 and 3 months after RT. All 13 patients showed no significant changes in XQS, LSC and Salivary Flow rates. As a result, we couldn't find out about xerostomia development. Based on the total mean parotid dose, 3,500 cGy, we divided these patients into two groups. The 8 patients (< 3,500 cGy) showed no significant changes in XQS, LSC and Salivary Flow rates. However, in 5 patients (≥ 3,500 cGy), there was a significant increase in USFR and, SSFR at 3 months after RT, and for the XQS and, LSC at 1 and 3 months after RT. The correlation between XQS and, LSC, and USFR and, SSFR in all patients (13) was significant at 3 months after RT. The correlation had a tendency to the decrease for USFR and, SSFR in proportion to the increase of XQS and, LSC. Base on the results of this study, IMRT seem to be an effective treatment to significantly decrease the xerostomia. XQS and, LSC seem to be a effective tool for predicting the xerostomia. A total parotid gland mean dose of < 3,500 cGy should be a planning goal if

  16. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0–III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8–2 Gy per f...

  17. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Fu; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Yeh, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chen-Fa; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)) and 5 Gy (V(5 Gy)) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. PMID:26116150

  18. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  19. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV)63 Gy as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV70 Gy and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV70 Gy coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC

  20. Beam intensity modulation for penumbra enhancement in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A treatment planning study was performed for patients with lung cancer in order to investigate the extent to which doses to critical structures could be reduced by penumbra enhancement at the superior and inferior field edges, using beam intensity modulation (BIM) with a multileaf collimator. By applying two independent published models for the prediction of the incidence of normal tissue complications, the potential for dose escalation without increasing the incidence of pneumonitis was estimated. Methods and Materials: For 12 patients, the standard treatment technique was compared with the BIM technique using the Cadplan 3D planning system (Varian-Dosetek). Dose distributions in the healthy lung tissue were evaluated by considering both lungs minus the tumor as one functional unit. The following parameters were compared: (i) the average normalized total dose (NTD), (ii) the lung volume receiving an NTD of more than 20 Gy, and (iii) the calculated normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: Due to the applied BIM technique, the field lengths could be reduced by 1.4 cm for all patients, while achieving a minimum dose at the superior and inferior parts of the target of 95% of the isocenter dose. Compared to the standard technique, BIM reduced the patient mean of the average NTD for the healthy lung tissue from 16.5 to 15.3 Gy. The volume of healthy lung tissue receiving an NTD of 20 Gy or more was reduced by 9.7% (range 2.2 to 23.1%). The calculated NTCP reduced from 10.7% to 7.6% on average. The length of the esophagus that received a dose of 60 Gy or more could be reduced for 5 of the 6 stage III patients in this study. Based on equal lung NTCPs for the standard technique and the BIM technique, a mean dose escalation of 5.7 Gy (range 1.1 to 16.0 Gy) was possible for the 12 patients in this study. Based on equal average NTDs for the two techniques, the patient mean of the allowed dose escalation was 6.5 Gy (range 1.1 to 18.2 Gy). All dose

  1. Non-coplanar beam intensity modulation allows large dose escalation in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we compared standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar beam arrangements, without (3D) and with beam intensity modulation (3D-BIM). Materials and methods: This study was a planning effort performed on a non-selected group of 10 patients. Starting from a serial CT scan, treatment planning was performed using Sherouse's GRATISTM 3D planning system. Two target volumes were defined; gross tumor volume (GTV) defined a high-dose target volume that had to receive a dose of at least 80 Gy and GTV plus the lymph node regions with >10% probability of invasion defined an intermediate-dose target volume (GTV+N). It was our intention to irradiate GTV+N up to 56 Gy or more. If the prescribed doses on GTV and GTV+N could not be reached with either the 2D or 3D technique, a 3D-BIM plan was performed. The 3D-BIM plan was a class solution involving identical gantry angles, segment arrangements and relative segment weights for all patients. Dose volume histograms for GTV, GTV+N, lung and spinal cord were calculated. Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20 Gy. Under these constraints, maximal achievable doses to GTV and GTV+N were calculated. Results: In all 2D plans, spinal cord was the limiting factor and the prescribed doses for GTV and GTV+N could not be reached in any patient. The non-coplanar 3D plan resulted in a satisfying solution in 4 out of 10 patients under the same constraints. In comparison with 2D, the minimum dose in GTV+N was increased. Six patients had to be planned with the 3D-BIM technique. The theoretical minimum dose to GTV+N ranged between 56 and 98 Gy. The delivery of 80 Gy or more to GTV was possible in all patients. For a minimal dose of 80 Gy to GTV, the maximal dose to any point of the spinal cord varied between 27 and 46 Gy. The lung volume receiving more than

  2. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jia-Fu [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Dah-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Hui-Ling, E-mail: hlyeh@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen-Fa [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]{sub 50.4} {sub Gy} and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV{sub 62} {sub Gy}). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) and 5 Gy (V{sub 5} {sub Gy}) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]50.4 Gy and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV62 Gy). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V20 Gy) and 5 Gy (V5 Gy) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer

  4. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Rao, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Heguy, Adriana [Department of Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shen, Ronglai [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Haque, Sofia [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katabi, Nora [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  5. Dosimetric comparison between proton therapy and X-ray intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference of proton therapy (PT) and X-ray intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical esophageal cancer. Methods: The treatment planning of 10 patients with cervical esophageal cancer were selected for this study. One IMRT plan and 2 PT plans (PT1 plan: two opposed AP-PA beams; PT2 plan: two anterior-oblique beams and one posterior beam) were constructed for each patient. The isodose distribution and statistical data extracted from dose volume histograms were used for dose plan comparison. Results: The conformal index (CI95%, defined as the ratio between the volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose and the volume of PTV) of IMRT, PT1 and PT2 was 1.43, 1.52 and 1.43 (F=3.62, P1 plan full fills the clinical requirements. (authors)

  6. Bone marrow sparing in intensity modulated proton therapy for cervical cancer: Efficacy and robustness under range and setup uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and methods: IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3 mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results: In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V5Gy, 47% for V10Gy, 54% for V20Gy, and 57% for V40Gy, all with p < 0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V5Gy, 37% for V10Gy, 41% for V20Gy, and 39% for V40Gy, all with p < 0.01. Conclusions: The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors

  7. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  8. The development of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer at Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre (ARMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the protocol development of the IMRT program for prostate cancer at the ARMC. A series of protocols were defined and developed to facilitate the delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. These included the following: 1. Physical Simulation including bowel and bladder preparation and immobilization 2. Image Acquisition including CT and MRI simulation scans with image co-registration 3. Contouring Definitions including target and organ at risk volumes as well as IMRT optimization and evaluation volumes 4. Radiotherapy Planning including constraint definition, inverse planning and CMS Focus specific parameters 5. DICOM RT interface including data transfer between CMS Focus and the Elekta Linac Desktop record and verify system 6. Verification including action limits and pre-treatment online EPID verification 7. Radiotherapy Delivery being that of step and shoot 8. Quality Assurance including physics testing and documentation The protocol development and testing has lead to the precise clinical delivery of IMRT for prostate cancer at ARMC that exceeds most of the parameters that were previously measured with our conventional and 3D conformal radiotherapy. Further development is now underway to allow it to be implemented as the routine treatment of prostate cancer at ARMC. The clinical implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer involves a collaborative team approach including radiation oncologists, radiation therapists, and radiation physics. This is necessary to develop the appropriate protocols and quality assurance for precision radiotherapy that is required for IMRT

  9. Radiotherapy through intensity modulation (IMRT). A new modality in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the treatment and evaluate the advantages of IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Material and methods: Four years ago, at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Catolica, the IMRT technique for the treatment of head and neck tumors was implemented. The IMRT technique is based on modifying the intensity of the radiation beam through a multisheet collimator in order to produce a more exact distribution in the radiation doses. The results are evaluated with dose/ volume histograms. The distributions of doses and toxicity for tridimensional con formed therapy (CRT-3D) and IMRT are compared. Results: The distribution of the dose in the dose/volume histograms showed a better coverage of the white volume (PTV), with IMRT. The doses received by the organs under risk: salivary glands, eyes, ears and brain diminish with IMRT. The spinal marrow is protected with IMRT without dividing the treatment area, preventing points with lower dosage that could reduce control of the tumor. Conclusions: IMRT achieves a better conformation of the dose obtaining a better coverage of the tumor and higher protection of the organs under risk

  10. Genital invasion or perigenital spread may pose a risk of marginal misses for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in anal cancer is feasible and improves high-dose conformality, the current RTOG/AGITG contouring atlas and planning guidelines lack specific instructions on how to proceed with external genitalia. Meanwhile, the RTOG-Protocol 0529 explicitly recommends genital sparing on the basis of specific genital dose constraints. Recent pattern-of-relapse studies based on conventional techniques suggest that marginal miss might be a potential consequence of genital sparing. Our goal is to outline the potential scope and increase the awareness for this clinical issue. We present and discuss four patients with perigenital spread in anal cancer in both early and advanced stages (three at time of first diagnosis and one in form of relapse). Genital/perigenital spread was observed once as direct genital infiltration and thrice in form of perigenital lymphatic spread. We review the available data regarding the potential consequences of genital sparing in anal cancer. Pattern-of-relapse studies in anal cancer after conventional radiotherapy and the current use of IMRT in anal cancer are equivocal but suggest that genital sparing may occasionally result in marginal miss. An obvious hypothesis suggested by our report is that perigenital lymphovascular invasion might be associated with manifest inguinal N+ disease. Local failure has low salvage rates in recent anal cancer treatment series. Perigenital spread may pose a risk of marginal misses in IMRT in anal cancer. To prevent marginal misses, meticulous pattern-of-relapse analyses of controlled IMRT-series are warranted. Until their publication, genital sparing should be applied with caution, PET/CT should be used when possible and meeting genital dose constraints should not be prioritized over CTV coverage, especially (but not only) in stage T3/4 and N+ disease

  11. Comparative analysis of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the various dosimetric parameters of dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans for base of tongue cases. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta synergy linear accelerator with 80 MLC. IMRT plans were planned with nine stationary beams, and VMAT plans were done for 360° arc with single arc or dual arc. The dose to the planning target volumes (PTV for 70, 63, and 56 Gy was compared. The dose to 95, 98, and 50% volume of PTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and the conformity index (CI of the PTV 70 were also analyzed. IMRT and VMAT plan showed similar dose coverage, HI, and CI. Maximum dose and dose to 1-cc volume of spinal cord, planning risk volume (PRV cord, and brain stem were compared. IMRT plan and VMAT plan showed similar results except for the 1 cc of PRV cord that received slightly higher dose in VMAT plan. Mean dose and dose to 50% volume of right and left parotid glands were analyzed. VMAT plan gave better sparing of parotid glands than IMRT. In normal tissue dose analyses VMAT was better than IMRT. The number of monitor units (MU required for delivering the good quality of the plan and the time required to deliver the plan for IMRT and VMAT were compared. The number of MUs for VMAT was higher than that of IMRT plans. However, the delivery time was reduced by a factor of two for VMAT compared with IMRT. VMAT plans yielded good quality of the plan compared with IMRT, resulting in reduced treatment time and improved efficiency for base of tongue cases.

  12. Analysis of dosimetry and clinical outcome using intensity modulated radiation therapy for early breast cancer patients after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the dosimetric benefits, clinical effect and side-respond of whole breast using intensity modulated radiotherapy for early breast cancer after conservative surgery. Methods: From Oct. 2004 to Aug. 2005, 103 patients received the whole breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A dosimetric comparison of IMRT with conventional radiotherapy (CR) was performed on each patient. The cosmetic results, clinical effect and side-respond were observed. Results: The average volume proportion of 95% and 107% prescribed dose was 95.8% ± 4.90% and 84.0% ± 20.7% (t=9.60, P20 (lung volume of accepted > 20 Gy/all lung volume x 100%) of the ipsilateral lung were 15.70% ± 4.64% and 23.11% ± 7.88% (t=-13.3, P30 of the heart were 4.44% ± 3.93% and 15.55% ± 10.89% (t=-11.3, P<0.01) with IMRT and CR respectively for sixty-three left side breast cancer patients. The 1- and 2-year excellent rate of good cosmetic outcome was both 100%. The 1-, 2- and 3-year local control rate was 99%, 99% and 98 %, respectively. The 1-, 2- and 3-year disease-free survival rate was 99%, 99% and 96%, respectively. The Grade 1 and 2 acute radiation skin reaction rate was 95.1% and 4.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Compared with conventional radiotherapy, IMRT improves dose distribution of CTV and reduce the dose of normal tissue around CTV; but with better clinical effects and lower side-respond for early breast cancer patients after' breast conservative surgery. (authors)

  13. Can dosimetric parameters predict acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Ninety-three rectal cancer patients receiving concurrent capecitabine and pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were analyzed. Pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium, and lower pelvis (LP). The volume of each site receiving 5–40 Gy (V 5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) as well as patient baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. The endpoint for hematologic toxicity was grade ≥ 2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze correlation between dosimetric parameters and grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Twenty-four in ninety-three patients experienced grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Only the dosimetric parameter V40 of lumbosacral spine was correlated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Increased pelvic lumbosacral spine V40 (LSS-V40) was associated with an increased grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity (p = 0.041). Patients with LSS-V40 ≥ 60 % had higher rates of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than did patients with lumbosacral spine V40 < 60 % (38.3 %, 18/47 vs.13 %, 6/46, p =0.005). On univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, lumbosacral spine V40 and gender was also the variable associated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Female patients were observed more likely to have grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than male ones (46.9 %, 15/32 vs 14.8 %, 9/61, p =0.001). Lumbosacral spine -V40 was associated with clinically significant grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Keeping the lumbosacral spine -V40 < 60 % was associated with a 13 % risk of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  14. Strategy for Online Correction of Rotational Organ Motion for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a correction strategy for prostate rotation using gantry and collimator angle adjustments. Methods and Materials: Gantry and collimator angle adjustments were used to correct for prostate rotation without rotating the table. A formula to partially correct for left-right (LR) rotations was derived through geometric analysis of rotation-induced clinical target volume (CTV) beam's-eye-view shape changes. For 10 prostate patients, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with different margins were created. Simulating CTV LR rotation and correcting each beam by a collimator rotation, the corrected CTV dose was compared with the original and uncorrected dose. Effects of residual geometric uncertainties were assessed using a Monte Carlo technique. A large number of treatments representative for prostate patients were simulated. Dose probability histograms of the minimum CTV dose (Dmin) were derived, with and without online correction, resulting in a more realistic margin estimate. Results: Dosimetric analysis of all IMRT plans showed that, with rotational correction and a 2-mm margin, Dmin was constant to within 3% for LR rotations up to ±15o. The Monte Carlo dose probability histograms showed that, with correction, a margin of 4 mm ensured that 90% of patients received a Dmin ≥95% of the prescribed dose. Without correction a margin of 6 mm was required. Conclusions: We developed and tested a practical method for (online) correction of prostate rotation, allowing safe and straightforward implementation of margin reduction and dose escalation

  15. Dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated proton therapy for oropharyngeal cancer compared with intensity-modulated radiation: A case-matched control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Emma B; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Feng, Lei; Thaker, Nikhil G; Blanchard, Pierre; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Garden, Adam S; Frank, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    A potential advantage of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) over intensity-modulated (photon) radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) is lower radiation dose to several critical structures involved in the development of nausea and vomiting, mucositis, and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to quantify doses to critical structures for patients with OPC treated with IMPT and compare those with doses on IMRT plans generated for the same patients and with a matched cohort of patients actually treated with IMRT. In this study, 25 patients newly diagnosed with OPC were treated with IMPT between 2011 and 2012. Comparison IMRT plans were generated for these patients and for additional IMRT-treated controls extracted from a database of patients with OPC treated between 2000 and 2009. Cases were matched based on the following criteria, in order: unilateral vs bilateral therapy, tonsil vs base of tongue primary, T-category, N-category, concurrent chemotherapy, induction chemotherapy, smoking status, sex, and age. Results showed that the mean doses to the anterior and posterior oral cavity, hard palate, larynx, mandible, and esophagus were significantly lower with IMPT than with IMRT comparison plans generated for the same cohort, as were doses to several central nervous system structures involved in the nausea and vomiting response. Similar differences were found when comparing dose to organs at risks (OARs) between the IMPT cohort and the case-matched IMRT cohort. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patients with OPC treated with IMPT may experience fewer and less severe side effects during therapy. This may be the result of decreased beam path toxicities with IMPT due to lower doses to several dysphagia, odynophagia, and nausea and vomiting-associated OARs. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in long-term disease control and chronic toxicity between patients with OPC treated with IMPT in comparison to those

  16. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  17. Adverse effect of a distended rectum in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The retrospective planning study for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer evaluated whether proximal rectum and supra-anal rectum/anal canal should be delineated as separated organs-at-risk (OARs) to achieve optimal dose distributions to the anorectal region. Patients and methods: For 10 patients with localized prostate cancer IMRT plans were generated with the rectum and anal canal as separated OARs (Rec-sep) and as one single OAR (Rec-tot). Two different treatment planning systems (TPS) were utilized. Influence on dose distributions to target and OARs was analyzed. Results: Results from both TPS showed significantly increased doses to the distal rectum/anal canal for plans Rec-tot compared with Rec-sep in case of a distended rectum in the planning CT study: doses were increased by up to mean 31% (P=0.02) and 18% (P=0.03), respectively, in both TPS. For the patient with the largest rectum, the maximum dose increase was 61%. No significant differences in doses to target, bladder, femoral head and proximal rectum were seen. Conclusions: For patients with a distended rectum in the planning CT, delineation of separated OARs for proximal rectum and distal rectum/anal canal resulted in superior dose distributions to the anorectal region and therefore, we recommend this as standard procedure for IMRT planning of prostate cancer

  18. Treatment results of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Image Guided Radiation Therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose is to evaluate treatment results of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: descriptive cross sectional study on 45 head and neck cancer patients treated by IMRT-IGRT with curative intent at Department of Radiation Oncology, 108 Central Military Hospital from 12/2013 to 3/2015. Results: 100% IMRT plan underwent quality assurance with gamma index ≥ 95%. Mean conformity index of IMRT plans was 1.21 ± 0.13. Patient setup errors in supero-inferior (SI), antero-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) were ≤ 3 mm. Overall treatment complete response, partial response and stable disease rates were 75.6% and 15.6 % and 8.8%, respectively. There were 42.2 % patients with no xerostomia; 57.8% grade 1 and no grade 2 - 4 xerostomia. Conclusions: Head and neck cancers treatment with IMRT-IGRT showed good tumor response with safety, high accuracy and acceptable side effects. (author)

  19. Dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator micromultileaf in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carosi, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.carosi@katamail.com; Ingrosso, Gianluca; Ponti, Elisabetta; Tolu, Barbara; Murgia, Alessandra; Cristino, Daniela di; Santoni, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. We compared treatment plans developed with 2 different Elekta multileaf collimators (MLC): Beam Modulator micro-MLC (mMLC) (4-mm leaf width at the isocenter) and standard MLC (10-mm leaf width at the isocenter). The comparison was performed for 15 patients with localized prostate cancer in 3DCRT and IMRT delivery; a total of 60 treatment plans were processed. The dose-volume histograms were used to provide the quantitative comparison between plans. In particular, we analyzed differences between rectum and bladder sparing in terms of a set of appropriate Vx (percentage of organ at risk [OAR] volume receiving the x dose) and differences between target conformity and coverage in terms of coverage factor and conformation number. Our analysis demonstrates that in 3DCRT there is an advantage in the use of Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC in terms of organ sparing; in particular, a significant decrease in rectal V{sub 60} and V{sub 50} (p = 0.001) and in bladder V{sub 70} and V{sub 65} (p = 0.007 and 0.002, respectively) was found. Moreover, a better target dose conformity was obtained (p = 0.002). IMRT plans comparison demonstrated no significant differences between the use of the 4 or 10-mm MLCs. Our analysis shows that in 3DCRT the use of the Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC gives a gain in target conformity and in OARs dose sparing whereas in IMRT plans there is no advantage.

  20. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefenbacher Uta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost significantly. To what extent this might be possible without impairing treatment outcome and cosmetic results remains to be clarified. Methods/Design The IMRT-MC2 study is a prospective, two armed, multicenter, randomized phase-III-trial comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with integrated boost to conventional radiotherapy with consecutive boost in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. 502 patients will be recruited and randomized into two arms: patients in arm A will receive IMRT in 28 fractions delivering 50.4 Gy to the breast and 64.4 Gy to the tumor bed by integrated boost, while patients in arm B will receive conventional radiotherapy of the breast in 28 fractions to a dose of 50.4 Gy and consecutive boost in 8 fractions to a total dose of 66.4 Gy. Discussion Primary objectives of the study are the evaluation of the cosmetic results 6 weeks and 2 years post treatment and the 2- and 5-year local recurrence rates for the two different radiotherapy strategies. Secondary objectives are long term overall survival, disease free survival and quality of life. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol ID: NCT01322854.

  1. Simultaneous integrated boost for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer- intensity modulated vs. conventional radiotherapy: The IMRT-MC2 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of breast cancer. Addition of radiotherapy to surgery has significantly increased local control and survival rates of the disease. However, radiotherapy is also associated with side effects, such as tissue fibrosis or enhanced vascular morbidity. Modern radiotherapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), can shorten the overall treatment time by integration of the additional tumor bed boost significantly. To what extent this might be possible without impairing treatment outcome and cosmetic results remains to be clarified. The IMRT-MC2 study is a prospective, two armed, multicenter, randomized phase-III-trial comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with integrated boost to conventional radiotherapy with consecutive boost in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. 502 patients will be recruited and randomized into two arms: patients in arm A will receive IMRT in 28 fractions delivering 50.4 Gy to the breast and 64.4 Gy to the tumor bed by integrated boost, while patients in arm B will receive conventional radiotherapy of the breast in 28 fractions to a dose of 50.4 Gy and consecutive boost in 8 fractions to a total dose of 66.4 Gy. Primary objectives of the study are the evaluation of the cosmetic results 6 weeks and 2 years post treatment and the 2- and 5-year local recurrence rates for the two different radiotherapy strategies. Secondary objectives are long term overall survival, disease free survival and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol ID: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01322854

  2. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Endometrial Cancers: Final Results of a Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique) to the upper two thirds of the vagina in endometrial cancers with low risk of local recurrence. Patients and Methods: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had low-risk resected primary endometrial adenocarcinomas. Radiotherapy was delivered in 5 fractions over 1 week. The planning target volume was the clinical target volume plus 5 mm. The clinical target volume was defined as the upper two thirds of the vagina as evidenced at CT simulation by a vaginal radio-opaque device. The planning target volume was irradiated by a seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique, planned by the Plato Sunrise inverse planning system. A first cohort of 6 patients received 25 Gy (5-Gy fractions), and a subsequent cohort received 30 Gy (6-Gy fractions). The Common Toxicity Criteria scale, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: Twelve patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled. Median age was 58 years (range, 49-74 years). Pathologic stage was IB (83.3%) and IC (16.7%). Median tumor size was 30 mm (range, 15-50 mm). All patients completed the prescribed radiotherapy. No patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity at the first level, and the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 25 to 30 Gy. No patients at the second dose level experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The most common Grade 2 toxicity was gastrointestinal, which was tolerable and manageable. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy was 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction. On the basis of this result, we are conducting a Phase II study with radiotherapy delivered at 30 Gy.

  3. Dosimetric investigation of breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kishimoto, Shun; Iwamura, Kohei; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyoto College of Medical Science, Nantan, Kyoto 622-0041 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate the effects of variations in respiratory motion during breath-holding (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (BH-IMRT) dose distribution using a motor-driven base, films, and an ionization chamber. Methods: Measurements were performed on a linear accelerator, which has a 120-leaf independently moving multileaf collimator with 5-mm leaf width at the isocenter for the 20-cm central field. Polystyrene phantoms with dimensions of 40 x 40 x 10 cm were set on a motor-driven base. All gantry angles of seven IMRT plans (a total of 35 fields) were changed to zero, and doses were then delivered to a film placed at a depth of 4 cm and an ionization chamber at a depth of 5 cm in the phantom with a dose rate of 600 MU/min under the following conditions: pulsation from the abdominal aorta and baseline drift with speeds of 0.2 mm/s (BD{sub 0.2mm/s}) and 0.4 mm/s (BD{sub 0.4mm/s}). As a reference for comparison, doses were also delivered to the chamber and film under stationary conditions. Results: In chamber measurements, means {+-} standard deviations of the dose deviations between stationary and moving conditions were -0.52% {+-} 1.03% (range: -3.41-1.05%), -0.07% {+-} 1.21% (range: -1.88-4.31%), and 0.03% {+-} 1.70% (range: -2.70-6.41%) for pulsation, BD{sub 0.2mm/s}, and BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, respectively. The {gamma} passing rate ranged from 99.5% to 100.0%, even with the criterion of 2%/1 mm for pulsation pattern. In the case of BD{sub 0.4mm/s}, the {gamma} passing rate for four of 35 fields (11.4%) did not reach 90% with a criterion of 3%/3 mm. The differences in {gamma} passing rate between BD{sub 0.2mm/s} and BD{sub 0.4mm/s} were statistically significant for each criterion. Taking {gamma} passing rates of > 90% as acceptable with a criterion of 3%/3 mm, large differences were observed in the {gamma} passing rate between the baseline drift of {<=}5 mm and that of >5 mm (minimum {gamma} passing rate: 92.0% vs 82

  4. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients with Cervical Cancer. An intra-individual Comparison of Prone and Supine Positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoradiation for cervical cancer patients is associated with considerable gastrointestinal toxicity. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has demonstrated superiority in terms of target coverage and normal tissue sparing in comparison to conventional 3D planning in gynaecological malignancies. Whether IMRT in prone (PP) or supine position (SP) might be beneficial for cervical cancer patients remains partially unanswered. 10 patients on FIGO stage IB-III cervical cancer, 6 patients for definitive and 4 patients for adjuvant external beam pelvic RT, were planned in PP and SP using a 7-field IMRT technique. IMRT plans for PP and SP (mean dose, Dmean 50.4 Gy) were optimized in terms of PTV coverage (1st priority) and small bowel sparing (2nd priority). A comparison of DVH parameters for PTV, small bowel, bladder, and rectum was performed. The comparison showed a similar PTV coverage of 95% of the prescribed dose and for target conformity in IMRT plans (PP, SP). PTV, rectum and bladder volumes were comparable for PP and SP. Significantly larger volumes of small bowel were found in PP (436 cc, + 35%, p = 0.01). PP decreased the volume of small bowel at 20-50.4 Gy (p < 0.05) and increased the rectum volumes covered by doses from 10-40 Gy (p < 0.01), the V50.4 was < 5% in both treatment positions. Bladder sparing was significant better at 50.4 Gy (p = 0.03) for PP. In this dosimetric study, we demonstrated that pelvic IMRT in prone position for patients with cervical cancer seems to be beneficial in reducing small bowel volume at doses ≥20 Gy while providing similar target coverage and target conformity. The use of frequent image guidance with KV (kilovolt) or MV (megavolt) computertomography can reduce set-up deviations, and treatment in prone position can be done with a higher set-up accuracy. Clinical outcome studies are needed to affirm lower toxicity

  6. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.villeneuve@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe; Fortin, Bernard; Filion, Edith; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis; Ayad, Tarek; Christopoulos, Apostolos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and rate of complications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2005 and November 2008, 25 patients with an unknown primary cancer underwent IMRT, with a median radiation dose of 70 Gy. The bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa were included in the target volume. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma, except for 1 patient who had adenosquamous differentiation. They were all treated with curative intent. Of the 25 included patients, 20 were men and 5 were women, with a median age of 54 years. Of these patients, 3 had Stage III, 18 had Stage IVa, and 4 had Stage IVb. Of the 25 patients, 18 (72%) received platinum-based chemotherapy in a combined-modality setting. Neck dissection was reserved for residual disease after definitive IMRT. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were all 100% at 3 years. No occurrence of primary cancer was observed during the follow-up period. The reported rates of xerostomia reduced with the interval from the completion of treatment. Nine patients (36%) reported Grade 2 or greater xerostomia at 6 months, and only 2 (8%) of them reported the same grade of salivary function toxicity after 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: In our institution, IMRT for unknown primary cancer has provided good overall and disease-free survival in all the patients with an acceptable rate of complications. IMRT allowed us to address the bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa with minimal late salivary function toxicity. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT for more advanced disease led to good clinical results with reasonable toxicities.

  7. Radiotherapy for unresectable sinonasal cancers: Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation therapy with coplanar and non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for treatment of unresectable paranasal sinuses cancers (PNSCs) with different clinical presentations. Material and methods: Four patients treated for primary target volume only (group 1), four requiring elective nodal irradiation (group 2) and four with positive nodes in macroscopic disease (group 3) were selected. For each patient were generated 7 fields IMRT, coplanar VMAT (c-VMAT) and non-coplanar VMAT (nc-VMAT) treatment plans. Total doses were 70 Gy and 54 Gy to high dose planning target volume (HD-PTV) and low-dose-PTV, respectively. Dose–volume histogram, conformity and homogeneity index (CI and HI), and monitor units (MUs) per Gy were evaluated. Results: VMAT provided significantly better target coverage, in terms of V100% (Volume encompassed by the isodose 100%), than IMRT, in particular when nc-VMAT was used. In general, organ at risk sparing is similar with the three approaches, although nc-VMAT can allow a statistically significant reduction of dose to contralateral parotid gland and cochlea for all three groups. Conclusions: VMAT can offer significant improvement of treatment for all unresectable PNSCs over existing IMRT techniques. In particular, nc-VMAT may be a further advantage for those patients with sinonasal cancers and involvement of the nodes in whom large volumes and complex/irregular shape have to be irradiated, even if clinical benefits should be established in the future

  8. Four-Week Course of Radiation for Breast Cancer Using Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Standard radiation for early breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6 to 7 weeks. This is an inconvenience to many women, and for some a barrier for breast conservation. We present the acute toxicity of a 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients completed radiation on a Phase II trial approved by the hospital institutional review board. Eligibility criteria were broad to include any patient normally eligible for standard radiation: age ≥18 years, invasive or in situ cancer, American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage 0 to II, breast-conserving surgery, and any systemic therapy not given concurrently. The median age was 52 years (range, 31-81 years). Of the patients, 15% had ductal carcinoma in situ, 67% T1, and 19% T2; 71% were N0, 17% N1, and 12% NX. Chemotherapy was given before radiation in 44%. Using photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy and incorporated electron beam boost, the whole breast received 45 Gy and the lumpectomy bed 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Results: The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 9 patients (12%), Grade 1 in 49 (65%) and Grade 2 in 17 (23%). There was no Grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. After radiation, all Grade 2 toxicity had resolved by 6 weeks. Hematologic toxicity was Grade 0 in most patients except for Grade 1 neutropenia in 2 patients, and Grade 1 anemia in 11 patients. There were no significant differences in baseline vs. 6-week posttreatment patient-reported or physician-reported cosmetic scores. Conclusions: This 4-week course of postoperative radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy is feasible and is associated with acceptable acute skin toxicity and quality of life. Long-term follow-up data are needed. This radiation schedule may represent an alternative both to longer 6-week to 7-week standard whole-breast radiation and more radically shortened 1-week, partial-breast treatment schedules

  9. A Study of Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Fiducials for Localized Prostate Cancer Including Pelvic Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the impact on nodal coverage and dose to fixed organs at risk when using daily fiducial localization of the prostate to deliver intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Five patients with prostate cancer in whom prostate and pelvic nodes were irradiated with IMRT were studied. Dose was prescribed such that 95% of the prostate planning target volume (PTV) and 90% of the nodal PTV were covered. Random and systematic prostate displacements in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and left-right directions were simulated to shift the original isocenter of the IMRT plan. The composite dose during the course of treatment was calculated. Results: Compared with a static setup, simulating random shifts reduced dose by less than 1.5% for nodal hotspot (i.e., dose to 1 cm3), by less than 1% for the 90% nodal PTV coverage, and by less than 0.5% for the nodal mean dose. Bowel and femoral head hotspots were reduced by less than 1.5% and 2%, respectively. A 10-mm systematic offset reduced nodal coverage by up to 10%. Conclusion: The use of prostate fiducials for daily localization during IMRT treatment results in negligible changes in dose coverage of pelvic nodes or normal tissue sparing in the absence of a significant systematic offset. This offers a simple and practical solution to the problem of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer when including pelvic nodes

  10. Long-term results of forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients with early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe long-term clinical outcomes for patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), including local control and clinical toxicities. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 214 patients with stage I-II breast cancer who were treated with breast conserving surgery followed by adjuvant breast radiation therapy between 2001 and 2008. All patients were treated using forward IMRT. The whole breast was irradiated to a dose of 50 to 50.4 Gy followed by an 8 to 12 Gy electron boost to the surgical bed. The median age was 46 years (range, 21 to 82 years) and the medial follow-up time was 7.3 years (range, 2.4 to 11.7 years). Stage T1 was 139 (65%) and T2 was 75 (35%), respectively. Ipsilateral breast recurrence was observed in 3 patients. The 5- and 10-year local control rates were 99.1% and 97.8%, respectively. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated according to the Harvard scale and 89.4% of patients were scored as excellent or good. The whole breast radiation therapy as an adjuvant treatment using a forward IMRT technique showed excellent long-term local control as well as favorable outcomes of toxicity and cosmesis.

  11. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govaert Stephanie LA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IMRT in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods and materials Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy or combined with (sequential or concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI after one year and 56% (±14% after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11% after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013 with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly combined with chemotherapy.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  13. Long-term results of forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients with early-stage breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Boram; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Ji Hae; Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Rena; Moon, Byung In [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To observe long-term clinical outcomes for patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), including local control and clinical toxicities. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 214 patients with stage I-II breast cancer who were treated with breast conserving surgery followed by adjuvant breast radiation therapy between 2001 and 2008. All patients were treated using forward IMRT. The whole breast was irradiated to a dose of 50 to 50.4 Gy followed by an 8 to 12 Gy electron boost to the surgical bed. The median age was 46 years (range, 21 to 82 years) and the medial follow-up time was 7.3 years (range, 2.4 to 11.7 years). Stage T1 was 139 (65%) and T2 was 75 (35%), respectively. Ipsilateral breast recurrence was observed in 3 patients. The 5- and 10-year local control rates were 99.1% and 97.8%, respectively. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated according to the Harvard scale and 89.4% of patients were scored as excellent or good. The whole breast radiation therapy as an adjuvant treatment using a forward IMRT technique showed excellent long-term local control as well as favorable outcomes of toxicity and cosmesis.

  14. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy) or combined with (sequential or concurrent) chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI) after one year and 56% (±14%) after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11%) after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013) with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly) combined with chemotherapy

  15. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI) are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  16. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askoxylakis Vasileios

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. Methods/design The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Discussion Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. Trial registration The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  17. Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control

    OpenAIRE

    Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Simona; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Sara, Gomellini; Arcangeli, Stefano; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical results in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate area. A total of 110 patients entered our study, 37 patients presented with localized prostate cancer and radiological evidence of node metastases or ≥15% estimated risk of lymph node (LN) involvement, while 73 patients underwent postoperative adjuvant or salvage irradiation f...

  18. An evaluation of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy in radical chemoradiation of esophageal cancer: A dosimetric study

    OpenAIRE

    Soumik Ghosh; Rakesh Kapoor; Rajesh Gupta; Divya Khosla; Rakesh Kochhar; Oinam, Arun S.; Reena Sharma; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be used to reduce doses to normal thoracic structures than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating esophageal cancer and to compare normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung between two treatment plans. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out from 2009 to 2011, in which 15 inoperable patients of esophageal cancer who were suitable for radical chemoradiatio...

  19. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Kang, Shengwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Lin, Mu-han; Chen, Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, Fu; Guo, Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Lili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  1. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  2. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer

  3. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  4. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  5. A Novel Dose Constraint to Reduce Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the predictors of incidence and duration of xerostomia (XT) based on parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SMG), and both glands taken as a whole organ (TG) in head-and-neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was initiated in May 2003. Sixty-three head-and-neck patients (44 with nasopharynx cancer) were included in the analysis. Using the dose-volume histogram the PG, SMG, and TG mean doses were calculated. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow were measured and XT-related questionnaires were compiled before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after radiotherapy. Salivary gland toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and Grade ≥3 toxicity was used as the endpoint. The XT incidence was investigated according to descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analysis. The Bonferroni method was used for multiple comparison adjustment. Results: After a reduced flow at 3 months after radiotherapy, recovery of salivary flow was observed over time. Primary site and salivary gland mean doses and volumes were identified in univariate analysis as prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TG mean dose (p = 0.00066) and pretreatment stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.00420) are independent factors for predicting XT. Conclusion: The TG mean dose correlates with XT as assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, salivary output, and XT-related questionnaires. Our results suggest that TG mean dose is a candidate dose constraint for reducing XT, requiring considerably more validation in non-nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

  6. Normalization of prostate specific antigen in patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the expected time to prostate specific antigen (PSA) normalization with or without neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAAD) therapy after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. A retrospective cohort research design was used. A total of 133 patients with clinical stage T1c to T3b prostate cancer (2002 AJCC staging) treated in a community setting between January 2002 and July 2005 were reviewed for time to PSA normalization using 1 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL as criteria. All patients received IMRT as part of their management. Times to PSA normalization were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Significance was assessed at p < 0.05. Fifty-six of the 133 patients received NAAD (42.1%). Thirty-one patients (23.8%) received radiation to a limited pelvic field followed by an IMRT boost, while 99 patients received IMRT alone (76.2%). The times to serum PSA normalization < 2 ng/mL when treated with or without NAAD were 298 ± 24 and 302 ± 33 days (mean ± SEM), respectively (p > 0.05), and 303 ± 24 and 405 ± 46 days, respectively, for PSA < 1 ng/mL (p < 0.05). Stage T1 and T2 tumors had significantly increased time to PSA normalization < 1 ng/mL in comparison to Stage T3 tumors. Also, higher Gleason scores were significantly correlated with a faster time to PSA normalization < 1 ng/mL. Use of NAAD in conjunction with IMRT leads to a significantly shortened time to normalization of serum PSA < 1 ng/mL in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer

  7. Grading xerostomia by physicians or by patients after intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess observer-based vs. patient self-reported scoring of xerostomia after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. Methods: A total of 38 patients who had received IMRT for HN cancer underwent xerostomia evaluations 6 to 24 months after completion of therapy using three methods each time: (1) Grading by 3 observers according to the Radiotherapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Therapy of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) system; (2) patient self-reported validated xerostomia questionnaire (XQ); and (3) major salivary gland flow measurements. Results: The interobserver agreement regarding the RTOG/EORTC grades was moderate: κ-coefficient 0.54 (95% CI = 0.31-0.76). The correlations between the average RTOG/EORTC grades and the salivary flow rates were not statistically significant. A trend for significant correlation was observed between these grades and the percent (relative to the pretherapy) nonstimulated salivary flow rates (p = 0.07), but not with the percent stimulated flow rates. Better correlations were found between grading made more than the median time (15 min) after the last liquid sipping and the nonstimulated (but not the stimulated) flows compared with grading made shortly after sipping. In contrast, significant correlations were found between the XQ scores and the nonstimulated (p < 0.005) and the stimulated (p < 0.005) salivary flow rates, as well as with the percentages of the corresponding pretherapy values (p = 0.002 and 0.038, respectively). No significant correlation was found between the RTOG/EORTC grades and the XQ scores. The observer-based grades underestimated the severity of xerostomia compared with the patient self-reported scores. Conclusions: Patient self-reported, rather than physician-assessed scores, should be the main end points in evaluating xerostomia

  8. Beam Path Toxicities to Non-Target Structures During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams traverse nontarget normal structures not irradiated during three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). This study estimates the doses and toxicities to nontarget structures during IMRT. Materials and Methods: Oropharyngeal cancer IMRT and 3D-CRT cases were reviewed. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to evaluate radiation dose to the lip, cochlea, brainstem, occipital scalp, and segments of the mandible. Toxicity rates were compared for 3D-CRT, IMRT alone, or IMRT with concurrent cisplatin. Descriptive statistics and exploratory recursive partitioning analysis were used to estimate dose 'breakpoints' associated with observed toxicities. Results: A total of 160 patients were evaluated for toxicity; 60 had detailed DVH evaluation and 15 had 3D-CRT plan comparison. Comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT, there was significant (p ≤ 0.002) nonparametric differential dose to all clinically significant structures of interest. Thirty percent of IMRT patients had headaches and 40% had occipital scalp alopecia. A total of 76% and 38% of patients treated with IMRT alone had nausea and vomiting, compared with 99% and 68%, respectively, of those with concurrent cisplatin. IMRT had a markedly distinct toxicity profile than 3D-CRT. In recursive partitioning analysis, National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria adverse effects 3.0 nausea and vomiting, scalp alopecia and anterior mucositis were associated with reconstructed mean brainstem dose >36 Gy, occipital scalp dose >30 Gy, and anterior mandible dose >34 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Dose reduction to specified structures during IMRT implies an increased beam path dose to alternate nontarget structures that may result in clinical toxicities that were uncommon with previous, less conformal approaches. These findings have implications for IMRT treatment planning and research, toxicity assessment, and multidisciplinary patient

  9. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior–posterior direction, with systematic (∑) and random (σ) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%±19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to ∑=0.01 mm and σ = 0.55 mm in the anterior–posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%±4.6% and 99.7%±0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a γ index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  10. Dosimetric effects of weight loss or gain during volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight loss or gain during the course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can alter the planned dose to the target volumes and critical organs. Typically, source-to-surface distance (SSD) measurements are documented by therapists on a weekly basis to ensure that patients' exterior surface and isocenter-to-skin surface distances remain stable. The radiation oncology team then determines whether the patient has undergone a physical change sufficient to require a new treatment plan. The effect of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetry is not well known, and it is unclear when rescanning or replanning is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on IMRT or VMAT dose delivery in patients with prostate cancer and to determine the SSD change threshold for replanning. Whether IMRT or VMAT provides better dose stability under weight change conditions was also determined. We generated clinical IMRT and VMAT prostate and seminal vesicle treatment plans for varying SSDs for 10 randomly selected patients with prostate cancer. The differences due to SSD change were quantified by a specific dose change for a specified volume of interest. The target mean dose, decreased or increased by 2.9% per 1-cm SSD decrease or increase in IMRT and by 3.6% in VMAT. If the SSD deviation is more than 1 cm, the radiation oncology team should determine whether to continue treatment without modifications, to adjust monitor units, or to resimulate and replan

  11. A dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare dosimetric parameters of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with regard to the coverage of planning target volume (PTV) and the sparing of organs at risk (OAR). Ten patients with nasal cavity or paranasal sinus cancer were re-planned by VMAT (two-arc) plan and non-coplanar IMRT (7-, 11-, and 15-beam) plans. Planning objectives were to deliver 60 Gy in 30 fractions to 95% of PTV, with maximum doses (Dmax) of <50 Gy to the optic nerves, optic chiasm, and brainstem, <40 Gy to the eyes and <10 Gy to the lenses. The target mean dose (Dmean) to the parotid glands was <25 Gy, and no constraints were applied to the lacrimal glands. Planning was optimized to minimized doses to OAR without compromising coverage of the PTV. VMAT and three non-coplanar IMRT (7-, 11-, and 15-beam) plans were compared using the heterogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) of the PTV, Dmax and Dmean of the OAR, treatment delivery time, and monitor units (MUs). The HI and CI of VMAT plan were superior to those of the 7-, 11-, and 15-beam non-coplanar IMRT. VMAT and non-coplanar IMRT (7-, 11-, and 15-beam) showed equivalent sparing effects for the optic nerves, optic chiasm, brainstem, and parotid glands. For the eyes and lenses, VMAT achieved equivalent or better sparing effects when compared with the non-coplanar IMRT plans. VMAT showed lower MUs and reduced treatment delivery time when compared with non-coplanar IMRT. In 10 patients with nasal cavity or paranasal sinus cancer, a VMAT plan provided better homogeneity and conformity for PTV than non-coplanar IMRT plans, with a shorter treatment delivery time, while achieving equal or better OAR-sparing effects and using fewer MUs

  12. The survival analysis on localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy followed by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Between March 2003 and October 2008, 54 localized prostate cancer treated by IMRT were recruited. All patients had received endocrine therapy before IMRT. The endocrine therapy included surgical castration or medical castration in combination with antiandrogens. The target of IMRT was the prostate and seminal vesicles with or without pelvis. The biochemical failure was defined according to the phoenix definition. By using the risk grouping standard proposed by D'Amico, patients were divided into three groups: low-risk group (n = 5), intermediate-risk group (n = 12), and high-risk group (n = 37). Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the overall survival rate. Prognostic factors were analyzed by univariate and multiple Cox regression analysis. Results: The follow-up rate was 98%. The number of patients under follow-up was 39 at 3 years and 25 at 5 years. Potential prognostic factors, including risk groups, mode of endocrine therapy, time of endocrine therapy, phoenix grouping before IMRT, the prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) before radiotherapy, PSA value before IMRT, interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT, irradiation region, and irradiation dose were analyzed by survival analysis. In univariate analysis, time of endocrine therapy (75 % vs 95 %, χ2= 6. 45, P = 0. 011), phoenix grouping before IMRT (87% vs 96%, χ2 = 4. 36, P = 0. 037), interval of endocrine therapy and IMRT (80% vs 95%, χ2= 11.60, P= 0. 001), irradiation dose (75% vs 91%, χ2=5.92, P= 0. 015) were statistically significant prognostic factors for 3 - year overall survival , and risk groups (85 vs 53 vs 29, χ2= 6. 40, P =0. 041) and PSADT before IMRT (62 vs 120, U =24. 50, P =0. 003) were significant factors for the median survival time. In the multiple Cox

  13. Beam intensity modulation for penumbra enhancement and field length reduction in lung cancer treatments: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recent treatment planning study, a previously published technique for superior-inferior field length reduction for prostate cancer patients, based on penumbra enhancement using static beam intensity modulation (BIM) with a multileaf collimator, was investigated for lung cancer treatments. For the patient group studied, the field lengths could be reduced by 1.4 cm and an average dose escalation of 6 Gy (maximum 16 Gy) appeared to be possible without any increase in the calculated risk of radiation pneumonitis. However, this planning study was performed with a treatment planning system that does not correctly account for the increased lateral secondary electron transport in lung tissue, resulting in too steep beam penumbrae. Therefore, prior to clinical implementation, an extensive dosimetric study was performed to evaluate and optimize BIM for penumbra enhancement and superior-inferior field length reduction in lung cancer treatments. Film dosimetry was performed in several phantoms consisting of water equivalent and lung equivalent materials, both for a 6 and a 10 MV photon beam. Measured dose distributions were used to (i) adapt the BIM technique to properly account for increased lateral secondary electron transport, (ii) compare BIM dose distributions in lung material with dose distributions of standard treatment fields, and (iii) investigate the use of our treatment planning system for the design of BIM plans for lung cancer patients. Compared with our treatment planning study the superior and inferior boost fields, used in the BIM technique for penumbra enhancement, had to be longer and of a higher weight to compensate for the increased lateral secondary electron transport in lung tissue. With these modifications in the BIM technique, field lengths could indeed be reduced by 1.4 cm compared with treatment with standard fields, without the appearance of underdosages in the most superior and inferior target areas, whilst better sparing the healthy lung

  14. Intensity modulated arc therapy implementation in a three phase adaptive 18F-FDG-PET voxel intensity-based planning strategy for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the implementation of a new intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) class solution in comparison to a 6-static beam step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (s-IMRT) for three-phase adaptive 18F-FDG-PET-voxel-based dose-painting-by-numbers (DPBN) for head-and-neck cancer. We developed 18F-FDG-PET-voxel intensity-based IMAT employing multiple arcs and compared it to clinically used s-IMRT DPBN. Three IMAT plans using 18F-FDG-PET/CT acquired before treatment (phase I), after 8 fractions (phase II) and CT acquired after 18 fractions (phase III) were generated for each of 10 patients treated with 3 s-IMRT plans based on the same image sets. Based on deformable image registration (ABAS, version 0.41, Elekta CMS Software, Maryland Heights, MO), doses of the 3 plans were summed on the pretreatment CT using validated in-house developed software. Dosimetric indices in targets and organs-at-risk (OARs), biologic conformity of treatment plans set at ≤5 %, treatment quality and efficiency were compared between IMAT and s-IMRT for the whole group and for individual patients. Doses to most organs-at-risk (OARs) were significantly better in IMAT plans, while target levels were similar for both types of plans. On average, IMAT ipsilateral and contralateral parotid mean doses were 14.0 % (p = 0.001) and 12.7 % (p < 0.001) lower, respectively. Pharyngeal constrictors D50% levels were similar or reduced with up to 54.9 % for IMAT compared to s-IMRT for individual patient cases. IMAT significantly improved biologic conformity by 2.1 % for treatment phases I and II. 3D phantom measurements reported an agreement of ≥95 % for 3 % and 3 mm criteria for both treatment modalities. IMAT delivery time was significantly shortened on average by 41.1 %. IMAT implementation significantly improved the biologic conformity as compared to s-IMRT in adaptive dose-escalated DPBN treatments. The better OAR sparing and faster delivery highly improved the treatment

  15. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  16. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of ...

  17. High-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: early toxicity and biochemical outcome in 772 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicity and preliminary biochemical outcomes in 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1996 and January 2001, 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment was planned using an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. A total of 698 patients (90%) were treated to 81.0 Gy, and 74 patients (10%) were treated to 86.4 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were scored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. PSA relapse was defined according to The American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range: 6-60 months). Results: Thirty-five patients (4.5%) developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity, and no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or higher rectal symptoms. Two hundred seventeen patients (28%) developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, and one experienced urinary retention (Grade 3). Eleven patients (1.5%) developed late Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Four patients (0.1%) experienced Grade 3 rectal toxicity requiring either one or more transfusions or a laser cauterization procedure. No Grade 4 rectal complications have been observed. The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 4%. Seventy-two patients (9%) experienced late Grade 2 urinary toxicity, and five (0.5%) developed Grade 3 urinary toxicity (urethral stricture). The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 15%. The 3-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival rates for favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk group patients were 92%, 86%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of high-dose IMRT in a large number of patients. Acute and late rectal toxicities seem to be

  18. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality

  19. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  20. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  1. Forward-planned intensity modulated radiation therapy using a cobalt source: A dosimetric study in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Cilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis evaluates the feasibility and dosimetric results of a simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment using a cobalt-therapy unit for post-operative breast cancer. Fourteen patients were included. Three plans per patient were produced by a cobalt-60 source: A standard plan with two wedged tangential beams, a standard tangential plan optimized without the use of wedges and a plan based on the forward-planned "field-in-field" IMRT technique (Co-FinF where the dose on each of the two tangential beams was split into two different segments and the two segments weight was determined with an iterative process. For comparison purposes, a 6-MV photon standard wedged tangential treatment plan was generated. D mean , D 98% , D 2% , V 95% , V 107%, homogeneity, and conformity indices were chosen as parameters for comparison. Co-FinF technique improved the planning target volume dose homogeneity compared to other cobalt-based techniques and reduced maximum doses (D 2% and high-dose volume (V 110% . Moreover, it showed a better lung and heart dose sparing with respect to the standard approach. The higher dose homogeneity may encourage the adoption of accelerated-hypofractionated treatments also with the cobalt sources. This approach can promote the spread of breast conservative treatment in developing countries.

  2. Acute and late toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated by dose escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy and organ tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report acute and late toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated by dose escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and organ tracking. From 06/2004 to 12/2005 39 men were treated by 80 Gy IMRT along with organ tracking. Median age was 69 years, risk of recurrence was low 18%, intermediate 21% and high in 61% patients. Hormone therapy (HT) was received by 74% of patients. Toxicity was scored according to the CTC scale version 3.0. Median follow-up (FU) was 29 months. Acute and maximal late grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was 3% and 8%, late grade 2 GI toxicity dropped to 0% at the end of FU. No acute or late grade 3 GI toxicity was observed. Grade 2 and 3 pre-treatment genitourinary (GU) morbidity (PGUM) was 20% and 5%. Acute and maximal late grade 2 GU toxicity was 56% and 28% and late grade 2 GU toxicity decreased to 15% of patients at the end of FU. Acute and maximal late grade 3 GU toxicity was 8% and 3%, respectively. Decreased late ≥ grade 2 GU toxicity free survival was associated with higher age (P = .025), absence of HT (P = .016) and higher PGUM (P < .001). GI toxicity rates after IMRT and organ tracking are excellent, GU toxicity rates are strongly related to PGUM

  3. Is “pelvic radiation disease” always the cause of bowel symptoms following prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) also widely known as “radiation proctopathy” is a well recognised late side-effect following conventional prostate radiotherapy. However, endoscopic evaluation and/or specialist referral for new or persistent post-prostate radiotherapy bowel symptoms is not routine and serious diagnoses may potentially be missed. Here we report a policy of endoscopic evaluation of bowel symptoms persisting >90 days post radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: A consecutive series of 102 patients who had radical prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and who had new or ongoing bowel symptoms or positive faecal occult blood tests (FOBT) on follow up visits more than three months after treatment, were referred for endoscopic examination. All but one (99%) had full colonoscopic investigation. Results: Endoscopic findings included gastric/colonic/rectal polyps (56%), diverticular disease (49%), haemorrhoids (38%), radiation proctopathy (29%), gastritis/oesophagitis (8%) and rarer diagnoses, including bowel cancer which was found in 3%. Only four patients (4%) had radiation proctopathy without associated pathology and 65 patients (63%) had more than one diagnosis. If flexible sigmoidoscopy alone were used, 36.6% of patients and 46.6% patients with polyp(s) would have had their diagnoses missed. Conclusions: Our study has shown that bowel symptoms following prostate IMRT/IGRT are due to numerous diagnoses other than PRD, including malignancy. Routine referral pathways should be developed for endoscopic evaluation/specialist review for patients with new or persistent bowel symptoms (or positive FOBT) following prostate radiotherapy. This recommendation should be considered for incorporation into national guidelines

  4. Fatigue is associated with inflammation in patients with head and neck cancer before and after intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Canhua; Beitler, Jonathan J; Higgins, Kristin A; Conneely, Karen; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Felger, Jennifer; Wommack, Evanthia C; Shin, Dong M; Saba, Nabil F; Ong, Luke Yeeloo; Kowalski, Jeanne; Bruner, Deborah W; Miller, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have particularly high rates of fatigue, and pre- and post-radiotherapy fatigue are prognostic factors for pathologic tumor responses and poor survival. Although inflammation has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms of fatigue in cancer patients, findings have not been consistent, and there is a dearth of longitudinal studies. Accordingly, we conducted a prospective study in 46 HNC patients pre- and one-month post-IMRT. Fatigue was measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI)-20 at both time points along with the assessment of peripheral blood inflammatory markers including interleukin (IL)-6, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and gene expression. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between inflammatory markers and fatigue. Gene enrichment analysis using MetaCore software was performed using up-regulated genes that were significantly associated with IMRT and fatigue. Significant associations between fatigue and IL-6 as well as CRP, which were independent of time, were observed. In addition the change in fatigue from pre- to post-IMRT was positively associated with the change in IL-6 and CRP. Analysis of up-regulated gene transcripts as a function of IMRT and fatigue revealed overrepresentation of transcripts related to the defense response and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, our findings support the hypotheses that inflammation is associated with fatigue over time in HNC patients. Future studies on how inflammation contributes to fatigue as well as strategies targeting inflammation to reduce fatigue are warranted. PMID:26515035

  5. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Lian Wang; Zhongxing Liao; Helen Liu; Jaffer Ajani; Stephen Swisher; James D Cox; Ritsuko Komaki

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the dosimetry, efficacy and toxicity of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer.METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on 7 patients who were definitively treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Patients who did not receive IMRT radiation and concurrent chemotherapy were not included in this analysis. IMRT plans were evaluated to assess the tumor coverage and normal tissue avoidance. Treatment response was evaluated and toxicities were assessed.RESULTS: Five- to nine-beam IMRT were used to deliver a total dose of 59.4-66 Gy (median: 64.8 Gy) to the primary tumor with 6-MV photons. The minimum dose received by the planning tumor volume (PTV) of the gross tumor volume boost was 91.2%-98.2% of the prescription dose (standard deviation [SD]: 3.7%-5.7%).tumor volume was 93.8%-104.8% (SD: 4.3%-11.1%)of the prescribed dose. With a median follow-up of 15 mo (range: 3-21 mo), all 6 evaluable patients achieved complete response. Of them, 2 developed local recurrences and 2 had distant metastases, 3 survived with no evidence of disease. After treatment, 2 patients developed esophageal stricture requiring frequent dilation and 1 patient developed tracheal-esophageal fistula.CONCLUSION: Concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy resulted in an excellent early response in patients with locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer. However, local and distant recurrence and toxicity remain to be a problem. Innovative approaches are needed to improve the outcome.

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  7. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  8. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  9. Quality of Life After Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated using hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I–II study enrolled patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8–10. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost to the prostate, for a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy per fraction) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Daily image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. Quality of life was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), a validated tool that assesses four primary domains (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal). Results: From 2004 to 2007, 97 patients were treated. Median follow-up was 39 months. Compared with baseline, at 24 months there was no statistically significant change in the mean urinary domain score (p = 0.99), whereas there were decreases in the bowel (p < 0.01), sexual (p < 0.01), and hormonal (p < 0.01) domains. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant difference in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores at 24 months was 27%, 31%, 55%, and 60%, respectively. However, moderate and severe distress related to these symptoms was minimal, with increases of only 3% and 5% in the urinary and bowel domains, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated. Although there were modest rates of clinically significant patient-reported urinary and bowel toxicity, most of this caused only mild distress, and moderate and severe effects on QOL were limited. Additional follow-up is ongoing to characterize long-term QOL.

  10. Treatment with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, G.N.; Hanna, S.A.; Gadia, R.

    2014-11-15

    Through the development of four relevant clinical questions related with the proposed subject, we tried to present the main evidence for safety, toxicity and effectiveness using different radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of female patients of all ages with primary breast cancer treated with radiation therapy to the whole breast, regardless of histological type, staging, context of treatment (radical, adjuvant or palliative) and whether comorbidities were present or not. For this, a systematic review of the literature was performed in primary scientific research databases (Medline - Pubmed; Embase - Elsevier; Lilacs - Bireme; Cochrane Library - Central Register of Controlled Trials). All articles available until July 22, 2013, were included. The search strategy used for Medline research is described in Appendix. Articles were selected based on critical evaluation in search of the best available evidence. Recommendations were prepared based on discussion with the writing group, composed of three members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group specializing in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was made available for public consultation for 15 days and the suggestions forwarded to the writers for evaluation and consideration into the final text. Objective: to assess the most appropriate method of radiation therapy for treating patients with primary breast tumors. (author)

  11. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-independent comparison of radiotherapy treatment planning of IMRT and VMAT for head-and-neck cancer performed by several institutes and based on the same CT- and contouring data. Five institutes generated IMRT and VMAT plans for five oropharyngeal cancer patients using either Pinnacle3 or Oncentra Masterplan to be delivered on Elekta linear accelerators. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT plans within the same patient and institute showed significantly better sparing for almost all OARs with VMAT. The average mean dose to the parotid glands and oral cavity was reduced from 27.2 Gy and 39.4 Gy for IMRT to 25.0 Gy and 36.7 Gy for VMAT, respectively. The dose conformity at 95% of the prescribed dose for PTVboost and PTVtotal was 1.45 and 1.62 for IMRT and 1.37 and 1.50 for VMAT, respectively. The average effective delivery time was reduced from 13:15 min for IMRT to 5:54 min for VMAT. Independently of institution-specific optimization strategies, the quality of the VMAT plans including double arcs was superior to step-and-shoot IMRT plans including 5–9 beam ports, while the effective treatment delivery time was shortened by ~50% with VMAT

  12. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using {sup 11}C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe H. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J. [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Anderson, Nigel J. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Davis, Ian D. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Clouston, David [Focus Pathology, Victoria (Australia); Bolton, Damien [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Urology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher S. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had {sup 11}C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub 60%} and SUV{sub 70%}). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN{sub 78}, which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN{sub 78-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy; and PLAN{sub 72-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP{sub PET}) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP{sub path}), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP{sub PET} values for PLAN{sub 78}, PLAN{sub 78-90}, and PLAN{sub 72-90} were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP{sub path} values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} had significantly higher TCP{sub PET} (P=.002 and .001) and TCP{sub path} (P<.001 and .014) values than PLAN{sub 78}. PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} were not significantly different in terms of TCP{sub PET} or TCP{sub path}. There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for

  13. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for high risk prostate cancer based on sentinel node SPECT imaging for target volume definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RTOG 94-13 trial has provided evidence that patients with high risk prostate cancer benefit from an additional radiotherapy to the pelvic nodes combined with concomitant hormonal ablation. Since lymphatic drainage of the prostate is highly variable, the optimal target volume definition for the pelvic lymph nodes is problematic. To overcome this limitation, we tested the feasibility of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) protocol, taking under consideration the individual pelvic sentinel node drainage pattern by SPECT functional imaging. Patients with high risk prostate cancer were included. Sentinel nodes (SN) were localised 1.5–3 hours after injection of 250 MBq 99mTc-Nanocoll using a double-headed gamma camera with an integrated X-Ray device. All sentinel node localisations were included into the pelvic clinical target volume (CTV). Dose prescriptions were 50.4 Gy (5 × 1.8 Gy / week) to the pelvis and 70.0 Gy (5 × 2.0 Gy / week) to the prostate including the base of seminal vesicles or whole seminal vesicles. Patients were treated with IMRT. Furthermore a theoretical comparison between IMRT and a three-dimensional conformal technique was performed. Since 08/2003 6 patients were treated with this protocol. All patients had detectable sentinel lymph nodes (total 29). 4 of 6 patients showed sentinel node localisations (total 10), that would not have been treated adequately with CT-based planning ('geographical miss') only. The most common localisation for a probable geographical miss was the perirectal area. The comparison between dose-volume-histograms of IMRT- and conventional CT-planning demonstrated clear superiority of IMRT when all sentinel lymph nodes were included. IMRT allowed a significantly better sparing of normal tissue and reduced volumes of small bowel, large bowel and rectum irradiated with critical doses. No gastrointestinal or genitourinary acute toxicity Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) occurred. IMRT based on sentinel lymph node

  14. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p 10, V20, V30, and V40, percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (Dmean) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p 30 and V40 of the rectum and V10, V20, V40, and Dmean of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for high risk prostate cancer based on sentinel node SPECT imaging for target volume definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiadis Aristotelis

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RTOG 94-13 trial has provided evidence that patients with high risk prostate cancer benefit from an additional radiotherapy to the pelvic nodes combined with concomitant hormonal ablation. Since lymphatic drainage of the prostate is highly variable, the optimal target volume definition for the pelvic lymph nodes is problematic. To overcome this limitation, we tested the feasibility of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT protocol, taking under consideration the individual pelvic sentinel node drainage pattern by SPECT functional imaging. Methods Patients with high risk prostate cancer were included. Sentinel nodes (SN were localised 1.5–3 hours after injection of 250 MBq 99mTc-Nanocoll using a double-headed gamma camera with an integrated X-Ray device. All sentinel node localisations were included into the pelvic clinical target volume (CTV. Dose prescriptions were 50.4 Gy (5 × 1.8 Gy / week to the pelvis and 70.0 Gy (5 × 2.0 Gy / week to the prostate including the base of seminal vesicles or whole seminal vesicles. Patients were treated with IMRT. Furthermore a theoretical comparison between IMRT and a three-dimensional conformal technique was performed. Results Since 08/2003 6 patients were treated with this protocol. All patients had detectable sentinel lymph nodes (total 29. 4 of 6 patients showed sentinel node localisations (total 10, that would not have been treated adequately with CT-based planning ('geographical miss' only. The most common localisation for a probable geographical miss was the perirectal area. The comparison between dose-volume-histograms of IMRT- and conventional CT-planning demonstrated clear superiority of IMRT when all sentinel lymph nodes were included. IMRT allowed a significantly better sparing of normal tissue and reduced volumes of small bowel, large bowel and rectum irradiated with critical doses. No gastrointestinal or genitourinary acute toxicity Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG

  16. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  17. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  18. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Van Gestel, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan was generated by applying the optimization parameters of the original treatment plan to the anatomy of the second CT scan. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose statistics of the hybrid plan and the adapted plan were compared. The mean volume of the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid gland decreased by 6.1 cm(3) (30.5%) and 5.4 cm(3) (24.3%), respectively. Compared with the hybrid plan, the adapted plan provided a higher dose to the target volumes with better homogeneity, and a lower dose to the organs at risk (OARs). The Dmin of all planning target volumes (PTVs) increased. The Dmax of the spinal cord and brainstem were lower in 94% of the patients (1.6-5.9 Gy, P < 0.001 and 2.1-9.9 Gy, P < 0.001, respectively). The Dmean of the contralateral parotid decreased in 70% of the patients (range, 0.2-4.4 Gy). We could not find a relationship between dose variability and weight loss. Our two-phase adaptive IMRT protocol improves dosimetric results in terms of target volumes and OARs in patients with locally advanced NPC. PMID:25666189

  19. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc therapy for lymph node metastasized prostate cancer: Early late toxicity and 3-year clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: For patients with N1 prostate cancer (PCa) aggressive local therapies can be advocated. We evaluated clinical outcome, gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity after intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (IMAT) + androgen deprivation (AD) for N1 PCa. Material and methods: Eighty patients with T1-4N1M0 PCa were treated with IMAT and 2–3 years of AD. A median dose of 69.3 Gy (normalized isoeffective dose at 2 Gy per fraction: 80 Gy [α/β = 3]) was prescribed in 25 fractions to the prostate. The pelvic lymph nodes received a minimal dose of 45 Gy. A simultaneous integrated boost to 72 Gy and 65 Gy was delivered to the intraprostatic lesion and/or pathologically enlarged lymph nodes, respectively. GI and GU toxicity was scored using the RTOG/RILIT and RTOG-SOMA/LENT-CTC toxicity scoring system respectively. Three-year actuarial risk of grade 2 and 3/4 GI–GU toxicity and biochemical and clinical relapse free survival (bRFS and cRFS) were calculated with Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3 and 2 GI toxicity is 8% and 20%, respectively. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3–4 and 2 GU toxicity was 6% and 34%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was 81% and 89%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was, respectively 26% and 32% lower for patients with cN1 disease when compared to patients with cN0 disease. Conclusion: IMAT for N1 PCa offers good clinical outcome with moderate toxicity. Patients with cN1 disease have poorer outcome

  20. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Nygaard, Ditte E.; Persson, Gitte F.; Korreman, Stine S.; Engelholm, Svend Aage (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen (Denmark)), E-mail: per.munck@rh.regionh.dk; Nystroem, Haakan (Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen Univ., Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Background. Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour motion. Material and methods. Seven patients with a nine targets with 4DCT scans were selected. IMPT plans were made on the midventilation phase using a 3-field technique. The plans were transferred and calculated on the remaining nine phases of the 4DCT, and the combined dose distribution was summed using deformable image registration (DIR). An additional set of plans were made in which the proton beam was simply geometrically shifted to the centre of the gross tumour volume (GTV), i.e. simulating tracking of the tumour motion but without on-line adjustment of the proton energies. A possible interplay effect between the dynamics of the spot scanning delivery and the tumour motion has not been considered in this work. Results. Around 97-100% of the GTV was covered by 95% of the prescribed dose (V95) for a tumour displacement of less than about 1 cm with a static beam. For the remaining three of nine targets with a larger motion the tracking method studied provided a marked improvement over static beam; raising the GTV V95 from 95 to 100%, 82 to 98% and 51 to 97%, respectively. Conclusion. The possibility of performing DIR and summing the dose on the 4DCT data set was shown to be feasible. The fairly simplistic tracking method suggested here resulted in a marked improvement in GTV coverage for tumours with large intra-fractional motion (>1 cm displacement), indicating that on-line adjustment of the proton energies may be redundant.

  1. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  2. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V45Gy and V55Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V25Gy and V40Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V40Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V45Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V55Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  3. Comparison of end normal inspiration and expiration for gated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Gated delivery of radiation during part of the respiration cycle may improve the treatment of lung cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In terms of the respiration phase for gated treatment, normal end-expiration (EE) is more stable but normal end-inspiration (EI) increases lung volume. We compare the relative merit of using EI and EE in gated IMRT for sparing normal lung tissue. Patients and methods: Ten patients received EI and EE respiration-triggered CT scans in the treatment position. An IMRT plan for a prescription dose of 70 Gy was generated for each patient and at each respiration phase. The optimization constraints included target dose uniformity, less than 35% of the total lung receiving 20 Gy or more and maximum cord dose ≤45 Gy. We compared planning target volume (PTV) coverage, mean lung dose, percentage of total lung receiving 20 Gy or more (V 20) and lung normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: For 9 of the 10 patients, cord and lung doses were acceptable and PTV coverage was similar for EE and EI, with lung sparing was equal to or slightly better at EI than at EE. For the 10th patient, lung sparing at EI was significantly better. Patient averaged mean lung dose was 15.4 Gy (range: 7.1-20.4) at EI and 16.3 Gy (range: 6.9-21.9) at EE. The average V 20 was 23.8% (range: 13-36.4) at EI and 25.3% (range: 13-37.3) at EE. The average NTCP at EI was 8 versus 12% at EE. Conclusions: Dosimetric indices of lung protection for IMRT plans at EI are better than at EE. For 9 out of the 10 patients in our study, this difference is small. Thus other factors such as reproducibility, reliability and duty cycle at normal end expiration may be more critical for selecting treatment breathing phase

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  5. Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether intensity-modulated proton therapy with a reduced spot size (rsIMPT) could further reduce the parotid and submandibular gland dose compared with previously calculated IMPT plans with a larger spot size. In addition, it was investigated whether the obtained dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Methods: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal cancer were included in a comparative treatment planning study. Both IMPT plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal PTV. IMPT and rsIMPT used identical three-field beam arrangements. In the IMPT plans, the parotid and submandibular salivary glands were spared as much as possible. rsIMPT plans used identical dose–volume objectives for the parotid glands as those used by the IMPT plans, whereas the objectives for the submandibular glands were tightened further. NTCPs were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Target coverage was similar for both IMPT techniques, whereas rsIMPT clearly improved target conformity. The mean doses in the parotid glands and submandibular glands were significantly lower for three-field rsIMPT (14.7 Gy and 46.9 Gy, respectively) than for three-field IMPT (16.8 Gy and 54.6 Gy, respectively). Hence, rsIMPT significantly reduced the NTCP of patient-rated xerostomia and parotid and contralateral submandibular salivary flow dysfunction (27%, 17%, and 43% respectively) compared with IMPT (39%, 20%, and 79%, respectively). In addition, mean dose values in the sublingual glands, the soft palate and oral cavity were also decreased. Obtained dose and NTCP reductions varied per patient. Conclusions: rsIMPT improved sparing of the salivary glands and reduced NTCP for xerostomia and parotid and submandibular salivary dysfunction, while maintaining similar target coverage results. It is expected that rsIMPT improves

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Gillian C. [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles B.; Twyman, Nicola [Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Services Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wishart, Gordon C. [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E., E-mail: charlotte.coles@addenbrookes.nhs.uk [Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Services Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13-2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  7. Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Tara A. van de, E-mail: t.a.van.de.water@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lomax, Antony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hug, Eugen B. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether intensity-modulated proton therapy with a reduced spot size (rsIMPT) could further reduce the parotid and submandibular gland dose compared with previously calculated IMPT plans with a larger spot size. In addition, it was investigated whether the obtained dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Methods: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal cancer were included in a comparative treatment planning study. Both IMPT plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal PTV. IMPT and rsIMPT used identical three-field beam arrangements. In the IMPT plans, the parotid and submandibular salivary glands were spared as much as possible. rsIMPT plans used identical dose-volume objectives for the parotid glands as those used by the IMPT plans, whereas the objectives for the submandibular glands were tightened further. NTCPs were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Target coverage was similar for both IMPT techniques, whereas rsIMPT clearly improved target conformity. The mean doses in the parotid glands and submandibular glands were significantly lower for three-field rsIMPT (14.7 Gy and 46.9 Gy, respectively) than for three-field IMPT (16.8 Gy and 54.6 Gy, respectively). Hence, rsIMPT significantly reduced the NTCP of patient-rated xerostomia and parotid and contralateral submandibular salivary flow dysfunction (27%, 17%, and 43% respectively) compared with IMPT (39%, 20%, and 79%, respectively). In addition, mean dose values in the sublingual glands, the soft palate and oral cavity were also decreased. Obtained dose and NTCP reductions varied per patient. Conclusions: rsIMPT improved sparing of the salivary glands and reduced NTCP for xerostomia and parotid and submandibular salivary dysfunction, while maintaining similar target coverage results. It is expected that rsIMPT improves quality

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83–1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13–2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39–1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  9. Feasibility of image registration and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning with hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging for non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland, Rob H.; Bragg, Chris M; McJury, Mark; Woodhouse, Neil; Fichele, Stan; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wild, Jim M.; Hatton, Matthew Q.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of registering hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance images ((3)He-MRI) to X-ray computed tomography (CT) for functionally weighted intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning.METHODS AND MATERIALS: Six patients with non-small-cell lung cancer underwent (3)He ventilation MRI, which was fused with radiotherapy planning CT using rigid registration. Registration accuracy was assessed using an overlap coefficient, calculated as the proportion of t...

  10. Efficacy of the smaller target volume for stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    LIANG, XIANGCUN; Yu, Huiming; Yu, Rong; Xu, Gang; Guangying ZHU

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the local recurrence, distant metastasis, progression-free survival, overall survival and radiation toxicity between two arms of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); one arm with clinical target volume (CTV) and the other without CTV. The two arms of local recurrence, distant metastasis, progression-free survival, overall survival, grade 3–4 radiation esophagitis and hematological toxicity had no statistic...

  11. Dosimetric analysis of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Priyusha Bagdare; Om Prakash Gurjar; Garima Shrivastav; Virendra Bhandari; Krishna Lal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the dosimetric parameters of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods: Ten patients with inoperable NSCLC were selected for this study. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated for all patients following Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. Generated plans were then compared on the basis of planning target ...

  12. Prone breast forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Asian women with early left breast cancer: factors for cardiac sparing and clinical outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jenny Ling-Yu; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Chan, Hsing-Min; Huang, Yu-Sen; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Since December 2009, after breast-conserving surgery for Stage 0–I cancer of the left breast, 21 women with relatively pendulous breasts underwent computed tomography prone and supine simulations. The adjuvant radiotherapy was 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the left breast alone. Four plans—conventional wedged tangents and forward intensity-modulated radiotherapy (fIMRT) in supine and prone positions—were generated. fIMRT generated better homogeneity in both positions. Prone position centralized th...

  13. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatmen...

  14. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Xiaojuan; Xu Yong; Zhou Lin; Liu Yongmei; Li Tao; Jiang Xiaoqin; Gong Youling

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT) techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. Materials and methods 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time compariso...

  15. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  16. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV-WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV-Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV-Pelvis: Dmax < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV-WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV-Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean). U5-95% for PTV-WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV-Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of a moving tumor target in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Kang, Min Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2013-07-01

    Immobilization plays an important role in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The application of IMRT in lung cancer patients is very difficult due to the movement of the tumor target. Patient setup in radiation treatment demands high accuracy because IMRT employs a treatment size of a 1mm pixel unit. Hence, quality assurance of the dose delivered to patients must be at its highest. The radiation dose was evaluated for breathing rates of 9, 14, and 18 breaths per minute (bpm) for tumor targets moving up and down by 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. The dose of the moving planned target volume (PTV) was measured by using a thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD) and Gafchromic™ EBT film. The measurement points were 1.0 cm away from the top, the bottom and the left and the right sides of the PTV center. The evaluated dose differences ranged from 94.2 to 103.8%, from 94.4 to 105.4%, and from 90.7 to 108.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. The mean values of the doses were 101.4, 99.9, and 99.5% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.0 cm. Meanwhile, the evaluated dose differences ranged from 93.6 to 105.8%, from 95.9 to 111.5%, and from 96.2 to 111.7% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. The mean values of the doses were 102.3, 103.4, and 103.1% for 9, 14 and 18 bpm, respectively, for a tumor movement of 1.5 cm. Therefore, we suggest that IMRT can be used in the treatment of lung cancer patients with vertical target movements within the range of 1.0 to 1.5 cm.

  18. Role of Principal Component Analysis in Predicting Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine if principal component analysis (PCA) and standard parameters of rectal and bladder wall dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) can predict acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent hypo-IMRT at 3 Gy/fraction, 5 days/week to either 60 Gy or 66 Gy, with daily online image guidance. Acute and late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were recorded weekly during treatment and at each follow-up. All Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria toxicity scores were dichotomized as <2 and ≥2. Standard dosimetric parameters and the first five to six principal components (PCs) of bladder and rectal wall DVHs were tested for association with the dichotomized toxicity outcomes, using logistic regression. Results: Median follow-up of all patients was 47 months (60 Gy cohort= 52 months; 66 Gy cohort= 31 months). The incidence rates of ≥2 acute GI and GU toxicity were 14% and 29%, respectively, with no Grade ≥3 acute GU toxicity. Late GI and GU toxicity scores ≥2 were 16% and 15%, respectively. There was a significant difference in late GI toxicity ≥2 when comparing the 66 Gy to the 60 Gy cohort (38% vs. 8%, respectively, p = 0.0003). The first PC of the rectal DVH was associated with late GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 6.91; p < 0.001), though it was not significantly stronger than standard DVH parameters such as Dmax (OR, 6.9; p < 0.001) or percentage of the organ receiving a 50% dose (V50) (OR, 5.95; p = 0 .001). Conclusions: Hypofractionated treatment with 60 Gy in 3 Gy fractions is well tolerated. There is a steep dose response curve between 60 Gy and 66 Gy for RTOG Grade ≥2 GI effects with the dose constraints employed. Although PCA can predict late GI toxicity for patients treated with hypo-IMRT for prostate cancer, it provides no additional information over

  19. Prospective evaluation of quality of life 54 months after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine late toxicity and quality of life (QoL) in patients with localized prostate cancer after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). This was a prospective study in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma who had been treated by IMRT (76 Gy) between February and November 2006. Physicians scored acute and late toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Patients completed cancer and prostate-specific QoL questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25) before IMRT (baseline) and at 2, 6, 18 and 54 months. Data were available for 38 patients (median age, 73 years) (18% low risk; 60% intermediate risk; 32% high risk). The incidence of urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was respectively: immediately post IMRT: 36.8% and 23.7% (grade 1), 5.3% and 5.3% (grade 2), 2.6% and 0% (grade 3); at 18 months: 23.7% and 10.3% (grade 1), 26.3% and 13.2% (grade 2), 0% and 2.6% (grade 3); at 54 months: 34.2% and 23.7% (grade 1), 5.3% and 15.8% (grade 2), 5.3% and 0% (grade 3). At 54 months, significant worsening was reported by patients for 11/19 QoL items but the worsening was clinically relevant (>10 points) for 7 items only: physical, role as well as social functioning, fatigue, pain, dyspnoea and constipation. There was no significant difference between 54-month and baseline QoL scores for global health, gastrointestinal symptoms, treatment-related symptoms and sexual function. However, there was significant - but clinically non-relevant (<10 points) - worsening of urinary symptom. High-dose IMRT to the prostate with accurate patient positioning did not induce any clinically relevant worsening in late urinary and gastrointestinal QoL at 54 months. Impaired physical and role functioning may be related to age and comorbidities

  20. Beam configuration selection for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy in cervical cancer using Pareto front comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, A. J. A. J.; Visser, J.; van Kesteren, Z.; Janssen, T. M.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Pareto front reflects the optimal trade-offs between conflicting objectives and can be used to quantify the effect of different beam configurations on plan robustness and dose-volume histogram parameters. Therefore, our aim was to develop and implement a method to automatically approach the Pareto front in robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning. Additionally, clinically relevant Pareto fronts based on different beam configurations will be derived and compared to enable beam configuration selection in cervical cancer proton therapy. A method to iteratively approach the Pareto front by automatically generating robustly optimized IMPT plans was developed. To verify plan quality, IMPT plans were evaluated on robustness by simulating range and position errors and recalculating the dose. For five retrospectively selected cervical cancer patients, this method was applied for IMPT plans with three different beam configurations using two, three and four beams. 3D Pareto fronts were optimized on target coverage (CTV D99%) and OAR doses (rectum V30Gy; bladder V40Gy). Per patient, proportions of non-approved IMPT plans were determined and differences between patient-specific Pareto fronts were quantified in terms of CTV D99%, rectum V30Gy and bladder V40Gy to perform beam configuration selection. Per patient and beam configuration, Pareto fronts were successfully sampled based on 200 IMPT plans of which on average 29% were non-approved plans. In all patients, IMPT plans based on the 2-beam set-up were completely dominated by plans with the 3-beam and 4-beam configuration. Compared to the 3-beam set-up, the 4-beam set-up increased the median CTV D99% on average by 0.2 Gy and decreased the median rectum V30Gy and median bladder V40Gy on average by 3.6% and 1.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates a method to automatically derive Pareto fronts in robust IMPT planning. For all patients, the defined four-beam configuration was found optimal in terms of

  1. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS), which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding) and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding). Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months). Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42%) observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%), although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62%) treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003) and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%). One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) and bleeding stopped in 5 (42%). After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories/enemas are expected to be effective. However, short

  2. Role of Principal Component Analysis in Predicting Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sia, Michael [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Clinical Study Co-ordination and Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Douglas; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Catton, Charles, E-mail: charles.catton@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine if principal component analysis (PCA) and standard parameters of rectal and bladder wall dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) can predict acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent hypo-IMRT at 3 Gy/fraction, 5 days/week to either 60 Gy or 66 Gy, with daily online image guidance. Acute and late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were recorded weekly during treatment and at each follow-up. All Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria toxicity scores were dichotomized as <2 and {>=}2. Standard dosimetric parameters and the first five to six principal components (PCs) of bladder and rectal wall DVHs were tested for association with the dichotomized toxicity outcomes, using logistic regression. Results: Median follow-up of all patients was 47 months (60 Gy cohort= 52 months; 66 Gy cohort= 31 months). The incidence rates of {>=}2 acute GI and GU toxicity were 14% and 29%, respectively, with no Grade {>=}3 acute GU toxicity. Late GI and GU toxicity scores {>=}2 were 16% and 15%, respectively. There was a significant difference in late GI toxicity {>=}2 when comparing the 66 Gy to the 60 Gy cohort (38% vs. 8%, respectively, p = 0.0003). The first PC of the rectal DVH was associated with late GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 6.91; p < 0.001), though it was not significantly stronger than standard DVH parameters such as Dmax (OR, 6.9; p < 0.001) or percentage of the organ receiving a 50% dose (V50) (OR, 5.95; p = 0 .001). Conclusions: Hypofractionated treatment with 60 Gy in 3 Gy fractions is well tolerated. There is a steep dose response curve between 60 Gy and 66 Gy for RTOG Grade {>=}2 GI effects with the dose constraints employed. Although PCA can predict late GI toxicity for patients treated with hypo-IMRT for prostate cancer, it provides no additional information

  3. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  4. Volumetric modulated arc therapy is superior to conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy - a comparison among prostate cancer patients treated in an Australian centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy technology is expanding rapidly. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) technologies such as RapidArc® (RA) may be a more efficient way of delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy-like (IM) treatments. This study is an audit of the RA experience in an Australian department with a planning and economic comparison to IM. 30 consecutive prostate cancer patients treated radically with RA were analyzed. Eight RA patients treated definitively were then completely re-planned with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D); and a conventional sliding window IM technique; and a new RA plan. The acceptable plans and their treatment times were compared and analyzed for any significant difference. Differences in staff costs of treatment were computed and analyzed. Thirty patients had been treated to date with eight being treated definitely to at least 74 Gy, nine post high dose brachytherapy (HDR) to 50.4Gy and 13 post prostatectomy to at least 64Gy. All radiotherapy courses were completed with no breaks. Acute rectal toxicity by the RTOG criteria was acceptable with 22 having no toxicity, seven with grade 1 and one had grade 2. Of the eight re-planned patients, none of the 3D (three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy) plans were acceptable based on local guidelines for dose to organs at risk. There was no statistically significant difference in planning times between IM and RA (p = 0.792). IM had significantly greater MUs per fraction (1813.9 vs 590.2 p < 0.001), total beam time per course (5.2 vs 3.1 hours, p = 0.001) and average treatment staff cost per patient radiotherapy course ($AUD489.91 vs $AUD315.66, p = 0.001). The mean saving in treatment staff cost for RA treatment was $AUD174.25 per patient. 3D was incapable of covering a modern radiotherapy volume for the radical treatment of prostate cancer. These volumes can be treated via conventional IM and RA. RA was significantly more efficient, safe and cost effective than IM. VMAT technologies are a superior way of

  5. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Khoo; Maureen Rolfo; Nigel Anderson; Morikatsu Wada; Aldo Rolfo; George Quong; Carmel Mantle; Angela Viotto; Joseph Sia; Daryl Lim Joon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with localised prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years). Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA) failure was defined according t...

  6. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Rana; Shyam Pokharel; Yuanshui Zheng; Li Zhao; Dina Risalvato; Carlos Vargas; Nancy Cersonsky

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT) scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the tre...

  7. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p+), the overall probability of injury (pI), the overall probability of control/benefit (pB), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D¯¯). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D¯¯ diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p+ index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of pB are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of pI are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (DB¯¯) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8 Gy

  8. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  9. The effect of photon energy on the intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for prostate cancer: a planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In-Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Woong; Suh, Tae-Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    In this study, the effect of the beam energy on the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan for prostate cancer was studied for competing IMRT plans optimized for delivery with either 6- or 15-MV photons. This retrospective planning study included 10 patients treated for localized prostate cancer at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. A dose of 66 Gy was prescribed in 33 daily fractions of 2 Gy. For inverse IMRT treatment planning, we used a 7-coplanar non-opposed beam arrangement at 0, 50, 100, 150, 210, 260, and 310 degree angles. To ensure that differences among the plans were due only to energy selection, the beam arrangement, number of beam, and dose constraints were kept constant for all plans. The dose volume histograms (DVHs) for the 6- and 15-MV plans were compared for the planning target volume (PTV) and for organs at risk (OAR), such as the rectum, bladder and both femoral heads. The conformal index was defined as the ratio of the 95% isodose volume divided by the PTV volume enclosed by the 95% isodose line, because we selected the 95% isodose line as our reference. Doses received by the 95% and 5% volume of the PTV were less than or equal to 1% for 6-MV compared to the 15-MV IMRT plan for 10 patients. Percentage of doses received by the 10% volume of the bladder and rectum were less than or equal to 1%. Percentage of doses received by the 30 and 50% volume of bladder and rectum were 1 {approx} 2% higher for 6-MV photons. Also, percentage of dose received by the 10% and 50% volume of the right and the left femur heads were 4 {approx} 5% higher for 6-MV photons. The mean homogeneity index for the 6-MV and 15-MV photon plans was 1.06. The mean conformity index of 95% was 1.04 {+-} 0.01 and 1.12 {+-} 0.02 for 6-MV and 15-MV, respectively, but this difference was not statistically significant. The mean monitor unit was 812 {+-} 40 and 716 {+-} 33 for the 6-MV and the 15-MV photon plans, respectively. The 6-MV photon plan delivers 13

  10. Effect of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy on the Risk of Mucositis During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the risk of Grade 3+ mucositis during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: 164 consecutive patients treated with IMRT at two institutions in nonoverlapping treatment eras were selected. All patients were treated with a dose painting approach, three dose levels, and comprehensive bilateral neck treatment under the supervision of the same radiation oncologist. Ninety-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy (cCHT) and 14 received induction chemotherapy (iCHT). Individual information of the dose received by the oral mucosa (OM) was extracted as absolute cumulative dose–volume histogram (DVH), corrected for the elapsed treatment days and reported as weekly (w) DVH. Patients were seen weekly during treatment, and peak acute toxicity equal to or greater than confluent mucositis at any point during the course of IMRT was considered the endpoint. Results: Overall, 129 patients (78.7%) reached the endpoint. The regions that best discriminated between patients with/without Grade 3+ mucositis were found at 10.1 Gy/w (V10.1) and 21 cc (D21), along the x-axis and y-axis of the OM-wDVH, respectively. On multivariate analysis, D21 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009–1.023, p < 0.001) and cCHT (OR = 4.118, 95% CI, 1.659–10.217, p = 0.002) were the only independent predictors. However, V10.1 and D21 were highly correlated (rho = 0.954, p < 0.001) and mutually interchangeable. cCHT would correspond to 88.4 cGy/w to at least 21 cc of OM. Conclusions: Radiotherapy and chemotherapy act independently in determining acute mucosal toxicity; cCHT increases the risk of mucosal Grade 3 toxicity ≈4 times over radiation therapy alone, and it is equivalent to an extra ≈6.2 Gy to 21 cc of OM over a 7-week course.

  11. Effect of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy on the Risk of Mucositis During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gsangui1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sormani, Maria Pia [Department of Biostatistics, University of Genoa (Italy); Marur, Shanthi [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon; Rao, Nikhil; Cianchetti, Marco [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Ricchetti, Francesco; McNutt, Todd; Wu Binbin [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To define the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the risk of Grade 3+ mucositis during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: 164 consecutive patients treated with IMRT at two institutions in nonoverlapping treatment eras were selected. All patients were treated with a dose painting approach, three dose levels, and comprehensive bilateral neck treatment under the supervision of the same radiation oncologist. Ninety-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy (cCHT) and 14 received induction chemotherapy (iCHT). Individual information of the dose received by the oral mucosa (OM) was extracted as absolute cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), corrected for the elapsed treatment days and reported as weekly (w) DVH. Patients were seen weekly during treatment, and peak acute toxicity equal to or greater than confluent mucositis at any point during the course of IMRT was considered the endpoint. Results: Overall, 129 patients (78.7%) reached the endpoint. The regions that best discriminated between patients with/without Grade 3+ mucositis were found at 10.1 Gy/w (V10.1) and 21 cc (D21), along the x-axis and y-axis of the OM-wDVH, respectively. On multivariate analysis, D21 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.023, p < 0.001) and cCHT (OR = 4.118, 95% CI, 1.659-10.217, p = 0.002) were the only independent predictors. However, V10.1 and D21 were highly correlated (rho = 0.954, p < 0.001) and mutually interchangeable. cCHT would correspond to 88.4 cGy/w to at least 21 cc of OM. Conclusions: Radiotherapy and chemotherapy act independently in determining acute mucosal toxicity; cCHT increases the risk of mucosal Grade 3 toxicity Almost-Equal-To 4 times over radiation therapy alone, and it is equivalent to an extra Almost-Equal-To 6.2 Gy to 21 cc of OM over a 7-week course.

  12. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ling-ling; FENG Lin-chun; WANG Yun-lai; DAI Xiang-kun; XIE Chuan-bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique.It is reported that HT plan for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can give better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the lung than IMRT plan. We compared the dosimetric characteristics of HT for NSCLC with those of conventional IMRT to observe the superiority of HT.Methods There was a comparative case series comprising 10 patients with NSCLC. Computed tomographic (CT) images of delineated targets were transferred to the PrecisePlan planning system (IMRT) and Tomo planning system (HT). The prescription doses were 70 Gy/33F for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the visible lymph nodes (GTVnd),and 60 Gy/33F for the clinical target volume (CTV) and the clinical target volume of the visible lymph nodes (CTVnd). The dose restrictions for organs at risk were as follows: the maximum dose to spinal cord ≤45 Gy, V20 to the total lungs <30%,V50 to the heart <50%, and V55 to the esophagus <50%. Both plans were evaluated by means of the dose coverage of the targets, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and other dosimetric indices.Results The dose coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the targets' volumes were found to be satisfactory in both plans, but the homogeneity of the HT plan was better than that of IMRT. The high-dose radiation volume (V20-V30) to the lung and the mean lung dose (MLD) decreased (P<0.05), but the low-dose radiation volume (V5-V10) increased slightly in the HT plan (P>0.05). The maximum doses to the spinal cord, heart, esophagus and trachea in the HT plan were lower than those in the IMRT plan, but the differences were not statistically significant.Conclusions The HT plan provids better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protectiqn for the organs at risk. It can reduce the high-dose radiation volume for lung and the MLD, but may deliver a larger lung volume of low-dose radiation.

  13. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in anal canal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aillères Norbert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans in anal canal cancers. Methods Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1 and a double (RA2 modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2 based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1 was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU and delivery treatment time were also reported. Results All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p Conformity index (CI95% for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2, 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT, and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1. Homogeneity (D5% - D95% for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2, 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT, and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1. RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted

  14. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans in anal canal cancers. Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1) and a double (RA2) modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2) based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1) was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue) were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU) and delivery treatment time were also reported. All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p < 0.05). Conformity index (CI95%) for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2), 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT), and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1). Homogeneity (D5% - D95%) for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2), 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT), and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1). RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted in comparable sparing for

  15. Locally advanced cervical cancer: Should intensity-modulated radiotherapy replace brachytherapy?; Complement d'irradiation dans le cancer du col de l'uterus localement evolue: curietherapie uterovaginale ou radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, R.; Gilmore, J.; Khodari, W.; Dumas, I.; Haie-Meder, C. [Service de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMRT) is booming as treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. This technique reduces the doses delivered to organs at risk and, by analogy to the irradiation of prostate cancer, opens the door to the possibility of dose escalation to levels close or similar to those achieved by brachytherapy. To date, several studies comparing IMRT with brachytherapy have been published, often methodologically flawed, concluding sometimes that both techniques are comparable. These results should be taken with extreme caution and should not overshadow the recent advances in brachytherapy with the use of 3D imaging and optimization. Preliminary works also showed that the combination of 3D optimized brachytherapy with IMRT could improve the management of the local disease especially for lesions poorly covered by intracavitary techniques. (authors)

  16. SU-E-T-62: Cardiac Toxicity in Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, X; Zhang, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Feng, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhou, L [West China Hospital, Sichuan (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Deng, J [Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The cardiac toxicity for lung cancer patients, each treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DAT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is investigated. Methods: 120 lung patients were selected for this study: 25 treated with DAT, 50 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. For comparison, all plans were generated in the same treatment planning system, normalized such that the 100% isodose lines encompassed 95% of planning target volume. The plan quality was evaluated in terms of homogeneity index (HI) and 95% conformity index (%95 CI) for target dose coverage and mean dose, maximum dose, V{sub 30} Gy as well as V{sub 5} Gy for cardiac toxicity analysis. Results: When all the plans were analyzed, the VMAT plans offered the best target coverage with 95% CI = 0.992 and HI = 1.23. The DAT plans provided the best heart sparing with mean heart dose = 2.3Gy and maximum dose = 11.6Gy, as compared to 5.7 Gy and 31.1 Gy by IMRT as well as 4.6 Gy and 30.9 Gy by VMAT. The mean V30Gy and V5Gy of the heart in the DAT plans were up to 11.7% lower in comparison to the IMRT and VMAT plans. When the tumor volume was considered, the VMAT plans spared up to 70.9% more doses to the heart when the equivalent diameter of the tumor was larger than 4cm. Yet the maximum dose to the heart was reduced the most in the DAT plans with up to 139.8% less than that of the other two plans. Conclusion: Overall, the VMAT plans achieved the best target coverage among the three treatment modalities, and would spare the heart the most for the larger tumors. The DAT plans appeared advantageous in delivering the least maximum dose to the heart as compared to the IMRT and VMAT plans.

  17. Treatment of left sided breast cancer for a patient with funnel chest: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs. 3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This case study presents a rare case of left-sided breast cancer in a patient with funnel chest, which is a technical challenge for radiation therapy planning. To identify the best treatment technique for this case, 3 techniques were compared: conventional tangential fields (3D conformal radiotherapy [3D-CRT]), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The plans were created for a SynergyS® (Elekta, Ltd, Crawley, UK) linear accelerator with a BeamModulator™ head and 6-MV photons. The planning system was Oncentra Masterplan® v3.3 SP1 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, Netherlands). Calculations were performed with collapsed cone algorithm. Dose prescription was 50.4 Gy to the average of the planning target volume (PTV). PTV coverage and homogeneity was comparable for all techniques. VMAT allowed reducing dose to the ipsilateral organs at risk (OAR) and the contralateral breast compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT: The volume of the left lung receiving 20 Gy was 19.3% for VMAT, 26.1% for IMRT, and 32.4% for 3D-CRT. In the heart, a D15% of 9.7 Gy could be achieved with VMAT compared with 14 Gy for IMRT and 46 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral breast, D15% was 6.4 Gy for VMAT, 8.8 Gy for IMRT, and 10.2 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral lung, however, the lowest dose was achieved with 3D-CRT with D10% of 1.7 Gy for 3D-CRT, and 6.7 Gy for both IMRT and VMAT. The lowest number of monitor units (MU) per 1.8-Gy fraction was required by 3D-CRT (192 MU) followed by VMAT (518 MU) and IMRT (727 MU). Treatment time was similar for 3D-CRT (3 min) and VMAT (4 min) but substantially increased for IMRT (13 min). VMAT is considered the best treatment option for the presented case of a patient with funnel chest. It allows reducing dose in most OAR without compromising target coverage, keeping delivery time well below 5 minutes

  18. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  19. Monte Carlo calculations support organ sparing in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Sibolt, Patrik; Larsen, Christina;

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies indicate that Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) is advantageous over Free-Breathing (FB) for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy. However, these studies were based on simplified dose calculation algorithms, potentially critical due to the heterogeneous nature...... of the lung region. Using detailed Monte-Carlo (MC) calculations, a comparative study of DIBH vs. FB was therefore designed. Material and methods: Eighteen locally advanced lung cancer patients underwent FB and DIBH CT imaging and treatment planning with the Anisotropic-Analytical-Algorithm (AAA......) for intensity-modulated-radio therapy or volumetric-modulated-arc-therapy using 66 Gy in 33 fractions. All plans were re-calculated with MC. Results: Relative to FB, the total lung volume increased 86.8% in DIBH, while the gross tumor volume decreased 14.8%. MC revealed equally under- and over...

  20. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Analysis of interfractional errors and acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, A.; Hammoud, M.; Alaradi, A.; Mohammed, A. [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of the study was to estimate interfractional deviations in patient and prostate position, the impact of the frequency of online verification on the treatment margins, and to assess acute radiation reactions of high-dose external beam image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) of localized prostate cancer. IG-IMRT was performed by daily online verification of implanted fiducial prostate markers using a megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A total of 1011 image-guided treatment fractions from 23 consecutive unselected prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The median total dose was 79.2 Gy (range 77.4-81.0 Gy). Acute radiation reactions were assessed weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.4.03. A relevant combined patient set-up and prostate motion population random error of 4-5 mm was observed. Compared to daily IGRT, image guidance every other day required an expansion of the CTV-PTV (clinical target volume-planning target volume) margin of 8.1, 6.6, and 4.1 mm in the longitudinal, vertical, and lateral directions, thereby, increasing the PTV by approximately 30-40 %. No grade 3 or 4 acute radiation reactions were observed with daily IG-IMRT. A high dose with surprisingly low acute toxicity can be applied with daily IG-IMRT using implanted fiducial prostate markers. Daily image guidance is clearly superior to image guidance every other fraction concerning adequate target coverage with minimal margins. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die interfraktionelle Variabilitaet der Patientenlagerung und Prostataposition, den Einfluss der Bildgebungsfrequenz und die akuten Strahlenreaktionen bei einer hochdosierten bildgesteuerten intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IG-IMRT) des Prostatakarzinoms zu untersuchen. IG-IMRT wurde durch taegliche Verifikation von implantierten roentgendichten Prostatamarkern mittels Megavolt-Bildgebung (''electronic portal imaging

  1. Implementation and utility of a daily ultrasound-based localization system with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of daily computer-assisted transabdominal ultrasonography for target position verification in the setting of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated using a sequential tomotherapy IMRT technique (Peacock) and daily computer-assisted transabdominal ultrasonography (BAT) for target localization. Patients were instructed to maintain a full bladder and were placed in the supine position using triangulation tattoos and a leg immobilizer to minimize pelvic rotation. The BAT ultrasound system is docked to the treatment collimator and electronically imports the CT simulation target contours and isocenter. The system is able to use the machine isocenter as a reference point to overlay the corresponding CT contours onto the ultrasound images captured in the transverse and sagittal planes. A touch screen menu is used to maneuver the CT contours in three dimensions such that they match the ultrasound images. The system then displays the three-dimensional couch shifts required to produce field alignment. Data were prospectively collected to measure the frequency by which useful ultrasound images were obtained, the amount of time required for localization/setup, and the direction/magnitude of the positional adjustments. Results: Of the 23 patients, the BAT ultrasound system produced images of sufficient quality to perform the overlay of the CT contours in 19 patients such that positional verification could be reliably performed. Poor image quality was associated with patient inability to maintain a full bladder, large body habitus, or other anatomic constraints. Of the 19 assessable patients, a total of 185 treatment alignments were performed (mean 8.8/patient). For all cases, the average time required for the daily ultrasound imaging and positional adjustments was 11.9 min. After the initial 5 cases, the user

  2. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichbaum Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. Methods/design The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border, heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Discussion Intensity-modulated WAR provides

  3. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border), heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Intensity-modulated WAR provides a new promising option in the consolidation treatment of

  4. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment delivery technique that can improve the therapeutic dose ratio. Its use in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This report reviews our experience with IMRT for patients with inoperable NSCLC. Methods and materials: We performed a retrospective review of 55 patients with stage I-IIIB inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT at our institution between 2001 and 2005. The study endpoints were toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results: With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 2-year local control and overall survival rates for stage I/II patients were 50% and 55%, respectively. For the stage III patients, 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 58% and 58%, respectively, with a median survival time of 25 months. Six patients (11%) experienced grade 3 acute pulmonary toxicity. There were no acute treatment-related deaths. Two patients (4%) had grade 3 or worse late treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT treatment resulted in promising outcomes for inoperable NSCLC patients

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27–91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3–135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia ≥Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy as Primary Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Report on Acute Toxicity After Dose Escalation With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report on the acute toxicity of a third escalation level using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa) and the acute toxicity resulting from delivery of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without spectroscopy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and March 2007, we treated 230 patients with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a third escalation level as primary therapy for prostate cancer. If an IPL (defined by MRI or MRI plus spectroscopy) was present, a SIB was delivered to the IPL. To report on acute toxicity, patients were seen weekly during treatment and 1 and 3 months after treatment. Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity scale, supplemented by an in-house-developed scoring system. Results: The median dose to the planning target volume was 78 Gy. An IPL was found in 118 patients. The median dose to the MRI-detected IPL and MRI plus spectroscopy-detected IPL was 81 Gy and 82 Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity developed. Grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was present in 26 patients (11%). Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was present in 15 patients (7%), and 95 patients developed Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity (41%). No statistically significant increase was found in Grade 2-3 acute gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity after a SIB to an IPL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that treatment-induced acute toxicity remains low when intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 80 Gy as primary therapy for prostate cancer is used. In addition, a SIB to an IPL did not increase the severity or incidence of acute toxicity

  8. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. Minimization of late dysphagia without jeopardizing tumor control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modesto, Anouchka; Laprie, Anne; Graff, Pierre; Rives, Michel [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Vieillevigne, Laure [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Medical Physics, Toulouse (France); Sarini, Jerome; Vergez, Sebastien; Farenc, Jean-Claude [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Toulouse (France); Delord, Jean-Pierre [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Medical Oncology, Toulouse (France); Vigarios, Emmanuelle [Centre Hospitalo Universitaire de Rangueil, Dental Surgery Department, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France)

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to retrospectively determine the value of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LHSCC), on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). A total of 175 consecutive patients were treated between 2007 and 2012 at our institution with curative intent RT and were included in this study: 90 were treated with 3D-CRT and 85 with IMRT. Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier statistics; acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events scale v 3.0. Median follow-up was 35 months (range 32-42 months; 95% confidence interval 95 %). Two-year disease-free survival did not vary, regardless of the technique used (69 % for 3D-CRT vs. 72 %; for IMRT, p = 0.16). Variables evaluated as severe late toxicities were all statistically lower with IMRT compared with 3D-CRT: xerostomia (0 vs. 12 %; p < 0.0001), dysphagia (4 vs. 26 %; p < 0.0001), and feeding-tube dependency (1 vs 13 %; p = 0.0044). The rates of overall grade ≥ 3 late toxicities for the IMRT and 3D-CRT groups were 4.1 vs. 41.4 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). IMRT for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer minimizes late dysphagia without jeopardizing tumor control and outcome. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war es, retrospektiv den Nutzen der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) in der Behandlung von Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinom von Kehlkopf und Hypopharynx (LHSCC) zu bewerten und mit dem Outcome und den Spaetfolgen der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3D-CRT) zu vergleichen. Insgesamt wurden zwischen Januar 2007 und Dezember 2012175 LHSCC-Patienten mit einer RT behandelt und in die Studie aufgenommen: 85 Patienten wurden mit 3D-CRT und 90 Patienten mit IMRT behandelt.Das onkologische Outcome wurde mittels Kaplan-Meier-Statistik ermittelt und Akut- und Spaettoxizitaeten anhand der CTCAE

  9. Feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Dan; QIN, Qin; Hao, Shaoyu; Huang, Wei; Wei, Yumei; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Zhongtang; LI, BAOSHENG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC). Methods Patients with LD-SCLC were treated with SIB-IMRT within 1 week after completion of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy. Then 2-4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were administered within 1 week after SIB-IMRT. Irradiation was given accelerated hyper-fractionated with the prescribed dose 57Gy ...

  10. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered “excellent”, 33% “good”, and 900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a “fair/poor” cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with “fair/poor” physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported “excellent”, “good”, and “fair/poor” cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with “fair/poor” outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose ≥16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83%-98% “good/excellent” cosmetic outcomes, and minimal

  11. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Lanea M.M., E-mail: Lanea.Keller@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sopka, Dennis M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and <1.5% 'fair/poor'. For physician-reported cosmesis, boost doses {>=}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy

  12. Application of the measurement-based Monte Carlo method in nasopharyngeal cancer patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to utilize a measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method to evaluate the accuracy of dose distributions calculated using the Eclipse radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) based on the anisotropic analytical algorithm. Dose distributions were calculated for the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten NPC IMRT plans were evaluated by comparing their dose distributions with those obtained from the in-house MBMC programs for the same CT images and beam geometry. To reconstruct the fluence distribution of the IMRT field, an efficiency map was obtained by dividing the energy fluence of the intensity modulated field by that of the open field, both acquired from an aS1000 electronic portal imaging device. The integrated image of the non-gated mode was used to acquire the full dose distribution delivered during the IMRT treatment. This efficiency map redistributed the particle weightings of the open field phase-space file for IMRT applications. Dose differences were observed in the tumor and air cavity boundary. The mean difference between MBMC and TPS in terms of the planning target volume coverage was 0.6% (range: 0.0–2.3%). The mean difference for the conformity index was 0.01 (range: 0.0–0.01). In conclusion, the MBMC method serves as an independent IMRT dose verification tool in a clinical setting. - Highlights: ► The patient-based Monte Carlo method serves as a reference standard to verify IMRT doses. ► 3D Dose distributions for NPC patients have been verified by the Monte Carlo method. ► Doses predicted by the Monte Carlo method matched closely with those by the TPS. ► The Monte Carlo method predicted a higher mean dose to the middle ears than the TPS. ► Critical organ doses should be confirmed to avoid overdose to normal organs

  13. Large planning target volume in whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers - a comparison between volumetric arc and fixed beam based intensity modulation in ovarian cancers: a comparison between volumetric arc and fixed beam based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this study is to assess dosimetric characteristics of multiple iso-centre volumetric-modulated arc therapy for the treatment of a large PTV in whole abdomen and ovarian cancers and in comparison with IMRT. Two patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) underwent CT-simulation in supine position with vacuum cushion and acquired CT-image with 3 mm slice thickness. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated with multiple isocenter using Eclipse Planning System (V10.0.39) for (6 MV photon) Varian UNIQUE Performance Linac equipped with a Millennium-120 MLC and optimised with Progressive Resolution optimizer (PRO3) for prescription 36 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTVWAR) and 45 Gy with daily fraction of 1.8 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTVPelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost and calculated with AAA algorithm in 2.5 mm grid resolution. Mean, V95%, V90%, V107% and uniformity number (Uniformity was defined as US-95%=D5%-D95%/Dmean) was calculated for Planning Target Volumes (PTVs). Organs at Risk (OAR's) were analysed statistically in terms of dose and volume. MU and delivery time were compared. Pre-treatment quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAl) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds with EPID as well as corresponding Dynalog files were generated and analysed. Feasibility and deliverability of VMAT plans showed to be a solution for the treatment planning and delivery for a large PTV volume (PTV-WAR) treatments, surrounded by critical structures such as liver, spinal canal, and kidneys, offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT. VMAT combines the advantages of faster delivery and lower number of monitor units (MU). It would help to reduce potential risk of secondary malignancy. VMAT(RapidArc) showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  14. Accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation: results of a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to investigate the local effects and toxicity of accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. Twenty-two patients with recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer who previously received pelvic irradiation were enrolled in our single-center trial between January 2007 and August 2012. Reirradiation was scheduled for up to 39 Gy in 30 fractions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose was delivered via a hyperfractionation schedule of 1.3 Gy twice daily. Patient follow-up was performed by clinical examination, CT/MRI, or PET/CT every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months thereafter. Tumor response was evaluated 1 month after reirradiation by CT/MRI based on the RECIST criteria. Adverse events were assessed using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) common toxicity criteria (version 3.0). The median time from the end of the initial radiation therapy to reirradiation was 30 months (range, 18-93 months). Overall local responses were observed in 9 patients (40.9%). None of the patients achieved a complete response (CR), and 9 patients (40.9%) had a partial response (PR). Thirteen patients failed to achieve a clinical response: 12 (54.5%) presented with stable disease (SD) and 1 (4.5%) with progressive disease (PD). Among all the patients who underwent reirradiation, partial or complete symptomatic relief was achieved in 6 patients (27.3%) and 13 patients (59.1%), respectively. Grade 4 acute toxicity and treatment-related deaths were not observed. The following grade 3 acute toxicities were observed: diarrhea (2 patients, 9.1%), cystitis (1 patient, 4.5%), dermatitis (1 patient, 4.5%), and intestinal obstruction (1 patient, 4.5%). Late toxicity was infrequent. Chronic severe diarrhea, small bowel obstruction, and dysuria were observed in 2 (9.1%), 1 (4.5%) and 2 (9.1%) of the patients, respectively. This study showed that

  15. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained from dosimetric systems with intensity modulated radiotherapy planning system in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, M.; Uslu, D. Koçyiǧit; Ertunç, C.; Karalı, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan of prostate cancer patients with different dose verification systems in dosimetric aspects and to compare these systems with each other in terms of reliability, applicability and application time. Dosimetric control processes of IMRT plan of three prostate cancer patients were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), ion chamber (IC) and 2D Array detector systems. The difference between the dose values obtained from the dosimetric systems and treatment planning system (TPS) were found to be about % 5. For the measured (TLD) and calculated (TPS) doses %3 percentage differences were obtained for the points close to center while percentage differences increased at the field edges. It was found that TLD and IC measurements will increase the precision and reliability of the results of 2D Array.

  16. Patterns of Care and Outcomes Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Older Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) requires a high degree of expertise compared with standard radiation therapy (RT). We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare patients treated with IMRT compared with standard RT to assess outcomes in national practice. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified patients treated with radiation for cancer of the head and neck from 2002 to 2005. We used multivariate Cox models to determine whether the receipt of IMRT was associated with differences in survival. Results: We identified 1613 patients, 33.7% of whom received IMRT. IMRT was not associated with differences in survival: the 3-year overall survival was 50.5% for IMRT vs. 49.6% for standard RT (p = 0.47). The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 60.0% for IMRT vs. 58.8% (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Despite its complexity and resource intensive nature, IMRT use seems to be as safe as standard RT in national community practice, because the use of IMRT did not have an adverse impact on survival.

  17. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Khoo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for patients with localised prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years. Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus definition (absolute nadir + 2ng/mL. Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate toxicity rates, as well as the risks of bPSA failure, distant metastases, disease-specific and overall survival, at 5 and 8-years post treatment. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy without any treatment breaks. The 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 2 genitourinary (GU and gastrointestinal (GI toxicity were 6.4% and 5.8% respectively, and the 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity were both < 0.05%. The 5 and 8-year freedom from bPSA failure were 76% and 58% respectively. Disease-specific survival at 5 and 8 years were 95% and 91%, respectively, and overall survival at 5 and 8 years were 90% and 71%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm existing international data regarding the safety and efficacy of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localised prostate cancer within an Australian setting.

  18. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment) and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity) were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4). In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used

  19. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sia, Joseph; Joon, Daryl Lim; Viotto, Angela; Mantle, Carmel [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Quong, George; Rolfo, Aldo [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Radiation Oncology Victoria, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Wada, Morikatsu; Anderson, Nigel; Rolfo, Maureen [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3053 (Australia); Royal Marsden Hospital & Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with localised prostate cancer. From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years). Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA) failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus definition (absolute nadir + 2ng/mL). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate toxicity rates, as well as the risks of bPSA failure, distant metastases, disease-specific and overall survival, at 5 and 8-years post treatment. All patients completed radiotherapy without any treatment breaks. The 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 2 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were 6.4% and 5.8% respectively, and the 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity were both < 0.05%. The 5 and 8-year freedom from bPSA failure were 76% and 58% respectively. Disease-specific survival at 5 and 8 years were 95% and 91%, respectively, and overall survival at 5 and 8 years were 90% and 71%, respectively. These results confirm existing international data regarding the safety and efficacy of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localised prostate cancer within an Australian setting.

  20. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  1. Impact of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Matched-Pair Comparison with Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with conventional RT for the quality of life (QOL) of head and neck cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Cross-sectional QOL measures (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire C30 and head and neck cancer module) were used with a French multicenter cohort of patients cured of head and neck cancer (follow-up ≥ 1 year) who had received bilateral neck RT (≥ 45 Gy) as a part of their initial treatment. We compared the QOL mean scores regarding RT modality (conventional RT vs. IMRT). The patients of the two groups were matched (one to one) according to the delay between the end of RT and the timing of the QOL evaluation and the T stage. Each QOL item was divided into two relevant levels of severity: 'not severe' (responses, 'not at all' and 'a little') vs. 'severe' (responses 'quite a bit' and 'very much'). The association between the type of RT and the prevalence of severe symptoms was approximated, through multivariate analysis using the prevalence odds ratio. Results: Two comparable groups (67 pairs) were available. Better scores were observed on the head and neck cancer module QOL questionnaire for the IMRT group, especially for dry mouth and sticky saliva (p < 0.0001). Severe symptoms were more frequent with conventional RT concerning saliva modifications and oral discomfort. The adjusted prevalence odds ratios were 3.17 (p = 0.04) for dry mouth, 3.16 (p = 0.02) for sticky saliva, 3.58 (p = 0.02) for pain in the mouth, 3.35 (p = 0.04) for pain in the jaw, 2.60 (p = 0.02) for difficulties opening the mouth, 2.76 (p = 0.02) for difficulties with swallowing, and 2.68 (p = 0.03) for trouble with eating. Conclusion: The QOL assessment of head and neck cancer survivors demonstrated the benefit of IMRT, particularly in the areas of salivary dysfunction and oral discomfort

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Franchin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88% of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67, the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4 resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; P=0.04, while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx was not significant (P=0.35. Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers) were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil) followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88%) of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67), the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4) resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; (Ρ =0.35),while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx) was not significant (Ρ =0.35). Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  4. Submandibular gland-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Sites of locoregional relapse and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the patterns of locoregional relapse and survival following submandibular gland (SMG)-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and methods: Eighty patients with laryngeal (n = 15), oropharyngeal (n = 50), hypopharyngeal (n = 11) or nasopharyngeal cancer (n = 4) were treated by submandibular gland-sparing IMRT for head and neck squamous cell cancer between July 2000 and December 2008. All patients were treated by bilateral IMRT. Thirty-nine (49%) received definitive radiotherapy (RT) and 41 (51%) postoperative RT. The contralateral parotid gland (PG) and SMG were included in the dose optimization planning program with intent to keep the mean doses for PG and SMG below 23 Gy and 28-30 Gy, respectively. The ipsilateral glands were also spared when considered feasible. Results: During a median follow-up time of 51 months (range, 24-117 months) nine local recurrent tumors were observed. Four of these nine patients were salvaged by surgery with no further recurrence. All local recurrences were located within the high-dose CTVs. None of the locally recurrent cancers were located at the vicinity of the spared PGs or SMGs. No recurrent tumors were observed in the contralateral neck. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for local control at five years following IMRT was 88 % for the whole cohort and the corresponding figure for local control following salvage surgery was 94 %. The estimates for five-year overall survival and disease-specific survival were 85 % and 90 %, respectively. Conclusion. In selected head and neck cancer patients who are estimated to have a low risk of cancer recurrence at the nodal levels I-II and who are treated with SMG-sparing IMRT the risk of cancer recurrence at the vicinity of the spared salivary glands is low

  5. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT

  6. Evolution of treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer – Success and setback in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To assess the therapeutic gains and setbacks as we evolved from the 2-dimensional radiotherapy (2DRT) to conformal 3-dimensional (3DRT) and to intensity-modulated (IMRT) era. Materials and methods: 1593 consecutive patients from 1994 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Evolving changes in the different era included advances in staging investigation, radiotherapy technique, dose escalation, and use of chemotherapy. Results: The 3DRT era achieved significant improvement in local failure-free rate (L-FFR), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). Neurological damage and bone/soft tissue necrosis were significantly reduced. However, the improvement in distant failure-free rate (D-FFR) was insignificant, and more hearing impairment occurred due to chemotherapy. Significantly higher D-FFR was achieved in the IMRT era, but L-FFR did not show further improvement. 5-Year DSS increased from 78% in the 2DRT, to 81% in the 3DRT, and 85% in the IMRT era, while the corresponding neurological toxicity rate decreased from 7.4% to 3.5% and 1.8%. Conclusions: Significant improvement in survival and reduction of serious toxicity was achieved as we evolved from 2DRT to 3DRT and IMRT era; the therapeutic ratio for all T-categories improved with more conformal techniques. Improvements in tumor control were attributed not only to advances in RT technique, but also to better imaging and increasing use of potent chemotherapy. However, it should also be noted that hearing impairment significantly increased due to chemotherapy, L-FFR reached a plateau in the 3DRT era, and it is worrisome that the result for T4 remained unsatisfactory. Besides exploring for more potent chemotherapy and innovative methods, the guideline on dose constraint should be re-visited to optimize the therapeutic ratio

  7. Brachial plexus dose tolerance in head and neck cancer patients treated with sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to study the radiation induced brachial plexopathy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with Sequential Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (S-IMRT). This IRB approved study included 68 patients with HNSCC treated consecutively. Detailed dose volume histogram data was generated for ipsilateral and contralateral brachial plexus (BP) volumes receiving a specified dose (Vds) i.e. V50-V75 and dose in Gray covering specified percent of BP volume (Dvs) i.e. D5-D30 and maximum point doses (Dmax). To assess BP injury all patients’ charts were reviewed in detail for sign and symptoms of BP damage. Post-hoc comparisons were done using Tukey-Kramer method to account for multiple significance testing. The mean and maximum doses to BP were significantly different (p < .05) based on tumor site, nodal status and tumor stage. The mean volume to the ipsilateral BP for V50, V60, V70, and V75 were 7.01 cc, 4.37 cc, 1.47 cc and 0.24 cc, respectively. The mean dose delivered to ≤5% of ipsilateral BP was 68.70 Gy (median 69.5Gy). None of the patients had acute or late brachial plexopathy or any other significant neurological complications, with a minimum follow up of two years (mean 54 months). In this study cohort, at a minimum of two-years follow up, the mean dose of 68.7Gy, a median dose to 69.5Gy to ≤5% of ipsilateral BP, and a median Dmax of 72.96Gy did not result in BP injury when patients were treated with S-IMRT technique. However, longer follow up is needed

  8. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V18 Gy), stomach (mean and V20 Gy), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V18 Gy), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V20 Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V15 Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing chemotherapy

  9. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  10. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Noncoplanar Beams for Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prosthesis-A Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megavoltage photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is typically used in the treatment of prostate cancer at our institution. Approximately 1% to 2% of patients with prostate cancer have hip prostheses. The presence of the prosthesis usually complicates the planning process because of dose perturbation around the prosthesis, radiation attenuation through the prosthesis, and the introduction of computed tomography artifacts in the planning volume. In addition, hip prostheses are typically made of materials of high atomic number, which add uncertainty to the dosimetry of the prostate and critical organs in the planning volume. When the prosthesis is bilateral, treatment planning is further complicated because only a limited number of beam angles can be used to avoid the prostheses. In this case study, we will report the observed advantages of using noncoplanar beams in the delivery of IMRT to a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip prostheses. The treatment was planned for 75.6 Gy using a 7-field coplanar approach and a noncoplanar arrangement, with all fields avoiding entrance though the prostheses. Our results indicate that, compared with the coplanar plan, the noncoplanar plan delivers the prescribed dose to the target with a slightly better conformality and sparing of rectal tissue versus the coplanar plan.

  12. Pitfalls and Challenges to Consider before Setting up a Lung Cancer Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Service: A Review of the Reported Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, R K; Mahata, A; Reddy, G D; Franks, K N; Chatterjee, S

    2016-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), despite the absence of published randomised controlled trials. Planning studies and retrospective series have shown a decrease in known predictors of lung toxicity (V20 and mean lung dose) and the maximum spinal cord dose. Potential dosimetric advantages, accessibility of technology, a desire to escalate dose or a need to meet normal organ dose constraints are some of the factors recognised as supporting the use of IMRT. However, IMRT may not be appropriate for all patients being treated with radical radiotherapy. Unique problems with using IMRT for NSCLC include organ and tumour motion because of breathing and the potential toxicity from low doses of radiotherapy to larger amounts of lung tissue. Caution should be exercised as there is a paucity of prospective data regarding the efficacy and safety of IMRT in lung cancer when compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT data from other cancer sites should not be extrapolated. This review looks at the use of IMRT in NSCLC, addresses the challenges and highlights the potential benefits of using this complex radiotherapy technique. PMID:26329504

  13. Investigation of conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques to determine the absorbed fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öğretici, Akın; Akbaş, Uğur; Köksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the fetal doses of pregnant patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancers. An Alderson Rando phantom was chosen to simulate a pregnant patient with breast cancer who is receiving radiation therapy. This phantom was irradiated using the Varian Clinac DBX 600 system (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) linear accelerator, according to the standard treatment plans of both three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) and IMRT techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the irradiated phantom׳s virtually designated uterus area. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements (in the phantom) revealed that the mean cumulative fetal dose for 3-D CRT is 1.39cGy and for IMRT it is 8.48cGy, for a pregnant breast cancer woman who received radiation treatment of 50Gy. The fetal dose was confirmed to increase by 70% for 3-D CRT and 40% for IMRT, if it is closer to the irradiated field by 5cm. The mean fetal dose from 3-D CRT is 1.39cGy and IMRT is 8.48cGy, consistent with theoretic calculations. The IMRT technique causes the fetal dose to be 5 times more than that of 3-D CRT. Theoretic knowledge concerning the increase in the peripheral doses as the measurements approached the beam was also practically proven. PMID:26831923

  14. Analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, Proton and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT for Reducing Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted C. Ling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. While neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy has improved outcomes for esophageal cancer patients, surgical complication rates remain high. The most frequent perioperative complications after trimodality therapy were cardiopulmonary in nature. The radiation modality utilized can be a strong mitigating factor of perioperative complications given the location of the esophagus and its proximity to the heart and lungs. The purpose of this study is to make a dosimetric comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, proton and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with regard to reducing perioperative cardiopulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients. Materials. Ten patients with esophageal cancer treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using proton radiotherapy, IMRT, and 3D-CRT modalities were created for each patient. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and analyzed to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR being evaluated in this study are the heart, lungs, and spinal cord. To determine statistical significance, ANOVA and two-tailed paired t-tests were performed for all data parameters. Results. The proton plans showed decreased dose to various volumes of the heart and lungs in comparison to both the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans. There was no difference between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans in dose delivered to the lung or heart. This finding was seen consistently across the parameters analyzed in this study. Conclusions. In patients receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer, proton plans are technically feasible while achieving adequate coverage with lower doses delivered to the lungs and cardiac structures. This may result in decreased cardiopulmonary toxicity and less morbidity to esophageal cancer patients.

  15. Analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Proton and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for Reducing Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Ted C.; Slater, Jerry M.; Nookala, Prashanth; Mifflin, Rachel; Grove, Roger; Ly, Anh M.; Patyal, Baldev; Slater, Jerry D.; Yang, Gary Y., E-mail: gyang@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, A875, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Background. While neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy has improved outcomes for esophageal cancer patients, surgical complication rates remain high. The most frequent perioperative complications after trimodality therapy were cardiopulmonary in nature. The radiation modality utilized can be a strong mitigating factor of perioperative complications given the location of the esophagus and its proximity to the heart and lungs. The purpose of this study is to make a dosimetric comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), proton and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with regard to reducing perioperative cardiopulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients. Materials. Ten patients with esophageal cancer treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using proton radiotherapy, IMRT, and 3D-CRT modalities were created for each patient. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and analyzed to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR) being evaluated in this study are the heart, lungs, and spinal cord. To determine statistical significance, ANOVA and two-tailed paired t-tests were performed for all data parameters. Results. The proton plans showed decreased dose to various volumes of the heart and lungs in comparison to both the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans. There was no difference between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans in dose delivered to the lung or heart. This finding was seen consistently across the parameters analyzed in this study. Conclusions. In patients receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer, proton plans are technically feasible while achieving adequate coverage with lower doses delivered to the lungs and cardiac structures. This may result in decreased cardiopulmonary toxicity and less morbidity to esophageal cancer patients.

  16. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depuydt Tom

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess acute (primary endpoint and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL, biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC. Methods 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT, at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. Results None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. Conclusion This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed

  17. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  18. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity-modulated

  19. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39–86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4–58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4–58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive

  20. Outcomes of Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze survival, failure patterns, and toxicity in patients with head-and-neck carcinoma of unknown primary origin (HNCUP) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Records from 27 patients with HNCUP treated during the period 2002-2008 with IMRT were reviewed retrospectively. Nodal staging ranged from N1 to N3. The mean preoperative dose to gross or suspected disease, Waldeyer's ring, and uninvolved bilateral cervical nodes was 59.4, 53.5, and 51.0 Gy, respectively. Sixteen patients underwent neck dissection after radiation and 4 patients before radiation. Eight patients with advanced nodal disease (N2b-c, N3) or extracapsular extension received chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 41.9 months (range, 25.3-93.9 months) for nondeceased patients, the 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and nodal control rates were 70.9%, 85.2%, and 88.5%, respectively. Actuarial disease-free survival rates for N1, N2, and N3 disease were 100%, 94.1%, and 50.0%, respectively, at 5 years. When stratified by nonadvanced (N1, N2a nodal disease without extracapsular spread) vs. advanced nodal disease (N2b, N2c, N3), the 5-year actuarial disease-free survival rate for the nonadvanced nodal disease group was 100%, whereas for the advanced nodal disease group it was significantly lower at 66.7% (p = 0.017). Three nodal recurrences were observed: in 1 patient with bulky N2b disease and 2 in patients with N3 disease. No nodal failures occurred in patients with N1 or N2a disease who received only radiation and surgery. Conclusion: Definitive IMRT to 50-56 Gy followed by neck dissection results in excellent nodal control and overall and disease-free survival, with acceptable toxicity for patients with T0N1 or nonbulky T0N2a disease without extracapsular spread. Patients with extracapsular spread, advanced N2 disease, or N3 disease may benefit from concurrent chemotherapy, targeted therapeutic agents, or

  1. Salivary gland sparing and improved target irradiation by conformal and intensity modulated irradiation of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A; Dawson, Laura A; Kim, Hyungjin M; Bradford, Carol R; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Chepeha, Douglas B; Teknos, Theodore N; Hogikyan, Norman D; Anzai, Yoshimi; Marsh, Lon H; Ten Haken, Randall K; Wolf, Gregory T

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this study were to facilitate sparing of the major salivary glands while adequately treating tumor targets in patients requiring comprehensive bilateral neck irradiation (RT), and to assess the potential for improved xerostomia. Since 1994 techniques of target irradiation and locoregional tumor control with conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have been developed. In patients treated with these modalities, the salivary flow rates before and periodically after RT have been measured selectively from each major salivary gland and the residual flows correlated with glands' dose volume histograms (DVHs). In addition, subjective xerostomia questionnaires have been developed and validated. The pattern of locoregional recurrence has been examined from computed tomography (CT) scans at the time of recurrence, transferring the recurrence volumes to the planning CT scans, and regenerating the dose distributions at the recurrence sites. Treatment plans for target coverage and dose homogeneity using static, multisegmental IMRT were found to be significantly better than standard RT plans. In addition, significant parotid gland sparing was achieved in the conformal plans. The relationships among dose, irradiated volume, and the residual saliva flow rates from the parotid glands were characterized by dose and volume thresholds. A mean radiation dose of 26 Gy was found to be the threshold for preserved stimulated saliva flow. Xerostomia questionnaire scores suggested that xerostomia was significantly reduced in patients irradiated with bilateral neck, parotid-sparing RT, compared to patients with similar tumors treated with standard RT. Examination of locoregional tumor recurrence patterns revealed that the large majority of recurrences occurred inside targets, in areas that had been judged to be at high risk and that had received RT doses according to the perceived risk. Tangible gains in salivary gland sparing and target coverage are being

  2. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiosurgery in oligometastatic breast and gynecological cancers: feasibility and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Torre, Gabriella; Corrado, Giacomo; Legge, Francesco; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Tagliaferri, Luca; Mignogna, Samantha; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the preliminary results of the first stereotactic body radiosurgery (SRS) experience with volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in oligometastatic breast and recurrent gynecological tumors (OBRGT) are reported in terms of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. Patients were treated in a head-first supine treatment position on a customized body frame immobilization shell. SRS-VMAT treatment plans were optimized using the ERGO++ treatment planning system. Response assessment was performed 8-12 weeks after treatment by morphologic imaging modalities, or if feasible, also by functional imaging. Thirty-six lesions in 24 consecutive patients (median age, 63 years; range, 40-81) were treated: 13.9% had primary or metastatic lung lesions, 30.5% had liver metastases, 36.1% had bone lesions, 16.7% had lymph node metastases and 2.8% had a primary vulvar melanoma. The median dose was 18 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=50.4 Gy), the minimal dose was 12 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=26.4 Gy) and the maximal dose was 28 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=106.4 Gy). Seven patients (29.2%) experienced acute toxicity, which however was grade 2 in only 1 case. Moreover, only 3 patients (12.5%) developed late toxicity of which only 1 was grade 2. Objective response rate was 77.7% including 16 lesions achieving complete response (44.4%) and 12 lesions achieving partial response (33.3%). The median duration of follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 6-50). Recurrence/progression within the SRS-VMAT treated field was observed in 6 patients (total lesions=7) with a 2-year inside SRS-VMAT field disease control expressed on a per lesion basis of 69%. Recurrence/progression of disease outside the SRS-VMAT field was documented in 15 patients; the 2-year outside SRS-VMAT field metastasis‑free survival, expressed on a per patient basis, was 35%. Death due to disease was documented in 6 patients and the 2-year overall survival was 58%. Although the maximum tolerated dose was

  3. Evaluation of a leaf position optimization tool for intensity modulated radiation therapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Since 1996, patients are treated at Ghent University Hospital with a multi-segment technique using MultiLeaf Collimators. The segments were obtained by using the Beam's eye view projections of the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OARs), after which the segments weights were optimized. To investigate if optimization of the leaf positions would further improve the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, a tool optimizing leaf positions and segment weights simultaneously, was developed. This tool is called SOWAT, which is the acronym for segment outline and weight adapting tool. Material and methods: The tool evaluates the effects of changing the position of each collimating leaf of all segments on the value of the objective function. Only changes that improve the value of the objective function are retained. Between December 1999 and January 2001, 30 head and neck patients were treated with IMRT. Two patient groups were distinguished: pharyngeal and laryngeal tumors (n=17) and sinonasal tumors (n=13). A specific set of physical endpoints was evaluated for each group. Dose statistics of the treatment plans without and with SOWAT were analyzed. Results: When using SOWAT for the pharyngeal and laryngeal cases, the PTV dose homogeneity increased with a median of 11% (range 2-27%), while the maximum dose to the spinal cord was decreased for 14 of the 17 patients. In four plans where parotid function preservation was a goal, the parotid mean dose was lower than 26 Gy in one plan without SOWAT, and in four plans with SOWAT. For the sinonasal tumors, the PTV dose homogeneity increased with a median of 7% (range 1-14%). SOWAT lowered the mean dose to 53 of the 63 optic pathway structures (retina, optic nerve and optic chiasm). SOWAT leaves the number of segments unchanged and has little or no effect on the delivery time. Conclusions: SOWAT is a powerful tool to perform the final optimization of IMRT plans, without

  4. Comparing morbidity and cancer control after 3D-conformal (70/74 Gy) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (78/82 Gy) for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolezel, Martin [Multiscan Alpha Pardubice Regional Hospital, Oncology Centre, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Oncology, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Multiscan Alpha Pardubice Regional Hospital, Oncology Centre, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Zouhar, Milan; Jansa, Jan; Paluska, Petr [University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Vaculikova, Miloslava [Hospital Trutnov, Department of Oncology, Trutnov (Czech Republic); Sefrova, Jana [Hospital Prachatice, Department of Oncology, Prachatice (Czech Republic); Kohlova, Tereza [Proton Therapy Center, Prague (Czech Republic); Vanasek, Jaroslav [Multiscan Alpha Pardubice Regional Hospital, Oncology Centre, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Kovarik, Josef [The Freeman Hospital, Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare toxicity and cancer control between patients with prostate cancer treated using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and those treated using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 553 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT 70-74 Gy (3D-CRT 70, 3D-CRT 74) or IMRT 78-82 Gy (IMRT 78, IMRT/SIB 82). Late toxicity was scored according to FC-RTOG/LENT criteria. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix and ASTRO definitions. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 genitourinary toxicity was 26.3 % (3D-CRT 70), 27.2 % (3D-CRT 74), 17.3 % (IMRT 78), and 25.1 % (IMRT/SIB 82) without statistical differences. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 gastrointestinal toxicity was 19.4 % (3D-CRT 70), 42.1 % (3D-CRT 74), 20.5 % (IMRT 78), and 26.6 % (IMRT/SIB 82). The differences between 3D-CRT 74 and 3D-CRT 70 and between 3D-CRT 74 and IMRT 78 were statistically significant (log rank p = 0.03). The 5-year Phoenix PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients treated using 3D-CRT were 89.4, 65.5, and 57.8 %, respectively. Patients treated with IMRT achieved the following results: 90.9, 89.4, and 83.9 %. Clinical relapse-free survival (C-RFS) in patients treated using 3D-CRT vs. IMRT for the aforementioned groups were 94.7 vs. 100 %, 86.8 vs. 98.6 %, and 84.4 vs. 94.5 %. Disease-free survival (DFS) for patients treated using 3D-CRT were 83.1, 70.9, and 71.5 %. The IMRT group reached 95.8, 89.1, and 87.6 %. The PSA-RFS for intermediate- and high-risk patients were statistically significant, while C-RFS and DFS were marginally better. Dose escalation with IMRT was associated with improved cancer control in intermediate- and high-risk patients in comparison with 3D-CRT, without compromising toxicity. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte ein Vergleich von Toxizitaet und Tumorkontrolle bei Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom nach der Behandlung mit dreidimensionaler konformaler

  5. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  6. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than −860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with ≥20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  7. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Lu-Le; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D A; Mori, W B; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can be made nowadays with high modulation speed, broad bandwidth, while being compact, owing to the recent advance in material science and microfabrication technology. However, these optical modulators usually work for low intensity light beams. Here, we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high power lasers with intensity up to 10^16 W/cm^2 level to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser beams in a sub-mm-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser beam is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are presented. Such optical modulators may enable new applications in the high field physics.

  8. The Impact of Pretreatment Prostate Volume on Severe Acute Genitourinary Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the impact of pretreatment prostate volume on the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 214 patients who underwent IMRT (75.6 Gy) for prostate cancer at two referral centers was analyzed. Prostate volumes were obtained from computed tomography scans taken during treatment simulation. Genitourinary toxicity was defined using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0 guidelines. Acute toxicity was defined as any toxicity originating within 90 days of the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were characterized as having a small or large prostate depending on whether their prostate volume was less than or greater than 50 cm3, respectively. Genitourinary toxicity was compared in these groups using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to further assess the impact of prostate volume on severe (Grade 3) acute genitourinary toxicity. Results: Patients with large prostates (>50 cm3) had a higher rate of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (p = .02). Prostate volume was predictive of the likelihood of developing acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity on bivariate (p = .004) and multivariate (p = .006) logistic regression. Every 27.0 cm3 increase in prostate volume doubled the likelihood of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with larger prostates are at higher risk for the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity when treated with IMRT for prostate cancer.

  9. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation

  10. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  11. Association Between Bone Marrow Dosimetric Parameters and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the volume of pelvic bone marrow (PBM) receiving 10 and 20 Gy or more (PBM-V10 and PBM-V20) is associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 48 consecutive anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median radiation dose to gross tumor and regional lymph nodes was 50.4 and 45 Gy, respectively. Pelvic bone marrow was defined as the region extending from the iliac crests to the ischial tuberosities, including the os coxae, lumbosacral spine, and proximal femora. Endpoints included the white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin, and platelet count nadirs. Regression models with multiple independent predictors were used to test associations between dosimetric parameters and HT. Results: Twenty patients (42%) had Stage T3-4 disease; 15 patients (31%) were node positive. Overall, 27 (56%), 24 (50%), 4 (8%), and 13 (27%) experienced acute Grade 3-4 leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, respectively. On multiple regression analysis, increased PBM-V5, V10, V15, and V20 were significantly associated with decreased WBC and ANC nadirs, as were female gender, decreased body mass index, and increased lumbosacral bone marrow V10, V15, and V20 (p < 0.05 for each association). Lymph node positivity was significantly associated with a decreased WBC nadir on multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This analysis supports the hypothesis that increased low-dose radiation to PBM is associated with acute HT during chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer. Techniques to limit bone marrow irradiation may reduce HT in anal cancer patients

  12. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, Svend O., E-mail: sfreyta1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Stricker, Hans [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Lu, Mei [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Peabody, James [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli [Pathology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Rodriguez, Ron [Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  13. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm−2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  14. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm-2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations.

  15. Intensity Modulated Proton and Photon Therapy for Early Prostate Cancer With or Without Transperineal Injection of a Polyethylen Glycol Spacer: A Treatment Planning Comparison Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Damien C., E-mail: damien.weber@unige.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Vallee, Jean Paul [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Rectal toxicity is a serious adverse effect in early-stage prostate cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (RT). Injecting a spacer between Denonvilliers' fascia increases the distance between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall and may thus decrease the rectal radiation-induced toxicity. We assessed the dosimetric impact of this spacer with advanced delivery RT techniques, including intensity modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and intensity modulated proton beam RT (IMPT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were simulated for RT with or without spacer. Plans were computed for IMRT, VMAT, and IMPT using the Eclipse treatment planning system using both computed tomography spacer+ and spacer- data sets. Prostate {+-} seminal vesicle planning target volume [PTV] and organs at risk (OARs) dose-volume histograms were calculated. The results were analyzed using dose and volume metrics for comparative planning. Results: Regardless of the radiation technique, spacer injection decreased significantly the rectal dose in the 60- to 70-Gy range. Mean V{sub 70Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} with IMRT, VMAT, and IMPT planning were 5.3 {+-} 3.3%/13.9 {+-} 10.0%, 3.9 {+-} 3.2%/9.7 {+-} 5.7%, and 5.0 {+-} 3.5%/9.5 {+-} 4.7% after spacer injection. Before spacer administration, the corresponding values were 9.8 {+-} 5.4% (P=.012)/24.8 {+-} 7.8% (P=.012), 10.1 {+-} 3.0% (P=.002)/17.9 {+-} 3.9% (P=.003), and 9.7 {+-} 2.6% (P=.003)/14.7% {+-} 2.7% (P=.003). Importantly, spacer injection usually improved the PTV coverage for IMRT. With this technique, mean V{sub 70.2Gy} (P=.07) and V{sub 74.1Gy} (P=0.03) were 100 {+-} 0% to 99.8 {+-} 0.2% and 99.1 {+-} 1.2% to 95.8 {+-} 4.6% with and without Spacer, respectively. As a result of spacer injection, bladder doses were usually higher but not significantly so. Only IMPT managed to decrease the rectal dose after spacer injection for all dose levels, generally with no

  16. Relationship between prostate volume changes and treatment duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation during intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Japanese patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, Masashi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Kamomae, Takeshi; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Yoshikazu; Yoneda, Kazuo; Itoh, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    The application of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) in prostate cancer leads to a reduction in prostate volume, and the trends in volume reduction differ according to the treatment duration of NAD. A reduction in volume during external beam radiation therapy may lead to the exposure of normal tissues to an unexpected dose. In fact, prostate volume reductions have primarily been reported in European and American institutions. Although the prostate volume of Japanese patients is known to be small, the trends in prostate volume change during radiation therapy remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the changes in prostate volume of Japanese patients during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with NAD. Nineteen Japanese patients with prostate cancer underwent IMRT with NAD. Kilovoltage computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for treatment planning and verification of the treatment position for each treatment fraction. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the duration of NAD, as follows: NAD prostate volume reductions at the 36th treatment fraction, relative to the planning CT, were 7.8%, 2.0%, and 1.7% for the S-NAD, M-NAD, and L-NAD groups, respectively. Prostate volume shrunk greater in the S-NAD group than in the M-NAD and L-NAD groups; this finding was consistent with those of previous studies. The prostate volume changes in Japanese patients were smaller compared to those in European and American patients. PMID:27578915

  17. A dosimetric study of polyethylene glycol hydrogel in 200 prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We sought to analyze the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel on rectal doses in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Between July 2009 and April 2013, we treated 200 clinically localized prostate cancer patients with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy. Half of the patients received a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided transperineal injection of 10 mL PEG hydrogel (DuraSeal™ Spinal Sealant System; Covidien, Mansfield, MA) in their anterior perirectal fat immediately prior to the first HDR brachytherapy treatment and 5 mL PEG hydrogel prior to the second HDR brachytherapy treatment. Prostate, rectal, and bladder doses and prostate–rectal distances were calculated based upon treatment planning CT scans. Results: There was a success rate of 100% (100/100) with PEG hydrogel implantation. PEG hydrogel significantly increased the prostate–rectal separation (mean ± SD, 12 ± 4 mm with gel vs. 4 ± 2 mm without gel, p < 0.001) and significantly decreased the mean rectal D2 mL (47 ± 9% with gel vs. 60 ± 8% without gel, p < 0.001). Gel decreased rectal doses regardless of body mass index (BMI). Conclusions: PEG hydrogel temporarily displaced the rectum away from the prostate by an average of 12 mm and led to a significant reduction in rectal radiation doses, regardless of BMI

  18. Preoperative concomitant boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer: A phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with oral capecitabine in patients with locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer using a concomitant boost technique. Materials and methods: Patients with resectable locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer (node-negative ⩾T3 or any node-positive tumor) were eligible. The eligible patients received IMRT to 2 dose levels simultaneously (50.6 and 41.8 Gy in 22 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily 5 days/week. The primary end point included toxicity, postoperative complication, and pathological complete response rate (ypCR). The secondary endpoints included local recurrence rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Sixty-three eligible patients were enrolled; five patients did not undergo surgery. Of the 58 patients evaluable for pathologic response, the ypCR rate was 31.0% (95% CI 19.1–42.9). Grade 3 toxicities included diarrhea (9.5%), radiation dermatitis (3.2%), and neutropenia (1.6%). There was no Grade 4 toxicity reported. Four (6.9%) patients developed postoperative complications. Two-year local recurrence rate, PFS, and OS were 5.7%, 90.5%, and 96.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The design of preoperative concurrent boost IMRT with oral capecitabine could achieve high rate of ypCR with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  19. Selective Nodal Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancer Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Application of RTOG Consensus Guidelines in Routine Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have been using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for selective neck irradiation. This article presents an analysis of patterns of failure and their dosimetric correlation. Methods and Materials: Between October 2003 and January 2008, 83 patients with head-and-neck cancer were treated with IMRT. Nodal levels were contoured as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines. Results: There were 32 relapses with 23 local relapses (21 local relapses alone and 2 local and regional relapses, simultaneously), 9 regional relapses (including 2 simultaneous local and regional relapses), and 5 distant relapses, of which 2 patients had local relapses. At 2 and 3 years, the locoregional relapse-free survival rates were was 68.3% and 60.8%, respectively, while the overall survival rates were 84.1% and 81.7%, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed significant differences in locoregional relapse-free survival rates for total treatment times of 53 days, a volume of CTV1PTV (i.e., the volume prescribed 70 Gy) 177 cc, a V100 for CTV1PTV of 91%, and a minimum dose to CTV1PTV of 54 Gy. There were no failures in the elective nodal volume, substantiating both the nodal selection criteria and the RTOG consensus guidelines for delineation of neck node levels. Conclusions: IMRT for head-neck cancer is feasible, using elective nodal selection criteria along with RTOG consensus guidelines for the radiological boundaries of levels of neck nodes.

  20. SU-E-P-58: Dosimetric Study of Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy for Postoperation of Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target can achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.

  1. Transitioning from conventional radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Changing focus from rectal bleeding to detailed quality of life analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of modern radiation techniques, we have been able to deliver a higher prescribed radiotherapy dose for localized prostate cancer without severe adverse reactions. We reviewed and analyzed the change of toxicity profiles of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from the literature. Late rectal bleeding is the main adverse effect, and an incidence of >20% of Grade ≥2 adverse events was reported for 2D conventional radiotherapy of up to 70 Gy. 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) was found to reduce the incidence to ∼10%. Furthermore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduced it further to a few percentage points. However, simultaneously, urological toxicities were enhanced by dose escalation using highly precise external radiotherapy. We should pay more attention to detailed quality of life (QOL) analysis, not only with respect to rectal bleeding but also other specific symptoms (such as urinary incontinence and impotence), for two reasons: (1) because of the increasing number of patients aged >80 years, and (2) because of improved survival with elevated doses of radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy; age is an important prognostic factor not only for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control but also for adverse reactions. Those factors shift the main focus of treatment purpose from survival and avoidance of PSA failure to maintaining good QOL, particularly in older patients. In conclusion, the focus of toxicity analysis after radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients is changing from rectal bleeding to total elaborate quality of life assessment. (author)

  2. Predicting the severity and prognosis of trismus after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oral cancer patients by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Hsieh

    Full Text Available To develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indicators to predict trismus outcome for post-operative oral cavity cancer patients who received adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 22 patients with oral cancer treated with IMRT were studied over a two-year period. Signal abnormality scores (SA scores were computed from Likert-type ratings of the abnormalities of nine masticator structures and compared with the Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA test between groups. Seventeen patients (77.3% experienced different degrees of trismus during the two-year follow-up period. The SA score correlated with the trismus grade (r = 0.52, p<0.005. Patients having progressive trismus had higher mean doses of radiation to multiple structures, including the masticator and lateral pterygoid muscles, and the parotid gland (p<0.05. In addition, this group also had higher SA-masticator muscle dose product at 6 months and SA scores at 12 months (p<0.05. At the optimum cut-off points of 0.38 for the propensity score, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 93% for predicting the prognosis of the trismus patients. The SA score, as determined using MRI, can reflect the radiation injury and correlate to trismus severity. Together with the radiation dose, it could serve as a useful biomarker to predict the outcome and guide the management of trismus following radiation therapy.

  3. Dosimetric study comparing volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and fixed dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric are modulation with RapidArc and fixed field dynamic IMRT for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with early left-sided breast cancer received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. After target definition, treatment planning was performed by RapidArc and two fixed fields dynamic IMRT respectively on the same CT scan. The target dose distribution, homogeneity of the breast, and the irradiation dose and volume for the lungs, heart, and contralateral breast were read in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and compared between RapidArc and IMRT. The treatment delivery time and monitor units were also compared. Results: In comparison with the IMRT planning,the homogeneity of clinical target volume (CTV), the volume proportion of 95% prescribed dose (V95%) was significantly higher by 0.65% in RapidArc (t=5.16, P=0.001), and the V105% and V110% were lower by 10.96% and 1.48 % respectively, however, without statistical significance (t=-2.05, P=0.055 and t=-1.33, P=0.197). The conformal index of planning target volume (PTV) by the RapidArc planning was (0.88±0.02), significantly higher than that by the IMRT planning [(0.74±0.03), t=18.54, P<0.001]. The homogeneity index (HI) of PTV by the RapidArc planning was 1.11±0.01, significantly lower than that by the IMRT planning (1.12±0.02, t=-2.44, P=0.02). There were no significant differences in the maximum dose (Dmax) and V20 for the ipsilateral lung between the RapidArc and IMRT planning, but the values of V10, V5, Dmin and Dmean by RapidArc planning were all significantly higher than those by the IMRT planning (all P<0.01). The values of max dose and V30 for the heart were similar by both techniques, but the values of V10 and V5 by the RapidArc planning were significantly higher (by 18% and 50%, respectively). The V5 of the contralateral breast and lung by the RapidArc planning were increased by 9

  4. Development of modulated electron beam for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on a photocathode electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy of cancer is developing to un-uniform irradiation, for concentrating dose to a cancer tumor and reducing dose to normal tissue. As a step toward the Intensity modulated radiation therapy, we examined dynamic optical modulation of electron beam produced by a photocathode electron gun. Images on photo-masks were transferred onto a photocathode by relay imaging. Electron beam could be controlled by a remote mirror. Modulated electron beam maintained its shape on acceleration, had a fine spatial resolution, and could be moved dynamically by optical methods. As a second step, optical modulation of electron beam and dynamic control succeeded by a digital micro mirror device (DMD). (author)

  5. Residual deficits in quality of life one year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) undergo life-changing treatments that can seriously affect quality of life (QoL). This prospective study examined the key QoL domains during the first year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and identified predictors of these changes in order to improve patient outcomes. A consecutive series of patients with LAHNC completed the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core module (QLQ-C30) and the HNC-specific QLQ-HN35 before (t0) and at the end (t1) of definitive or adjuvant IMRT, then at 6-8 weeks (t2), 6 months (t3), and 1 year (t4) after IMRT. Patients (n = 111) completing questionnaires at all five time points were included (baseline response rate: 99 %; dropout rate between t0 and t4: 5 %). QoL deteriorated in all domains during IMRT and improved slowly during the first year thereafter. Many domains recovered to baseline values after 1 year but problems with smelling and tasting, dry mouth, and sticky saliva remained issues at this time. Increases in problems with sticky saliva were greater after 1 year in patients with definitive versus adjuvant IMRT (F = 3.5, P = 0.05). QoL in patients with LAHNC receiving IMRT takes approximately 1 year to return to baseline; some domains remain compromised after 1 year. Although IMRT aims to maintain function and QoL, patients experience long-term dry mouth and sticky saliva, particularly following definitive IMRT. Patients should be counseled at the start of therapy to reduce disappointment with the pace of recovery. (orig.)

  6. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Department of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or

  7. Hypothyroidism as a Consequence of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Taxane-Based Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To conduct a retrospective review of 168 consecutively treated locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LAHNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/chemotherapy, to determine the rate and risk factors for developing hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered in 33 daily fractions to 69.3 Gy to gross disease and 56.1 Gy to clinically normal cervical nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of IMRT plans were used to determine radiation dose to thyroid and were compared with DVHs using conventional three-dimensional radiotherapy (3D-RT) in 10 of these same patients randomly selected for replanning and with DVHs of 16 patients in whom the thyroid was intentionally avoided during IMRT. Weekly paclitaxel (30 mg/m2) and carboplatin area under the curve-1 were given concurrently with IMRT. Results: Sixty-one of 128 evaluable patients (47.7%) developed hypothyroidism after a median of 1.08 years after IMRT (range, 2.4 months to 3.9 years). Age and volume of irradiated thyroid were associated with hypothyroidism development after IMRT. Compared with 3D-RT, IMRT with no thyroid dose constraints resulted in significantly higher minimum, maximum, and median dose (p < 0.0001) and percentage thyroid volume receiving 10, 20, and 60 Gy (p < 0.05). Compared with 3D-RT, IMRT with thyroid dose constraints resulted in lower median dose and percentage thyroid volume receiving 30, 40, and 50 Gy (p < 0.005) but higher minimum and maximum dose (p < 0.005). Conclusions: If not protected, IMRT for LAHNC can result in higher radiation to the thyroid than with conventional 3D-RT. Techniques to reduce dose and volume of radiation to thyroid tissue with IMRT are achievable and recommended.

  8. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  9. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01 – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohn Christof

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Methods/Design The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2 Discussion The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal treatment concept of advanced ovarian cancer FIGO stage III.

  10. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m2 plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  11. Long-term results of a study using individualized planning target volumes for hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a prospective phase I study which evaluated the feasibility, toxicities, and biochemical control in prostate cancer patients treated with a hypofractionated boost utilizing a fiducial marker-based daily image guidance strategy and small patient-specific PTV margins. Low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided implantation of three gold fiducial markers and were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to 42 Gy (2 Gy/day). During the first nine fractions of treatment, pre- and post-treatment electronic portal imaging was performed to calculate intrafraction prostate motion. Patient-specific PTV margins were derived and a 30 Gy (3 Gy/day) intensity modulated radiotherapy boost was delivered (Total dose = 72 Gy in 31 fractions; EQD2 = 81 Gy, α/β = 1.4). Thirty-three patients completed treatment and were followed for a median of 7.2 years (range, 1.2 – 9.5). Seven patients (21%) developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late grade 2 GI toxicity and 1 patient (3%) developed late grade 2 GU toxicity. No patients developed late grade 3 GI or GU toxicity. To date, nine patients developed PSA relapse according to the Phoenix criteria. The actuarial five, seven and nine year biochemical control (BC) rates were 87% (95% confidence interval: 69–95), 77% (95% confidence interval: 56–89) and 66% (95% confidence interval: 42–82). Our study demonstrates that the use of prostate fiducial markers in combination with a daily online image guidance protocol permits reduced, patient-specific PTV margins in a hypofractionated treatment scheme. This treatment planning and delivery strategy was well tolerated in the intermediate time frame. The use of very small PTV margins did not result in excessive failures when compared to other radiation regimens of similar radiobiological intensity

  12. The Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy versus Three-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of the Literatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianying; Shi, Huashan; Liu, Yang; Feng, Shijian; Hao, Meiqin; Ye, Lei; Wu, Xueqian; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher doses with less damage of healthy tissues compared with three-dimensional radiation therapy (3DCRT). However, for the scenarios with better clinical outcomes for IMRT than 3DCRT in prostate cancer, the results remain ambiguous. We performed a meta-analysis to assess whether IMRT can provide better clinical outcomes in comparison with 3DCRT in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of 23 studies (n = 9556) comparing the clinical outcomes, including gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical controland overall survival (OS). Results IMRT was significantly associated with decreased 2–4 grade acute GI toxicity [risk ratio (RR) = 0.59 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44, 0.78)], late GI toxicity [RR = 0.54, 95%CI (0.38, 0.78)], late rectal bleeding [RR = 0.48, 95%CI (0.27, 0.85)], and achieved better biochemical control[RR = 1.17, 95%CI (1.08, 1.27)] in comparison with 3DCRT. IMRT and 3DCRT remain the same in regard of grade 2–4 acute rectal toxicity [RR = 1.03, 95%CI (0.45, 2.36)], late GU toxicity [RR = 1.03, 95%CI (0.82, 1.30)] and overall survival [RR = 1.07, 95%CI (0.96, 1.19)], while IMRT slightly increased the morbidity of grade 2–4 acute GU toxicity [RR = 1.08, 95%CI (1.00, 1.17)]. Conclusions Although some bias cannot be ignored, IMRT appears to be a better choice for the treatment of prostate cancer when compared with 3DCRT. PMID:27171271

  13. Combination of dose escalation with technological advances (intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy) is not associated with increased morbidity for patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    2011-08-15

    The aim was to evaluate treatment-related morbidity after intensity-modulated (IMRT) and image-guided (IGRT) radiotherapy with a total dose of 76 Gy in comparison to conventional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) up to 70.2-72 Gy for patients with prostate cancer. All patients were prospectively surveyed prior to, on the last day, as well as after a median time of 2 and 16 months after RT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Criteria for the 78 matched pairs after IMRT vs. 3DCRT were patient age, use of antiandrogens, treatment volume ({+-} whole pelvis), prognostic risk group, and urinary/bowel/sexual quality of life (QoL) before treatment. QoL changes after dose-escalated IMRT were found to be similar to QoL changes after 3DCRT in all domains. Only sexual function scores more than 1 year after RT decreased slightly more after 3DCRT in comparison to IMRT (mean 9 vs. 6 points; p = 0.04), with erections firm enough for intercourse in 14% vs. 30% (p = 0.03). Painful bowel movements were reported more frequently after 3DCRT vs. IMRT 2 months after treatment ({>=} once a day in 10% vs. 1%; p = 0.03), but a tendency for higher rectal bleeding rates was found after IMRT vs. 3DCRT more than 1 year after RT ({>=} rarely in 20% vs. 9%; p = 0.06). Combination of dose escalation with technological advances (IMRT and IGRT) is not associated with increased morbidity for patients with prostate cancer. (orig.)

  14. Interim assessment of prospective phase Ⅱ trial evaluating efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine for stage Ⅱ/Ⅲ gastric cancer after radical surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the preliminary efficacy and acute toxicities of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine for stage Ⅱ/Ⅲ gastric cancer (AJCC 7th) after radical surgery and to decide whether to continue phase Ⅱ trial. Methods: From 2009 to 2011, 35 patients with gastric cancer (10 stage Ⅱ patients and 25 stage Ⅲ patients) were included in prospective phase Ⅱ trial to receive chemoradiotherapy. In radiotherapy, the patients received IMRT to the anastomosis,tumor bed, and regional lymph nodes at a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. In concurrent chemotherapy, the patients received capecitabine at 1 600 mg/m2 in two divided doses per day for 5 weeks; in adjuvant chemotherapy, the patients received fluorouracil or capecitabine ± oxaliplatin (4-8 cycles). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates, and the log-rank test was used for univariate prognostic analysis. A disease-free survival (DFS) of 52.9% was used as the lower limit for continuing study. Results: With a median follow-up of 21 months, the follow-up rate was 94%. Radiotherapy was not completed in 3 patients. The 2-year DFS and overall survival (OS) were 70% and 86%, respectively. The incidence rates of grade 3 acute gastrointestinal, hematologic, and overall toxicities were 11%, 11%, and 26%, respectively. The prognostic analysis showed that signet-ring cell carcinoma and positive lymph node ratio were adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and advanced T stage (T4) was the adverse prognostic factor for OS. Conclusions: The 2-year DFS was greater than 52.9% among all patients with gastric cancer who received IMRT with concurrent capecitabine after radical surgery, and the toxicities were tolerable. Thus, phase Ⅱ trial could be continued. (authors)

  15. Influence of high-definition multileaf collimator for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric impact of treatment planning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer using Varian/BrainLAB 120-leaf high-definition multileaf collimator (HD120 MLC) with 2.5 mm leaf width and Varian 120-leaf millennium multileaf collimator (M120 MLC) with 5 mm leaf width. We measured the leaf transmission and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) of two multileaf collimator (MLC) systems using Farmer ionization chamber. The dosimetric impact of treatment planning for 3DCRT and IMRT of prostate cancer for ten clinical cases using two MLC systems was evaluated quantitatively. 3DCRT was divided to 3DCRTmiddle as fitting at middle of leaf tip and 3DCRToutside as fitting at outside of leaf tip. The leaf transmission factor and DLG of HD120 MLC for 6 and 10 MV X-ray decreased by 0.2% and 1 mm, respectively, compared to M120 MLC. The mean conformity index of planning target volume (PTV) of treatment planning for prostate 3DCRTmiddle, 3DCRToutside, and IMRT decreased by 0.9%, 6.6%, and 0.9% and the mean homogeneity index increased 2.3%, 13.0%, and 4.2%, respectively. The mean V20, V40, and V65 decreased by 2.4%, 6.6%, and 4.5% for bladder and 3.3%, 6.1%, and 5.9% for rectum, respectively. The results of this work demonstrated that the dose conformity of PTV improved and the dose of bladder and rectum decreased for 3DCRT and IMRT of prostate cancer using HD120 MLC compared to M120 MLC, because of reduction of leaf width, leaf transmission, and rounded leaf end transmission. (author)

  16. Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Simona; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Sara, Gomellini; Arcangeli, Stefano; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical results in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate area. A total of 110 patients entered our study, 37 patients presented with localized prostate cancer and radiological evidence of node metastases or ≥15% estimated risk of lymph node (LN) involvement, while 73 patients underwent postoperative adjuvant or salvage irradiation for biochemical or residual/recurrent disease, LN metastases, or high risk of harboring nodal metastases. All patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 2 years. The median follow-up was 56.5 months. For the whole patient group, the 3- and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure were 82.6% and 74.6%, respectively, with a better outcome in patients treated with radical approach. The 3- and 5-year freedom from local failure were 94.4% and 90.2%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year distant metastasis-free survival were 87.8% and 81.7%, respectively. For all study patients, the rate of freedom from G2 acute rectal, intestinal, and urinary toxicities was 60%, 77%, and 61%, respectively. There was no G3 acute toxicity, ≥G2 late intestinal toxicity, or G3 late urinary or rectal toxicity. The 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late rectal toxicity rate were 98% and 95%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late urinary toxicity rate were 95% and 88%, respectively. The study concludes that pelvic IMRT and SIB to the prostatic area in association with 2-year ADT was a well-tolerated technique, providing high disease control in patients with prostate cancer requiring LN treatment. PMID:24976538

  17. Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical results in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate area. A total of 110 patients entered our study, 37 patients presented with localized prostate cancer and radiological evidence of node metastases or ≥15% estimated risk of lymph node (LN) involvement, while 73 patients underwent postoperative adjuvant or salvage irradiation for biochemical or residual/recurrent disease, LN metastases, or high risk of harboring nodal metastases. All patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 2 years. The median follow-up was 56.5 months. For the whole patient group, the 3- and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure were 82.6% and 74.6%, respectively, with a better outcome in patients treated with radical approach. The 3- and 5-year freedom from local failure were 94.4% and 90.2%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year distant metastasis-free survival were 87.8% and 81.7%, respectively. For all study patients, the rate of freedom from G2 acute rectal, intestinal, and urinary toxicities was 60%, 77%, and 61%, respectively. There was no G3 acute toxicity, ≥G2 late intestinal toxicity, or G3 late urinary or rectal toxicity. The 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late rectal toxicity rate were 98% and 95%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late urinary toxicity rate were 95% and 88%, respectively. The study concludes that pelvic IMRT and SIB to the prostatic area in association with 2-year ADT was a well-tolerated technique, providing high disease control in patients with prostate cancer requiring LN treatment

  18. An evaluation of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy in radical chemoradiation of esophageal cancer: A dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT can be used to reduce doses to normal thoracic structures than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT in treating esophageal cancer and to compare normal tissue complication probability (NTCP for lung between two treatment plans. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out from 2009 to 2011, in which 15 inoperable patients of esophageal cancer who were suitable for radical chemoradiation were enrolled. All patients were treated with 3DCRT. In first phase, patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT dose of 36Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks, along with concurrent weekly chemotherapy with cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil (5 FU. In second phase, boost dose of 18Gy in 10 fractions in 2 weeks was given. An IMRT plan was generated for each patient. Plan sum of both the 3D CRT and IMRT plans were compared. Doses to critical structures and NTCP for lung were compared between 3DCRT and IMRT plans. Results: The mean lung dose and volumes of lung receiving 20 Gy, 10 Gy, and 5 Gy (V20, V10, and V5 were significantly lower with 3DCRT plans as compared to IMRT plans. The mean dose to heart and spinal cord was higher in 3DCRT arm. There was no difference in dose distribution to the liver between the 3D CRT and IMRT techniques. The NTCP for lung was lower with 3D CRT than IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT technique needs further dosimetric study as well as further clinical trials before implication of this technique replacing 3D CRT technique with escalated dose for the treatment of esophageal cancer in our setup. IMRT using seven fields provided no improvement over 3DCRT.

  19. Twice-Weekly Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer With Low-Risk Nodal Involvement: Toxicity and Outcome From a Dose Escalation Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and preliminary outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated with twice-weekly hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 82 prostate cancer patients with a nodal involvement risk ≤20% (Roach index) have been treated to the prostate with or without seminal vesicles with 56 Gy (4 Gy/fraction twice weekly) and an overall treatment time of 6.5 weeks. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. Median follow-up was 48 months (range, 9-67 months). Results: All patients completed the treatment without interruptions. No patient presented with Grade ≥3 acute GU or GI toxicity. Of the patients, 4% presented with Grade 2 GU or GI persistent acute toxicity 6 weeks after treatment completion. The estimated 4-year probability of Grade ≥2 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival were 94.2% ± 2.9% and 96.1% ± 2.2%, respectively. One patient presented with Grade 3 GI and another patient with Grade 4 GU late toxicity, which were transitory in both cases. The 4-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival was 91.3% ± 5.9%, 76.4% ± 8.8%, and 77.5% ± 8.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Conclusions: In patients with localized prostate cancer, acute and late toxicity were minimal after dose-escalation administering twice-weekly 4 Gy to a total dose of 56 Gy, with IMRT. Further prospective trials are warranted to further assess the best fractionation schemes for these patients.

  20. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis of Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I–III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade ≥2 GI toxicity and the volume of bowel receiving ≥45 Gy (V45) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade ≥2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V45 was 143 mL (99). The mean V45 values for patients with and without Grade ≥2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V45 >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade ≥2 GI toxicity with and without V45 >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and γ were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60–399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V45 was associated with an increased odds of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04–4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V45 is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V45 could reduce the risk of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Vazquez, Esther G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  2. Forward Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Breast Cancer to Improve Dose Homogeneity: Feasibility of Class Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV)95% of >99%; V107% of 5Gy of 10Gy of 23.6 cm, additional beams were always required.

  3. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  4. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT) for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84%) or without (16%) chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  5. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  6. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the treatment planning among all three modalities with identical patient contouring and treatment planning goal. A proton therapy plan was generated in XiO treatment planning system (TPS using 2 fields for each target. For a comparative purpose, IMRT and RapidArc plans were generated in Eclipse TPS. Treatment plans were generated for a total dose of 74 CGE or Gy prescribed to each planning target volume (PTV (left and right with 2 CGE or Gy per fraction. In IMRT and RapidArc plans, normalization was done based on PTV coverage values in proton plans. Results: The mean PTV dose deviation from the prescription dose was lower in proton plan (within 3.4%, but higher in IMRT (6.5% to 11.3% and RapidArc (3.8% to 11.5% plans. Proton therapy produced lower mean dose to the total lung, heart, and esophagus when compared to IMRT and RapidArc. The relative volume of the total lung receiving 20, 10, and 5 CGE or Gy (V20, V10, and V5, respectively were lower using proton therapy than using IMRT, with absolute differences of 9.71%, 22.88%, and 39.04%, respectively. The absolute differences in the V20, V10, and V5 between proton and RapidArc plans were 4.84%, 19.16%, and 36.8%, respectively, with proton therapy producing lower dosimetric values. Conclusion: Based on the results presented in this case study, uniform scanning proton therapy has a dosimetric advantage over both IMRT and RapidArc for a synchronous bi-lateral NSCLC, especially for the normal lung tissue, heart, and

  7. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date

  8. Comparison of before and after CBCT image registration based on the lung cancer intensity-modulated planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the CBCT image registration of PTV enlarging distance and IMRT planning (CT-1) for patients with lung cancer,and evaluate their characters. Methods: Ten patients with lung cancer were included in the study. Two sets image, before and after radiotherapy, were acquired every week. Then delineated the targeted volume and made the planning (CT-2) according the enlarging distance data. To compare the parameters of DVH for lung and spinal cord, volumes and dose of PTV and NTCP with CT-1 and CT-2. The difference of two plan was analyzed by covariance analysis or Wilcoxson's z-test. Results: The max, min and mean dose of PTV, the lung V5, V10, V20, V30, V50 were similar in both plans (P =0.242-0.663). There was superiority in CT-2 of PTV and lung's mean dose (P =0.049, 0.035). The NTCP had the decent tendency followed by the increasing of lung V5, V10, V20 (P =0.146, 0.053, 0.000). Conclusions: CBCT based image registration can reduce PTV, the mean dose of lung, NTCP, and increase PTV dose. This provides a tool for exploring accurate radiotherapy strategies. (authors)

  9. An anatomy-based beam segmentation tool for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and its application to head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In segmental intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the beam fluences result from superposition of unmodulated beamlets (segments). In the inverse planning approach, segments are a result of 'clipping' intensity maps. At Ghent University Hospital, segments are created by an anatomy-based segmentation tool (ABST). The objective of this report is to describe ABST. Methods and Materials: For each beam direction, ABST generates segments by a multistep procedure. During the initial steps, beam's eye view (BEV) projections of the planning target volumes (PTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) are generated. These projections are used to make a segmentation grid with negative values across the expanded OAR projections and positive values elsewhere inside the expanded PTV projections. Outside these regions, grid values are set to zero. Subsequent steps transform the positive values of the segmentation grid to increase with decreasing distance to the OAR projections and to increase with longer pathlengths measured along rays from their entrance point through the skin contours to their respective grid point. The final steps involve selection of iso-value lines of the segmentation grid as segment outlines which are transformed to leaf and jaw positions of a multileaf collimator (MLC). Segment shape approximations, if imposed by MLC constraints, are done in a way that minimizes overlap between the expanded OAR projections and the segment aperture. Results: The ABST procedure takes about 3 s/segment on a Compaq Alpha XP900 workstation. In IMRT planning problems with little complexity, such as laryngeal (example shown) or thyroid cancer, plans that are in accordance with the clinical protocol can be generated by weighting the segments generated by ABST without further optimization of their shapes. For complex IMRT plans such as paranasal sinus cancer (not shown), ABST generates a start assembly of segments from which the shapes and weights are further optimized

  10. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  11. Simulation Of Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy By Using PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present about the simulation of intensity modulate radiation therapy (IMRT) with PENELOPE. The simulation of IMRT in here involves two problems, the first is the modulation with tomotherapy and the second is the modulation with the movement of the multileaf collimator. Obtained results is the distribution of absorbed dose on the target volume and the organs at risk (OARs). The results show that IMRT could give a desired distribution of dose, which is enough for the target to kill the cancer cells and prevent the over dose to OARs. This paper also shows how to use PENELOPE for studies of the distribution of absorbed dose in radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Prospective Preference Assessment of Patients' Willingness to Participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate patients’ willingness to participate (WTP) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with proton beam therapy (PBT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study in which we prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa. We used purposive sampling to ensure a diverse sample based on age, race, travel distance, and physician. Patients participated in a semi-structured interview in which they reviewed a description of a hypothetical RCT, were asked open-ended and focused follow-up questions regarding their motivations for and concerns about enrollment, and completed a questionnaire assessing characteristics such as demographics and prior knowledge of IMRT or PBT. Patients’ stated WTP was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale. Results: Forty-six eligible patients (33 white, 13 black) were enrolled from the practices of eight physicians. We identified 21 factors that impacted patients’ WTP, which largely centered on five major themes: altruism/desire to compare treatments, randomization, deference to physician opinion, financial incentives, and time demands/scheduling. Most patients (27 of 46, 59%) stated they would either “definitely” or “probably” participate. Seventeen percent (8 of 46) stated they would “definitely not” or “probably not” enroll, most of whom (6 of 8) preferred PBT before their physician visit. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of patients indicated high WTP in a RCT comparing IMRT and PBT for PCa.

  13. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study

  14. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age ≥18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m2 twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation

  15. Unilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer: Potential dose distribution optimization with a simple two-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy beam arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and dosimetric optimization potential of a unilateral two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique in the curative treatment of lateralized tonsil cancer. Materials and methods: Six patients with lateralized tonsillar carcinoma were treated unilaterally with a two-field IMRT technique (oblique-anterior and oblique-posterior fields, with or without collimator and couch rotation). Alternative IMRT plans using seven non-opposed coplanar fields were compared with the two-field plans for each patient. Results: Planning target volume (PTV) coverage was excellent with the two-field technique, using a relatively low number of monitor units (MU) (median, 441; range, 309-550). Dose constraints were respected for all organs at risk (OAR). Mean doses to contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were 3.9 and 17.7 Gy, respectively. Seven-field IMRT provided similar PTV coverage, with statistically significant better dose homogeneity and conformality. However, the mean delivered dose to the contralateral parotid (3.9 vs. 9.0 Gy, p = 0.001) as well as the mean number of MU (437 vs. 814, p = 0.002) and consequently machine time were lower with two-field IMRT. Conclusions: Unilateral two-field IMRT is a simple and feasible technique providing excellent tumor coverage and optimal OAR sparing while reducing the number of MU and treatment time.

  16. Volume and dosimetric changes and initial clinical experience of a two-step adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) scheme for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to show the benefit of a two-step intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) method by examining geometric and dosimetric changes. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with pharyngeal cancers treated with two-step IMRT combined with chemotherapy were included. Treatment-planning CT was done twice before IMRT (CT-1) and at the third or fourth week of IMRT for boost IMRT (CT-2). Transferred plans recalculated initial plan on CT-2 were compared with the initial plans on CT-1. Dose parameters were calculated for a total dose of 70 Gy for each plan. Results: The volumes of primary tumors and parotid glands on CT-2 regressed significantly. Parotid glands shifted medially an average of 4.2 mm on CT-2. The mean doses of the parotid glands in the initial and transferred plans were 25.2 Gy and 30.5 Gy, respectively. D2 (dose to 2% of the volume) doses of the spinal cord were 37.1 Gy and 39.2 Gy per 70 Gy, respectively. Of 15 patients in whom xerostomia scores could be evaluated 1–2 years after IMRT, no patient complained of grade 2 or more xerostomia. Conclusions: This two-step IMRT method as an adaptive RT scheme could adapt to changes in body contour, target volumes and risk organs during IMRT

  17. NOTE: Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hatton, Matthew Q. F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving >= 10 Gy (V10) and >= 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  18. The effect of uterine motion and uterine margins on target and normal tissue doses in intensity modulated radiation therapy of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J. J.; Weiss, E.; Abayomi, O. K.; Siebers, J. V.; Dogan, N.

    2011-05-01

    In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of cervical cancer, uterine motion can be larger than cervix motion, requiring a larger clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margin around the uterine fundus. This work simulates different motion models and margins to estimate the dosimetric consequences. A virtual study used image sets from ten patients. Plans were created with uniform margins of 1 cm (PTVA) and 2.4 cm (PTVC), and a margin tapering from 2.4 cm at the fundus to 1 cm at the cervix (PTVB). Three inter-fraction motion models (MM) were simulated. In MM1, all structures moved with normally distributed rigid body translations. In MM2, CTV motion was progressively magnified as one moved superiorly from the cervix to the fundus. In MM3, both CTV and normal tissue motion were magnified as in MM2, modeling the scenario where normal tissues move into the void left by the mobile uterus. Plans were evaluated using static and percentile DVHs. For a conventional margin (PTVA), quasi-realistic uterine motion (MM3) reduces fundus dose by about 5 Gy and increases normal tissue volumes receiving 30-50 Gy by ~5%. A tapered CTV-to-PTV margin can restore fundus and CTV doses, but will increase normal tissue volumes receiving 30-50 Gy by a further ~5%.

  19. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Materials and methods Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Results Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Conclusions Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study.

  20. Dosimetric consequences of the application of off-line setup error correction protocols and a hull-volume definition strategy for intensity modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the consequences of a planning volume definition based on multiple CTs and the application of off-line setup error correction for the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Further, to compare various setup correction protocols (SCP) by their influence on the average dose distributions. Materials and methods: A planning target volume (PTV) consisting of the bounding volume of prostate contours of five CTs (CTVhull) plus an additional margin of 5 mm and a virtual Rectumhull volume (the solid bounding volume of the five corresponding rectum contours) are used for treatment planning. Simulations of treatment courses with the non-parametric bootstrap method allow to estimate the distribution of the expected equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The impact of off-line setup error correction protocols is evaluated based on estimated EUD distributions. Results: Off-line SCP allow to achieve the intended prostate and rectum EUD and a reliable coverage of the CTV despite the reduced margins. The EUD of the virtual hull volumes is a good estimate for the EUD of prostate and rectal wall. Conclusion: Treatment planning based on Rectumhull and CTVhull plus setup margin as PTV in combination with SCP results in a robust and safe IMRT planning concept

  1. Dose escalation in the radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer with aperture-based intensity modulation and photon beam energy optimization for non-preselected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To verify the potential of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) to realize dose escalation plans for non-preselected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, using photon beam energy optimization. Methods and materials: Seven cases of NSCLC were retrospectively studied. Clinical reference plans were made at 60 Gy by an experienced dosimetrist. Dose escalation was applied to PTV2, a subvolume within the main PTV1. Escalation plans were optimized by considering beam angles (table and gantry), energy (6 and 23 MV) and weights, for an increasing dose to the PTV2, starting from 66 Gy and keeping 30 fractions. Results: In five cases, doses over 78 Gy could be achieved before exceeding organs at risk (OARs) standard tolerance. Peripheral overdosages, as well as lung and spinal cord tolerance doses, limited escalation. Means ± SD V95% parameters were (97.3 ± 0.9)% for PTV1s and (96.7 ± 2.2)% for PTV2s. Doses to OARs were also maintained at acceptable levels. Optimized plans made use of both low- and high-energy beams and had a similar number of monitor units compared to the 60 Gy clinical plans. Conclusions: The AB-IMRT system can successfully realize dose escalation for a sizeable number of cases. Plans produced contained few large segments, and are applicable to a wide range of tumor volumes and locations.

  2. Preoperative intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost in locally advanced rectal cancer: Report on late toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The addition of chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has been established as the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. As an alternative strategy, we explored intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT–IGRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in a prospective phase II study. Here, we report outcome and late toxicity after a median follow-up of 54 months. Methods and materials: A total of 108 patients were treated preoperatively with IMRT–IGRT, delivering a dose of 46 Gy in fractions of 2 Gy. Patients (n = 57) displaying an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm based on magnetic resonance imaging received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Results: The absolute incidence of grade ⩾3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity was 9% and 4%, respectively, with a 13% rate of any grade ⩾3 late toxicity. The actuarial 5-year local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 97%, 57%, and 68%. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection and pN2 disease were associated with significantly impaired OS. Conclusions: The use of preoperative IMRT–IGRT with a SIB resulted in a high 5-year LC rate and non-negligible late toxicity

  3. Hypoxia imaging with [F-18] FMISO-PET in head and neck cancer: Potential for guiding intensity modulated radiation therapy in overcoming hypoxia-induced treatment resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with [F-18] fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been validated as a hypoxic tracer . Head and neck cancer exhibits hypoxia, inducing aggressive biologic traits that impart resistance to treatment. Delivery of modestly higher radiation doses to tumors with stable areas of chronic hypoxia can improve tumor control . Advanced radiation treatment planning (RTP) and delivery techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher doses to a small volume without increasing morbidity. We investigated the utility of co-registered FMISO-PET and CT images to develop clinically feasible RTPs with higher tumor control probabilities (TCP). Materials and methods: FMISO-PET images were used to determine hypoxic sub-volumes for boost planning. Example plans were generated for 10 of the patients in the study who exhibited significant hypoxia. We created an IMRT plan for each patient with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the hypoxic sub-volumes. We also varied the boost for two patients. Result: A significant (mean 17%, median 15%) improvement in TCP is predicted when the modest additional boost dose to the hypoxic sub-volume is included. Conclusion: Combined FMISO-PET imaging and IMRT planning permit delivery of higher doses to hypoxic regions, increasing the predicted TCP (mean 17%) without increasing expected complications.

  4. CAPIRI-IMRT: a phase II study of concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the local effect and acute toxicity of irinotecan and capecitabine with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer without prior pelvic irradiation. Seventy-one patients diagnosed with recurrent rectal cancer who did not previously receive pelvic irradiation were treated in our hospital from October 2009 to July 2012. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis, and IMRT of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction), followed by a boost of 10 Gy to 16 Gy (2 Gy per fraction), was delivered to the recurrent sites. The concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m2 irinotecan weekly and 625 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily (Mon-Fri). Radical surgery was recommended for medically fit patients without extra-pelvic metastases. The patients were followed up every 3 months. Tumor response was evaluated using CT/MRIs according to the RECIST criteria or postoperative pathological findings. NCI-CTC 3.0 was used to score the toxicities. Forty-eight patients (67.6%) had confirmed recurrent rectal cancer without extra pelvic metastases, and 23 patients (32.4%) had extra pelvic metastases. Fourteen patients (19.7%) underwent radical resections (R0) post-chemoradiation. A pathologic complete response was observed in 7 of 14 patients. A clinical complete response was observed in 4 patients (5.6%), and a partial response was observed in 22 patients (31.0%). Only 5 patients (7.0%) showed progressive disease during or shortly after treatment. Of 53 symptomatic patients, clinical complete and partial symptom relief with chemoradiation was achieved in 56.6% and 32.1% of patients, respectively. Only 2 patients (2.8%) experienced grade 4 leukopenia. The most common grade 3 toxicity was diarrhea (16 [22.5%] patients). The median follow-up was 31 months. The cumulative local progression-free survival rate was 74.2% and 33.9% at 1 and 3 years after chemoradiation, respectively. The cumulative total survival rate was 80.1% and 36

  5. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m2 b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m2 on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96–100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  6. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.)

  7. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  8. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy

  9. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poorvu, Philip D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sadow, Cheryl A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy.

  10. Analysis of inter-fraction setup errors and organ motion by daily kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography in intensity modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) enables a better conformality to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues and potentially allows to increase the dose to the target, if this is precisely and accurately determined. The goal of this work is to determine inter-fraction setup errors and prostate motion in IMRT for localized prostate cancer, guided by daily kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT). Systematic and random components of the shifts were retrospectively evaluated by comparing two matching modalities (automatic bone and manual soft-tissue) between each of the 641 daily kVCBCTs (18 patients) and the planning kVCT. A simulated Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) protocol using the average of the first 5 kVCBCTs was tested by non-parametric bootstrapping procedure. Shifts were < 1 mm in left-right (LR) and in supero-inferior (SI) direction. In antero-posterior (AP) direction systematic prostate motion (2.7 ± 0.7 mm) gave the major contribution to the variability of results; the averages of the absolute total shifts were significantly larger in anterior (6.3 ± 0.2 mm) than in posterior (3.9 mm ± 0.2 mm) direction. The ART protocol would reduce margins in LR, SI and anterior but not in posterior direction. The online soft-tissue correction based on daily kVCBCT during IMRT of prostate cancer is fast and efficient. The large random movements of prostate respect to bony anatomy, especially in the AP direction, where anisotropic margins are needed, suggest that daily kVCBCT is at the present time preferable for high dose and high gradients IMRT prostate treatments

  11. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Dublin, Arthur B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  12. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam’s eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18–35 cc), 25 cc (21–30 cc), 29 cc (28–32 cc), 29 cc (23–38 cc), and 29 cc (23–34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  13. Lack of Osteoradionecrosis of the Mandible After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Likely Contributions of Both Dental Care and Improved Dose Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence and dosimetric and clinical predictors of mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in patients with head and neck cancer who underwent a pretherapy dental evaluation and prophylactic treatment according to a uniform policy and were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2005, all patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with parotid gland-sparing IMRT in prospective studies underwent a dental examination and prophylactic treatment according to a uniform policy that included extractions of high-risk, periodontally involved, and nonrestorable teeth in parts of the mandible expected to receive high radiation doses, fluoride supplements, and the placement of guards aiming to reduce electron backscatter off metal teeth restorations. The IMRT plans included dose constraints for the maximal mandibular doses and reduced mean parotid gland and noninvolved oral cavity doses. A retrospective analysis of Grade 2 or worse (clinical) ORN was performed. Results: A total of 176 patients had a minimal follow-up of 6 months. Of these, 31 (17%) had undergone teeth extractions before RT and 13 (7%) after RT. Of the 176 patients, 75% and 50% had received ≥65 Gy and ≥70 Gy to ≥1% of the mandibular volume, respectively. Falloff across the mandible characterized the dose distributions: the average gradient (in the axial plane containing the maximal mandibular dose) was 11 Gy (range, 1-27 Gy; median, 8 Gy). At a median follow-up of 34 months, no cases of ORN had developed (95% confidence interval, 0-2%). Conclusion: The use of a strict prophylactic dental care policy and IMRT resulted in no case of clinical ORN. In addition to the dosimetric advantages offered by IMRT, meticulous dental prophylactic care is likely an essential factor in reducing ORN risk

  14. Comparative cost-effectiveness of stereotactic body radiation therapy versus intensity-modulated and proton radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju eParthan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods. A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publically available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both a payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results. Compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and proton beam therapy (PT, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost effective in 75%, and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75%, and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusions. Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  15. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbea, Leire, E-mail: larbea@unav.es [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Hernandez, Jose Luis [Department of General Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Sola, Jesus Javier [Department of Pathology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Ramos, Luis Isaac [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Subtil, Jose Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Nunez, Jorge [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  16. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin in Rectal Cancer: Is There Still a Place for Ecoendoscopic Ultrasound?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The main goals of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) in rectal cancer are to achieve pathological response and to ensure tumor control with functional surgery when possible. Assessment of the concordance between clinical and pathological responses is necessary to make decisions regarding alternative conservative procedures. The present study evaluates the patterns of response after a preoperative CHRT regimen, and the value of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in assessing response. Methods and Materials: A total of 51 EUS-staged T3 to T4 and/or N0 to N+ rectal cancer patients received preoperative CHRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy and capecitabine/oxaliplatin (XELOX) followed by radical resection. Clinical response was assesed by EUS. Rates of pathological tumor regression grade (TRG) and lymph node (LN) involvement were determined in the surgical specimen. Clinical and pathological responses were compared, and the accuracy of EUS in assessing response was calculated. Results: Twenty-four patients (45%) achieved a major pathological response (complete or >95% pathological response (TRG 3+/4)). Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of EUS in predicting pathological T response after preoperative CHRT were 77.8%, 37.5%, 60%, and 58%, respectively. The EUS sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for nodal staging were 44%, 88%, 88%, and 44%, respectively. Furthermore, EUS after CHRT accurately predicted the absence of LN involvement in 7 of 7 patients (100%) with major pathological response of the primary tumor. Conclusion: Preoperative IMRT with concomitant XELOX induces favorable rates of major pathological response. EUS has a limited ability to predict primary tumor response after preoperative CHRT, but it is useful for accurately determining LN status. EUS may have a potential value in identifying patients with a very low risk of LN involvement in association

  17. No Impairment of Quality of Life 18 Months After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine prospectively intermediate-term toxicity and quality of life (QoL) of prostate cancer patients after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods: Fifty-five patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma were treated by IMRT (76 Gy). Physicians scored acute and late toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Patients assessed general and prostate-specific QoL before IMRT (baseline) and at 2, 6, and 18 months using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30(+3) and QLQ-PR25. Results: Median age was 73 years (range, 54-80 years). Risk categories were 18% low risk, 60% intermediate risk, and 22% high risk; 45% of patients received hormonal therapy (median duration, 6 months). The incidence of urinary and bowel toxicity immediately after IMRT was, respectively, 38% and 13% (Grade 2) and 2% and none (Grade 3); at 18 months it was 15% and 11% (Grade 2) and none (Grade 3). Significant worsening of QoL was reported at 2 months with regard to fatigue (+11.31, p = 1.10-7), urinary symptoms (+9.07, p = 3.10-11), dyspnea (+7.27, p = 0.008), and emotional (-7.02, p = 0.002), social (-6.36, p = 0.003), cognitive (-4.85, p = 0.004), and physical (-3.39, p = 0.007) functioning. Only fatigue (+5.86, p = 0.003) and urinary symptoms (+5.86, p = 0.0004) had not improved by 6 months. By 18 months all QoL scores except those for dyspnea (+8.02, p = 0.01) and treatment-related symptoms (+4.24, p = 0.01) had returned to baseline. These adverse effects were exacerbated by hormonal therapy. Conclusion: High-dose IMRT with accurate positioning induces only a temporary worsening of QoL.

  18. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  19. Robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy to account for anatomy changes in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Robust optimization for IMPT takes setup and range uncertainties into account during plan optimization. However, anatomical changes were not prospectively included. The purpose of this study was to examine robustness and dose variation due to setup uncertainty and anatomical change in IMPT of lung cancer. Material and methods: Plans were generated with multi-field optimization based on planning target volume (MFO-PTV) and worst-case robust optimization (MFO-RO) on simulation computed tomography scans (CT0) for nine patients. Robustness was evaluated on the CT0 by computing the standard deviation of DVH (SD-DVH). Dose variations calculated on weekly CTs were compared with SD-DVH. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) change from the original plan on weekly dose was also calculated for both plans. Results: SD-DVH and dose variation on weekly CTs were both significantly lower in the MFO-RO plans than in the MFO-PTV plans for targets, lungs, and the esophagus (p < 0.05). When comparing EUD for ITV between weekly and planned dose distributions, three patients and 28% of repeated CTs for MFO-RO plans, and six patients and 44% of repeated CTs for MFO-PTV plans, respectively, showed an EUD change of >5%. Conclusions: RO in IMPT reduces the dose variation due to setup uncertainty and anatomy changes during treatment compared with PTV-based planning. However, dose variation could still be substantial; repeated imaging and adaptive planning as needed are highly recommended for IMPT of lung tumors

  20. High-resolution pulmonary ventilation and perfusion PET/CT allows for functionally adapted intensity modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To assess the utility of functional lung avoidance using IMRT informed by four-dimensional (4D) ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT. Materials and methods: In a prospective clinical trial, patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent 4D-V/Q PET/CT scanning before 60 Gy of definitive chemoradiation. Both “highly perfused” (HPLung) and “highly ventilated” (HVLung) lung volumes were delineated using a 70th centile SUV threshold, and a “ventilated lung volume” (VLung) was created using a 50th centile SUV threshold. For each patient four IMRT plans were created, optimised to the anatomical lung, HPLung, HVLung and VLung volumes, respectively. Improvements in functional dose volumetrics when optimising to functional volumes were assessed using mean lung dose (MLD), V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, V50 and V60 parameters. Results: The study cohort consisted of 20 patients with 80 IMRT plans. Plans optimised to HPLung resulted in a significant reduction of functional MLD by a mean of 13.0% (1.7 Gy), p = 0.02. Functional V5, V10 and V20 were improved by 13.2%, 7.3% and 3.8% respectively (p-values < 0.04). There was no significant sparing of dose to functional lung when adapting to VLung or HVLung. Plan quality was highly consistent with a mean PTV D95 and D5 ranging from 60.8 Gy to 61.0 Gy and 63.4 Gy to 64.5 Gy, respectively, and mean conformity and heterogeneity index ranging from 1.11 to 1.17 and 0.94 to 0.95, respectively. Conclusion: IMRT plans adapted to perfused but not ventilated lung on 4D-V/Q PET/CT allowed for reduced dose to functional lung whilst maintaining consistent plan quality

  1. Split-field vs extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for oropharyngeal cancer: Which spares the larynx? Which spares the thyroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Chen, Josephine; Leary, Celeste I; Shugard, Erin; Yom, Sue S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation of the low neck can be accomplished using split-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sf-IMRT) or extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ef-IMRT). We evaluated the effect of these treatment choices on target coverage and thyroid and larynx doses. Using data from 14 patients with cancers of the oropharynx, we compared the following 3 strategies for radiating the low neck: (1) extended-field IMRT, (2) traditional split-field IMRT with an initial cord-junction block to 40Gy, followed by a full-cord block to 50Gy, and (3) split-field IMRT with a full-cord block to 50Gy. Patients were planned using each of these 3 techniques. To facilitate comparison, extended-field plans were normalized to deliver 50Gy to 95% of the neck volume. Target coverage was assessed using the dose to 95% of the neck volume (D95). Mean thyroid and larynx doses were computed. Extended-field IMRT was used as the reference arm; the mean larynx dose was 25.7 ± 7.4Gy, and the mean thyroid dose was 28.6 ± 2.4Gy. Split-field IMRT with 2-step blocking reduced laryngeal dose (mean larynx dose 15.2 ± 5.1Gy) at the cost of a moderate reduction in target coverage (D95 41.4 ± 14Gy) and much higher thyroid dose (mean thyroid dose 44.7 ± 3.7Gy). Split-field IMRT with initial full-cord block resulted in greater laryngeal sparing (mean larynx dose 14.2 ± 5.1Gy) and only a moderately higher thyroid dose (mean thyroid dose 31 ± 8Gy) but resulted in a significant reduction in target coverage (D95 34.4 ± 15Gy). Extended-field IMRT comprehensively covers the low neck and achieves acceptable thyroid and laryngeal sparing. Split-field IMRT with a full-cord block reduces laryngeal doses to less than 20Gy and spares the thyroid, at the cost of substantially reduced coverage of the low neck. Traditional 2-step split-field IMRT similarly reduces the laryngeal dose but also reduces low-neck coverage and delivers very high doses to the thyroid. PMID:26947055

  2. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elith, Craig A [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Dempsey, Shane E; Warren-Forward, Helen M [School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time.

  3. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time

  4. A matched-pair comparison of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with cetuximab versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with platinum-based chemotherapy for locally advanced head neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively compared the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and cetuximab (IMRT/cetuximab) versus IMRT and platinum-based chemotherapy (IMRT/platinum) for locally advanced head neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC). Thirty-one IMRT/cetuximab patients were matched 1:2 with 62 IMRT/platinum patients according to primary site and clinical stage. The primary endpoint was locoregional recurrence (LRR), and secondary endpoints included distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Because of inherent selection bias, the IMRT/cetuximab cohort was significantly older and with a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index. IMRT/cetuximab and IMRT/platinum did not have significantly different LRR and DM (33 vs. 23% at 2 years, P=0.22; 17 vs. 11% at 2 years, P=0.40; respectively). IMRT/cetuximab had significantly worse CSS and OS (67 vs. 84%, P=0.04; 58 vs. 83%, P=0.001; respectively). However, for the subset of elderly patients ≥65 years old, there is no difference between the two cohorts for all endpoints (all P=NS). IMRT/platinum should remain the preferred choice of chemoradiotherapy for LAHNSCC, but IMRT/cetuximab may be a reasonable alternative for elderly patients. (author)

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103Pd or 125I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7% of

  6. Randomized phase II trial of urethral sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy in low-risk prostate cancer: implications for focal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients have excellent outcomes, with treatment modality often selected by perceived effects on quality of life. Acute urinary symptoms are common during external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), while chronic symptoms have been linked to urethral dose. Since most low-risk PCa occurs in the peripheral zone (PZ), we hypothesized that EBRT using urethral sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (US-IMRT) could improve urinary health-related quality of life (HRQOL) while maintaining high rates of PCa control. Patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) defined low-risk PCa with no visible lesion within 5 mm of the prostatic urethra on MRI were randomized to US-IMRT or standard (S-) IMRT. Prescription dose was 75.6 Gy in 41 fractions to the PZ + 3–5 mm for US-IMRT and to the prostate + 3 mm for S-IMRT. For US-IMRT, mean proximal and distal urethral doses were limited to 65 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. HRQOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index (EPIC) Quality of Life questionnaire. The primary endpoint was change in urinary HRQOL at 3 months. From June 2004 to November 2006, 16 patients were randomized, after which a futility analysis concluded that continued accrual was unlikely to demonstrate a difference in the primary endpoint. Mean change in EPIC urinary HRQOL at 3 months was −0.5 ± 11.2 in the US-IMRT arm and +3.9 ± 15.3 in the S-IMRT arm (p = 0.52). Median PSA nadir was higher in the US-IMRT arm (1.46 vs. 0.78, p = 0.05). At 4.7 years median follow-up, three US-IMRT and no S-IMRT patients experienced PSA failure (p = 0.06; HR 8.8, 95% CI 0.9–86). Two out of 3 patients with PSA failure had biopsy-proven local failure, both located contralateral to the original site of disease. Compared with S-IMRT, US-IMRT failed to improve urinary HRQOL and resulted in higher PSA nadir and inferior biochemical control. The high rate of PSA failure and contralateral local failures in US-IMRT patients, despite

  7. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  8. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Is Safe and Effective Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Selected Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, Alan A., E-mail: alanl@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Derhagopian, Robert [Department of Surgery, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Saigal, Kunal; Panoff, Joseph E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Abitbol, Andre; Wieczorek, D. Jay; Mishra, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Reis, Isildinha; Ferrell, Annapoorna [Division of Biostatistics, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Moreno, Lourdes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility, toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with respiratory gating to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in selected Stage I/II breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with node-negative Stage I/II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in an institutional review board approved protocol to receive APBI using IMRT after breast-conserving surgery. The target volume was treated at 3.8 Gy/fraction twice daily for 5 days, to a total dose of 38 Gy. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled for a median follow-up time of 44.8 months. The median tumor size was 0.98 cm (range, 0.08-3 cm). The median clinical target volume (CTV) treated was 71.4 cc (range, 19-231 cc), with the mean dose to the CTV being 38.96 Gy. Acute toxicities included Grade 1 erythema in 44% of patients and Grade 2 in 6%, Grade 1 hyperpigmentation in 31% of patients and Grade 2 in 3%, and Grade 1 breast/chest wall tenderness in 14% of patients. No Grade 3/4 acute toxicities were observed. Grade 1 and 2 late toxicities as edema, fibrosis, and residual hyperpigmentation occurred in 14% and 11% of patients, respectively; Grade 3 telangiectasis was observed in 3% of patients. The overall cosmetic outcome was considered 'excellent' or 'good' by 94% of patients and 97% when rated by the physician, respectively. The local control rate was 97%; 1 patient died of a non-cancer-related cause. Conclusions: APBI can be safely and effectively administered using IMRT. In retrospective analysis, IMRT enabled the achievement of normal tissue dose constraints as outlined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 04-13/NSABP B-13 while providing excellent conformality for the CTV. Local control and cosmesis have remained excellent at current follow-up, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities. Our data suggest that cosmesis is dependent on target volume

  9. Impact of intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a boost treatment on the lung-dose distributions for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a method of boost radiotherapy after the initial irradiation by the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams for centrally located non-small-cell lung cancer through the evaluation of dose distributions according to the various boost methods. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with T3 or T4 lung cancer and mediastinal node enlargement who previously received radiotherapy were studied. All patients underwent virtual simulation retrospectively with the previous treatment planning computed tomograms. Initial radiotherapy plans were designed to deliver 40 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodal regions with the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams. Two radiation dose levels, 24 and 30 Gy, were used for the boost radiotherapy plans, and four different boost methods (a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT], five-, seven-, and nine-beam IMRT) were applied to each dose level. The goals of the boost plans were to deliver the prescribed radiation dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and minimize the volumes of the normal lungs and spinal cord irradiated above their tolerance doses. Dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs, according to the four types of boost plans, were compared in the boost and sum plans, respectively. Results: The percentage of lung volumes irradiated >20 Gy (V20) was reduced significantly in the IMRT boost plans compared with the 3DCRT boost plans at the 24- and 30-Gy dose levels (p 0.007 and 0.0315 respectively). Mean lung doses according to the boost methods were not different in the 24- and 30-Gy boost plans. The conformity indexes (CI) of the IMRT boost plans were lower than those of the 3DCRT plans in the 24- and 30-Gy plans (p = 0.001 in both). For the sum plans, there was no difference of the dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs according to the boost methods. Conclusions: In the boost plans the V20s and CIs were

  10. SU-E-P-48: Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Three Different Commercial Planning Systems for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D; Chi, Z; Yang, H; Miao, M; Jing, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the performances of three commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization regarding cervical cancer. Methods: For twenty cervical cancer patients, three IMRT plans were retrospectively re-planned: one with Pinnacle TPS,one with Oncentra TPS and on with Eclipse TPS. The total prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy delivered for PTV and 58.8 Gy for PTVnd by simultaneous integrated boost technique. The treatments were delivered using the Varian 23EX accelerator. All optimization schemes generated clinically acceptable plans. They were evaluated based on target coverage, homogeneity (HI) and conformity (CI). The organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed according to the percent volume under some doses and the maximum doses. The statistical method of the collected data of variance analysis was used to compare the difference among the quality of plans. Results: IMRT with Eclipse provided significant better HI, CI and all the parameters of PTV. However, the trend was not extension to the PTVnd, it was still significant better at mean dose, D50% and D98%, but plans with Oncentra showed significant better in the hight dosage volume, such as maximum dose and D2%. For the bladder wall, there were not notable difference among three groups, although Pinnacle and Oncentra systems provided a little lower dose sparing at V50Gy of bladder and rectal wall and V40Gy of bladder wall, respectively. V40Gy of rectal wall (p=0.037), small intestine (p=0.001 for V30Gy, p=0.010 for maximum dose) and V50Gy of right-femoral head (p=0.019) from Eclipse plans showed significant better than other groups. Conclusion: All SIB-IMRT plans were clinically acceptable which were generated by three commercial TPSs. The plans with Eclipse system showed advantages over the plans with Oncentra and Pinnacle system in the overwhelming majority of the dose coverage for targets and dose sparing of OARs in cervical cancer.

  11. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Is Safe and Effective Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Selected Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the feasibility, toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with respiratory gating to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in selected Stage I/II breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with node-negative Stage I/II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in an institutional review board approved protocol to receive APBI using IMRT after breast-conserving surgery. The target volume was treated at 3.8 Gy/fraction twice daily for 5 days, to a total dose of 38 Gy. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled for a median follow-up time of 44.8 months. The median tumor size was 0.98 cm (range, 0.08–3 cm). The median clinical target volume (CTV) treated was 71.4 cc (range, 19–231 cc), with the mean dose to the CTV being 38.96 Gy. Acute toxicities included Grade 1 erythema in 44% of patients and Grade 2 in 6%, Grade 1 hyperpigmentation in 31% of patients and Grade 2 in 3%, and Grade 1 breast/chest wall tenderness in 14% of patients. No Grade 3/4 acute toxicities were observed. Grade 1 and 2 late toxicities as edema, fibrosis, and residual hyperpigmentation occurred in 14% and 11% of patients, respectively; Grade 3 telangiectasis was observed in 3% of patients. The overall cosmetic outcome was considered “excellent” or “good” by 94% of patients and 97% when rated by the physician, respectively. The local control rate was 97%; 1 patient died of a non–cancer-related cause. Conclusions: APBI can be safely and effectively administered using IMRT. In retrospective analysis, IMRT enabled the achievement of normal tissue dose constraints as outlined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 04-13/NSABP B-13 while providing excellent conformality for the CTV. Local control and cosmesis have remained excellent at current follow-up, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities. Our data suggest that cosmesis is dependent on target volume size

  12. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Center for Cancer Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chepeha, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  13. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schneeweiss, Andreas [University of Heidelberg, Nationales Centrum fuer Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Sohn, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynecology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Akut- und Langzeittoxizitaet sowie Ueberlebensdaten der konsolidierenden intensitaetsmodulierten Ganzabdomenbestrahlung (''intensity-modulated

  14. Conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation of pediatrics tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to take stock on the validated and potential indications of the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation ( intensity modulated radiotherapy I.M.R.T.) in pediatrics and to propose recommendations for its use as well as the adapted dose constraints. About 40 to 50% of children treated for a cancer are irradiated. The I.M.R.T., by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy has for aim to give a homogenous dose to the target volume and to save organs at risk. Its use in pediatrics seems particularly interesting because of the complexity of target volumes and the closeness of organs at risk. In compensation for these positive elements, the importance of low doses irradiation given in big volumes makes fear event consequences on growth and an increased incidence of secondary cancers in children suffering from tumors with high cure rates and long life expectancy. (N.C.)

  15. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm3 with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites

  16. Prospective Preference Assessment of Patients' Willingness to Participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Scott D. [Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Coen, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate patients' willingness to participate (WTP) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with proton beam therapy (PBT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study in which we prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa. We used purposive sampling to ensure a diverse sample based on age, race, travel distance, and physician. Patients participated in a semi-structured interview in which they reviewed a description of a hypothetical RCT, were asked open-ended and focused follow-up questions regarding their motivations for and concerns about enrollment, and completed a questionnaire assessing characteristics such as demographics and prior knowledge of IMRT or PBT. Patients' stated WTP was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale. Results: Forty-six eligible patients (33 white, 13 black) were enrolled from the practices of eight physicians. We identified 21 factors that impacted patients' WTP, which largely centered on five major themes: altruism/desire to compare treatments, randomization, deference to physician opinion, financial incentives, and time demands/scheduling. Most patients (27 of 46, 59%) stated they would either 'definitely' or 'probably' participate. Seventeen percent (8 of 46) stated they would 'definitely not' or 'probably not' enroll, most of whom (6 of 8) preferred PBT before their physician visit. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of patients indicated high WTP in a RCT comparing IMRT and PBT for PCa.

  17. Superiority of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy over helical tomotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A comparative plan analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Pyo, H.; Kim, J. [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Lim, Y.K.; Kim, D.W.; Cho, K.H. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Kim, W.C. [Inha Univ. School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kim, H.J. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a variety of dosimetric and radiobiologic indexes in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with LA-NSCLC were enrolled. IMRT plans with 4-6 coplanar beams and HT plans were generated for each patient. Dose distributions and dosimetric indexes for the tumors and critical structures were computed for both plans and compared. Results: Both modalities created highly conformal plans. They did not differ in the volumes of lung exposed to > 20 Gy of radiation. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=} 30 Gy, and volume receiving {>=} 10 Gy in HT planning were 18.3 Gy, 18.5%, and 57.1%, respectively, compared to 19.4 Gy, 25.4%, and 48.9%, respectively, with IMRT (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). The differences between HT and IMRT in lung volume receiving {>=} 10-20 Gy increased significantly as the planning target volume (PTV) increased. For 6 patients who had PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT for 5 patients in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. The integral dose to the entire thorax in HT plans was significantly higher than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: HT gave significantly better control of mean lung dose and volume receiving {>=} 30-40 Gy, whereas IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving {>=} 5-15 Gy and the integral dose to entire thorax. In most patients with PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. It is therefore advised that caution should be exercised when planning LA-NSCLC using HT. (orig.)

  18. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  19. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of ≥60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60–76 Gy, 1.8–2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade ≥3 maximum TRP (TRPmax) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade ≥1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosismax) and 7% Grade ≥2 pulmonary fibrosismax. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitismax) were 3 weeks (range, 1–13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3–13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitismax later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  20. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  1. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed

  2. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Binbin, E-mail: binbin.wu@gunet.georgetown.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zahurak, Marianna [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Simari, Patricio [Autodesk Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pang, Dalong [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); Taylor, Russell [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  3. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  4. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities

  5. [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole and a New PET System With Semiconductor Detectors and a Depth of Interaction System for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Koichi [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya, E-mail: ronimaru@pop.med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Katoh, Norio; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Suzuki, Ryusuke [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Takeuchi, Wataru [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd, Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Central Institute of Isotope Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of a new type of positron emission tomography (New PET) with semiconductor detectors using {sup 18}F-labeled fluoromisonidazole (FMISO)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was compared with a state-of-the-art PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) system in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with non-NPC malignant tumors (control group) and 16 patients with NPC were subjected to FMISO-PET. The threshold of the tumor-to-muscle (T/M) ratio in each PET scan was calculated. The hypoxic volume within the gross tumor volume (GTVh) was determined using each PET ({sub NewPET}GTVh and {sub PET/CT}GTVh, respectively). Dose escalation IMRT plans prescribing 84 Gy to each GTVh were carried out. Results: The threshold of the T/M ratio was 1.35 for New PET and 1.23 for PET/CT. The mean volume of {sub NewPET}GTVh was significantly smaller than that of {sub PET/CT}GTVh (1.5 {+-} 1.6 cc vs 4.7 {+-} 4.6 cc, respectively; P=.0020). The dose escalation IMRT plans using New PET were superior in dose distribution to those using PET/CT. Dose escalation was possible in all 10 New PET-guided plans but not in 1 PET/CT-guided plan, because the threshold dose to the brainstem was exceeded. Conclusions: New PET was found to be useful for accurate dose escalation in FMISO-guided IMRT for patients with NPC.

  6. Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning Based on Manual and Automatically Generated Contours Using Deformable Image Registration in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography of Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the implications of differences between contours drawn manually and contours generated automatically by deformable image registration for four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning. Methods and Materials: In 12 lung cancer patients intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning was performed for both manual contours and automatically generated ('auto') contours in mid and peak expiration of 4D computed tomography scans, with the manual contours in peak inspiration serving as the reference for the displacement vector fields. Manual and auto plans were analyzed with respect to their coverage of the manual contours, which were assumed to represent the anatomically correct volumes. Results: Auto contours were on average larger than manual contours by up to 9%. Objective scores, D2% and D98% of the planning target volume, homogeneity and conformity indices, and coverage of normal tissue structures (lungs, heart, esophagus, spinal cord) at defined dose levels were not significantly different between plans (p = 0.22-0.94). Differences were statistically insignificant for the generalized equivalent uniform dose of the planning target volume (p = 0.19-0.94) and normal tissue complication probabilities for lung and esophagus (p = 0.13-0.47). Dosimetric differences >2% or >1 Gy were more frequent in patients with auto/manual volume differences ≥10% (p = 0.04). Conclusions: The applied deformable image registration algorithm produces clinically plausible auto contours in the majority of structures. At this stage clinical supervision of the auto contouring process is required, and manual interventions may become necessary. Before routine use, further investigations are required, particularly to reduce imaging artifacts

  7. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Racquel E. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheets, Nathan C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Wheeler, Stephanie B. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Nutting, Chris [Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kindom (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Division of Clinical Studies, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy. Effect on outcome and toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, M.; Nevens, D.; Nuyts, S. [University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-03-15

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has rapidly become standard of care in the management of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, our aim was to retrospectively investigate the effect of the introducing IMRT on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Material and methods: A total of 245 patients with stage III and IV HNSCC treated with primary radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in this analysis: 135 patients were treated with 3DCRT, 110 patients with IMRT. Groups were compared for acute and late toxicity, locoregional control (LRC), and overall survival (OS). Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using a log-rank test. Acute toxicity was analyzed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and late toxicity was scored using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system. Results: Median follow-up was 35 months in the IMRT group and 68 months in the 3DCRT group. No significant differences were found in 3-year LRC and OS rates between the IMRT group and 3DCRT group. Significantly less acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was observed in the IMRT group (32% vs. 44%, p = 0.03). There was significantly less late xerostomia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (23% vs. 68%, p < 0.001). After 24 months, there was less dysphagia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group although differences failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The introduction of IMRT in the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced head and neck cancer significantly improved late toxicity without compromising tumor control compared to a parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  9. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of ‘isotoxic’ radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Methods and analysis Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. Ethics and dissemination The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West—Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. Trial registration number NCT01836692; Pre-results. PMID:27084277

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving ≥ 10 Gy (V10) and ≥ 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration. (note)

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, Bilal A; Bragg, Christopher M [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Lawless, Sarah E; Hatton, Matthew Q F; Ireland, Rob H [Academic Unit of Clinical Oncology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk

    2010-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV{sub 90}), the volume of total lung receiving {>=} 10 Gy (V{sub 10}) and {>=} 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean {+-} SD reductions for V{sub 10}, V{sub 20} and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 {+-} 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 {+-} 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 {+-} 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV{sub 90} was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration. (note)

  12. Prognostic parameters for acute esophagus toxicity in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and dosimetric variables with acute esophageal toxicity (AET) following Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, timeline of AET was reported. Material and methods: 153 patients with locally advanced NSCLC treated with 66 Gy/2.75 Gy/24 fractions of radiotherapy and concurrent daily low dose cisplatin were selected. Medical records and treatments of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Maximum AET grade ⩾2 and maximum grade 3 were the endpoints of this study. Dates for onset, maximum and recovery (to baseline) of AET were reported. Univariate and multivariate analysis were applied to correlate clinical, tumor, dosimetric and chemotherapy dose variables to AET grade ⩾2 and grade 3. Results: AET grade 2 occurred in 37% and grade 3 in 20% of the patients. The median onset of AET was around day 15 for all grades. The median onset of the maximum grade was day 30 for both grades 2 and 3. The median duration was 43 days for grade 1, 50 days for grade 2 and >80 days for grade 3. Of the grade 3 AET patients, 48% recovered within 3 months. Esophagus V50, ethnic background, and the number of cisplatin administrations were significantly correlated with grade 3 AET. Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT A higher number of cisplatin administrations, non-Caucasian background and higher V50oes were associated with grade 3 AET. The median onset of AET grade 3 is 15 days after the start of treatment, maximized at day 30, with a median duration of >80 days

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  14. Residual deficits in quality of life one year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Results of a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribius, Silke; Raguse, Marieclaire; Voigt, Christian; Petersen, Cordula; Kruell, Andreas [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Muenscher, Adrian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Groebe, Alexander [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Bergelt, Corinna [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Medical Psychology, Hamburg (Germany); Singer, Susanne [University Medical Center Mainz, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-08

    Patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) undergo life-changing treatments that can seriously affect quality of life (QoL). This prospective study examined the key QoL domains during the first year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and identified predictors of these changes in order to improve patient outcomes. A consecutive series of patients with LAHNC completed the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core module (QLQ-C30) and the HNC-specific QLQ-HN35 before (t0) and at the end (t1) of definitive or adjuvant IMRT, then at 6-8 weeks (t2), 6 months (t3), and 1 year (t4) after IMRT. Patients (n = 111) completing questionnaires at all five time points were included (baseline response rate: 99 %; dropout rate between t0 and t4: 5 %). QoL deteriorated in all domains during IMRT and improved slowly during the first year thereafter. Many domains recovered to baseline values after 1 year but problems with smelling and tasting, dry mouth, and sticky saliva remained issues at this time. Increases in problems with sticky saliva were greater after 1 year in patients with definitive versus adjuvant IMRT (F = 3.5, P = 0.05). QoL in patients with LAHNC receiving IMRT takes approximately 1 year to return to baseline; some domains remain compromised after 1 year. Although IMRT aims to maintain function and QoL, patients experience long-term dry mouth and sticky saliva, particularly following definitive IMRT. Patients should be counseled at the start of therapy to reduce disappointment with the pace of recovery. (orig.) [German] Die Therapie von Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (LFKHT) geht mit einschneidenden Veraenderungen einher und beeinflusst die Lebensqualitaet (LQ) erheblich. Diese prospektive Studie untersucht die LQ waehrend des ersten Jahres nach intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT) und hat Praediktoren dieser Veraenderungen herausgearbeitet, um

  15. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaojuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. Materials and methods 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time comparison. Results The SA-VMAT plans showed the superior target dose coverage, although the minimum/mean/maximum doses to the target were similar. For the total and contralateral lungs, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and mean lung dose (MLD were observed in the SA/PA-VMAT plans (p 20, V30 and MLD of the controlateral lung more notably, comparing to those parameters of the IMRT and SA-VMAT plans respectively. The delivered monitor units (MUs and treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT plans, especially PA-VMAT plans (for MUs: mean 458.3 vs. 439.2 vs. 435.7 MUs, p vs. 10.6 vs. 6.4 minutes, p Conclusions The SA-VMAT technique achieves highly conformal dose distribution to the target. Comparing to the IMRT plans, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and MLD were observed in the total and contralateral lungs in the VMAT plans, especially in the PA-VMAT plans. The SA/PA-VMAT plans also reduced treatment time with more efficient dose delivering. But the clinical benefit of the VMAT technique for locally advanced lung cancer needs further investigations.

  16. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number

  17. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT) techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time comparison. The SA-VMAT plans showed the superior target dose coverage, although the minimum/mean/maximum doses to the target were similar. For the total and contralateral lungs, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and mean lung dose (MLD) were observed in the SA/PA-VMAT plans (p < 0.05, respectively). The PA-VMAT technique improves the dose sparing (V20, V30 and MLD) of the controlateral lung more notably, comparing to those parameters of the IMRT and SA-VMAT plans respectively. The delivered monitor units (MUs) and treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT plans, especially PA-VMAT plans (for MUs: mean 458.3 vs. 439.2 vs. 435.7 MUs, p < 0.05 and for treatment time: mean 13.7 vs. 10.6 vs. 6.4 minutes, p < 0.01). The SA-VMAT technique achieves highly conformal dose distribution to the target. Comparing to the IMRT plans, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and MLD were observed in the total and contralateral lungs in the VMAT plans, especially in the PA-VMAT plans. The SA/PA-VMAT plans also reduced treatment time with more efficient dose delivering. But the clinical benefit of the VMAT technique for locally advanced lung cancer needs further investigations

  18. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, L; Deng, G [Department of Oncology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xie, J; Cheng, J; Liang, N; Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, J; Luo, H [Division of Oncology, Department of Graduate, Weifang Medical College, 2610, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number.

  19. Dose-Escalated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible and May Improve Locoregional Control and Laryngeal Preservation in Laryngo-Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the safety and outcomes of induction chemotherapy followed by dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concomitant chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx and hypopharynx (LA-SCCL/H). Methods and Materials: A sequential cohort Phase I/II trial design was used to evaluate moderate acceleration and dose escalation. Patients with LA-SCCL/H received IMRT at two dose levels (DL): DL1, 63 Gy/28 fractions (Fx) to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 51.8 Gy/28 Fx to PTV2; DL2, 67.2 Gy/28 Fx and 56 Gy/28 Fx to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Patients received induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil and concomitant cisplatin. Acute and late toxicities and tumor control rates were recorded. Results: Between September 2002 and January 2008, 60 patients (29 DL1, 31 DL2) with Stage III (41% DL1, 52% DL2) and Stage IV (52% DL1, 48% DL2) disease were recruited. Median (range) follow-up for DL1 was 51.2 (12.1–77.3) months and for DL2 was 36.2 (4.2–63.3) months. Acute Grade 3 (G3) dysphagia was higher in DL2 (87% DL2 vs. 59% DL1), but other toxicities were equivalent. One patient in DL1 required dilatation of a pharyngeal stricture (G3 dysphagia). In DL2, 2 patients developed benign pharyngeal strictures at 1 year. One underwent a laryngo-pharyngectomy and the other a dilatation. No other G3/G4 toxicities were reported. Overall complete response was 79% (DL1) and 84% (DL2). Two-year locoregional progression-free survival rates were 64.2% (95% confidence interval, 43.5–78.9%) in DL1 and 78.4% (58.1–89.7%) in DL2. Two-year laryngeal preservation rates were 88.7% (68.5–96.3%) in DL1 and 96.4% (77.7–99.5%) in DL2. Conclusions: At a mean follow-up of 36 months, dose-escalated chemotherapy–IMRT at DL2 has so far been safe to deliver. In this study, DL2 delivered high rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and organ preservation and has been selected as the experimental arm in a Cancer Research UK

  20. SU-E-T-452: Impact of Respiratory Motion On Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy to Treat Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W; Schild, S; Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Liao, Z; Sahoo, N [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Park, P [Scottsdale, GA (United States); Li, H [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Li, Y [Varian Medical Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Li, X; Shen, J [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AA (United States); Anand, A [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix (United States); Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Zhu, X; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We compared conventionally optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans against the worst-case robustly optimized treatment plans for lung cancer. The comparison of the two IMPT optimization strategies focused on the resulting plans' ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set-up, inherent proton range uncertainty, and dose perturbation caused by respiratory motion. Methods: For each of the 9 lung cancer cases two treatment plans were created accounting for treatment uncertainties in two different ways: the first used the conventional Method: delivery of prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) that is geometrically expanded from the internal target volume (ITV). The second employed the worst-case robust optimization scheme that addressed set-up and range uncertainties through beamlet optimization. The plan optimality and plan robustness were calculated and compared. Furthermore, the effects on dose distributions of the changes in patient anatomy due to respiratory motion was investigated for both strategies by comparing the corresponding plan evaluation metrics at the end-inspiration and end-expiration phase and absolute differences between these phases. The mean plan evaluation metrics of the two groups were compared using two-sided paired t-tests. Results: Without respiratory motion considered, we affirmed that worst-case robust optimization is superior to PTV-based conventional optimization in terms of plan robustness and optimality. With respiratory motion considered, robust optimization still leads to more robust dose distributions to respiratory motion for targets and comparable or even better plan optimality [D95% ITV: 96.6% versus 96.1% (p=0.26), D5% - D95% ITV: 10.0% versus 12.3% (p=0.082), D1% spinal cord: 31.8% versus 36.5% (p =0.035)]. Conclusion: Worst-case robust optimization led to superior solutions for lung IMPT. Despite of the fact that robust optimization did not explicitly

  1. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose–Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose–volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V70), 65 Gy (V65), and 40 Gy (V40). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V70 ≤10%, V65 ≤20%, and V40 ≤40%; 92% for men with rectal V70 ≤20%, V65 ≤40%, and V40 ≤80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged ≥70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints may help limit late GI morbidity.

  2. Feasibility of omitting clinical target volume for limited-disease small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the feasibility of omitting clinical target volume (CTV) for limited small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy. 89 patients were treated from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2011, 54 cases were irradiated with target volume without CTV, and 35 cases were irradiated with CTV. Both arms were irradiated post chemotherapy tumor extent and omitted elective nodal irradiation; dose prescription was 95% PTV56-63 Gy/28-35 F/5.6-7 weeks. In the arm without CTV and arm with CTV, the local relapse rates were 16.7% and 17.1% (p = 0.586) respectively. In the arm without CTV, of the 9 patients with local relapse, 6 recurred in-field, 2 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. In the arm with CTV, of the 6 patients with local relapse, 4 recurred in-field, 1 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. The distant metastases rates were 42.6% and 51.4% (p = 0.274) respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity and radiation esophagitis had no statistically significant, but grade 3-4 radiation pneumonia was observed in only 7.4% in the arm without CTV, compared 22.9% in the arm with CTV (p = 0.040). The median survival in the arm without CTV had not reached, compared with 38 months in the with CTV arm. The l- years, 2- years, 3- years survival rates of the arm without CTV and the arm with CTV were 81.0%, 66.2%, 61.5% and 88.6%, 61.7%, 56.6% (p = 0.517). The multivariate analysis indicated that the distant metastases (p = 0.000) and PCI factor (p = 0.004) were significantly related to overall survival. Target delineation omitting CTV for limited-disease small cell lung cancer received IMRT was feasible. The distant metastases and PCI factor were significantly related to overall survival

  3. Single Vocal Cord Irradiation: Image Guided Intensity Modulated Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for T1a Glottic Cancer: Early Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.almamgani@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kwa, Stefan L.S.; Tans, Lisa; Moring, Michael; Fransen, Dennie; Mehilal, Robert; Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baatenburg de Jong, Rob J. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery – Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Data for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and

  4. Single Vocal Cord Irradiation: Image Guided Intensity Modulated Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for T1a Glottic Cancer: Early Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Data for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and

  5. Assessment of Interfraction Patient Setup for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Computed Tomography-Based Image Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5Σ + 0.7 σ, where Σ and σ were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, −0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, −0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup

  6. Anterior Myocardial Territory May Replace the Heart as Organ at Risk in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We investigated whether the heart could be replaced by the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as the organ at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of the breast for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with left-sided breast cancer who received postoperative radiation after breast-conserving surgery were studied. For each patient, we generated five IMRT plans including heart (H), left ventricle (LV), AMT, LV+AMT, and H+LV as the primary OARs, respectively, except both lungs and right breast, which corresponded to IMRT(H), IMRT(LV), IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV+AMT), and IMRT(H+LV). For the planning target volumes and OARs, the parameters of dose–volume histograms were compared. Results: The homogeneity index, conformity index, and coverage index were not compromised significantly in IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV) and IMRT(LV+ AMT), respectively, when compared with IMRT(H). The mean dose to the heart, LV, and AMT decreased 5.3–21.5% (p < 0.05), 19.9–29.5% (p < 0.05), and 13.3–24.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. Similarly, the low (e.g., V5%), middle (e.g., V20%), and high (e.g., V30%) dose-volume of the heart, LV, and AMT decreased with different levels. The mean dose and V10% of the right lung increased by 9.2% (p < 0.05) and 27.6% (p < 0.05), respectively, in IMRT(LV), and the mean dose and V5% of the right breast decreased significantly in IMRT(AMT) and IMRT(LV+AMT). IMRT(AMT) was the preferred plan and was then compared with IMRT(H+LV); the majority of dose–volume histogram parameters of OARs including the heart, LV, AMT, both lungs, and the right breast were not statistically different. However, the low dose-volume of LV increased and the middle dose-volume decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in IMRT(AMT). Also, those of the right lung (V10%, V15%) and right breast (V5%, V10%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The AMT may replace the heart as the OAR in left-sided breast IMRT after breast

  7. SU-E-T-452: Impact of Respiratory Motion On Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy to Treat Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We compared conventionally optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans against the worst-case robustly optimized treatment plans for lung cancer. The comparison of the two IMPT optimization strategies focused on the resulting plans' ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set-up, inherent proton range uncertainty, and dose perturbation caused by respiratory motion. Methods: For each of the 9 lung cancer cases two treatment plans were created accounting for treatment uncertainties in two different ways: the first used the conventional Method: delivery of prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) that is geometrically expanded from the internal target volume (ITV). The second employed the worst-case robust optimization scheme that addressed set-up and range uncertainties through beamlet optimization. The plan optimality and plan robustness were calculated and compared. Furthermore, the effects on dose distributions of the changes in patient anatomy due to respiratory motion was investigated for both strategies by comparing the corresponding plan evaluation metrics at the end-inspiration and end-expiration phase and absolute differences between these phases. The mean plan evaluation metrics of the two groups were compared using two-sided paired t-tests. Results: Without respiratory motion considered, we affirmed that worst-case robust optimization is superior to PTV-based conventional optimization in terms of plan robustness and optimality. With respiratory motion considered, robust optimization still leads to more robust dose distributions to respiratory motion for targets and comparable or even better plan optimality [D95% ITV: 96.6% versus 96.1% (p=0.26), D5% - D95% ITV: 10.0% versus 12.3% (p=0.082), D1% spinal cord: 31.8% versus 36.5% (p =0.035)]. Conclusion: Worst-case robust optimization led to superior solutions for lung IMPT. Despite of the fact that robust optimization did not explicitly

  8. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: The standard; Radiotherapie avec modulation d'intensite pour les cancers de la tete et du cou: le standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingon, P.; Crehange, G.; Chamois, J.; Khoury, C.; Truc, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Pr-Marion, 21079 Dijon cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Combined radical radiation therapy for head and neck carcinoma should be planned with intensity modulated beams to provide a rapid answer to patients' requirements in terms of quality of treatment. The most frequent late toxicity of radiation therapy is xerostomia, which may be prevented by using this technique able to significantly spare salivary glands irradiation. Selection of indications is a very important step. The objective of sparing salivary functions, strongly associated with optimization criteria of quality of life should be considered as a main objective in irradiation of head and neck tumours. The various possibilities offered by this technique allowing to boost a target volume included in prophylactically irradiated regions could offer the possibility to escalate the dose in selected patients. The feasibility of this process is currently validated in prospective studies. Finally, routine implementation of intensity modulated radiation therapy should be performed with strong and robust quality assurance procedures, ensuring that the expected benefit could be increased with the current developments by using rotational techniques. (authors)

  9. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  10. Speckle dynamics for intensity-modulated illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the dynamics of laser speckle patterns, designed for sensing with a receiver, based on spatial filtering. The speckle translation arises after free-space propagation of light scattered from nonspecular surfaces of a solid object in motion. The speckle pattern is manipulated by modulating the intensity of the coherent light, illuminating the target. The space-time normalized cross covariance of speckle patterns incident on the spatial sensor is calculated for the field distribution of three Gaussian beams having arbitrary directions and separations when incident on the target. The modulation of the intensity distribution at the target introduce a higher spatial frequency component in the speckle pattern. The theoretical analysis provides the statistical parameters for both the speckles and the higher spatial frequency component. The analysis reveals that the speckles and the higher spatial frequency component do not necessarily translate as a rigid structure. The theoretical findings are supported by measurements

  11. Matched case-control study of quality of life and xerostomia after intensity-modulated radiotherapy or standard radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Initial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QOL) and xerostomia between head-and-neck cancer patients who received standard radiotherapy (RT) and patients matched by factors known to affect QOL who received intensity-modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a prospective, longitudinal study of patients with head-and-neck cancer requiring bilateral neck irradiation who received IMRT at the University of Michigan and patients who received standard RT at affiliated clinics. Each patient received a validated head-and-neck cancer-related QOL questionnaire (HNQOL) consisting of four multi-item domains-Eating, Communication, Pain, and Emotion-and a validated patient-reported xerostomia questionnaire (XQ). In both questionnaires, the answers were scored 0-100, with higher scores denoting worse QOL or xerostomia. The questionnaires were given before therapy and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after the completion of therapy. Each standard RT patient was matched with several IMRT patients according to tumor site, stage, RT status (postoperative or definitive), and age. A linear mixed-effects model was fit to compare outcomes between the two treatment groups and to model trends over time. To account for matching, the differences in scores between the matched sets of patients were fit as a random intercept. Also, matching was taken into account in the model by using the standard error of the within-paired-groups differences. Results: Between 1997 and 2002, 10 patients who had received standard RT and answered the XQ and HNQOL through at least 1 year were included in the study. Each of these patients was matched with a subgroup of 2-5 patients (median, 3) who had received IMRT, had similar patient and tumor characteristics, and answered the same questionnaires. A total of 30 patients were included in the IMRT group. During the initial months after therapy, the XQ and HNQOL summary scores worsened significantly in both groups compared with the pretherapy scores. Starting

  12. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  13. Fluorine-18-Labeled Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission and Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Hypoxia renders tumor cells radioresistant, limiting locoregional control from radiotherapy (RT). Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) allows for targeting of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and can potentially deliver a greater dose to hypoxic subvolumes (GTVh) while sparing normal tissues. A Monte Carlo model has shown that boosting the GTVh increases the tumor control probability. This study examined the feasibility of fluorine-18-labeled fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FMISO PET/CT)-guided IMRT with the goal of maximally escalating the dose to radioresistant hypoxic zones in a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: 18F-FMISO was administered intravenously for PET imaging. The CT simulation, fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT, and 18F-FMISO PET/CT scans were co-registered using the same immobilization methods. The tumor boundaries were defined by clinical examination and available imaging studies, including fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT. Regions of elevated 18F-FMISO uptake within the fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT GTV were targeted for an IMRT boost. Additional targets and/or normal structures were contoured or transferred to treatment planning to generate 18F-FMISO PET/CT-guided IMRT plans. Results: The heterogeneous distribution of 18F-FMISO within the GTV demonstrated variable levels of hypoxia within the tumor. Plans directed at performing 18F-FMISO PET/CT-guided IMRT for 10 HNC patients achieved 84 Gy to the GTVh and 70 Gy to the GTV, without exceeding the normal tissue tolerance. We also attempted to deliver 105 Gy to the GTVh for 2 patients and were successful in 1, with normal tissue sparing. Conclusion: It was feasible to dose escalate the GTVh to 84 Gy in all 10 patients and in 1 patient to 105 Gy without exceeding the normal tissue tolerance. This information has provided important data for subsequent hypoxia-guided IMRT trials with the goal of further improving locoregional control in HNC patients

  14. Impact of different beam set-up methods on quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate whether the change of beam set-up methods will influence the dosimetric quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Twenty-one stage I-III NSCLC patients were selected for this study. The technique of step and shoot was used and three different beam set-up methods were chosen for IMRT planning including IMRT-7 with nine equal-spaced beams angled 0 degree, 51 degree, 102 degree, 153 degree, 204 degree, 255 degree and 306 degree; IMRT-5 with five equal-spaced beams angled 0 degree, 72 degree, 144 degree, 216 degree and 288 degree; and IMRT-5m which was created from IMRT-7 but excluded 2 fields (51 degree and 102 degree were omitted if there was lesion in the right lung, while 255 degree and 306 degree were excluded if there was lesion in the left lung). The dose constrains of normal lungs for IMRT were set according to V5-V60 of normal lungs obtained from the same patient's actually treated 3D-CRT dose volume histogram. The prescription dose for IMRT started from 65 Gy, and then escalated or decreased step by step by 2 Gy once a time until best plan was obtained. Results: For normal lung dose, IMRT-5m had lower V5-V25 than the other two groups; but there was no significant difference in V30-V40. IMRT-5 was the worst for V45-V60; and mean lung dose was lowest in IMRT-5m. Dose parameters of esophagus and spinal cord, target conformity index, and total monitor units were all similar among difference plans. IMRT-5m had lowest heart V40 compared to the other two groups. For target heterogeneity index, IMRT-5 was higher than IMRT-7, but there were no significant differences among IMRT-5m, IMRT-5 and IMRT-7. Compared to 3D-CRT, the prescription dose could be increased by (5.1±4.6) Gy for IMRT-7, (3.1±5.3) Gy for IMRT-5, and (5.5±4.8) Gy for IMRT-5m. Conclusions: Fewer beams and modified beam angles could result in similar, even better plan quality. (authors)

  15. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  16. Dosimetric analysis of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyusha Bagdare

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the dosimetric parameters of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases. Methods: Ten patients with inoperable NSCLC were selected for this study. The 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated for all patients following Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG guidelines. Generated plans were then compared on the basis of planning target volume (PTV coverage, dose delivered to organs at risk, homogeneity index (HI, and conformity index (CI for the prescribed dose (PD of 50 Gy in 25 fractions.Results: The mean D95 and D99 (dose to the 95% and 99% volume for the PTV were found better in the 3DCRT plans compared to the ones in the IMRT plans. On an average, the volume receiving 20 Gy (V20 of contralateral lung was 2.91% and 3.03% in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively. The Dmean of contralateral lung was 3.17 Gy (3DCRT versus 4.2 Gy (IMRT, whereas the Dmean of ipsilateral lung was 12.69 Gy (3DCRT and 13.82 Gy (IMRT. The V20 of ipsilateral lung was found to be slightly lower in the 3DCRT (25.67% when compared to the IMRT (30.50%. The dose to the heart was comparable in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans (mean dose: 4.42 Gy versus 4.48 Gy; D33: 3.77 Gy versus and 4.02 Gy. For the spinal cord, the Dmax was found to be lower in the 3DCRT plans (18.40 Gy when compared to the IMRT plans (25.49 Gy. The HI was 1.08 versus 1.41 in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively. The CI was identical (1.67 in both sets of plans.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the PTV coverage was found to be slightly better in the 3DCRT plans when compared to the one in the IMRT plans. On average, the dose to the organs at risk were found to be comparable.

  17. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm2. The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows higher

  18. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with concurrent but not adjuvant chemotherapy in primary nasopharyngeal cancer – a retrospective single center analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our experience in 49 consecutive patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were treated by Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with simultaneous but not adjuvant chemotherapy (CHT). The medical records of 49 patients with histologically proven primary nasopharygeal carcinoma treated with IMRT and concurrent platin-based CHT (predominantly cisplatin weekly) were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of patients showed advanced clinical stages (stage III/IV:72%) with undifferentiated histology (82%). IMRT was performed in step-and-shoot technique using an integrated boost concept in 84%. In this concept, the boost volume covered the primary tumor and involved nodes with doses of 66–70.4 Gy (single dose 2.2 Gy). Uninvolved regional nodal areas were covered with doses of 54–59.4 Gy (median single dose 1.8 Gy). At least one parotid gland was spared. None of the patients received adjuvant CHT. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 48 months. Radiation therapy was completed without interruption in all patients and 76% of the patients received at least 80% of the scheduled CHT. Four local recurrences have been observed, transferring into 1-, 3-, and 5-year Local Control (LC) rates of 98%, 90% and 90%. One patient developed an isolated regional nodal recurrence, resulting in 1-, 3-, and 5-year Regional Control (RC) rates of 98%. All locoregional failures were located inside the radiation fields. Distant metastases were found in six patients, transferring into 1-, 3, and 5-year Distant Control (DC) rates of 92%, 86% and 86%. Progression free survival (PFS) rates after 1, 3 and 5 years were 86%, 70% and 69% and 1-, 3- and 5-year Overall Survival (OS) rates were 96%, 82% and 79%. Acute toxicity ≥ grade III mainly consisted of dysphagia (32%), leukopenia (24%), stomatitis (16%), infection (8%) and nausea (8%). Severe late toxicity (grade III) was documented in 18% of the patients, mainly as xerostomia (10%). Concurrent chemoradiation

  19. Clinical efficacy of radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation in treatment of stage Ⅲ small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and toxicities of radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation in the treatment of stage Ⅲ small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 40 patients with stage Ⅲ SCLC who were admitted from January 2010 to August 2012. The prescribed dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the primary gross tumor volume and was 54 Gy in 30 fractions to the planning target volume. All patients received induction chemotherapy,31 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and 22 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy; the platinum-based chemotherapy combined with etoposide or teniposide was adopted. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (25 Gy in 10 fractions) was administered to 17 patients. The short-term tumor response was evaluated by RECIST 1.0, and radiation-related toxicities were assessed by CTCAE 4.0. Overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The short-term tumor response rate was 98%. The follow-up rate was 100%. Twenty-two patients were followed up for at least 2 years. The 1-and 2-year OS rates were 84% and 48%, respectively; the LRFS rates were 89% and 85%, respectively; the PFS rates were 61% and 41%, respectively. Grade 0-1 radiation-related pneumonia was observed in 65% (26/40) of all patients, grade 2 in 25% (10/40),grade 3 in 5% (2/40), and grade 5 in 5% (2/40). Grade 0-1 radiation-related esophagitis was observed in 53% (21/40) of all patients, grade 2 in 43% (17/40), and grade 3 in 5 % (2/40). Conclusions: Preliminary results from this study suggested that IMRT combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation is safe and effective in patients with stage Ⅲ SCLC and is worth further evaluation in a large, prospective, randomized study. (authors)

  20. Feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC). Patients with LD-SCLC were treated with SIB-IMRT within 1 week after completion of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy. Then 2-4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were administered within 1 week after SIB-IMRT. Irradiation was given accelerated hyper-fractionated with the prescribed dose 57Gy at 1.9Gy twice daily to the gross tumor volume (GTV) , 51Gy at 1.7Gy twice daily to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) and 45Gy at 1.5Gy twice daily to the planning target volume (PTV). The chemotherapy regimen consisted of platinum plus etoposide. Prophylactic cranial radiation (25Gy in 10 fractions) was administered to patients who got complete response (CR) or near complete response (nCR). The primary endpoint of this study was the frequency of grade 3 or higher acute non-hematologic treatment-related toxicities. Secondary end points included objective response, overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS). A cohort of 35 patients were enrolled in the study, the biological equivalent dose (BED) of the GTV in the SIB-IMRT was 59.16Gy. Grade 1, 2, and 3 esophagitis were observed in 11 (31%), 12 (34%), and 6 (17%) patients, respectively; Grade 1 and 2 pneumonitis were observed in 8 (23%) and 4 (11%) patients, respectively. The median OS and PFS of the whole group were 37.7 months and 29.3 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year OS was 94.1% and 68.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year PFS was 76.8% and 40.7%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year LRFS was 87.7% and 73.8%, respectively. SIB-IMRT was feasible and well-tolerated in patients with LD-SCLC, and worth further evaluating in a large prospective clinical trial

  1. Long-Term Quality of Life After Swallowing and Salivary-Sparing Chemo–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Survivors of Human Papillomavirus–Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moon, Dominic H. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chepeha, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in 2 prospective studies of chemo–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Of 93 patients with stage III/IV OPC treated on prospective studies of swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT, 69 were eligible for long-term HRQOL assessment. Three validated patient-reported instruments, the Head and Neck QOL (HNQOL) questionnaire, the University of Washington quality of life (UWQOL) questionnaire, and the Xerostomia Questionnaire (XQ), previously administered from baseline through 2 years in the parent studies, were readministered at long-term follow-up, along with the Short-Form 36. Long-term changes in HRQOL from before treatment and 2 years were evaluated. Results: Forty patients (58%) with a median follow-up of 6.5 years participated, 39 of whom (97.5%) had confirmed human papillomavirus–positive OPC. Long term, no clinically significant worsening was detected in mean HRQOL scores compared with 2 years, with stable or improved HRQOL from before treatment in nearly all domains. “Moderate” or greater severity problems were uncommon, reported by 5% of patients for eating, 5% for swallowing, and 2.5% and 5% by HNQOL and UWQOL summary scores, respectively. Freedom from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence and stricture dilation beyond 2 years was 97.5% and 95%, respectively. Eleven percent and 14% of patients reported “moderate” or “severe” long-term worsening in HNQOL Pain and Overall Bother domains, respectively, which were associated with mean dose to the cervical esophagus, larynx, and pharyngeal constrictors. Conclusions: At more than 6 years' median follow-up, OPC patients treated with swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT reported stable or improved HRQOL in nearly all domains compared with both before treatment and 2-year follow-up. New late toxicity after 2 years was

  2. The feasibility of choosing intensity-modulated radiotherapy to treat 3 -5 brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This study evaluates the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat patients with 1 -5 brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: 30 IMRT patients with brain metastases for NSCLC studied retrospectively. Whole brain radiotherapy plus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (WBRT + 3DCRT) and WBRT plus stereotactic radiotherapy (WBRT + SRT) plans were generated. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk dose were measured and compared by dose volume histogram. Differences were analyzed in the three techniques by Wilcoxon Z -test. Results: D99% of the shoulder (D99%-D90%) from IMRT were higher than from WBRT + 3DCRT and WBRT + SRT in all cases. From D15% of slope (D90%-D10%) to D5% of tail (D10% -D1%), IMRT were lower than WBRT + 3DCRT and WBRT + SRT (Z =- 4.72, P =0.000 and Z =- 4.72, P =0.000). D10% and D5% of IMRT were (35.1 ±1.42) Gy and (37.7 ±2.91) Gy, WBRT + 3DCRT were (36.5±2.86) Gy and ( 39.1 ± 3.56) Gy; WBRT + SRT were (36.2 ± 2.57) Gy and ( 38.7 ± 3.67) Gy. IMRT vs WBRT + 3DCRT and WBRT + SRT were significant (Z=-3.18, -3.18, P=0.001, 0.001 and Z=- 4.11, - 3.02, P =0.000, 0.002) in 13 patients with 3 - 5 brain metastases. The total mean monitor units were 14756.3, 9614.8 and 9043.2 for IMRT, WBRT + 3DCRT and WBRT + SRT plans, respectively, with a 38.7% reduction from IMRT to WBRT + SRT (Z =-4.78, -4.78, P =0.000, 0.000). The brain doses around metastases were similar in the three techniques with 1 -2 metastases, but IMRT was the best with 3 -5 metastases. Conclusions: IMRT can advance brain metastases dose and improve the planning target minimum dose and spare the dose around brain metastases. Only IMRT is the best choice for just sparing the dose around brain metastases among 3 -5 brain metastases. (authors)

  3. NTCP models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: The role of dosimetric and clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this multicentre prospective study was to develop multivariable logistic regression models to make valid predictions about the risk of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia (XERM6) and sticky saliva 6 months (STICM6) after primary treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and materials: The study population was composed of 178 consecutive HNC patients treated with IMRT. All patients were included in a standard follow up programme in which acute and late side effects and quality of life were prospectively assessed, prior to, during and after treatment. The primary endpoints were XERM6 and STICM6 as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 after completing IMRT. Organs at risk (OARs) potentially involved in salivary function were delineated on planning-CT, including the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands and the minor glands in the soft palate, cheeks and lips. Patients with moderate-to-severe xerostomia or sticky saliva, respectively, at baseline were excluded. The optimal number of variables for a multivariate logistic regression model was determined using a bootstrapping method. Results: Eventually, 51.6% of the cases suffered from XERM6. The multivariate analysis showed that the mean contralateral parotid gland dose and baseline xerostomia (none vs. a bit) were the most important predictors for XERM6. For the multivariate NTCP model, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was 0.68 (95% CI 0.60–0.76) and the discrimination slope was 0.10, respectively. Calibration was good with a calibration slope of 1.0. At 6 months after IMRT, 35.6% of the cases reported STICM6. The mean contralateral submandibular gland dose, the mean sublingual dose and the mean dose to the minor salivary glands located in the soft palate were most predictive for STICM6. For this model, the AUC was 0.70 (95% CI 0.61–0.78) and the discrimination slope was 0

  4. Long-Term Quality of Life After Swallowing and Salivary-Sparing Chemo–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Survivors of Human Papillomavirus–Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in 2 prospective studies of chemo–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Of 93 patients with stage III/IV OPC treated on prospective studies of swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT, 69 were eligible for long-term HRQOL assessment. Three validated patient-reported instruments, the Head and Neck QOL (HNQOL) questionnaire, the University of Washington quality of life (UWQOL) questionnaire, and the Xerostomia Questionnaire (XQ), previously administered from baseline through 2 years in the parent studies, were readministered at long-term follow-up, along with the Short-Form 36. Long-term changes in HRQOL from before treatment and 2 years were evaluated. Results: Forty patients (58%) with a median follow-up of 6.5 years participated, 39 of whom (97.5%) had confirmed human papillomavirus–positive OPC. Long term, no clinically significant worsening was detected in mean HRQOL scores compared with 2 years, with stable or improved HRQOL from before treatment in nearly all domains. “Moderate” or greater severity problems were uncommon, reported by 5% of patients for eating, 5% for swallowing, and 2.5% and 5% by HNQOL and UWQOL summary scores, respectively. Freedom from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence and stricture dilation beyond 2 years was 97.5% and 95%, respectively. Eleven percent and 14% of patients reported “moderate” or “severe” long-term worsening in HNQOL Pain and Overall Bother domains, respectively, which were associated with mean dose to the cervical esophagus, larynx, and pharyngeal constrictors. Conclusions: At more than 6 years' median follow-up, OPC patients treated with swallowing and salivary organ-sparing chemo-IMRT reported stable or improved HRQOL in nearly all domains compared with both before treatment and 2-year follow-up. New late toxicity after 2 years was

  5. A Multi-institutional Clinical Trial of Rectal Dose Reduction via Injected Polyethylene-Glycol Hydrogel During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Dosimetric Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of a prostate-rectum spacer on dose to rectum during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess for factors correlated with rectal dose reduction. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients at 4 institutions were enrolled into a prospective pilot clinical trial. Patients underwent baseline scans and then were injected with perirectal spacing hydrogel and rescanned. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created on both scans for comparison. The objectives were to establish rates of creation of ≥7.5 mm of prostate-rectal separation, and decrease in rectal V70 of ≥25%. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between preinjection and postinjection changes in rectal V70 and changes in plan conformity, rectal volume, bladder volume, bladder V70, planning target volume (PTV), and postinjection midgland separation, gel volume, gel thickness, length of PTV/gel contact, and gel left-to-right symmetry. Results: Hydrogel resulted in ≥7.5-mm prostate-rectal separation in 95.8% of patients; 95.7% had decreased rectal V70 of ≥25%, with a mean reduction of 8.0 Gy. There were no significant differences in preinjection and postinjection prostate, PTV, rectal, and bladder volumes. Plan conformities were significantly different before versus after injection (P=.02); plans with worse conformity indexes after injection compared with before injection (n=13) still had improvements in rectal V70. In multiple regression analysis, greater postinjection reduction in V70 was associated with decreased relative postinjection plan conformity (P=.01). Reductions in V70 did not significantly vary by institution, despite significant interinstitutional variations in plan conformity. There were no significant relationships between reduction in V70 and the other characteristics analyzed. Conclusions: Injection of hydrogel into the prostate-rectal interface resulted in dose reductions to rectum

  6. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  7. SU-E-T-592: Relationship Between Dose of Distribution and Area of Segment Fields Among Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R; Wang, Y; Cao, Y; Zhang, R; Shang, K; Chi, Z [Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In premise of uninfluenced to dose distribution of tumor target and organ at risk(OAR) in cervical cancer,area of segment fields was changed to increase efficacy and optimize treatment method by designing different plan of intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Methods: 12 cases of cervical cancer were confirmed in pathology and treated with step and shoot IMRT. Dose of PTV was 50Gy/25fractions. Every patient was designed 9 treatment plans of IMRT by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system,each plan was used with 9 beams of uniform distribution and fixing incidence direction(200°,240°,280°,320°,0°,40°,80°,120°and 160°respectively),and designed for delivery on Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. All plans were optimized with the direct machine parameter optimization(DMPO) algorithm using the same set of optimization objectives. Number of maximum segment field was defined at 80 and minimum MU in each segment was 5MU,and minimal segment area was 2*1cm{sup 2},2*2cm{sup 2},3*3cm{sup 2},4*4cm{sup 2},5*5cm{sup 2},6*6cm{sup 2},7*7cm{sup 2},8*8cm{sup 2}and 9*9cm{sup 2},respectively.Coverage,homogeneity and conformity of PTV,sparing of OAR, MU and number of segment were compared. Results: In this group, mean volume of PTV was 916.8±228.7 cm{sup 3}.