WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer institute sponsored

  1. Sponsoring Organization | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) project officers are responsible for the design and oversight of all aspects of the PLCO trial. These NCI components work directly with the Coordinating Center which provides support for development and implementation of the study protocol; and with the Principal Investigators from each of the Screening Centers to ensure that the technical aspects of the trial are carried out under rigorous scientific standards. |

  2. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  3. National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  4. The Economics of Perception: Potential Effect regarding Institutional Uses of Recovered Facilities and Administrative Costs upon a Faculty Member's Decision to Engage in Sponsored Research Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Anne Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    There is one aspect of sponsored research associated with higher education's research enterprise that often places the institution's research administrators and the institution's faculty members in conflict with each other; the recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored research projects (Sedwick, 2009;…

  5. ICMIC Institutions - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICMIC grants facilitate interaction among scientists from a variety of fields to conduct multidisciplinary research on cellular and molecular imaging related to cancer. Pre-ICMIC planning grants have provided time and funds for investigators and institutions to prepare themselves, organizationally and scientifically, to establish ICMICs.

  6. Treatment success in cancer: industry compared to publicly sponsored randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Djulbegovic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess if commercially sponsored trials are associated with higher success rates than publicly-sponsored trials. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTINGS: We undertook a systematic review of all consecutive, published and unpublished phase III cancer randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK and the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (CTG. We included all phase III cancer RCTs assessing treatment superiority from 1980 to 2010. Three metrics were assessed to determine treatment successes: (1 the proportion of statistically significant trials favouring the experimental treatment, (2 the proportion of the trials in which new treatments were considered superior according to the investigators, and (3 quantitative synthesis of data for primary outcomes as defined in each trial. RESULTS: GSK conducted 40 cancer RCTs accruing 19,889 patients and CTG conducted 77 trials enrolling 33,260 patients. 42% (99%CI 24 to 60 of the results were statistically significant favouring experimental treatments in GSK compared to 25% (99%CI 13 to 37 in the CTG cohort (RR = 1.68; p = 0.04. Investigators concluded that new treatments were superior to standard treatments in 80% of GSK compared to 44% of CTG trials (RR = 1.81; p<0.001. Meta-analysis of the primary outcome indicated larger effects in GSK trials (odds ratio = 0.61 [99%CI 0.47-0.78] compared to 0.86 [0.74-1.00]; p = 0.003. However, testing for the effect of treatment over time indicated that treatment success has become comparable in the last decade. CONCLUSIONS: While overall industry sponsorship is associated with higher success rates than publicly-sponsored trials, the difference seems to have disappeared over time.

  7. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ...@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Breast Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute...

  8. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Review of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohe, Meaghan; Hao, Yanni; Lamoureux, Roger E.; Galipeau, Nina; Globe, Denise; Foley, Catherine; Mazar, Iyar; Solomon, Jeffrey; Shields, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures serve to capture vital patient information not otherwise obtained by primary study endpoints. This paper examines how PROs are utilized as endpoints in industry-sponsored metastatic breast cancer clinical trials. METHODS A search was conducted in the clinicaltrials.gov web site for trials involving common treatments for metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-eight clinical trials were identified which included a PRO endpoint in the study, and data were extracted and summarized. RESULTS Overall, 17 unique PRO questionnaires and 14 concepts of measurement were identified as secondary or exploratory endpoints. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Breast was the most frequently utilized questionnaire, commonly implemented to assess quality of life. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was also frequently used to measure quality of life or pain. CONCLUSION This review shares insights into the role of PROs in trials for metastatic breast cancer from which treatment developers and other stakeholders can enhance successful implementation of the patient voice into future trials. PMID:27441001

  9. 75 FR 1790 - Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... of February 3, 2006 (71 FR 5861), which describes FDA's intention to update the process for... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  10. "Doping, Fair Play, and the Dilemmas of Government Sponsored Sport Institutions"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2005-01-01

    The article inquires into the moral dilemmas public sport institutions are facing when they on the one hand officially argue that the important thing in sport is fair play and sportsmanship while their raison d'etre on the other hand is to help the athletes to achieve the best possible results...

  11. 24 CFR 202.10 - Governmental institutions, Government-sponsored enterprises, public housing agencies and State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... defined in 24 CFR 44.2) that receive insurance as lenders and mortgagees shall conduct audits in... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Governmental institutions... Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE...

  12. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Blog: How to make kid-friendly, tasty fruit leather with 4 ingredients Study: Now is the Lowest Weight You’ll Be All Year Cancer Research Our Cancer Research Cancer Sites Research Conference ...

  13. Evaluation of institutional cancer registries in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, L G; Roca, S; Rodríguez, M N; Stein, J; Izquierdo, J; Trujillo, A; Mora, M

    1999-09-01

    The four primary objectives of this descriptive study were to: 1) design a quality-measurement instrument for institutional cancer registries (ICRs), 2) evaluate the existing ICRs in Colombia with the designed instrument, 3) categorize the different registries according to their quality and prioritize efforts that will efficiently promote better registries with the limited resources available, and 4) determine the institution with the greatest likelihood of successfully establishing Colombia's second population-based cancer registry. In 1990 the National Cancer Institute of Colombia developed 13 institution-based cancer registries in different Colombian cities in order to promote the collection of data from a large group of cancer diagnostic and treatment centers. During the first half of 1997, this evaluation reviewed 12 registries; one of the original 13 no longer existed. All of the Colombian institutions (hospitals) that maintain institution-based cancer registries were included in the study. At each institution, a brief survey was administered to the hospital director, the registry coordinator, and the registrar (data manager). Researchers investigated the institutions by looking at six domains that are in standard use internationally. Within each domain, questions were developed and selected through the Delphi method. Each domain and each question were assigned weights through a consensus process. In most cases, two interviewers went to each site to collect the information. The university hospitals in Cali, Pereira, and Medellín had substantially higher scores, reflecting a good level of performance. Four of the 12 institutions had almost no cancer registry work going on. Five of the 12 hospital directors considered that the information provided by the cancer registries influenced their administrative decisions. Three of the registries had patient survival data. Four of the institutions allocated specific resources to operate their cancer registries; in the

  14. Single Institution Feasibility Trials - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the CIP program, the current R21 mechanism provides potential funding for small, single institution feasibility trials. The current announcement is titled In Vivo Cancer Imaging Exploratory/Developmental Grants.

  15. 75 FR 16816 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Skin and Prostate Cancers. Date..., Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  16. 78 FR 20118 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Biology and Therapy. Date: April 17... Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  17. 78 FR 25459 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Therapy (Omnibus). Date: June 27-28....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  18. Cooperative research and development opportunities with the National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybert, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is responsible for negotiating Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs), whereby the knowledge resulting from NCI investigators' government-sponsored research is developed in collaboration with universities and/or industry into new products of importance for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The NCI has recently executed a unique 'clinical trials' CRADA and is developing a model agreement based upon it for the development and commercialization of products for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and AIDS. NCI drug screening, preclinical testing, clinical trials, and AIDS program capabilities form the basis for this new technology development/technology transfer vehicle. NCI's extensive drug screening program and 'designer foods' program serve as potential sources of investigational new drugs (INDs) and cancer preventatives. Collaborations between NCI and pharmaceutical companies having the facilities, experience, and expertise necessary to develop INDs into approved drugs available to the public are being encouraged where the companies have proprietary rights to INDs, or where NCI has proprietary rights to INDs and invites companies to respond to a collaborator announcement published in the Federal Register. The joint efforts of the NCI and the chosen collaborator are designed to generate the data necessary to obtain pharmaceutic regulatory approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market the drugs developed, and thereby make them available to health care providers for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and AIDS.

  19. 75 FR 67379 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Prostate, Skin, Pancreatic and other.... 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  20. 76 FR 9353 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ....nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Prostate Imaging..., Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  1. 77 FR 67015 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel NCI Omnibus and Cancer Therapy. Date: November... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  2. 78 FR 8157 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Provocative Questions: Cancer Therapy and... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  3. 78 FR 36200 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Biology and Therapy. Date: June 24, 2013... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  4. Breast Cancer: Surgery at the South Egypt Cancer Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Ahmed A.S.; Mohamed Abou Elmagd Salem; Hamza Abbass

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In Egypt, it is the most common cancer among women, representing 18.9% of total cancer cases (35.1% in women and 2.2% in men) among the Egypt National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) series of 10,556 patients during the year 2001, with an age-adjusted rate of 49.6 per 100,000 people. In this study, the data of all breast cancer patients presented to the surgical department of the South Egypt cancer Institute (SECI) hospital durin...

  5. 77 FR 5029 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... 1 p.m. Agenda: 2/29--Drug Shortage--A Critical Challenge for the Cancer Community; Cancer Drug..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant...

  6. 78 FR 55750 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Omnibus--Drug and Gene Delivery. Date: November 7, 2013... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  7. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Breast, Prostate and... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  8. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SBIR Topic 304 ``Development of Blood-based Methods for the Detection of Cancer Recurrence in Post-Therapy Breast Cancer Patients. Date: June 4, 2013... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  9. 78 FR 41939 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Omnibus Review, Cancer Etiology/Genetics... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and...

  10. 78 FR 58321 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... Emphasis Panel, Provocative Questions: Cancer Therapy & Outcomes. Date: November 7-8, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  11. 77 FR 31030 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ...: June 27, 2012--Drug User Fee Programs, Generic Cancer Drug Shortages: Continuing the Dialogue, The Role..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant...

  12. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  13. 78 FR 28235 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Diagnostic Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: June 13, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Novel Imaging Agents to Expand the...

  14. 75 FR 3239 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Basal-like Breast Cancer Assay. Date: March 10, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute...

  15. 75 FR 21002 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Panel, SPORE in Lymphoma and Breast Cancer. Date: June 15-16, 2010. Time: 5 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Drug Discovery, Chemoprevention and...

  16. 75 FR 16488 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes...

  17. 77 FR 15782 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes...

  18. 76 FR 76981 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Prostate and Gastrointestinal Cancers. Date: February 15-16, 2012. Time: 8 a.m... Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  19. 78 FR 14099 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Treatment for Prostate Cancer. Date: March 28, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  20. 75 FR 54161 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Sarcoma, Brain, Liver, Lung, and Prostate Cancers. Date: September 29-30, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  1. 75 FR 60132 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September...

  2. 75 FR 71712 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November...

  3. 77 FR 43098 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93....398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated:...

  4. 76 FR 64090 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ..., Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116....) Contact Person: Timothy C. Meeker, MD, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  5. 78 FR 64507 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... hereby given of meetings of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology National Cancer Institute and the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology National Cancer Institute. Date: November 12, 2013. Time:...

  6. 78 FR 50064 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ...: 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Agenda: Cancer Communication for Prevention: In the Digital Commons... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... a meeting of the President's Cancer Panel. The meeting will be open to the public, with...

  7. 78 FR 69432 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ...:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: Cancer Communication in the Digital Era: Opportunities and Challenges... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... a meeting of the President's Cancer Panel. The meeting will be open to the public, with...

  8. 78 FR 53154 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93... Emphasis Panel NCI Experimental Therapeutics--Clinical Trials Network with Phase 1 Emphasis. Date: November... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  9. Analysis of warning letters issued by the US Food and Drug Administration to clinical investigators, institutional review boards and sponsors: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Yashashri C; Saiyed, Aafreen A

    2015-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues warning letters to all research stakeholders if unacceptable deficiencies are found during site visits. Warning letters issued by the FDA between January 2011 and December 2012 to clinical investigators and institutional review boards (IRBs) were reviewed for various violation themes and compared to similar studies in the past. Warning letters issued to sponsors between January 2005 and December 2012 were analysed for the first time for a specific set of violations using descriptive statistics. Failure to protect subject safety and to report adverse events to IRBs was found to be significant compared to prior studies for clinical investigators, while failure to follow standard operating procedures and maintain documentation was noted as significant in warning letters to IRBs. Failure to maintain minutes of meeting and to follow written procedures for continuing review were new substantial violations in warning letters issued to IRBs. Forty-six warning letters were issued to sponsors, the most common violations being failure to follow a monitoring schedule (58.69%), failure to obtain investigator agreement (34.78%), failure to secure investigators' compliance (30.43%), and failure to maintain data records and ship documents to investigators (30.43%). Appropriate methods for handling clinical trial procedural violations should be developed and implemented worldwide.

  10. NASA sponsored Light Emitting Diode (LED) development helps in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    What started out as an attempt to develop a light which would allow for the growth of plants in space led to a remarkable discovery: The Light Emitting Diode (LED). This device through extensive study and experimentation has developed into a tool used by surgeons in the fight against brain cancer in children. Pictured is a mock-up of brain surgery being performed. By encapsulating the end of the LED with a balloon, light is diffused over a larger area of the brain allowing the surgeon a better view. This is one of many programs that begin as research for the space program, and through extensive study end up benefitting all of mankind.

  11. 76 FR 41273 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ...: Gail J Bryant, MD, Medical Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  12. 78 FR 41072 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: July 2, 2013. David Clary, Program...

  13. 78 FR 66370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: October 30, 2013. Melanie J. Gray,...

  14. 77 FR 12318 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... outcome of the evaluation will provide information for consideration by an internal NCI committee that... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93....398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  15. 77 FR 70170 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 16, 2012. Melanie J. Gray,...

  16. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Portable e-Technology Diet and Physical Activity Tools for Consumers. Date: April... Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd.,...

  17. 77 FR 19024 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... SPORE in Lymphoma, Leukemia, Brain, Esophageal and Gastrointestinal Cancers. Date: May 23-24, 2012. Time...., Scientific Review Officer, National Cancer Institute, Division of Extramural Activities, Research Programs... Development of Emerging Technologies for Cancer Research (R33). Date: June 14, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 6...

  18. 76 FR 42719 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... development of the potential therapeutic to improve the treatment of various forms of cancer. The research... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI Experimental Therapeutics...

  19. 76 FR 10381 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... development of the potential therapeutic to improve the treatment of various forms of cancer. The research... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Experimental Therapeutics...

  20. 75 FR 33817 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... development of the potential therapeutic to improve the treatment of various forms of cancer. The research... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Experimental Therapeutics...

  1. 76 FR 66733 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... development of the potential therapeutic to improve the treatment of various forms of cancer. The research... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI Experimental Therapeutics...

  2. 78 FR 15021 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396... Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 4, 2013. Melanie J. Gray, Program...

  3. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY... Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for...

  4. 76 FR 1625 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group; Subcommittee I--Career Development, Career Development. Date: February 22-23, 2011. Time: February 22, 2011, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review...

  5. 75 FR 48699 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group, Subcommittee I--Career Development, NCI-I Career Development. Date: September 21, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

  6. 78 FR 50065 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Roberson, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural... Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  7. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ...: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities... Person: Timothy C. Meeker, MD, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  8. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  9. An update on research priorities in hydrocephalus: overview of the third National Institutes of Health-sponsored symposium "Opportunities for Hydrocephalus Research: Pathways to Better Outcomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, James P; Williams, Michael A; Walker, Marion L; Kestle, John R W; Relkin, Norman R; Anderson, Amy M; Gross, Paul H; Browd, Samuel R

    2015-12-01

    Building on previous National Institutes of Health-sponsored symposia on hydrocephalus research, "Opportunities for Hydrocephalus Research: Pathways to Better Outcomes" was held in Seattle, Washington, July 9-11, 2012. Plenary sessions were organized into four major themes, each with two subtopics: Causes of Hydrocephalus (Genetics and Pathophysiological Modifications); Diagnosis of Hydrocephalus (Biomarkers and Neuroimaging); Treatment of Hydrocephalus (Bioengineering Advances and Surgical Treatments); and Outcome in Hydrocephalus (Neuropsychological and Neurological). International experts gave plenary talks, and extensive group discussions were held for each of the major themes. The conference emphasized patient-centered care and translational research, with the main objective to arrive at a consensus on priorities in hydrocephalus that have the potential to impact patient care in the next 5 years. The current state of hydrocephalus research and treatment was presented, and the following priorities for research were recommended for each theme. 1) Causes of Hydrocephalus-CSF absorption, production, and related drug therapies; pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus; improved animal and in vitro models of hydrocephalus; developmental and macromolecular transport mechanisms; biomechanical changes in hydrocephalus; and age-dependent mechanisms in the development of hydrocephalus. 2) Diagnosis of Hydrocephalus-implementation of a standardized set of protocols and a shared repository of technical information; prospective studies of multimodal techniques including MRI and CSF biomarkers to test potential pharmacological treatments; and quantitative and cost-effective CSF assessment techniques. 3) Treatment of Hydrocephalus-improved bioengineering efforts to reduce proximal catheter and overall shunt failure; external or implantable diagnostics and support for the biological infrastructure research that informs these efforts; and evidence-based surgical standardization with

  10. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  11. 78 FR 69858 - National Cancer Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... following agenda topics will be discussed: Proposed organizational change: DEA, Biomedical Cloud Technology, Optimizing Big Data to Advance Research, and Advocate and Organizational Engagement. Dated: November 15, 2013... is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Cancer Institute Director's...

  12. New Hires at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty-one people joined the facility in November and December 2013. The National Cancer Institute welcomes… Emily Boward Emad Darvishi Shuo Gu Sanath Kumar Janaka Robert Kortum Yasmin Lachir Jinbian Liu Yang Liu Eric Ramirez Salazar Brett Shelley Li Xia Jaeho Yoon

  13. Screening mammography. A missed clinical opportunity? Results of the NCI [National Cancer Institute] Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and national health interview survey studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from seven studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were used to determine current rates of breast cancer screening and to identify the characteristics of and reasons for women not being screened. All seven studies were population-based surveys of women aged 50 to 74 years without breast cancer. While over 90% of non-Hispanic white respondents had regular sources of medical care, 46% to 76% had a clinical breast examination within the previous year, and only 25% to 41% had a mammogram. Less educated and poorer women had fewer mammograms. The two most common reasons women gave for never having had a mammogram were that they did not known they needed it and that their physician had not recommended it. Many physicians may have overlooked the opportunity to recommend mammography for older women when performing a clinical breast examination and to educate their patients about the benefit of screening mammography

  14. Gastrointestinal Tumor Board: An Evolving Experience in Tehran Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI cancers are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in Iran, with stomach adenocarcinoma as the most common cancer in men and the second common cancer in women. Also, some parts of Northern Iran have one of the highest incidences of esophageal cancer in the world. Multi-disciplinary organ-based joint clinics and tumor boards are a well-recognized necessity for modern treatment of cancer and are routinely utilized in developed countries, especially in major academic centres. But this concept is relatively new in developing countries, where cancer treatment centres are burdened by huge loads of patients and have to cope with a suboptimum availability of resources and facilities. Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences is the oldest and the only comprehensive cancer treatment centre in Iran, with a long tradition of a general tumor board for all cancers. But with the requirements of modern oncology, there has been a very welcome attention to sub-specialized organ-based tumor boards and joint clinics here in the past few years. Considering this, we started a multi-disciplinary tumor board for GI cancers in our institute in early 2010 as the first such endeavor here. We hereby review this 2-year evolving experience. The process of establishment of a GI tumor board, participations from different oncology disciplines and related specialties, the cancers presented and discussed in the 2 years of this tumor board, the general intents of treatment for the decisions made and the development of interest in this tumor board among the Tehran oncology community will be reviewed. The GI tumor board of Tehran Cancer Institute started its work in January 2010, with routine weekly sessions. A core group of 2 physicians from each surgical, radiation and medical oncology departments plus one gastroenterologist, GI pathologist and radiologist was formed, but participation from all interested physicians was encouraged. An

  15. Child sexual abuse in religiously affiliated and secular institutions: a retrospective descriptive analysis of data provided by victims in a government-sponsored reappraisal program in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Spröber, Nina; Schneider, Thekla; Rassenhofer, Miriam; Seitz, Alexander; Liebhardt, Hubert; König, Lilith; Fegert, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    Background The disclosure of widespread sexual abuse committed by professional educators and clergymen in institutions in Germany ignited a national political debate, in which special attention was paid to church-run institutions. We wanted to find out whether the nature of the abuse and its effect on victims differed depending on whether the abuse had been experienced in religiously affiliated versus secular institutions. Methods In 2010, the German government established a hotline that vict...

  16. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Out More MedlinePlus: Breast Cancer medlineplus.gov/breastcancer.html National Cancer Institute, NIH, HHS Phone Number(s): ( ... Treatment-Research-Studies MedlinePlus tutorial medlineplus.gov/tutorials/breastcancer/htm/index.htm NIH Senior Health http://nihseniorhealth. ...

  17. National Cancer Institute-supported chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy trials: outcomes and lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majithia, Neil; Temkin, Sarah M.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Beutler, Andreas S.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common and debilitating complications of cancer treatment. Due to a lack of effective management options for patients with CIPN, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a series of trials aimed at both prevention and treatment. A total of 15 such studies were approved, evaluating use of various neuro-modulatory agents which have shown benefit in other neuropathic pain states. Aside from duloxetine, none of the pharmacologic methods demonstrated therapeutic benefit for patients with CIPN. Despite these disappointing results, the series of trials revealed important lessons that have informed subsequent work. Some examples of this include the use of patient-reported symptom metrics, the elimination of traditional—yet unsubstantiated—practice approaches, and the discovery of molecular genetic predictors of neuropathy. Current inquiry is being guided by the results from these large-scale trials, and as such, stands better chance of identifying durable solutions for this treatment-limiting toxicity. PMID:26686859

  18. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives.

  19. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  20. 保荐机构声誉与创业板 IPO公司盈余管理实证研究%An Empirical Study on Reputation of Sponsor Institutions on Earnings Management of GEM IPO Companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪攀攀; 罗殿英

    2014-01-01

    本文以2009年至2011年在我国创业板上市的281家公司为样本,通过经营活动现金流量模型、生产成本模型和酌量性费用模型,分别计算出三种方式下的真实活动盈余管理程度,通过构建真实活动盈余管理总额模型,度量了我国创业板上市公司IPO过程中的真实活动盈余管理程度。在此基础上,研究了保荐机构声誉对创业板上市公司IPO盈余管理程度的影响。结果表明,在其他变量不变的情况下,保荐机构的声誉越高,其推荐的上市公司的IPO盈余管理程度越低。%With samples from the 281 companies listed on GEM from 2009 to 2011, the real earnings management activities were e‐valuated respectively in three models including the operating cash flow model, the production cost model and discretionary expense model. By constructing an authentic model of the total real earnings management activities, the degree of real earnings management in IPO of GEM listed Corporations were measured. Besides, the influence of the sponsor institutions’reputation on the degree of earnings management in GEM listed corporation’s IPO was studied. The results show that the higher the sponsor institutions’rep‐utation is, the lower degree is found in the listed Corporation’s IPO sponsored by the institutions when other variables remain the same.

  1. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  2. KBTAC [Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center] - The EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]-sponsored knowledge-based technology application center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has announced the establishment of the Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center (KBTAC), whose goal is to assist member utilities with expert system technology and applications. The center, established November 7, 1989, is located on the campus of Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, and will be operated jointly by Kaman Sciences Corporation and the university. The mission of the KBTAC is to assist EPRI member utilities to develop, test, and transfer expert systems into nuclear power plant operations, maintenance, and administration

  3. 75 FR 51830 - National Cancer Institute's Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute's Best Practices for Biospecimen... best practices, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking public comment on a revised version of the NCI Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources. This revised version of the NCI Best Practices...

  4. Can Lifestyle Change Prevent the Recurrence of Ovarian Cancer? A DCP/CCOP-Sponsored Phase 3 Trial in the GOG | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker David S Alberts, MD Director Emeritus, University of Arizona Cancer Center Regents Professor of Medicine Pharmacology Nutritional Science and Public Health This meeting is reserved for NIH staff only. |

  5. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  6. Problems in the Co-sponsoring Process of Vocational Colleges and Training Institutions%探讨高职院校与培训机构联合办学中存在的问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小波

    2014-01-01

    我国的高等职业教育已成为高等教育的重要组成部分。随着国民经济的不断发展,职业教育迎来新契机同时,却也面临着巨大的挑战。近年来很多高职院校已意识到可持续性发展的紧迫性,纷纷开始探索新的办学理念与模式。本文从高职教育、校企合作办学理念等方面,就高职院校与培训机构联合办学过程中存在的问题进行探讨。%China's vocational education has become an important part of higher education. With the continuous development of the national economy, vocational education usher in new opportunities, but it also faces enormous challenges. In recent years, many vocational institutions have realized the urgency of sustainable development, have begun to explore new educational philosophy and model. From the aspect of vocational education, school-enterprise cooperation educational philosophy, etc., this paper discussed the problems in the co-sponsoring process of vocational colleges and training institutions.

  7. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives. PMID:27619249

  8. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy. PMID:25941356

  9. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  10. The national cancer institute (NCI) and cancer biology in a 'post genome world'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) exists to reduce the burden of all cancers through research and discovery. Extensive restructuring of the NCI over the past year has been aimed at assuring that the institution functions in all ways to promote opportunities for discovery in the laboratory, in the clinic, and in the community. To do this well requires the difficult and almost paradoxical problem of planning for scientific discovery which, in turn is based on the freedom to pursue the unanticipated. The intellectual and structural landscape of science is changing and it places new challenges, new demands and new opportunities for facilitating discovery. The nature of cancer as a disease of genomic instability and of accumulated genetic change, coupled with a possibility of the development of new technologies for reading, utilizing, interpreting and manipulating the genome of single cells, provides unprecedented opportunities for a new type of high through-put biology that will change the nature of discovery, cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic decision-making and therapeutic discovery. To capture these new opportunities will require attention to be paid to integrate the development of technology and new scientific discoveries with the ability to apply advances rapidly and efficiently through clinical trials

  11. RESPONSIBILITIES IN RESEARCH: THE ROLES OF SPONSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cañete VILLAFRANCA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The principle of responsibility assumed special status in the contemporary scenery besides de emergence of the conception related to necessity of public control of the scientific practice. The aim of this paper was to reflect about the roles carried out by sponsors from different institutions, national and international organizations, and pharmaceutical industries when moral conflicts emerge in this context. The complexity in the daily practice of researches involving human subjects points out the obligation to enlarge the panorama of the discussion on this theme, including several social and institutional partners. In this specific case became necessary to know the potential sponsors, exceeding the question concerning to the pharmaceutical industry. The most frequent sponsors listed in the literature were: the pharmaceutical industry, specially related to international research for development of new drugs, vaccines and medical products and equipments; international organizations in the case of epidemiological studies, drugs and vaccines for neglected diseases and research strengthening capabilities; national organizations working with specific health problems of the countries or regions populations; and research and academic institutions that have their own policies for research. This paper assumes the position that an ethical conduct during the preparation, development and dissemination of a research protocol results need to be shared between different partners. However, the sponsors have a crucial role to maintain the integrity of researches, to guarantee the protection of volunteers and society at large.

  12. 75 FR 992 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Advisory Board; Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Experimental Therapeutics. Open: February 8, 2010, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Agenda: Discussion on cancer experimental... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research;...

  13. Accreditation for excellence of cancer research institutes: recommendations from the Italian Network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deriu, Pier Luigi; La Pietra, Leonardo; Pierotti, Marco; Collazzo, Raffaele; Paradiso, Angelo; Belardelli, Filippo; De Paoli, Paolo; Nigro, Aldo; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, Piergiuseppe; Pierotti, Marco; Roli, Anna; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Scala, Stefania; Amadori, Alberto; Chiusole, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino; Fusco, Vincenzo; Storto, Giovanni; De Maria, Ruggero; Canitano, Stefano; Apolone, Giovanni; Ravelli, Maria; Mazzini, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Bernabini, Marna; Ancarani, Valentina; Lombardo, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    A panel of experts from Italian Comprehensive Cancer Centers defines the recommendations for external quality control programs aimed to accreditation to excellence of these institutes. After definition of the process as a systematic, periodic evaluation performed by an external agency to verify whether a health organization possesses certain prerequisites regarding structural, organizational and operational conditions that are thought to affect health care quality, the panel reviews models internationally available and makes final recommendations on aspects considered of main interest. This position paper has been produced within a special project of the Ministry of Health of the Italian Government aimed to accredit, according to OECI model, 11 Italian cancer centers in the period 2012-2014. The Project represents the effort undertaken by this network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers to find a common denominator for the experience of all Institutes in external quality control programs. Fourteen shared "statements" are put forth, designed to offer some indications on the main aspects of this subject, based on literature evidence or expert opinions. They deal with the need for "accountability" and involvement of the entire organization, the effectiveness of self-evaluation, the temporal continuity and the educational value of the experience, the use of indicators and measurement tools, additionally for intra- and inter-organization comparison, the system of evaluation models used, the provision for specific requisites for oncology, and the opportunity for mutual exchange of evaluation experiences. PMID:24503807

  14. The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Ragon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Librarian involvement in the Open Access (OA movement has traditionally focused on access to scholarly publications. Recent actions by the White House have focused attention on access on the data produced from federally sponsored research. Questions have emerged concerning access to the output of federally sponsored research and whether it is a public or private good. Understanding the political battle over access to federally funded research is closely tied to the ownership of the peer review process in higher education and associated revenue streams, and as a result, interest groups seeking to influence government regulation have politicized the issues. As a major funder of research in higher education, policies from the federal government are likely to drive change in research practices at higher education institutions and impact library services. The political economy of federally sponsored research data will shape research enterprises in higher education inspire a number of new services distributed throughout the research life cycle.

  15. Prevalence of bone marrow necrosis in Egyptian cancer patients referring to the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow necrosis; Egyptian cancer patients Abstract Background: Bone marrow necrosis is a relatively rare entity which has been associated with a poor prognosis. It is most commonly found in patients with neoplastic disorders and severe infections. Methods: study comprised examination of 5043 bone marrow biopsy specimens performed at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, over 7 years period (March 2004-March 2011). It included 5 years retrospective (2867 archived samples) and 2 years prospective (2176 samples). Results: Bone marrow necrosis was diagnosed in fifteen out of 5043 examined specimens with a percentage of 0.3% and ranged from mild to massive according to semiquantitative estimation. Prognosis of all patients was poor with survival not exceeding 6 months from the date of marrow necrosis diagnosis. Conclusion: In Egyptian patients, bone marrow necrosis in association with malignancy is a rare disorder which is accompanied by a poor outcome

  16. Adherence of non-pharmaceutically sponsored oncology trial protocols to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in an academic institution outside the ICH jurisdictions and the impact of IRB implementation on this adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess adherence of non-pharmaceutically sponsored trials (non-PSTs) to ICH protocol structure guidelines and to estimate the effect of implementing Institutional Review Boards (IRB) review on this adherence. Methods: This is a retrospective exploratory study where 60 non-PST clinical trial protocols (CTPs) were reviewed and halved to IRB-reviewed CTPs (IRCTPs) and non-lRB-reviewed CTPs (non-lRCTPs). Adherence score (AS) was calculated as the number of fulfilled items or sub-items divided by their total number. Results: Three adherence patterns were encountered: (1) items consistently present in both groups e.g. general and background information, objectives, inclusion criteria and intervention details, (2) items consistently absent in both groups and included contact information of investigators and trial sites, product accountability, randomization codes management, interim analyses and many other statistical aspects, and (3) items variably present in both groups where the effect of IRB was verifiable. Trial site details, potential benefits, discontinuation and exclusion criteria, and follow up for adverse events were more encountered in IRCTPs than non-IRCTPs. Withdrawal criteria monitoring of treatment compliance showed a reverse pattern (p < 0.05 for all). The total AS, administrative AS and ethics AS for IRCTPs was 43%, 22% and 70% compared to 38%, 16% and 33% for non-IRCTPs (p < 0.003, <0.001, 0.004), respectively. The scientific AS was 54% for both groups (p = 0.87). Conclusions: IRB-implementation at NCl-Egypt improved ethical and administrative sections of academic protocols. However, this improvement is modest and needs further actions including adoption of protocol templates. Scientific sections were as good after IRB-implementation as they were before that

  17. [Cancer between infection and heredity: genes, viruses and mice at National Cancer Institute (1937-1977)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudillière, J P

    1994-01-01

    After World War II, in the United States,viral explanation of cancer replaced a vision of the disease emphasizing genetic factors. From the mid 1950s onwards, experimental oncologists favored the notion that cancer was initiated by infectious agents passed from one generation to the next. In order to analyze this displacement, the present paper focuses on the part played by new experimental systems, i.e. mice showing tumors induced by viruses. Since animal models are agencies which "represent" human diseases, and mediate between different social worlds, their uses often result in opposing views. Mouse models thus provided tractable resources which favored the alternation between heredity and infection. The paper describes the emergence, in the late 1930s, at the Jackson Memorial Laboratory, of an agent enhancing the formation of mammary tumors in mice. This laboratory was then involved in the production of marketable inbred mice as well as in research concerned with genetic factors that may cause cancer. After World War II, loose theories and conflicting results helped turn the agent into a virus. At the National Cancer Institute, the virus was associated with a whole range of particles causing leukemia in mice. Owing to the Virus Cancer Program, the value of mouse tumor viruses increased in the late 1960s. This research effort then aimed at finding human tumor viruses, and at crafting cancer vaccines. It was modeled after the experience of the NCI chemotherapy program stemming from war research. In addition to the fact that biomedical research became a state enterprise, the study emphasizes three parameters. First, loose practices--both theoretical and experimental--helped manage the variability of animal models. Secondly, the standardization and mass production of animals and reagents encouraged the stabilization of research programs. Thirdly, private biotechnology companies working under NCI contracts implemented preclinical work, and mediated between virology

  18. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Mesothelioma, Lung, Breast and Ovarian Cancers. Date: February 2-3, 2011. Time: 8... Molecular Diagnostics Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: February 15, 2011. Time: 12 p.m. to 5...-Therapy Breast Cancer Patients. Date: March 3, 2011. Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review...

  19. 75 FR 26267 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Advisory Board Ad hoc Subcommittee on Experimental Therapeutics. Open: June 21, 2010, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Agenda: Discussion on Experimental Therapeutics. Place... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research;...

  20. Committees and sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  1. Trends in Research on Energy Balance Supported by the National Cancer Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Siddiqi, Sameer M.; Berrigan, David A.; Ross, Sharon A.; Nebeling, Linda C.; Dowling, Emily C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the body of research linking energy balance to the incidence, development, progression and treatment of cancer has grown substantially. No prior NIH portfolio analyses have focused on energy balance within one institute. This portfolio analysis describes the growth of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant research on energy balance–related conditions and behaviors from 2004 to 2010 following the release of an NCI research priority statement in 2003 on energy balance and ...

  2. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that oc

  3. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research lifestyle recommendations in colorectal cancer survivors : Results of the PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, Renate M; van Lee, Linde; Beijer, Sandra; Bours, Martijn J; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Geelen, Anouk; Hoedjes, Meeke; Mols, F.; de Vries, Jeanne; Weijenberg, Matty P; Kampman, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    We examined adherence to the eight The World Cancer Research Foundation/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations on diet, physical activity, and body weight among colorectal cancer survivors, and whether adherence was associated with intention to eat healthy and with the ne

  4. 78 FR 57400 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ...: Biomedical Cloud Technology; Electronic Health Records; Advocate and Organizational Engagement; and Proposed Organizational Change: Division of Extramural Activities. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31,...

  5. 78 FR 19496 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT Program Evaluation SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section... submitted ] to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the...

  6. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  7. A clinicoepidemiological study of esophageal cancer patients at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soumaya Ezzat; Hisham El Hossieny; Mohamed Abd Alla; Azza Nasr; Nagwan Anter; Ahmed Adel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) assess the clinicoepidemiological characteristics of esopha-geal cancer patients, (2) analyze the prognostic factors determining treatment failure and survival, and (3) evaluate the results of various treatment modalities for locoregional and disseminated disease and their ef ect on disease-free survival and overal survival (OS). Methods Clinicoepidemiological retrospective data from 81 esophageal cancer patients treated at the Na-tional Cancer Institute of Cairo between 2007 and 2011 were evaluated. Results The study showed that patients with esophageal cancer commonly present with local y advanced disease (87.7% had T-stage 3 and 12.3% had T-stage 4). There was a significant correlation between surgery and survival; patients who received radical surgery and postoperative radiation had a better median survival than patients who received radical radiotherapy (20 months vs. 16 months, respectively; P = 0.04). There was also a significant statistical correlation between radical concomitant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) and pal iative treatment. Patients who received radical NCRT had a better median survival than patients who received pal-liative radiotherapy (16 months vs. 10 months, respectively; P = 0.001). The median fol ow-up period for al patients was 7 months. The median OS of the whole group was 12 months. The OS after 1 and 2 years was 57.8% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion High-dose NCRT is an acceptable alternative for patients unfit for surgery or with inoperable disease. High-dose radiation is more ef ective than low-dose radiation in terms of local control, time to relapse, and OS. Further study using a larger series of patients and introducing new treatment protocols is necessary for a final evaluation.

  8. 78 FR 59362 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Boulevard, Gaithersburg, MD 20878. Contact Person: Caron A. Lyman, Ph.D., Chief, Research Programs Review... B: Exploratory Grants. Date: November 18, 2013. Time: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research;...

  9. 78 FR 4422 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Prevention and Etiology. Date: February 27, 2013. Time: 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and...

  10. 75 FR 62547 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the... performance, and competence of individual investigators. Place: Double Tree Hotel, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue... qualifications and performance, and competence of individual investigators. Place: National Institutes of...

  11. 75 FR 62552 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Institute, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of... personal qualifications and performance, and competence of individual investigators. Place: National... performance, and competence of individual investigators. Place: Double Tree Hotel, 8120 Wisconsin...

  12. 75 FR 79010 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Special Emphasis Panel. SPORE in Glioma, Head and Neck, Lymphoma, Myeloid Leukemia, and Myeloma. Date... Program for Cancer Epidemiology. Date: April 28-29, 2011. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review...

  13. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  14. 75 FR 26266 - National Cancer Institute (NCI); National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...: From Mouse Models to Human Disease and Treatment.'' Dates: September 2-3, 2010. Location: Lister Hill... treatment. It is hoped that one consequence of this meeting might be some consensus as to what is...

  15. Application of log-linear models to cancer patients: a case study of data from the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensuwan, Montip; Yimprayoon, Pornpis; Lenbury, Yongwimon

    2005-09-01

    Cancer is a noninfectious disease which is on the increase throughout the world and has become a serious problem for public health in many countries, including Thailand. In Thailand, cancer has risen significantly to become a leading cause of death and most patients are admitted to the National Cancer Institute. The objective of this study is to identify the associated factors between personal, cancer/clinical variables of cancer patients using log-linear models. Tests of independence are used (chi-square and Cramer's V-value tests) to find out the relationships between any two variables. In addition two- and three-dimensional log-linear models are used to obtain estimated parameters and expected frequencies for these models. Amongst the models fitted, the best are chosen based on the analysis of deviance. The results of this study show that most paired variables of personal, cancer/clinical variables are significantly related at p-value value. Moreover, the site of cancer also affects the method of diagnostic evidence and treatment. Since the site of cancer in each sex is different, prevention for various sites of cancer should be considered for each specific sex. In addition, for male and female patients, treatment is related to the site of cancer. Consequently, physicians may consider these factors before selecting the appropriate method of treatment. PMID:16438159

  16. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Adela Castelló; Miguel Martín; Amparo Ruiz; Casas, Ana M.; Baena-Cañada, Jose M; Virginia Lope; Silvia Antolín; Pedro Sánchez; Manuel Ramos; Antonio Antón; Montserrat Muñoz; Begoña Bermejo; Ana De Juan-Ferré; Carlos Jara; José I Chacón

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the “World Cancer Research Fund” and the “American Institute of Cancer Research” (WCRF/AICR) one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity. Objective To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer. Methods During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the W...

  17. Multi-Institutional Analysis of Early Glottic Cancer from 2000 to 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Hirasawa Naoki; Itoh Yoshiyuki; Naganawa Shinji; Ishihara Shunichi; Suzuki Kazunori; Koyama Kazuyuki; Murao Takayuki; Asano Akiko; Nomoto Yoshihito; Horikawa Yoshimi; Sasaoka Masahiro; Obata Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to analyze the outcome of patients with early glottic cancer (GC) treated with radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy at 10 institutions in the Tokai District, Japan. Methods Ten institutions combined data from 279 patients with T1-T2 GC treated with RT with or without chemotherapy between 2000 and 2005. The overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and local control rate were evaluated in 270 patients, except for incomplet...

  18. Management of Ontario children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute protocols.

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, S J; Barr, R D; Andrew, M.; deVeber, L L; Pai, M K

    1989-01-01

    There is ample evidence of the value of intensive therapeutic strategies in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the commonest form of malignant disease in children. Such a program, devised at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), Boston, and incorporating high-dose L-asparaginase, was adopted in 1984 by the Children's Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Hamilton, Ont., and the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, London. We describe the experience of these institutions in th...

  19. Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancer: a single-institution review

    OpenAIRE

    Zuber, Simon; Weiß, Susan; Baaske, Dieter; Schöpe, Michael; Stevens, Simon; Bodis, Stephan; Zwahlen, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We are reporting the five-year biochemical control, toxicity profile and dosimetric parameters using iodine-125 low dose rate brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer at a single institution. Material and methods Between April 2006 and December 2010, 169 men with early stage prostate cancer were treated with BT. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL). Treatment-related morbidities, including urinary, rectal and sexual fu...

  20. Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancer: a single-institution review

    OpenAIRE

    Zuber, Simon; Weiß, Susan; Baaske, Dieter; Schöpe, Michael; Stevens, Simon; Bodis, Stephan; Zwahlen, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We are reporting the five-year biochemical control, toxicity profile and dosimetric parameters using iodine-125 low dose rate brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer at a single institution. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between April 2006 and December 2010, 169 men with early stage prostate cancer were treated with BT. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL). Treatment-related morbidities, including urinary, rectal and sexu...

  1. Recommendations for Collection and Handling of Specimens From Group Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Leyland-Jones, Brian R.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bartlett, John; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Enos, Rebecca A.; Raji, Adekunle; Pins, Michael R.; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Forbes, John F.; Abramovitz, Mark; Braga, Sofia; Cardoso, Fatima; Harbeck, Nadia; Denkert, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Recommendations for specimen collection and handling have been developed for adoption across breast cancer clinical trials conducted by the Breast International Group (BIG)-sponsored Groups and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored North American Cooperative Groups. These recommendations are meant to promote identifiable standards for specimen collection and handling within and across breast cancer trials, such that the variability in collection/handling practices that currently exist...

  2. Soccer Sponsor: Fan Or Businessman?

    OpenAIRE

    Iuliia Naidenova; Petr Parshakov; Alexey Chmykhov

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how soccer sponsorship influences the financial performance of sponsors. We use an instrumental variable regression framework combined with a fixed effects model to avoid the possible endogeneity raised by omitted variables and reverse causality. The number of tweets containing both team and sponsor names were collected to use as the instrumental variable. Top European leagues were analyzed. Our results show that soccer sponsorship is more charity than commercial inves...

  3. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  4. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  5. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3–88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4–6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  6. Outcome and treatment strategy in female lung cancer: a single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate of female lung cancer treated at the Institute of Oncology of the Vilnius University, Lithuania during the period between 1996-2005. Materials and Methods: During the period between 1996-2005, 471 women diagnosed with lung cancer were treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery and Oncology of the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. Data on morphology, stage and treatment was collected from the medical records. All lung cancer cases by histology were classified in two groups: non-small cell lung cancer (includes squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and other less common types) and small cell lung cancer. The vital status of the study group was assessed as of December 31, 2007, by passive follow-up, using data from the population registry. It was found that 411 (87.3%) of the patients had died. Survival was estimated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median survival of female lung cancer diagnosed during 1996-2005 in Lithuania show to be 8.7 months (8.4 (95% CI 7.2-10.8) months with non-small cell lung cancer and 9.3 (95% CI 6.3-13.0) months with small-cell lung cancer). Survival was more than 20 months in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (stages I, II, IIIA). Non-small cell lung cancer survival in advanced stages was less than 7 months. Small-cell lung cancer patients median survival at limited and extended stages of the disease were 9.5 (95% CI 2.9-18.4) compared to 9.2 (95% CI 6.2-13.7) months. Non-small cell lung cancer patients most frequently were treated by surgery (27.0%), surgery and chemotherapy or radiotherapy (19.6%). Small cell lung cancer patient treatment included chemo and radiotherapy (27.0%), chemotherapy (19.0%), radiotherapy (17.5%), surgery (27.9%). Conclusions: The single center study of female lung cancer diagnosed during 1996-2005 in Lithuania show a significantly better chance of survival in resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Advanced stages of

  7. Integrated oncology and palliative care: five years experience at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Pérez, Silvia; Verástegui-Avilés, Emma; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Meneses-García, Abelardo; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Under the national plan for addressing cancer, prevention and detection play important roles. However, the cost of treatments and late diagnosis represent a significant burden on health services. At the National Cancer Institute, more than half of patients present with tumors in advanced stages, and approximately 10% of patients seen for the first time exhibit terminal-stage malignancies, where there are no feasible cancer treatment options, and the patients are instead admitted to the hospital exclusively for palliative symptomatic management. In 2010, the National Cancer Plan began implementing a model of integrative management of palliative care in oncology that has gradually come to include symptomatic palliative care, involving ambulatory, distant and hospitalized management of patients with cancer, in its final stages and, more recently, in earlier stages. PMID:27557392

  8. Epidemiology of epithelial ovarian cancer, a single institution-based study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Kumar Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of mortality among all cancers of female genital tract in countries where effective cervical cancer screening program exists. As the world's population ages, remarkable increase in the total number of ovarian cancer cases are expected. This is preliminary epidemiological study to decide priorities in ovarian cancer research. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with primary epithelial ovarian cancer cases registered in J. K. Cancer Institute, Kanpur (Uttar Pradesh, from 2007 to 2009. Patients' age at diagnosis, clinical feature, parity of patients, tumor histological type, Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, chemotherapy regimens, and overall survival data were collected and analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-three cases of primary ovarian epithelial cancer were analyzed. Patients' mean age at diagnosis was 55.98 ± 9.24 (median = 55. Serous adenocarcinoma (49.69% was the most prevalent type of histopathology followed by endometroid (19.1%, mucinous (10.42% and clear cell (4.29%. Combination of taxane and platin was most commonly used first line regimen in newly diagnosed as well as in relapsed patients post 1 year. Survival was not significantly different in various histopathology (log-rank P = 0.7406, but advancing stage demonstrated gradually poor survival (log-rank P < 0.05 when compared with early stage disease. Conclusion: Research efforts should be in the direction to find early diagnostic and effective screening tools as well as better therapeutic approaches for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  9. The Radiological Physics Center: 40 years of vigilance and quality assurance for NCI sponsored clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RPC was established in 1968 to contribute to the development, conduct, and QA of multi-institutional cooperative group clinical trials. One key aspect to the RPC's function is that it operates as an independent quality assurance office for multi-institutional cooperative group clinical trials. The RPC grant was originally awarded through a competition sponsored by the AAPM. In 1967, a memorandum of agreement was reached between the AAPM and the Committee for Radiation Therapy Studies (CRTS) for clinical radiation dosimetry related to inter-institutional studies. The agreement called for the establishment of a center of operations for the implementation of this scientific program, in other words, the creation of a Radiological Physics Center. The RPC has been funded continuously since 1968 under Dr. Shalek's guidance (1968-1985), followed by Dr. William Hanson (1985-2001) and currently by Dr. Geoffrey Ibbott (2001-present). The RPC currently monitors 1768 institutions that participate in cooperative group clinical trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). These institutions are located primarily in the USA and Canada, but also include participants from 30 other countries. Within the 1768 institutions, there are over 3300 megavoltage therapy machines that are monitored by the RPC QA program. In 1999, the RPC joined with several other QA offices to form the Advanced Technology Consortium (ATC). The role of the ATC is to support the development and conduct of advanced technology clinical trials, to facilitate communications among the four QA offices and to reduce duplication of effort among the quality assurance offices. The four major components of the RPC's QA program are: 1) the remote TLD audit of machine calibration, 2) on-site dosimetry review visits, 3) credentialing for advanced technology clinical trials, and 4) review of patient treatment records

  10. Techniques for thyroid FNA: a synopsis of the National Cancer Institute Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration State of the Science Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Martha Bishop; Abele, John; Ali, Syed Z; Duick, Dan; Elsheikh, Tarik M; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Powers, Celeste N; Randolph, Gregory; Renshaw, Andrew; Scoutt, Leslie

    2008-06-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored the NCI Thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) State of the Science Conference on October 22-23, 2007 in Bethesda, MD. The 2-day meeting was accompanied by a permanent informational website and several on-line discussion periods between May 1 and December 15, 2007 (http://thyroidfna.cancer.gov). This document summarizes matters addressing manual and ultrasound guided FNA technique and related issues. Specific topics covered include details regarding aspiration needles, devices, and methods, including the use of core needle biopsy; the pros and cons of anesthesia; the influence of thyroid lesion location, size, and characteristics on technique; the role of ultrasound in the FNA of a palpable thyroid nodule; the advantages and disadvantages of various specialists performing a biopsy; the optimal number of passes and tissue preparation methods; sample adequacy criteria for solid and cystic nodules, and management of adverse reactions from the procedure. (http://thyroidfna.cancer.gov/pages/info/agenda/) PMID:18478608

  11. Employer-sponsored pension plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakonjac-Antić Tatjana N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from pension plans within social insurance, in developed pension systems there are also available to individuals schemes which may to a large extent ensure a significant part of their total pension. Among them are the following: employer-sponsored pension plans or individual pension plans. The most widely used employer-sponsored pension plan in the USA is 401(k, in which both the employer and the employee contribute to the financing of the pension. These contributions as well as the return to their investment have a preferential tax treatment, i.e. do not enter a tax base. The funds are taxed only when drawn from the account in the form of a pension. This paper aims to present the functioning of 401(k pension plan as the most widely used employer sponsored pension plan in the USA, which is likely, in a modified form, to have an important place within our future reformed pension insurance system.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  14. A comparative study of breast cancer mass screening using ultrasonography and mammography at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasonic screening for breast cancer (US group) in comparison with mammographic screening (MMG group), we analyzed 78,214 breast screening examinees presenting between 2007 and 2008 at our institution. The cancer detection rate in the US group was lower than that in the MMG group. However, the average age in the US group was significantly younger than that in the MMG group, and the rate of annual screening was significantly higher in the former than in the latter. In the US subgroup who underwent annual screening, the recall rate and the cancer detection rate were significantly lower, and the rate of detection of early breast cancers was significantly higher than that in the subgroup who underwent screening biennially or at longer intervals, and there was no significant inter-group difference in the cancer detection rate between women in their 40s and those aged 50 or above who underwent annual screening. The proportion of early breast cancers detected was almost the same in the both groups. In summary, US screening as well as MMG screening seems to be useful for detection of early breast cancer. Although a high recall rate for US screening has been reported previously, annual screening and sufficient quality control based on the guidelines proposed by the Japan Association of Breast and Thyroid Sonology (JABTS) are considered to reduce the recall rate. (author)

  15. Some radiation protection problems in a cancer hospital and associated research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience gained at the Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research has shown that with attention to the design of facilities and procedures and an active personnel monitoring policy, relatively large scale radiation commitments can proceed with individual whole body doses to staff being held well below 15 mSv/annum. In spite of detailed attention to control of radiation work, traumatic radiation incidents may still occur. (H.K.)

  16. Architectural and engineering design work for the Nevada Cancer Institute facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project was to complete the architectural and engineering design, program planning, and other preliminary work necessary to construct the new Nevada Cancer Institute facility. These goals were accomplished with the construction of a new building of approximately 119,000 gross square feet. The facility houses the diagnostic and radio therapeutic treatment laboratories, radiation oncology treatment facility, physician offices, and clinical research areas

  17. Long-term clinical outcomes of 420 consecutive prostate cancer patients in a single institute.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edamura,Kohei

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available

    This study was undertaken to reveal the trends of prostate cancer and the outcome of treatment modalities for each disease stage in patients in a single institute over a 10-year period. From January 1994 through December 2003, 420 consecutive patients with previously untreated and histologically confirmed prostate cancer were analyzed for annual distributions of disease stages and treatment modalities and for long-term clinical progression-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA failure-free survival rates for each stage and treatment modality. Annual trends showed that the number of patients, especially those with clinically localized cancer, increased dramatically. The 5-year disease-specific survival rates for patients with clinically localized disease were 100 percent for all treatment modalities, including hormonal therapy alone. Patients with PSA levels less than 10 ng/ml showed an 81 percent 5-year PSA failure-free survival rate with radical prostatectomy. Stage C patients treated by surgery or radiation-based therapy with concomitant hormonal therapy obtained 93 percent and 100 percent cause-specific survival rates, respectively, and those treated by hormonal therapy alone showed a 79 percent rate. The number of patients with localized prostate cancer was increasing in this decade. While long-term hormonal therapy alone was highly efficient in controlling localized prostate cancer, radical therapies in conjunction with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy produced better survival rates in cases of locally advanced disease.

  18. Measuring Consumer Reactions to Sponsoring Partnerships Based upon Emotional and Attitudinal Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis Christensen, Sverre

    2004-01-01

    to the measurements, and it is suggested that the effects can be measured on the atti-tudes-towards-the sponsor and on the emotion-towards-the sponsor levels. This type of modelling is known as the ELAM model, however the types of independent variables involved is new to research into sponsorship effects. Two......-tude Response Score or NARS), the differences between sponsored institutions are much smaller, although the charitable institutions still show a structurally different profile from the cultural and sports institutions. The differences between companies in NARS are quite small and probably only significant...

  19. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    OpenAIRE

    Soejarto, D. D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with the collaboration of the Arnold Arboretum and the Bishop Museum. Botanists from these and other institutions collaborated in the field work operation for the program, among others: J.S. BURLEY (A), ...

  20. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soejarto, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with t

  1. 45 CFR 1226.12 - Sponsor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sponsor employees. 1226.12 Section 1226.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.12 Sponsor...

  2. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence. PMID:26804371

  3. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence.

  4. Preliminary Analysis of Difficulty of Importing Pattern-Based Concepts into the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Geller, James

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of biomedical ontologies is difficult. We have developed a pattern-based method for dealing with the problem of identifying missing concepts in the National Cancer Institute thesaurus (NCIt). Specifically, we are mining patterns connecting NCIt concepts with concepts in other ontologies to identify candidate missing concepts. However, the final decision about a concept insertion is always up to a human ontology curator. In this paper, we are estimating the difficulty of this task for a domain expert by counting possible choices for a pattern-based insertion. We conclude that even with support of our mining algorithm, the insertion task is challenging.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Difficulty of Importing Pattern-Based Concepts into the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Geller, James

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of biomedical ontologies is difficult. We have developed a pattern-based method for dealing with the problem of identifying missing concepts in the National Cancer Institute thesaurus (NCIt). Specifically, we are mining patterns connecting NCIt concepts with concepts in other ontologies to identify candidate missing concepts. However, the final decision about a concept insertion is always up to a human ontology curator. In this paper, we are estimating the difficulty of this task for a domain expert by counting possible choices for a pattern-based insertion. We conclude that even with support of our mining algorithm, the insertion task is challenging. PMID:27577410

  6. Male breast cancer: a report of 127 cases at a Moroccan institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijami Fouad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer (MBC is a rare disease representing less than 1% of all malignancies in men and only 1% of all incident breast cancers. Our study details clinico-pathological features, treatments and prognostic factors in a large Moroccan cohort. Findings One hundred and twenty-seven patients were collected from 1985 to 2007 at the National Institute of Oncology in Rabat, Morocco. Median age was 62 years and median time for consultation 28 months. The main clinical complaint was a mass beneath the areola in 93, 5% of the cases. Most patients have an advanced disease. Ninety-one percent of tumors were ductal carcinomas. Management consisted especially of radical mastectomy; followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and hormonal therapy with or without chemotherapy. The median of follow-up was 30 months. The evolution has been characterized by local recurrence; in twenty two cases (17% of all patients. Metastasis occurred in 41 cases (32% of all patients. The site of metastasis was the bone in twenty cases; lung in twelve cases; liver in seven case; liver and skin in one case and pleura and skin in one case. Conclusion Male breast cancer has many similarities to breast cancer in women, but there are distinct features that should be appreciated. Future research for better understanding of this disease at national or international level are needed to improve the management and prognosis of male patients.

  7. Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Western Research Institute

    2009-03-31

    Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental

  8. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials.

  9. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  10. Environmental dose in the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimeters TLD-100 and TLD-900 were used to know the levels of environmental dose in areas of the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer. The dosimeters calibration was carried out in the Metrology Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. The radioisotopes used in the studied areas are 131I, 18F, 67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 201Tl and 137Cs with gamma energies between 93 and 662 KeV. Dosimeters were placed during five months in the diagnostic, injection, waiting and PET rooms as well as hot room, waste room, enclosed corridors to patient rooms treated with 131I and 137Cs and witness dosimeters to know the bottom. The values found vary between 0.3 and 70 major times that those of bottom. The maximum doses were measured in the waste room and in the enclosed corridor to the patient rooms with cervical uterine cancer treated with 137Cs. (Author)

  11. Quality of life among young women with breast cancer: Study from a tertiary cancer institute in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Dubashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The incidence of breast cancer in young patients less than 35 years is less than 1%. The physical and psychosocial morbidity may affect their ability to successfully function in their social roles. Hence we studied the quality of life (QOL issues in this subset. Materials and Methods :Younger women with age less than 35 years, diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer at our Institute, from 1995 to 2005, were included in the study. Quality of life issues were studied during the follow-up using EORTC QOL C30 and BR23. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in order to analyze the data. Results : A total of 51 patients were included for the study. The mean age at diagnosis was 30 years. The effect of breast cancer on the occupation and marital status was minimal. The global health status and the functional scores were high, while the overall sexual function was lower. The global health status was higher in the mastectomy group. The arm symptoms (P = 0.027 and pain were higher in the Breast conservation surgery (BCS group. The sexual symptoms appeared to be higher in the ovary ablated group when compared to the ovary preserved group. The sexual functional scores (P = 0.02 and sexual enjoyment scores (P = 0.003 were better in the mastectomy group. Conclusion : The overall QOL in younger patients with breast cancer appeared to be good. The QOL and sexual function were marginally worse in the breast conservation group when compared to mastectomy group.

  12. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study1,4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Chan, D.S.; Romieu, I.; Freisling, H.; Ferrari, P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dartois, L.; Li, K.; Tikk, K.; Bergmann, M.M.; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Redondo, M.L.; Agudo, A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Crowe, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Masala, G.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; May, A.; Wirfalt, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Johansson, I.; Hallmans, G.; Lund, E.; Weiderpass, E.; Parr, C.L.; Riboli, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We inves

  13. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe : results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romaguera, Dora; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Chan, Doris S. M.; Romieu, Isabelle; Freisling, Heinz; Ferrari, Pietro; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Dartois, Laureen; Li, Kuanrong; Tikk, Kaja; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Luisa Redondo, Maria; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Crowe, Francesca; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ros, Martine M.; May, Anne; Wirfalt, Elisabet; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hallmans, Goeran; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Parr, Christine L.; Riboli, Elio; Norat, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. Objective: We inves

  14. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  15. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline. PMID:26970137

  16. Cost comparison of curative therapies for localized prostate cancer in Japan. A single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to open surgery, curative therapies for prostate cancer now include endoscopic surgery and radiation therapies. Because of the expansion and subdivision of treatment methods for prostate cancer, the medical fee point schedule in Japan was revised in fiscal year 2006. We examined changes in medical income and expenditure after this revision of the medical fee system. We studied income and expenditure, after institution of the new medical fee schedule, for the five types of therapies for prostate cancer performed at our hospital: two surgical therapies (radical retropubic prostatectomy and laparoscopic prostatectomy) and three radiation therapies (three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and 125I low-dose-rate brachytherapy). Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was found to be associated with a profit of 199 yen per patient. Laparoscopic prostatectomy, a highly advanced medical treatment that the fee revision changed from a partially insured to an insured procedure, yielded a profit of 75672 yen per patient. However, high-dose-rate brachytherapy was associated with a loss of 654016 yen per patient. Given the loss in hospital income per patient undergoing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, the medical fee point system for this procedure should be reassessed. (author)

  17. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  18. Pelvic exenteration for colorectal cancer: oncologic outcome in 59 patients at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelvic exenteration (PE) continues to be the only curative option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent pelvic neoplasms. A current debate exists concerning the appropriate selection of patients for PE, with the most important factor being the absence of extrapelvic disease. To evaluate the outcome of patients submitted to exenterative surgery. A review of the clinical charts of patients with colorectal cancer who underwent PE between January 1994 and June 2010 at the Institute National of Cancerología in Mexico City was performed. We selected 59 patients, 53 of whom were females (90%), and six of whom were males (10%). Mean age at the time of diagnosis was 50 years (range, 21–77 years). A total of 51 patients underwent posterior PE (86%), and eight patients underwent total PE (14%). Operative mortality occurred in two cases (3%), and 29 patients developed complications (49%). Overall, 11 patients (19%) experienced local failure with mean disease-free survival time of 10.2 months. After a mean follow-up of 28.3 months, nine patients are still alive without evidence of the disease (15%). PE should be considered in advanced colorectal cancer without extrapelvic metastatic disease. PE is accompanied by considerable morbidity (49%) and mortality (3%), but local control is desirable. Overall survival justifies the use of this procedure in patients with primary or recurrent locally advanced rectal cancer

  19. Sponsoring, brand value and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Zauner; Monika Koller; Matthias Fink

    2012-01-01

    The increasing involvement of individuals in social media over the past decade has enabled firms to pursue new avenues in communication and sponsoring activities. Besides general research on either social media or sponsoring, questions regarding the consequences of a joint activity (sponsoring activities in social media) remain unexplored. Hence, the present study analyses whether the perceived image of the brand and the celebrity endorser credibility of a top sports team influence the percei...

  20. Postoperative Survival Estimation of Gastric Cancer Patients in Cancer Institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital and Its Relative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kazemnejad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Gastric Cancer (GC is one of the most common causes of death in the world. The most important cause of high death rate related to GC is late diagnosis of the disease. The main treatment of gastric cancer in its primary stage of is surgery, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are supplementary treatments. There are some factors that affect survival after surgery. This study aimed to assess the survival of patients with GC under surgery and to determine the risk factors of this cancer. Materials & Methods: A total of 262 patients with GC under surgery were followed and included in the study from 21st of March 2003 to 21st of March 2007 in the cancer institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital, . The staging of the disease before the surgery was based on CT-Scan and endosonography and after the surgery was based on the pathologic reports. The survival of the patients was determined by their periodical referrals and our telephone contacts with their relatives. The survival times were considered as the time from the diagnosis up to the death or the end of the study. The effect of the various risk factors including gender, age at diagnosis, tumor site, pathologic stage of the disease, type of treatment, metastases and relapse were evaluated. Kaplan-Miere approach was used to estimate survival and Log-rank test and proportional Cox model to evaluate the related factors. Data were analyzed using Spss16 statistical software. Results: 75.2% of patients were men and 34.4% cases of patients experienced death. The mean follow-up time was 19.317.4. The mean age at diagnosis was 5811.5 and survival mean and median were 49 and 27 months respectively. The one, three and five year survival of the patients were 0.85, 0.41 and 0.3 respectively. Gender, pathologic stage, age at diagnosis and weight-loss were significantly related to the survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The diagnosis of the cancer in primary stages causes

  1. Locally advanced cervix cancer: chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery or radiotherapy. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary or neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy has potential advantages for locally advanced cervix cancer. It can down stage a cancer and allow definitive local therapy to be technically possible (surgery), or potentially more effective (radiotherapy). It can also eradicate subclinical systemic metastases. This report reviews a single institution's experience of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy for cervix cancer over a 13-year period. One hundred and six patients were treated with this intent. The patients were analysed for their response to chemotherapy, treatment received, survival, relapse and toxicity. The chemotherapy was feasible and the majority of patients had a complete or partial response (58.5%). Eight patients did not proceed to local treatment. Forty-six patients had definitive surgery and 52 had definitive radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival was 27% and the majority of patients died with disease. The first site of relapse was usually in the pelvis (46.2%). Late complications that required ongoing medical therapy (n = 6) or surgical intervention (n = 2) were recorded in eight patients (7.5%). On univariate analysis stage (P= 0.04), tumour size (P = 0.01), lymph node status (P=0.003), response to chemotherapy (P = 0.045) and treatment (P = 0.003) were all significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, tumour size (P < 0.0001) and nodal status (P = 0.02) were significant predictors of survival. Despite the impressive responses to chemotherapy of advanced cervix cancer, there is evidence from randomized trials that it does not improve or compromise survival prior to radiotherapy. As its role prior to surgery remains unclear, it should not be used in this setting outside a prospective randomized trial. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  2. Clinical Features of Male Breast Cancer: Experiences from Seven Institutions Over 20 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Hyung; Ha, Kyung Sun; Jung, Yun Hwa; Won, Hye Sung; An, Ho Jung; Lee, Guk Jin; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Ji Chan; Park, Sarah; Byun, Jae Ho; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Woo Chan; Jung, Sang Seol; Park, Il Young; Chung, Su-Mi; Woo, In Sook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer treatment has progressed significantly over the past 20 years. However, knowledge regarding male breast cancer (MBC) is sparse because of its rarity. This study is an investigation of the clinicopathologic features, treatments, and clinical outcomes of MBC. Materials and Methods Clinical records of 59 MBC patients diagnosed during 1995-2014 from seven institutions in Korea were reviewed retrospectively. Results Over a 20-year period, MBC patients accounted for 0.98% among total breast cancer patients, and increased every 5 years. The median age of MBC patientswas 66 years (range, 24 to 87 years). Forty-three patients (73%) complained of a palpable breast mass initially. The median symptom duration was 5 months (range, 1 to 36 months). Mastectomy was performed in 96% of the patients. The most frequent histology was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (75%). Ninety-one percent of tumors (38/43) were estrogen receptor–positive, and 28% (11/40) showed epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression. After curative surgery, 42% of patients (19/45) received adjuvant chemotherapy; 77% (27/35) received hormone therapy. Five out of ten patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors did not receive adjuvant anti–HER-2 therapy, while two out of four patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors received palliative trastuzumab for recurrent and metastatic disease. Letrozole was used for one patient in the palliative setting. The median overall survival durations were 7.2 years (range, 0.6 to 17.0 years) in patients with localized disease and 2.9 years (range, 0.6 to 4.3 years) in those with recurrent or metastatic disease. Conclusion Anti–HER-2 and hormonal therapy, except tamoxifen, have been underutilized in Korean MBC patients compared to female breast cancer patients. With the development of precision medicine, active treatment with targeted agents should be applied. Further investigation of the unique pathobiology of MBC is clinically warranted

  3. The Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of the National Cancer Institute - its resources to assist patients with bone marrow failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the bone marrow transplantation center of the brazilian National Cancer Institute, which is responsible for the cancer control in Brazil. The document also describes the resources available in the Institute for assisting patients presenting bone marrow failures. The Center provides for allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplants, peripheral stem cell transplants, umbilical cord collections and transplants, and a small experience with unrelated bone marrow transplants. The Center receives patient from all over the country and provides very sophisticated medical care at no direct cost to the patients

  4. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small-cell lung cancer: the experience at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana:

    OpenAIRE

    Stanic, Karmen; Kovac, Viljem

    2010-01-01

    Background Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has been used in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to reduce the incidence of brain metastases (BM) and thus increase overall survival. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the characteristics of patients with SCLC referred to the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, their eligibility for PCI, patterns of dissemination, and survival. Patients and methods Medical charts of 357 patients with SCLC, referred to the Institute of...

  5. Handbook for Sponsors of Indochinese Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Joseph Jay; Koschmann, Nancy Lee

    This handbook provides information for the prospective sponsors of Indochinese refugees. The refugees' general background, experiences, and reasons for coming to the United States are discussed. The sponsor's importance and role in the resettlement program are examined. The handbook also outlines problems of adjustment to life in America and what…

  6. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Mayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality.

  7. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Paul C.; Lele, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality. PMID:27669307

  8. Paradigma Baru Sponsor sebagai Mitra Penyelenggaraan Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidya Wati Evelina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this article is to know why sponsorship only to be viewed as sources of funding to implement the public relation events or marketing communication events. Method used in this article is qualitative method research to be based on observation, library study and content analysis. The result of this research seems that change happened in role of sponsorship from only fund source to become a partner of cooperation (mutual symbiotism between sponsor and event organizer. This article exploring the change of sponsorship concept from only looking for sponsor as an activity of fund mobilitation to become a partnership cooperation between event organizer and sponsor company. The mean of sponsor itself beside the fund supporter, they are also a side who takes mutual benefit from the cooperation. Conclusion, any close relationship (mutual benefit between two sides who take cooperation in event implementation (sponsor and event organiser.

  9. SPONSORING, BRAND VALUE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zauner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing involvement of individuals in social media over the past decade has enabled firms to pursue new avenues in communication and sponsoring activities. Besides general research on either social media or sponsoring, questions regarding the consequences of a joint activity (sponsoring activities in social media remain unexplored. Hence, the present study analyses whether the perceived image of the brand and the celebrity endorser credibility of a top sports team influence the perceived brand value of the sponsoring firm in a social media setting. Moreover, these effects are compared between existing customers and non-customers of the sponsoring firm. Interestingly, perceived celebrity endorser credibility plays no role in forming brand value perceptions in the case of the existing customers. Implications for marketing theory and practice are derived.

  10. Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancer: a single-institution review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are reporting the five-year biochemical control, toxicity profile and dosimetric parameters using iodine-125 low dose rate brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer at a single institution. Between April 2006 and December 2010, 169 men with early stage prostate cancer were treated with BT. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL). Treatment-related morbidities, including urinary, rectal and sexual function, were measured, applying the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the 7-grade Quality of Life Scale (QoL) and medical status, the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ), the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v4.03). Seed migration and loss, dosimetric parameters and learning effects were also analyzed. Medium follow-up time was 50 months (range, 1–85 months). The five-year biochemical failure rate was 7%. Acute proctitis rates were 19% (grade 1) and 1% (grade 2), respectively. The overall incidence of incontinence was 19% (mild), 16% (moderate) and < 1% (severe). An increase in IPSS ≥ 5 points was detected in 59% of patients, with 38% regaining their baseline. Seed dislocation was found in 24% of patients and correlated with D90 and V100. A learning curve was found for seed migration, D90 and V100. QoL correlated with the general health condition of patient, incontinence symptoms and IPSS. BT for early stage prostate cancer offers excellent five-year biochemical control with low toxicities. QoL aspects are favorable. A learning curve was detected for procedural aspects but its impact on patient relevant endpoints remains inconclusive

  11. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute Past Issues / Winter ... a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone or iPad that uses proven quit ...

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  13. Quality Improvement in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program: The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert D.; Castro, Kathleen M.; Eisenstein, Jana; Stallings, Holley; Hegedus, Patricia D.; Bryant, Donna M.; Kadlubek, Pam J.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007; it is a network of community-based hospitals funded by the NCI. Quality of care is an NCCCP priority, with participation in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) playing a fundamental role in quality assessment and quality improvement (QI) projects. Using QOPI methodology, performance on quality measures was analyzed two times per year over a 3-year period to enhance our implementation of quality standards at NCCCP hospitals. Methods: A data-sharing agreement allowed individual-practice QOPI data to be electronically sent to the NCI. Aggregated data with the other NCCCP QOPI participants were presented to the network via Webinars. The NCCCP Quality of Care Subcommittee selected areas in which to focus subsequent QI efforts, and high-performing practices shared voluntarily their QI best practices with the network. Results: QOPI results were compiled semiannually between fall 2010 and fall 2013. The network concentrated on measures with a quality score of ≤ 0.75 and planned voluntary group-wide QI interventions. We identified 13 measures in which the NCCCP fell at or below the designated quality score in fall 2010. After implementing a variety of QI initiatives, the network registered improvements in all parameters except one (use of treatment summaries). Conclusion: Using the NCCCP as a paradigm, QOPI metrics provide a useful platform for group-wide measurement of quality performance. In addition, these measurements can be used to assess the effectiveness of QI initiatives. PMID:25538082

  14. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  15. Observatory Sponsoring Astronomical Image Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Forget the headphones you saw in the Warner Brothers thriller Contact, as well as the guttural throbs emanating from loudspeakers at the Very Large Array in that 1997 movie. In real life, radio telescopes aren't used for "listening" to anything - just like visible-light telescopes, they are used primarily to make images of astronomical objects. Now, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) wants to encourage astronomers to use radio-telescope data to make truly compelling images, and is offering cash prizes to winners of a new image contest. Radio Galaxy Fornax A Radio Galaxy Fornax A Radio-optical composite image of giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316, showing the galaxy (center), a smaller companion galaxy being cannibalized by NGC 1316, and the resulting "lobes" (orange) of radio emission caused by jets of particles spewed from the core of the giant galaxy Click on image for more detail and images CREDIT: Fomalont et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF "Astronomy is a very visual science, and our radio telescopes are capable of producing excellent images. We're sponsoring this contest to encourage astronomers to make the extra effort to turn good images into truly spectacular ones," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. The contest, offering a grand prize of $1,000, was announced at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The image contest is part of a broader NRAO effort to make radio astronomical data and images easily accessible and widely available to scientists, students, teachers, the general public, news media and science-education professionals. That effort includes an expanded image gallery on the observatory's Web site. "We're not only adding new radio-astronomy images to our online gallery, but we're also improving the organization and accessibility of the images," said Mark Adams, head of education and public outreach (EPO) at NRAO. "Our long-term goal is to make the NRAO Image Gallery an international resource for radio astronomy imagery

  16. FDG-PET scanning in patients with differentiated thyroid cancers. Institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Patient with detectable serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and negative radioiodine whole body (RAI-WB) scan should have FDG-PET scan to locate tumor tissue. Sometimes scan fail to detect any pathologic accumulation of FDG. Some well-differentiated thyroid cancers do not accumulate FDG. In addition, tumor burden could be so small that imaging becomes impossible. To explore this possibility, several studies explored relationship between serum Tg level and result of FDG-PET scans. Results were inconclusive and it is not clear if there is some low level of serum Tg below which PET scanning is not cost effective. We examined all cases of thyroid cancer patients who underwent FDG-PET scanning in our institution (N-33) for relationship between Tg level and results of the scan. There were 16 females, 17 males. Age was 19-81 years. Follicular cancer was present in 2 patients while 31 had papillary cancer. 14 patients had PET scan while withdrawn from T4 therapy, and 19 patients were scanned while TSH was suppressed. Overall, 20 scans were considered positive, while 12 were negative. One patient was considered to have positive scan but after scan was repeated interpretation was changed into - positive uptake due to inflammation. In patients whose PET scan was positive, Tg level was in a range 6.6-7,108 ng/ml, while those with negative scan had Tg level in 1.7-36.5 ng/ml range. In group withdrawn from T4 therapy and positive scan Tg level ranged from 13.8-7,108 ng/ml, and with negative scan 2.8-36.5 ng/ml. In PET positive patients in euthyroid group Tg ranged 6.6-432 ng/ml and in negative 1.7-13.3 ng/ml. Conclusion: These results suggest that patients who have negative RAI scan and low Tg level may not benefit from PET scanning. In our study Tg level less than 6.6 ng/ml for the whole group, and below 13.8 ng/ml for patient withdrawn from T4 therapy did not result in positive FDG-PET scan result. Our group is small and more data need to be collected to clarify these

  17. Cancer - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov

  18. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions... industry partnership called TONIC (Translation Of Nanotechnology In Cancer) to promote...

  19. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  20. Multi-Institutional Analysis of Early Glottic Cancer from 2000 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirasawa Naoki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to analyze the outcome of patients with early glottic cancer (GC treated with radiotherapy (RT with or without chemotherapy at 10 institutions in the Tokai District, Japan. Methods Ten institutions combined data from 279 patients with T1-T2 GC treated with RT with or without chemotherapy between 2000 and 2005. The overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and local control rate were evaluated in 270 patients, except for incomplete cases due to issues such as discontinuation, using the method of Kaplan-Meier and compared using the log-rank test. Results were considered statistically significant at the level of p  0.05. Results For 122 patients, the tumors were classified as T1a, while 64 patients had T1b tumors, and 84 patients had T2 tumors. In three cases of T1 tumors, the subtype was unknown. Combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT was administered during each stage, and various chemotherapy drugs and regimens were used. The median follow-up period was 55.4 months. The 5-year LC rates for T1a, Tb, and T2 tumors in all patients were 87.9%, 82.7%, and 74.1%, respectively. The difference between T1a and T2 was statistically significant (p = 0.016. The 5-year LC rates for T1a, Tb, and T2 with CRT were 92.7%, 78.6%, and 80.7%, respectively, while the rates with radiation alone were 86.5%, 83.8%, and 64.4%, respectively. The difference between CRT and RT alone was not statistically significant in each stage. Conclusions In this survey, CRT was performed for early GC at most institutions in clinical practice. Our data showed no statistical difference in the LC rates between CRT and RT alone in each stage. However, there was a tendency for the LCRs of the CRT group to be more favorable than those of the RT group in the T2-stage.

  1. Multi-Institutional Analysis of Early Glottic Cancer from 2000 to 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the outcome of patients with early glottic cancer (GC) treated with radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy at 10 institutions in the Tokai District, Japan. Ten institutions combined data from 279 patients with T1-T2 GC treated with RT with or without chemotherapy between 2000 and 2005. The overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and local control rate were evaluated in 270 patients, except for incomplete cases due to issues such as discontinuation, using the method of Kaplan-Meier and compared using the log-rank test. Results were considered statistically significant at the level of p < 0.05. For 122 patients, the tumors were classified as T1a, while 64 patients had T1b tumors, and 84 patients had T2 tumors. In three cases of T1 tumors, the subtype was unknown. Combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT) was administered during each stage, and various chemotherapy drugs and regimens were used. The median follow-up period was 55.4 months. The 5-year LC rates for T1a, Tb, and T2 tumors in all patients were 87.9%, 82.7%, and 74.1%, respectively. The difference between T1a and T2 was statistically significant (p = 0.016). The 5-year LC rates for T1a, Tb, and T2 with CRT were 92.7%, 78.6%, and 80.7%, respectively, while the rates with radiation alone were 86.5%, 83.8%, and 64.4%, respectively. The difference between CRT and RT alone was not statistically significant in each stage. In this survey, CRT was performed for early GC at most institutions in clinical practice. Our data showed no statistical difference in the LC rates between CRT and RT alone in each stage. However, there was a tendency for the LCRs of the CRT group to be more favorable than those of the RT group in the T2-stage

  2. Soccer jersey sponsors and the world cup

    OpenAIRE

    Groot, L.F.M.; Ferwerda, J

    2014-01-01

    The market for soccer jerseys is a multibillion market dominated by Adidas, Nike and Puma. This paper investigates whether jersey sponsorship has a non-arbitrary effect on the outcomes of World Cup knockout matches. The results show that in the knockout stages of the last four World Cup tournaments, especially national teams sponsored by Adidas perform significantly better than expected, while teams sponsored by any other company than Adidas, Puma or Nike perform worse. The average advantage ...

  3. The Gray Cancer Institute X-ray microprobe and its radiobiological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation micro-beams represent a unique and powerful tool to study and quantify the effects of precise doses of radiation delivered with micron precision to selected biological samples. The Gray Cancer Institute has developed two independent but complementary micro-irradiation facilities, specifically developed for the targeted irradiation of cells and structured tissues; a charged-particle microbeam that uses collimated protons or helium ions and an ultra-soft X-ray microprobe. The ultra-soft X-ray facility employs a focused electron bombardments source to produce a near monochromatic CK X-ray beam. Highly efficient zone plates optimised for the appropriate wavelength are used to focus the characteristic X-rays into a sub-micron spot. The facility is also equipped with a three-axis micro-positioning stage, an epi-fluorescent UV microscope with intensified CCD camera coupled to a fast PC for a automatic, fast and accurate samples recognition and alignment with the probe. Recent experiments have been directed to investigate the bystander effect by irradiating only one cell within a population of V79 cells that are subsequently individually revisited for colony formation. A clear bystander effect has been detected (∼ 10 % reduction in survival) when a single cell has been irradiated. The effect is triggered by very low doses ((∼ 100 mGy) and it is largely dose independent. (authors)

  4. Skin cancer profile in patients from Ceara Cancer Institute on the period of 2000 to 2003 - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p46

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Leite Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on skin cancer fulfilled in places with geographical and/or population characteristics that predispose to this kind of disease have become more and more necessary, so that prevention may be performed effectively. This descriptive, retrospective and documental study had the aim of setting the skin cancer profile of the patients registered in the Ceara Cancer Institute (ICC in the period of January,2000 to December, 2003. During the referred period, 1153 skin cancer cases were identified, especially in men (n=612; 53.1%. Basal cell carcinoma (n=736; 63.8% and spin cell carcinoma (n=254; 22.0% were the main histological types of skin cancer observed, and the face (n=478; 41.5% was the most common affected site. There was a predominance of skin cancer in patients from 60s to 80s (n=547; 47.4% with white skin (n=635; 55.8%, and surgery was the usual treatment choice (n=591; 51.2%. By the analysis of the ICC patients’ skin cancer profile, it was disclosed that with the age, people with light-colored skin and blond hair, male with chronic exposure to the sunlight without protection have greater risk to develop pre-malignant and malignant cutaneous lesions, increasing the rate of surgeries as a way of treatment.

  5. Results of treatment of differentiated thyroid cancers using Iodine-131 at Sri Lanka's first private institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This department was started in order to meet the urgent demand of iodine-131 treatment in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), as the waiting list in government hospitals was unduly long. Data obtained revealed that 52% of the patients had iodine-131 therapy within 4 months, 31% in 4 to 8 months and 17% over 8 months time. Institute received license to order, stock and administer iodine-131 from the AEA-Sri Lanka as its facilities were according to IAEA standards. Facility included three 'single bedded en-suit toilet rooms' with storage capacity for iodine-131 capsules. 115 cases (male: female ratio 1:4) of DTC were treated during the past one and half year and each received 100 GBq of radioactivity. 89 (77.3%) comprised papillary carcinoma, 25 (21.7%) follicular carcinoma and 1 case of mixed carcinoma. 52% of males and 60.8% of females were in the 26-45 years age group. Sixty cases of papillary carcinoma were sub-typed and grouped to observe the distribution of metastases and response to iodine-131. They were follicular variant (FV) in 28 (46%), micropaillary (MP) in 10 (20%), encapsulated (EP) in 8 (13.3%), tall cell (TC) in 3 (5%) and diffuse sclerosis (DS) in 9 (15%). TSH and Tg values were measured before therapy and four months afterwards. Activity readings were measured 30 min after ingestion and 4 days later and discharged when the values were less than 20 μSv / hour. Six of the nine (66%) DS cancer patients had metastasis in lymph nodes and lungs when referred for iodine-131 treatment. In 8 of these patients, Tg levels were raised. 36% (8/9) of the FC patients also had raised Tg levels indicating metastases and 4/5 were found to have bony metastases. In post iodine-131 therapy whole body scans, 3.3% had metastases in the lungs in PC and 20% of FC in skeleton. With a single dose of iodine-131 over 90% had drop in Tg levels to less than I ng/ml except in DS (23% drop) and TC (33% drop). The study shows that sub-typing of PC was useful and TC and

  6. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dignam, James [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Michalski, Jeff [University of Washington, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Simon, Richard [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ten Haken, Randal K. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Tunis, Sean [Center for Medical Technology Policy, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  7. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials—Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  8. Definitive Radiotherapy for T1-2 Hypopharyngeal Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Aya, E-mail: anakajima-kyt@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nishiyama, Kinji; Morimoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miyagi, Ken [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Fujii, Takashi; Yoshino, Kunitoshi [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in T1-2 hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with T1-2 hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radical RT between March 2000 and June 2008 at our institution were analyzed. Pre-RT neck dissection (ND) was performed in 26 patients with advanced neck disease. Chemotherapy was used concurrently with RT in 14 patients. Sixty patients were associated with synchronous or metachronous malignancies. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. Results: The 3-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 70% and 79%, respectively. The 3-year local control rates were 87% for T1 and 83% for T2 disease. The ultimate local control rate was 89%, including 7 patients in whom salvage was successful. The ultimate local control rate with laryngeal preservation was 82%. Tumors of the medial wall of the pyriform sinus tended to have lower control rates compared with tumors of the lateral or posterior pharyngeal wall. Among patients with N2b-3 disease, the 3-year regional control rates were 74% for patients with pre-RT ND and 40% for patients without ND. The 3-year locoregional control rates were as follows: Stage I, 100%; Stage II, 84%; Stage III, 67%; Stage IVA, 43%; Stage IVB, 67%. Forty-two patients developed disease recurrence, with 29 (70%) patients developing recurrence within the first year. Of the 103 patients, 6 developed late complications higher than or equal to Grade 3. Conclusions: Definitive RT accomplished a satisfactory local control rate and contributed to organ preservation.

  9. A pilot study to assess the level of depression and the coping strategies adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitumoni Konwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer, the second most common cause of death, has become a major health problem. Depression is the most common psychological problem encountered in patients with cancer. The coping skills adopted may affect the mental health of patients. Therefore, this research is undertaken to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by the patients diagnosed with cancer. Materials and methods: A descriptive study to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl was carried out from April to May 2014 with 30 convenient samples. Depression was assessed by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS developed by Zigmond and Snaith in 1983. Coping strategy adopted by patients were assessed by revised version of the Ways of Coping Checklist developed by Folkman and Lazarus in 1985. Results: Findings of the study showed that depression was universal to all the cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients (66.5% had moderate depression while 13.26% of the cancer patients had severe depression, and only 6.7% of them reported to have low depression. The most effective coping strategy adopted was reappraisal, followed by distancing. There is significant correlation between depression and reappraisal (r=-0.538, p<0.002, and also with depression and acceptance (r=-0.415, p<0.022 strategies. Conclusion: As depression is universal to all cancer patients, use of appropriate coping strategy is very essential to improve their quality of life. The recognition of coping strategies by health team may enable appropriate information and interventions to be provided at optimal times for each individual.

  10. Surgical treatment pattern and outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer patients from a cancer institute in Kerala, India

    OpenAIRE

    Georgeena, P; Rajanbabu, Anupama; Vijaykumar, DK; Pavithran, K.; Sundaram, KR; Deepak, KS; Sanal, MR

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the treatment and survival pattern of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods and results Retrospective study of all advanced epithelial ovarian cancer patients treated in the department of gynaecologic oncology from an academic centre, in a four year period from 1 January 2008–31 December 2011. Selection criteria All patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (stage III and IV) who underwent surgery from 2008–2011and had a follow-up of at least t...

  11. The National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group MAP.3 trial: an international breast cancer prevention trial

    OpenAIRE

    Pater, J.; Richardson, H.; Johnston, D.; Goss, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    Several large phase iii trials have demonstrated that tamoxifen—and more recently, raloxifene—can effectively reduce the incidence of invasive breast cancer by 50%. However, these selective estrogen receptor modulators can also be associated with several rare, but serious, adverse events. Recently, the third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIS) have demonstrated excellent efficacy in adjuvant breast cancer trials, and they show particular promise in the breast cancer prevention setting. The ...

  12. 77 FR 26697 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor Address; Change of Sponsor Name and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in, abbreviated new animal drug... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510 and 522 New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the...

  13. Development and evaluation of radiographer led telephone follow up following radical radiotherapy to the prostate. A report of a Macmillan Cancer Support Sponsored Pilot project at Mount Vernon Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer is an effective and well tolerated treatment. Following radiotherapy, most men are followed up either in doctor or specialist nurse led hospital outpatient clinics. Attending clinics may be of little personal benefit as the majority of patients have few ongoing symptoms post radiotherapy and have very good cancer prognoses. Recognising the limitations outpatient clinic follow up, we developed a radiographer led model of remote telephone follow up of patients completing radiotherapy for low to intermediate risk prostate cancer. Standardised toxicity assessments were performed and patient satisfaction assessed. Radiographer led follow up detected similar levels of post radiotherapy GI, GU and sexual toxicity as outpatient clinic appointments, with a very high level of patient satisfaction compared to routine outpatient clinics. We believe that radiographer led telephone follow up provides an alternative model for long term follow up of men after prostate radiotherapy

  14. Market Imperfections and Firm-Sponsored Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, M.; van Ours, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent human capital theories predict that labor market frictions and product market competition influence firm-sponsored training. Using matched worker-firm data from Dutch manufacturing, our paper empirically assesses the validity of these predictions. We find that a decrease in labor market frict

  15. The State-Sponsored Student Entrepreneur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Matthew M.; Slaughter, Sheila; Rhoades, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the emergent role of the state-sponsored student entrepreneur within the academic capitalist knowledge/learning regime. Drawing on two clarifying cases of such entrepreneurship, the study explores the shifting boundaries between public and private sectors, the creation of new circuits of knowledge, and the entrepreneurial…

  16. Comparison of Serum Selenium Levels in Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy People at a Cancer Institute in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Maleki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast Cancer is one of the most important fatal cancers in women. The mean age of breast cancer in Iran is 48.8 years which is very lower than other countries. Selenium can play an important role in reduction of cancer in several ways, for example selenium increases immunity response and protects cells from oxidation of free radicals and also decreases carcinogenic metabolites. Breast cancer is one of the most important cancers in our country because its incidence is very high and the mean age of patients is very low. Different studies have shown the benefits of selenium in prevention of cancer and since many years selenium has been used as a dietary supplement in advanced countries. Several studies regarding relationship between selenium levels and breast cancer have been done in different countries. We therefore planned a study to evaluate serum selenium levels in breast cancer patients and compare them with a healthy control group. Methods: We selected 45 patients younger than 48 years old and 33 patients older than 48 years old who had not yet received any therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, etc for their cancer as a case group and 46 healthy people who were matched with the patients as a control group and included 23 persons younger and 23 persons older than 48 years old. From each participant, 5cc blood was derived and in several stages, serum selenium levels were evaluated using atomic absorption technology. Data about type of cancer, stage, grade, IHC and cigarette smoking were also collected. Results: The mean Se level was 161.20 μg/l (SD=46.27 μg/l in the patients and 189.13 μg/l (SD=48.75 μg/l in the control group that was statistically significant (P48 years old was 155.39 μg/l (SD=46.68 μg/l that was lower than the control groups. Difference in serum selenium levels between patients and controls in the older group was significant (P=0.007, but in the younger group, it was not statistically significant (P=0

  17. Retrospective assessment of occupational asbestos exposure among 220 patients with respiratory cancer hospitalized at Vilnius University Institute of Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No cases of lung cancer or mesothelioma have ever been diagnosed or compensated as asbestos-related in Lithuania. This paper attempts to estimate the proportion of those occupationally exposed to asbestos among respiratory cancer patients. Occupational exposure to asbestos was assessed retrospectively for 218 lung cancer and 2 mesothelioma patients admitted to Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. The evaluation was based on personal interview data using an internationally established questionnaire. Cumulative exposure to asbestos at work was evaluated in fibre-years. A cumulative asbestos exposure of ≥25 fibre-years was found for 7 patients (3.2%), in further 135 (61.2%) a cumulative exposure from 0.01 to 24.99 fibre-years was assessed. The most common occupations among heavily (≥25 fibre-years) exposed patients were smith, welder or insulator in foundries, construction, shipyard as well as asbestos cement and glass industry. Preliminary findings indicate that a fraction (3.2%) of the respiratory cancer cases could be attributed to occupational exposure to asbestos. Since 1560 or more cases of lung cancer are registered every year in Lithuania, about 50 cases per year could be predicted to be asbestos-related. (author)

  18. Epidemiology and management of breast carcinoma in Egyptian males: Experience of a single Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the epidemiological and clinico-pathological features, surgical and reconstructive techniques, adjuvant treatments and clinical outcome of breast carcinoma in males (BCM) at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute (NCI). Patients and methods: Thirty-two males with breast carcinoma presented to NCI between January 2000 and December 2002. They were evaluated by complete history, physical examination, laboratory and radiological investigations. Results: Median age was 59 years. Left sided and retroareolar breast lumps were the commonest presentations. Grade 11 tumors positive for hormone receptors were very common. Stage I, II, 111 and IV disease were encountered in 6.2%, 34.4%, 34.4% and 25.0% of patients, respectively. Curative surgery was done in 22 patients; they received adjuvant hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy in 22,16 and 10 patients, respectively. Eight metastatic patients were treated with palliative measures. Surgery was done in 25 patients; the most common procedure was modified radical mastectomy (40.6%). Primary closure was feasible in 17 patients (68%), local flaps were needed in 4 cases (16%), while myocutaneous flap was done in 3 cases (12%). The commonest complication was development of seroma (9 cases). The overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 65.4%. The disease free survival (DPS) at 5 years was 53.9%. Stage and curative surgery significantly affected OS, while type of surgery was the only variable significantly affecting DPS. Conclusion: Male breast carcinoma occurs at older ages than females, usually in advanced stage. This necessitates directing attention of males and awareness on the prevalence and risk factors for this disease.needed in 4 cases (16%), while myocutaneous flap was done in 3 cases (12%). The commonest complication was development of seroma (9 cases). The overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 65.4%. The disease free survival (DPS) at 5 years was 53.9%. Stage and curative surgery significantly affected OS

  19. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written... for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... Nanotechnology Research (OCNR), part of the Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives within NCI. OMB...

  20. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  1. Algorithmic Methods for Sponsored Search Advertising

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Modern commercial Internet search engines display advertisements along side the search results in response to user queries. Such sponsored search relies on market mechanisms to elicit prices for these advertisements, making use of an auction among advertisers who bid in order to have their ads shown for specific keywords. We present an overview of the current systems for such auctions and also describe the underlying game-theoretic aspects. The game involves three parties--advertisers, the search engine, and search users--and we present example research directions that emphasize the role of each. The algorithms for bidding and pricing in these games use techniques from three mathematical areas: mechanism design, optimization, and statistical estimation. Finally, we present some challenges in sponsored search advertising.

  2. Effects of Disclosing Sponsored Content in Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reijmersdal, Eva A.; Fransen, Marieke L.; van Noort, Guda; Opree, Suzanna J.; Vandeberg, Lisa; Reusch, Sanne; van Lieshout, Floor; Boerman, Sophie C.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents two studies examining the effects of disclosing online native advertising (i.e., sponsored content in blogs) on people’s brand attitude and purchase intentions. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these effects, we integrated resistance theories with the persuasion knowledge model. We theorize that disclosures activate people’s persuasion knowledge, which in turn evokes resistance strategies that people use to cope with the persuasion attempt made in the blog. We tested our predications with two experiments (N = 118 and N = 134). We found that participants indeed activated persuasion knowledge in response to disclosures, after which they used both cognitive (counterarguing) and affective (negative affect) resistance strategies to decrease persuasion. The obtained insights do not only advance our theoretical understanding of how disclosures of sponsored blogs affect persuasion but also provide valuable insights for legislators, advertisers, and bloggers. PMID:27721511

  3. A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar A. Patel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1 for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2 a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3 a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual

  4. DOE-EERC jointly sponsored research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikson, J.G.; Sondreal, E.A.

    1999-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-93MC30098 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying efficient, nonpolluting energy technologies that can compete effectively in meeting market demands for clean fuels, chemical feedstocks, and electricity in the 21st century. The objective of the JSRP was to advance the deployment of advanced technologies for improving energy efficiency and environmental performance through jointly sponsored research on topics that would not be adequately addressed by the private sector alone. Examples of such topics include the barriers to hot-gas cleaning impeding the deployment of high-efficiency power systems and the search for practical means for sequestering CO{sub 2} generated by fossil fuel combustion. The selection of particular research projects was guided by a combination of DOE priorities and market needs, as provided by the requirement for joint venture funding approved both by DOE and the private sector sponsor. The research addressed many different energy resource and related environmental problems, with emphasis directed toward the EERC's historic lead mission in low-rank coals (LRCs), which represent approximately half of the U.S. coal resources in the conterminous states, much larger potential resources in Alaska, and a major part of the energy base in the former U.S.S.R., East Central Europe, and the Pacific Rim. The Base and JSRP agreements were tailored to the growing awareness of critical environmental issues, including water supply and quality, air toxics (e.g., mercury), fine respirable particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}), and the goal of zero net CO{sub 2} emissions.

  5. Audi cars Sponsored to Summer Davos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Wanlong

    2009-01-01

    @@ During the upcoming Summer Davos in Asia this year,it is not only the grand affair to Dalian city,but also for the Audi cars,as the exclusive vehicle sunnlier for the event The Vehicle Handover Ceremony of the Faw Volkswagen Audi was held at Xinghai Square,Dalian,China,September 3,2009. Faw Volkswa,vehicle sponsor of the Summer Davos 2009,provides a total of 85 new Audi cars to be running for the distinguished guests during the meeting.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop: Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa A; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Petersen, Gloria M; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E; Chari, Suresh T; Klein, Alison P; Lubman, David M; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Wolpin, Brian M; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E; Rinaudo, Jo Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10 to 11, 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions, high-risk populations and criteria to identify a high-risk population for potential chemoprevention trials, identification of chemopreventative/immunopreventative agents, and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short-term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging, and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an National Cancer Institute working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27518363

  7. Critical appraisal of the suitability of translational research models for performance assessment of cancer institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, A.; Sullivan, R.; Bakker, S.; Harten, van W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations. P

  8. 42 CFR 423.401 - General requirements for PDP sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... financial solvency and other standards as the State may require for it to operate as a PDP sponsor. (2) Assumption of financial risk for unsubsidized coverage. The PDP sponsor assumes financial risk on a... sponsor is organized and licensed under State law as a risk bearing entity eligible to offer...

  9. 17 CFR 229.1104 - (Item 1104) Sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (c) Describe the sponsor's securitization program and state how long the sponsor has been engaged in the securitization of assets. The description must include, to the extent material, a general... material roles and responsibilities in its securitization program, including whether the sponsor or...

  10. 45 CFR 233.51 - Eligibility of sponsored aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Definition: Sponsor is any person who, or any public or private agency or organization that, executed an... by public or private agencies or organizations with respect to periods after October 1, 1984. A State... living in the same household as the sponsor who are or could be claimed by the sponsor as dependents...

  11. Sponsored Search Auctions with Markovian Users

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Gagan; Muthukrishnan, S; Pal, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Sponsored search involves running an auction among advertisers who bid in order to have their ad shown next to search results for specific keywords. Currently, the most popular auction for sponsored search is the "Generalized Second Price" (GSP) auction in which advertisers are assigned to slots in the decreasing order of their "score," which is defined as the product of their bid and click-through rate. In the past few years, there has been significant research on the game-theoretic issues that arise in an advertiser's interaction with the mechanism as well as possible redesigns of the mechanism, but this ranking order has remained standard. From a search engine's perspective, the fundamental question is: what is the best assignment of advertisers to slots? Here "best" could mean "maximizing user satisfaction," "most efficient," "revenue-maximizing," "simplest to interact with," or a combination of these. To answer this question we need to understand the behavior of a search engine user when she sees the dis...

  12. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.villeneuve@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe; Fortin, Bernard; Filion, Edith; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis; Ayad, Tarek; Christopoulos, Apostolos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and rate of complications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2005 and November 2008, 25 patients with an unknown primary cancer underwent IMRT, with a median radiation dose of 70 Gy. The bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa were included in the target volume. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma, except for 1 patient who had adenosquamous differentiation. They were all treated with curative intent. Of the 25 included patients, 20 were men and 5 were women, with a median age of 54 years. Of these patients, 3 had Stage III, 18 had Stage IVa, and 4 had Stage IVb. Of the 25 patients, 18 (72%) received platinum-based chemotherapy in a combined-modality setting. Neck dissection was reserved for residual disease after definitive IMRT. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were all 100% at 3 years. No occurrence of primary cancer was observed during the follow-up period. The reported rates of xerostomia reduced with the interval from the completion of treatment. Nine patients (36%) reported Grade 2 or greater xerostomia at 6 months, and only 2 (8%) of them reported the same grade of salivary function toxicity after 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: In our institution, IMRT for unknown primary cancer has provided good overall and disease-free survival in all the patients with an acceptable rate of complications. IMRT allowed us to address the bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa with minimal late salivary function toxicity. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT for more advanced disease led to good clinical results with reasonable toxicities.

  13. Effect of Metformin Use on Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Chenwi M; Mahipal, Amit; Fulp, Jimmy; Chen, Lu; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies have demonstrated that metformin use in diabetic patients is associated with reduced cancer incidence and mortality. Here, we aimed to determine whether metformin use was associated with improved survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. All patients with diabetes who underwent resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 12/1/1986 and 4/30/2013 at our institution were categorized by metformin use. Survival analysis was done using the Kaplan-Meier method, with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards multivariable regression models. For analyses of our data and the only other published study, we used Meta-Analysis version 2.2. We identified 44 pancreatic cancer patients with diabetes who underwent resection of the primary tumor (19 with ongoing metformin use, 25 never used metformin). There were no significant differences in major clinical and demographic characteristics between metformin and non-metformin users. Metformin users had a better median survival than nonusers, but the difference was not statistically significant (35.3 versus 20.2 months; P = 0.3875). The estimated 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates for non-metformin users were 42%, 28%, and 14%, respectively. Metformin users fared better with corresponding rates of 68%, 34%, and 34%, respectively. In our literature review, which included 111 patients from the two studies (46 metformin users and 65 non-users), overall hazard ratio was 0.668 (95% CI 0.397-1.125), with P = 0.129. Metformin use was associated with improved survival outcomes in patients with resected pancreatic cancer, but the difference was not statistically significant. The potential benefit of metformin should be investigated in adequately powered prospective studies.

  14. Triple negative breast cancer in Moroccan women: clinicopathological and therapeutic study at the National Institute of Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rais Ghizlane

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is defined by the lack of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2 expression. This is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis despite the high rates of response to chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to determine the clinicopathological, therapeutic features and outcomes associated with this type of breast cancer. Methods This is a retrospective study of confirmed triple negative breast cancer females collected at the National institute of oncology of Rabat in Morocco, between January 2007 and December 2008. Epidemiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic and evolutive data were analyzed. OS and DFS rates were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results A total of one 152 patients with breast cancer, were identified as having triple-negative breast cancer (16,5%. The median age at diagnosis was 46 years. 130 patients (86% had infiltrating ductal carcinoma and thirteen had medullar carcinoma (9%. 84 cases (55% were grade III Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR. 48 % had positive lymph nodes, and 5 % had distant metastases at diagnosis. According TNM staging, 12 patients (8% had stage I, 90 patients (60% had stage II and the 43(28% had stage III. 145 patients received surgery. 41 (28% had conservative surgery and 104 (72% received radical mastectomy with axillary lymph nodes dissection. 14 patients with advanced tumors or inflammatory breast cancer have received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and four patients (28% had complete pathologic response. From 131 patients how received adjuvant chemotherapy, 99 patients (75,5% had Anthracycline based chemotherapy and 27 patients (20,6% had sequential Anthracycline and docetaxel,. Seven patients with metastatic disease received anthracycline-based regimen in the first line metastatic chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 46 months (range 6,1 -60 months. Overall survival at 5 years

  15. A simple technique for the generation of institution-specific nomograms for permanent prostate cancer brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lafata, Kyle J.; Bushe, Harry; Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nomograms once had a vital role in prostate brachytherapy practice. Although some of their functions have been assumed by computerized dosimetry, many programs still find them useful to determine the number and strength of seeds to be ordered in advance of the implant. As it has been demonstrated that brachytherapists differ in their implant practices and preferences (in regard to seed distribution and total implanted activity), we propose a simple technique for generating institution...

  16. Institute enriching students in Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    Burton, H

    2004-01-01

    In Cape Town, South Africa, the first annual African Summer Theory Institute is being held. This is a three-week conference for university science students throughout the whole of Africa, co-sponsored by Perimeter Institute as part of international outreach initiatives (1 page).

  17. Prostate cancer - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  18. A long-term survival pattern for breast cancer treated in a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gokce

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This paper presents a 14-year retrospective study evaluating the survival rates and prognostic factors of breast carcinoma patients treated in private treatment center in the west coast of Turkey. Materials and Methods: The survival rates of breast cancer patients (n = 1746 who have been treated from 1995 until 2008 were analyzed. The clinical data include age, menopausal stage, oestrogen (ER and progesterone (PR receptor status, and C-erbB-2 status as well as histopathological evaluation. AJCC (2002 was used for clinical tumor staging. Survival rates were computed using standard Kaplan-Meier methods, and the difference in survival curves was analyzed with the log-rank test. Results: The 14-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local failure-free survival, and distant failure-free survival rates were 77%, 95%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Early-stage patients had higher overall survival rates compared to advanced-stage patients (stage IIIb and IIIc, AJCC 2002, and early-stage patients had higher survival rates than advanced-stage patients for disease-free survival, local failure-free survival, and distant failure-free survival. The risk for cancer development increases significantly for advanced-stage patients with positive ER and PR receptor as well as C-erbB-2 receptor. Conclusions: The incidence of breast cancer in Turkey is smaller compared to other European countries. Low advanced-stage patient numbers compared to high early-stage patient numbers; and very high median survival times could possibly be the result of the improvement of detection and treatment of breast cancer over the years.

  19. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer: 30-Year Experience in a Single Institution in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingu, Keiichi, E-mail: kjingu-jr@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Tanabe, Takaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Ariga, Hisanori; Umezawa, Rei; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ken; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Kubozono, Masaki; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Yamada, Shogo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy ({+-} EBRT) for localized pancreatic cancer in the past three decades and to analyze prognostic factors by multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Records for 322 patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT in Tohoku University Hospital between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed. One hundred ninety-two patients who had no distant organ metastases or dissemination at the time of laparotomy were enrolled in the present study. Results: Eighty-three patients underwent gross total resection (R0: 48 patients, R1: 35 patients), and 109 patients underwent only biopsy or palliative resection. Fifty-five patients underwent adjuvant EBRT, and 124 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 and 40 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients had disease recurrence, and 35 patients had local failure. The 2-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates were 71.0% and 16.9%, respectively. Comparison of the results for each decade showed that OS was significantly improved decade by decade (2-year: 25.0% vs. 18.8% vs. 4.2%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection (R0-1 vs. R2, hazard ratio = 1.97, p = 0.001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes vs. no, hazard ratio = 1.54, p = 0.028) had significant impacts on OS. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 4 or 5 was observed in four patients. Conclusion: Excellent local control for pancreatic cancer with few cases of severe late toxicity was achieved by using IORT. OS of patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT improved significantly decade by decade. Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy had significant impacts on OS.

  20. Radiotherapy in the cavum cancer: analysis of 30 cases treated in our institution in Beirut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the results obtained for nasopharyngeal cancers treated by irradiation, exclusively or in combination with chemotherapy. They also assess the impact of the different pathological and clinic variables on survival without relapse. The study is based on a sample of 30 patients treated between 1999 and 2009. Local control, metastatic dissemination, and toxicity are analysed and discussed. A ganglionary extension seems to be the worst prognostic factor. Short communication

  1. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  2. Lung Cancer in Homeless People: Clinical Outcomes and Cost Analysis in a Single Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koung Jin Suh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To characterize the demographic and clinical features, outcomes, and treatment costs of lung cancer in homeless people. Methods. Medical records of 22 homeless patients with lung cancer at Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea, were retrospectively analyzed. Results. All patients were men (median age, 62 years. Most patients (78% had advanced disease (stage IIIB, n=2; stage IV, n=15. Seven died during initial hospitalization (median survival, 1.5 months. Six were lost to follow-up after initial outpatient visits or discharges from initial admission (median follow-up, 13 days. Only 4 received appropriate treatment for their disease and survived for 1, 15, 19, and 28 months, respectively. Conversely, 4 of 5 patients with early stage disease (stage I, n=4; stage IIA, n=1 received curative surgery (median follow-up 25.5 months. The median treatment cost based on 29 days of hospitalization and 2 outpatient visits was $12,513, constituting 47.3% of the 2013 per capita income. Inpatient treatment accounted for 90% of the total costs. The National Health Insurance Service paid 82% of the costs. Conclusion. Among the homeless, lung cancer seems to be associated with poor prognosis and substantial costs during a relatively short follow-up and survival period.

  3. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  4. The National Institutes of Health Affordable Cancer Technologies Program: Improving Access to Resource-Appropriate Technologies for Cancer Detection, Diagnosis, Monitoring, and Treatment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divi, Rao; Gwede, Michael; Tandon, Pushpa; Sorg, Brian S.; Ossandon, Miguel R.; Agrawal, Lokesh; Pai, Vinay; Baker, Houston; Lash, Tiffani Bailey

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) technologies have proved valuable in cancer detection, diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment in the developed world, and have shown promise in low-and-middle-income countries (LMIC) as well. Despite this promise, the unique design constraints presented in low-resource settings, coupled with the variety of country-specific regulatory and institutional dynamics, have made it difficult for investigators to translate successful POC cancer interventions to the LMIC markets. In response to this need, the National Cancer Institute has partnered with the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering to create the National Institutes of Health Affordable Cancer Technologies (ACTs) program. This program seeks to simplify the pathway to market by funding multidisciplinary investigative teams to adapt and validate the existing technologies for cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment in LMIC settings. The various projects under ACTs range from microfluidic cancer diagnostic tools to novel treatment devices, each geared for successful clinical adaptation to LMIC settings. Via progression through this program, each POC innovation will be uniquely leveraged for successful clinical translation to LMICs in a way not before seen in this arena. PMID:27730015

  5. An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 93 Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer: Treatment Outcomes, Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Antoni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prognostic factors and indexes of a series of 93 patients with breast cancer and brain metastases (BM in a single institution. Treatment outcomes were evaluated according to the major prognostic indexes (RPA, BSBM, GPA scores and breast cancer subtypes. Independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS were identified. The median OS values according to GPA 0–1, 1.5–2, 2.5–3 and 3.5–4, were 4.5, 9.5, 14.2 and 19.1 months, respectively (p < 0.0001 and according to genetic subtypes, they were 5, 14.2, 16.5 and 17.1 months for basal-like, luminal A and B and HER, respectively (p = 0.04. Using multivariate analysis, we established a new grading system using the six factors that were identified as indicators of longer survival: age under 60 (p = 0.001, high KPS (p = 0.007, primary tumor control (p = 0.05, low number of extracranial metastases and BM (p = 0.01 and 0.0002, respectively and triple negative subtype (p = 0.002. Three groups with significantly different median survival times were identified: 4.1, 9.5 and 26.3 months, respectively (p < 0.0001. Our new grading system shows that prognostic indexes could be improved by using more levels of classification and confirms the strength of biological prognostic factors.

  6. Skin Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction (SSMIR for early breast cancer: Eight years single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin Jean

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin Sparing Mastectomy (SSM and immediate breast reconstruction has become increasingly popular as an effective treatment for patients with breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of skin sparing mastectomy in early breast cancer at a single population-based institution. Methods Records of ninety-five consecutive patients with operable breast cancer who had skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstructions between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed. Patient and tumor characteristic, type of reconstruction, postoperative complications, aesthetic results and incidence of recurrence were analyzed. Results Mean age of the patients was 51.6(range 33–72 years. The AJCC pathologic stages were 0 (n = 51, 53.7%, I (n = 20, 21.1%, and II (n = 2, 2.1%. Twenty of the patients had recurrent disease (21.1%. The immediate breast reconstructions were performed with autologus tissue including latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in 63 (66.3% patients and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap in 4 (4.2% patients. Implants were used in 28 (29.4% patients. The average hospital stay was 7.7 days. Flap complication occurred in seven (10.4% patients resulting in four (6% re-operations and there were no delay in accomplishing postoperative adjuvant therapy. At a median follow-up of 69 months (range 48 to 144, local recurrence was seen in one patient (1.1% and systemic recurrence was seen in two patients (2.1%. Conclusion Skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for early breast cancer is associated with low morbidity and low rate of local recurrence.

  7. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients. PMID:23118755

  8. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  9. Measurement and forecasting of tides of Mumbai High. Sponsored by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Joseph, A.; Sundar, D.; Mehra, P.; VijayKumar, K.; Michael, G.S.

    NIO/SP-24/2007 Measurement and Forecasting of Tides at Mumbai High Sponsored by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd. June, 2007 DocumentsPDFComplete Click Here & Upgrade Expanded Features Unlimited Pages 1 Contents Project Team..., Institute for Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management (IPSHEM) of the ONGC approached NIO to undertake a study on tides in the Mumbai High. IPSHEM suggested that NIO make a forecast of tides for a period of one year on a trial basis. Earlier, NIO had...

  10. La gigantomastie gravidique à l'Institut du Cancer de Dakar: à propos de 2 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Sidy; Thiam, Jaafar; Mane, Maimouna; Some, Rolland; Niang, Rokhaya; Goudiaby, Céline; Dem, Ahmadou

    2015-01-01

    La gigantomastie gravidique est une augmentation exagérée et invalidante de la taille des seins survenant pendant la grossesse chez une patiente aux seins préalablement normaux. Sa physiopathologie est mal cernée. Elle pose localement des problèmes trophiques et rend difficile la grossesse. Le traitement est médical anti hormonal et chirurgical sur la base d'une réduction mammaire. Il est difficile et peut compromettre l'avenir esthétique et fonctionnel de la glande mammaire. Nous rapportons 2 cas de gigantomasties gravidiques suivies et traitées à l'Institut Joliot Curie de Dakar. PMID:26977223

  11. Outcomes of locally advanced prostate cancer: a single institution study of 209 patients in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihiro Saito; Yasuo Kitamura; Shuichi Komatsubara; Yasuo Matsumoto; Tadashi Sugita; Noboru Hara

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the outcomes for Asian populations with locally advanced/clinical stage Ⅲ prostate cancer (Pca)treated with currently prevailing modalities. Methods: We reviewed the record of 209 patients with clinical stage Ⅲ Pca, who were treated at Niigata Cancer Center Hospital between 1992 and 2003. Treatment options included hormone therapy-combined radical prostatectomy (RP+HT), hormone therapy-combined external beam irradiation (EBRT+HT) and primary hormone therapy (PHT). Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 80.3%and 46.1% in all cohorts, respectively. The survival rates were 87.3% and 66.5% in the RP+HT group, 94.9% and 70.0% in the EBRT+HT group and 66.1% and 17.2% in the PHT group, respectively. A significant survival advantage was found in the EBRT+HT group compared with that in the PHT group (P < 0.0001). Also, the RP+HT group had better survival than the PHT group (P = 0.0107). The 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for all cases were 92.5% and 80.0%, respectively. They were 93.8% and 71.4% in the RP+HT group, 96.6% and 93.6% in the EBRT+HT group and 88.6% and 62.3% in the PHT group, respectively. A survival advantage was found in the EBRT+HT group compared with the PHT group (P = 0.029). No significant difference was found in disease-specific survival between the EBRT+HT and RP+HT groups or between the RP+HT and PHT groups. Conclusion: Although our findings indicate that radiotherapy plus HT has a survival advantage in this stage of Pca, we recommend therapies that take into account the patients' social and medical conditions for Asian men with clinical stage Ⅲ PCa.

  12. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Consuelo Rubio-Poo21Universidad Autónoma Metropolitano–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Departments: Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS; 2Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies-Zaragoza (FES-ZaragozaAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94 were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS.Keywords: breast cancer, Mexican women, direct and indirect costs

  13. Security and privacy requirements for a multi-institutional cancer research data grid: an interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weems William A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data protection is important for all information systems that deal with human-subjects data. Grid-based systems – such as the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG – seek to develop new mechanisms to facilitate real-time federation of cancer-relevant data sources, including sources protected under a variety of regulatory laws, such as HIPAA and 21CFR11. These systems embody new models for data sharing, and hence pose new challenges to the regulatory community, and to those who would develop or adopt them. These challenges must be understood by both systems developers and system adopters. In this paper, we describe our work collecting policy statements, expectations, and requirements from regulatory decision makers at academic cancer centers in the United States. We use these statements to examine fundamental assumptions regarding data sharing using data federations and grid computing. Methods An interview-based study of key stakeholders from a sample of US cancer centers. Interviews were structured, and used an instrument that was developed for the purpose of this study. The instrument included a set of problem scenarios – difficult policy situations that were derived during a full-day discussion of potentially problematic issues by a set of project participants with diverse expertise. Each problem scenario included a set of open-ended questions that were designed to elucidate stakeholder opinions and concerns. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. For quantitative analysis, data was aggregated at the individual or institutional unit of analysis, depending on the specific interview question. Results Thirty-one (31 individuals at six cancer centers were contacted to participate. Twenty-four out of thirty-one (24/31 individuals responded to our request- yielding a total response rate of 77%. Respondents included IRB directors and policy-makers, privacy and

  14. Pazopanib in metastatic renal cancer: a “real-world” experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

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    Sabrina Chiara Cecere

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a real-world study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS and the overall survival (OS were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included Objective Response Rate (ORR, Disease Control Rate (DCR, and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.5 months. The median OS (mOS was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6-39.9 months; the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3% and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (3, gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR=0.05 [95% CI, 0.05-055], p=0.01; HR=0.10 [95% CI, 0.02-0.43], p=0.002 respectively. A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p= 0.2 and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites 6 (p= 0.08. Worst OS was observed in patients age >70 years old (HR=6.91 [95% CI, 1.49-31.91], p=0.01. The treatment was well tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR=0.22 [95% CI, 0.05-0.8], p=0.03 and thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR=0.12 [95% CI, 0.02-0.78], p=0.02. Our results are consistent with those reported in prospective phase III trials and the published retrospective

  15. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers.

  16. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  17. CYP17 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer from the national Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Stram, Daniel O.; Albanes, Demetrius; Altshuler, David; Berglund, Gran; Buring, Julie; Calle, Eugenia E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Cox, David G.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hirschhorn, Joel; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Linseisen, Jakob; Lund, Eiliv; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Riboli, Elio; Stampfer, Meir J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    CYP17 encodes cytochrome p450c17 alpha, which mediates activities essential for the production of sex steroids. Common germ line variation in the CYP17 gene has been related to inconsistent results in breast and prostate cancer, with most studies focusing on the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polym

  18. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rico, Jacobo Alejandro; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Cárdenas-Elizalde, Rosario; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94) were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM) surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS) were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS. PMID:22312199

  19. Lifestyle and cancer prevention in female employees at a health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Eugenia Canaval

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the relationship between lifestyle for prevention of cervix and breast cancer and perceptual cognitive factors from the Pender model in working women. Materials and methods: Correlation and cross-sectional study with a random sample of 143 working women. The Lifestyle index is the total score of 5 variables: Papanicolau test, breast self-exam, physical activity, body mass index, and cigarette smoking. Results: The mean age for the sample was 44.4 + 6.2; 87% of the women had higher education and 85% were working in health care services. A total of 89% of the women had unhealthy lifestyles because of the lack of regular physical activity, not having a Papanicolau test according to the norm, not practicing breast self-exams, and having an altered body mass index. There was significant correlation between lifestyle and occupation, and also with self-efficacy perception for breast self-examination. Conclusion: The lifestyles for most of the women sampled were unhealthy. Recommendations: It is also recommend conducting culturally sensitive healthcare campaigns in addition to setting up flexible attention schedules for women.

  20. Lifestyle and cancer prevention in female employees at a health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Eugenia Canaval

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the relationship between lifestyle for prevention of cervix and breast cancer and perceptual cognitive factors from the Pender model in working women.Materials and methods: Correlation and cross-sectional study with a random sample of 143 working women. The Lifestyle index is the total score of 5 variables: Papanicolau test, breast self-exam, physical activity, body mass index, and cigarette smoking.Results: The mean age for the sample was 44.4 + 6.2; 87% of the women had higher education and 85% were working in health care services. A total of 89% of the women had unhealthy lifestyles because of the lack of regular physical activity, not having a Papanicolau test according to the norm, not practicing breast self-exams, and having an altered body mass index. There was significant correlation between lifestyle and occupation, and also with self-efficacy perception for breast self-examination.Conclusion: The lifestyles for most of the women sampled were unhealthy.Recommendations: It is recommend the reorientation of health services based on health promotion, which permit planning and executing health care, health education and nursing care programs specifically for working women. It is also recommend conducting culturally sensitive.

  1. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: A Single Institution Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Nace

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We sought to evaluate our experience using yttrium-90 (90Y resin microsphere hepatic radioembolization as salvage therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Methods. A retrospective review of consecutive patients with unresectable mCRC who were treated with 90Y after failing first and second line systemic chemotherapy. Demographics, treatment dose, biochemical and radiographic response, toxicities, and survival were examined. Results. Fifty-one patients underwent 90Y treatments of which 69% were male. All patients had previously undergone extensive chemotherapy, 31% had undergone previous liver-directed therapy and 24% had a prior liver resection. Using RECIST criteria, either stable disease or a partial response was seen in 77% of patients. Overall median survival from the time of first 90Y treatment was 10.2 months (95% CI = 7.5–13.0. The absence of extrahepatic disease at the time of treatment with 90Y was associated with an improved survival, median survival of 17.0 months (95% CI = 6.4–27.6, compared to those with extrahepatic disease at the time of treatment with 90Y, 6.7 months (95% CI = 2.7–10.6 Conclusion: 90Y therapy is a safe locoregional therapy that provides an important therapeutic option to patients who have failed first and second line chemotherapy and have adequate liver function and performance status.

  2. Liver transplantation for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma at the Liver Cancer Institute of Fudan University, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jian; HE Yi-feng; YANG Guo-huan; SONG Kang; YUAN Zhou; WANG Yu-qi; TANG Zhao-you; FAN Jia; WU Zhi-quan; QIU Shuang-jian; HUANG Xiao-wu; YU Yao; WANG Zheng; SUN Jian; XIAO Yong-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Background Selection of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) remains controversial. Since there is a trend to expand the transplant criteria for HCC patients, we reviewed the data of patients with HCC who had received OLT at our institute to determine their survival and prognostic factors.Methods A total of 67 patients with HCC who had undergone OLT from April 2001 through December 2003 were reviewed retrospectively. Selection OLT candidates with HCC was dependent on the anatomical characteristics and/or the severity of underlying liver cirrhosis. The 67 patients were followed up for more than 6 months after transplantation. Their survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards regression model were performed to reveal the factors affecting the survival rate.Results No perioperative death occurred in this series. The 1- and 2-year cumulative survival rates were 90.0% and 65.6%, and the disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 77.5% and 62.5% respectively. Univariate analysis revealed the tumor size, portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT), serum alpha-fetoprotein level, bilobular distribution of tumors, pTNM stage and histological differentiation were statistically significant factors affecting the DFS (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed tumor size and PVTT were independent and statistically significant factors affecting the DFS (P=0.005 and 0.010, respectively). In this series, all but 2 received systemic chemotherapy, among them 13 had tumor recurrence within 8 months after OLT.Conclusions OLT is indicated for patients with HCC, even for some patients with end-stage liver disease who may survive longer without tumor recurrence. Adjuvant chemotherapy may decrease the recurrence of HCC after OLT.

  3. Cancer risk among Italian veterans from the Balkans: the activities of the Italian National Institute of Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, cases of cancer have been reported among Italian troops involved in the peace-keeping mission in Bosnia and Kosovo. By the end of 2000, the Italian Minister of Defence appointed a Committee of Enquiry to gain a scientifically sound, reliable picture of the health consequences of the exposure of military personnel to Depleted Uranium (DU) and to assess the possible etiologic role DU may have played in the occurrence of specific pathologies. The Committee found a statistically significant excess of Hodgkin's lymphomas, but up to now the lack of thorough knowledge about internal uranium exposure and its potential effects has prevented us from determining whether lymphatic cancers are correlated with DU exposure. The Committee of Enquiry issued several recommendations, in particular: 1) to follow up the cohort of military personnel deployed in Bosnia and Kosovo and monitor the incidence of tumours and the evolution of the ensuing epidemiological scenario, and 2) to list the individuals that could have been exposed to DU for different reasons and enrol them in a long-term programme of medical surveillance. A decision was also made to quantify levels of U and other potentially toxic elements - as well as to measure the isotopic ratio 235U/238U for the assessment of DU - in biological samples of soldiers deployed in war theatres where presumably DU weapons were used, together with tentative indexes of contact with possible genotoxic factors. In this paper a general description is given of the activities carried out by the Italian National Institute of Health (ISS, in the Italian acronym) in compliance with both the recommendations of the Committee of Enquiry and the decision to quantify potential exposures. (author)

  4. Multi-institutional analysis of bioimpedance spectroscopy in the early detection of breast cancer related lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicini FA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy’s (BIS ability to detect and monitor extracellular fluid accumulation of the upper limb as it relates to the extent of loco-regional therapy. Methods: A total of 125 patients with breast cancer from 4 clinical practices were evaluated with BIS at baseline and following loco-regional procedures. In order to assess the ability of BIS to detect subclinical changes by treatment modality, the change in L-Dex score from baseline to measurements taken within 180 days following surgery were calculated. Results: Mean age was 55 years with 68 patients (54.4% undergoing sentinel lymph node (SLN sampling while 57 (45.6% underwent an axillary dissection (ALND. Sixty-five patients (52% underwent radiation therapy (RT. Patients receiving RT had a significantly increased change in L-Dex score (0.8 v.-2.5, p=0.03 compared with those patients not receiving RT. For all patients, ALND was associated with a significantly increased change in L-Dex score (5.0 v. 0.3, p=0.003 compared with SLN. When stratifying by the number of nodes removed, a statistically significant increase in the change in L-Dex score was noted (0.4 v. 0.4 v. 4.3 v. 6.4, p=0.04 for 0-3, 4-6, 7-10 and greater than 10 lymph nodes removed. Conclusions: In this limited analysis, L-Dex scores paralleled the extent of axillary sampling and the addition of radiation therapy; these results demonstrate that BIS can be used to monitor patients for the early onset of edema as differences emerged within 180 days of surgery.

  5. Monitoring of people and workers exposure to the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in an Italian national cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomba Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields (emf measurements carried out in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute (NCI. Several devices, used in diagnostics and in medical cures, can represent sources of emf for the workers and for the public subjected to the treatments. The aim is to evaluate their exposition, in order to assess the compliance with the law. Methods The investigations have been carried out in the departments of: intensive care, physiotherapy, MR presstherapy and in the surgical rooms. The measurements have been performed using broad band probes in the frequency ranges 5 Hz÷30 kHz and 100 kHz-3 GHz. Results The variability of the magnetic induction (B(μT levels is between 0,05 μT and 80 μT. The statistical distribution shows that most of the measurements are in the range 0,05 Conclusion The measurement of the emf levels in the NCI is recommended because of the presence of the oncological patients; their long stay near the equipments and their day-long exposure represent additional risk factors for which a prudent avoidance strategy have to de adopted.

  6. ONE STEP NUCLEIC ACID AMPLIFICATION IN BREAST CANCER SENTINEL LYMPH NODE.A SINGLE INSTITUTIONAL EXPERIENCE AND A SHORT REVIEW.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana eBrambilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sentinel lymph node (SLN examination is a standard in breast cancer patients, with several methods employed along its 20-years history, the last one represented by OSNA. The latter is a intra-operative molecular assay searching for CK19 mRNA as a surrogate of metastatic cells. Our 3-years experience with OSNA (1122 patients showed results overlapping those recorded in the same Institution with a morphological evaluation (930 patients of SLN. In detail the data of OSNA were almost identical to those observed with standard post-operative procedure in terms of patients with positive SLN (30% and micrometastatic/macrometastatic involvement of SLN (respectively 38-45% and 62-55%. By contrast when OSNA was compared to the standard intra-operatory procedure it was superior in terms of accuracy, prompting the use of this molecular assay as a very valid and reproducible for intra-operative evaluation of SLN.Further possibilities prompting the use of OSNA range from adhesion to quality control programs, saving of medical time, ability to predict, during surgery, additional nodal metatastis and molecular bio-banking.

  7. Comparison of the epidemiologic features and patterns of initial care for prostate cancer between public and private institutions: a survey by the Brazilian Society of Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguinaldo Cesar Nardi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological features and patterns of initial care for prostate cancer at public and private institutions in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,082 physicians affiliated to the Sao Paulo Section of the Brazilian Society of Urology were invited to participate in this cross-sectional, web-based survey. Between September 2004 and September 2005, participating urologists entered data on demographic, clinical and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer in their practice. Data on patients attended at public institutions were analyzed and compared with those patients attended at private practice. RESULTS: One hundred and ten society members contributed with data from 1915 patients, 1026 (53.6% of whom from public institutions. When compared with patients attended at private institutions, those attended at public institutions were older and more likely to be black, had higher serum prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, had a higher probability of being diagnosed with metastatic disease, but were less likely to undergo prostatectomy (all P < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, age, biopsy Gleason score, and being attended at a public institution were independently associated with metastatic disease upon diagnosis. The significant predictors of nonsurgical treatment were age, black race, and higher serum levels of PSA. CONCLUSIONS: A statewide registry provides valuable information regarding patient demographics, clinical features, and patterns of care. The results of this study suggest that significant disparities exist for patients with prostate cancer attended at different health-care systems. The relative contribution of biological versus socioeconomic features remains uncertain.

  8. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J.; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G.; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cancer research has been conducted among younger adults, with limited evidence to guide the care of nutritional issues among older adults with cancer. Cancer diagnoses among older adults are increasing, and the care of the older adult with cancer is complicated due to multimorbidity, heterogeneous functional status, polypharmacy, deficits in cognitive and mental health, and several other non-cancer factors. Due to this complexity, nutritional needs are dynamic, multifaceted, and dependent on the clinical scenario. This manuscript outlines the proceedings of this conference including knowledge gaps and recommendations for future nutritional research among older adults with cancer. Three common clinical scenarios encountered by oncologists include (1) weight loss during anti-cancer therapy, (2) malnutrition during advanced disease, and (3) obesity during survivorship. In this manuscript, we provide a brief overview of relevant cancer literature within these three areas, knowledge gaps that exist, and recommendations for future research. PMID:27197919

  9. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D; Wildes, Tanya M; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cancer research has been conducted among younger adults, with limited evidence to guide the care of nutritional issues among older adults with cancer. Cancer diagnoses among older adults are increasing, and the care of the older adult with cancer is complicated due to multimorbidity, heterogeneous functional status, polypharmacy, deficits in cognitive and mental health, and several other non-cancer factors. Due to this complexity, nutritional needs are dynamic, multifaceted, and dependent on the clinical scenario. This manuscript outlines the proceedings of this conference including knowledge gaps and recommendations for future nutritional research among older adults with cancer. Three common clinical scenarios encountered by oncologists include (1) weight loss during anti-cancer therapy, (2) malnutrition during advanced disease, and (3) obesity during survivorship. In this manuscript, we provide a brief overview of relevant cancer literature within these three areas, knowledge gaps that exist, and recommendations for future research. PMID:27197919

  10. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D; Wildes, Tanya M; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cancer research has been conducted among younger adults, with limited evidence to guide the care of nutritional issues among older adults with cancer. Cancer diagnoses among older adults are increasing, and the care of the older adult with cancer is complicated due to multimorbidity, heterogeneous functional status, polypharmacy, deficits in cognitive and mental health, and several other non-cancer factors. Due to this complexity, nutritional needs are dynamic, multifaceted, and dependent on the clinical scenario. This manuscript outlines the proceedings of this conference including knowledge gaps and recommendations for future nutritional research among older adults with cancer. Three common clinical scenarios encountered by oncologists include (1) weight loss during anti-cancer therapy, (2) malnutrition during advanced disease, and (3) obesity during survivorship. In this manuscript, we provide a brief overview of relevant cancer literature within these three areas, knowledge gaps that exist, and recommendations for future research.

  11. 7 CFR 225.9 - Program assistance to sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... changes in the series for food away from home of the Consumer Price Index(CPI) for all urban consumers... sponsors information on available commodities. Sponsors shall use in the Program food donated by the... Program, and operate more than one child nutrition program under a single State agency, must use a...

  12. A single-institution experience with bevacizumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and in conjunction with liver resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osterlund P

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pia Osterlund,1,2 Reetta Peltonen,2,3 Tuomo Alanko,1 Petri Bono,1,2 Helena Isoniemi2,3 1Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, 3Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland Background: Bevacizumab is active in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. However, efficacy of bevacizumab has predominantly been evaluated on selected patients with relatively good performance status and minor comorbidities. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in unselected patients with mCRC, some of whom underwent liver resection. Material and methods: All patients with inoperable mCRC, fit for combination chemotherapy (n=180, who were initially not resectable, not included into studies and without contraindications to bevacizumab, and initiated on bevacizumab at the Helsinki University Central Hospital between April 2004 and December 2005 were included (n=114. Most (n=70 received 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin/irinotecan plus bevacizumab as first-line therapy. The remainder (n=44 of the patients received bevacizumab in combination with oxaliplatin or irinotecan with or without 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Minimum follow-up was 7 years. Treatment response was evaluated every 8–10 weeks according to RECIST criteria. Results: Median age was 59.6 years (range 35–79; male/female ratio was 54%/46%; World Health Organization performance status 0/1/2–3 was 33%/55%/11%, respectively; and the number of metastatic sites, one/two/three or more, was 31%/21%/48%, respectively. Median duration of bevacizumab therapy was 7.8 months (range 0.5–70.5 with pauses. In first-line (n=40, response rate (RR was 62%, progression-free survival (PFS 11.7 months, and overall survival (OS 22.1 months. In second-line (n=43, RR was 44%, PFS 8.7 months, and OS 18.7 months. In later lines (n=31, RR was 14%, PFS 6.7 months, and OS 14

  13. The single institutional outcome of postoperative radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Chun; Kim, Yeon Si; Oh, Se Jin; Lee, Yun Hee; Lee, Dong Soo; Song, Jin Ho; Kang, Jin Hyung; Park, Jae Ki [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study was conducted to observe the outcomes of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in single institution. From 2002 to 2013, 78 patients diagnosed with NSCLC after curative resection were treated with radiotherapy alone (RT, n = 48) or concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT, n = 30). The indications of adjuvant radiation therapy were N2 node positive (n = 31), close or involved resection margin (n = 28), or gross residual disease due to incomplete resection (n = 19). The median radiation dose was 57.6 Gy (range, 29.9 to 66 Gy). Median survival time was 33.7 months (range, 4.4 to 140.3 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 49.5% (RT 46% vs. CCRT 55.2%; p = 0.731). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 45.5% (RT 39.4% vs. CCRT 55.3%; p = 0.130). The 3-year local control rate was 68.1% (RT 64.4% vs. CCRT 77.7%; p = 0.165). The 3-year DMFS rate was 56.1% (RT 52.6% vs. CCRT 61.7%; p = 0.314). In multivariate analysis, age > or =66 years and pathologic stage III were significant poor prognostic factors for OS. Treatment failure occurred in 40 patients. Four patients had radiologically confirmed grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. In NSCLC, adjuvant RT or CCRT after curative surgery is a safe and feasible modality of treatment. OS gain was seen in patients less than 66 years. Postoperative CCRT showed a propensity of achieving better local control and improved disease-free survival compared to RT alone according to our data.

  14. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate

  15. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  16. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  17. Evaluation of gemtuzumab ozogamycin associated sinusoidal obstructive syndrome: Findings from an academic pharmacovigilance program review and a pharmaceutical sponsored registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwood-Golston, Jametta S.; Kessler, Samuel; Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved gemtuzumab ozogamycin for monotherapy for older patients with relapsed AML. A 0.9% rate of hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) was noted in licensing trials. In 2001, FDA received reports of 14 GO-associated SOS cases from MD Anderson Cancer Center. A State of South Carolina/National Cancer Institute funded pharmacovigilance program and a manufacturer sponsored registry independently evaluated this concern. Methods The manufacturer’s registry and the academic program focused on risk factors and incidence of GO-associated SOS in routine clinical practice and clinical trial settings, respectively. Comparisons were made of findings and dissemination efforts from the two studies. Results Retrospective analysis of clinical trials by the academic initiative identified 99 cases of SOS among 221 GO-treated stem cell patients and 649 patients who did not undergo HSCTs. SOS rates were 3% when GO was administered at doses ≤6 mg/m2 as monotherapy or with non-hepatotoxic agents; 28% when administered with 6-thioguanine, a hepatotoxic agent; 15% when administered as monotherapy at doses at a dose of 9 mg/m2, and between 15% and 40% if a stem cell transplant (SCT) was performed within 3 months of GO administration. Death from SOS occurred in 33% of the cases. The manufacturer’s registry prospectively evaluated 482 GO-treated patients who received a mean dose of 7.8 mg/m2. Overall, 41% received concomitant chemotherapy, 18% had undergone prior SCT, 9.1% developed SOS, and death from SOS occurred in 60% of the SOS cases. Findings from each initiative were disseminated at national conferences and in peer-reviewed manuscripts beginning in 2003. Conclusion Retrospective review of clinical trials, case series, and FDA reports and prospective registries can provide important information on safety signals initially identified in licensing trials. PMID:27030962

  18. National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Disparities Visit CRCHD Site Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology Visit CBIIT Site Center for ... Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department ...

  19. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Foundation Medicine, Inc. (FMI), a molecular information company. Newly launched Genomic Data Commons to facilitate data ... of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp ...

  20. Identifying and recruiting sponsors for Uganda Olympic Committee

    OpenAIRE

    Nuwagaba, Godfrey; Delpy, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Sponsorship is one of the biggest challenge facing Olympic sports in Uganda. Many sports disciplines have not been able to identify, recruit, and sustain sponsors.. This has hampered team preparations, training, provision of kits, and consequently poor performance of individuals and teams at all levels. To avert this situation, Uganda Olympic Committee (UOC) needs to identify and recruit capable sponsors in order to allow long term planning and execution of strategic plans. This research stud...

  1. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) seeks to improve the lives of cancer patients by finding better treatments, control mechanisms, and cures for cancer. CTEP funds a national program of cancer research, sponsoring clinical trials to evaluate new anti-cancer agents.

  2. DOE-EPSCOR SPONSORED PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jianting

    2010-03-11

    geostatistical characterization of hydraulic parameter heterogeneity. The project also examined the validity of the some simple average schemes for unsaturated hydraulic properties widely used in previous studies. A new suite of pedo-transfer functions were developed to improve the predictability of hydraulic parameters. We also explored the concept of tension-dependent hydraulic conductivity anisotropy of unsaturated layered soils. This project strengthens collaboration between researchers at the Desert Research Institute in the EPSCoR State of Nevada and their colleagues at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of numerical simulations of a field injection experiment at Hanford site in this project could be used to provide insights to the DOE mission of appropriate contamination characterization and environmental remediation.

  3. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer: An International Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, Ng Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer.An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate.The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively.Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer.

  4. External Link Policy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following graphic notice means that you are leaving the DCP Web site: (link is external)This external link provides additional information that is consistent with the intended purpose of DCP.The National Cancer Institute (NCI) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal site.Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by HHS or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site.You will be subject to the destination site |

  5. Evaluating bioactive food components in obesity and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kristi M; Allison, David

    2015-01-01

    Research into bioactive food compounds (BFC) continues to evolve albeit with shared challenges among scientists in the fields of obesity and cancer treatment and prevention. Given the diversity of scientific disciplines involved in evaluating BFC, multidisciplinary conferences provide opportunities to update the state of the science and critically discuss conceptual and methodological challenges encountered in studying BFC in both preclinical and clinical trials. This overview is an introduction to presentations given at a conference sponsored by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, which convened a multidisciplinary group of researchers evaluating BFC in obesity and cancer prevention. Full presentations can be viewed in video format at http://www.norc.uab.edu/courses/conferences/conference2013.

  6. Concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) guidelines for cancer prevention and obesity-related cancer risk in the Framingham Offspring cohort (1991–2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Nour; Lin, Yong; Bandera, Elisa V.; Jacques, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This prospective cohort study evaluates associations between healthful behaviors consistent with WCRF/AICR cancer prevention guidelines and obesity-related cancer risk, as a third of cancers are estimated to be preventable. Methods The study sample consisted of adults from the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 2,983). From 1991 to 2008, 480 incident doctor-diagnosed obesity-related cancers were identified. Data on diet, measured by a food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity, collected in 1991 was used to construct a 7-component score based on recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, foods that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcohol, and food preservation, processing, and preparation. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate associations between the computed score, its components, and subcomponents in relation to obesity-related cancer risk. Results The overall score was not associated with obesity-related cancer risk after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, energy, and preexisting conditions (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.86–1.02). When score components were evaluated separately, for every unit increment in the alcohol score, there was 29 % lower risk of obesity-related cancers (HR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.51–0.99) and 49–71 % reduced risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Every unit increment in the subcomponent score for non-starchy plant foods (fruits, vegetables, and legumes) among participants who consume starchy vegetables was associated with 66 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR 0.44, 95 % CI 0.22–0.88). Conclusions Lower alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet consistent with the cancer prevention guidelines were associated with reduced risk of obesity-related cancers in this population. PMID:25559553

  7. Cancer-specific survival after radical nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma: proposal and multi-institutional validation of a post-operative nomogram

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, D R; Hupertan, V.; Colin, P.; Ouzzane, A; Descazeaud, A; Long, J. A.; Pignot, G; Crouzet, S; Rozet, F; Neuzillet, Y; Soulie, M.; Bodin, T; Valeri, A.; Cussenot, O; Rouprêt, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Owing to the scarcity of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUT-UC) it is often necessary for investigators to pool data. A patient-specific survival nomogram based on such data is needed to predict cancer-specific survival (CSS) post nephroureterectomy (NU). Herein, we propose and validate a nomogram to predict CSS post NU. Patients and methods: Twenty-one French institutions contributed data on 1120 patients treated with NU for UUT-UC. A total of 667 had full data for nom...

  8. Cancer of Unknown Primary Site:A Review of 28 Cases and the Efficacy of Cisplatin/Docetaxel Therapy at a Single Institute in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimori, Hisakazu; TAKAHASHI, SHUNJI; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ennishi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Sano,Koji; SHINOZAKI, EIJI; Yokoyama, Masahiro; Mishima, Yuko; Terui, Yasuhito; Chin,Keisho; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin/docetaxel (CDDP/TXT) chemotherapy and identified prognostic factors in Japanese patients with cancer of unknown primary site (CUP). Twenty-eight consecutive patients seen at a single institute were reviewed retrospectively. Sixteen patients were treated with TXT 80mg/m2, followed by CDDP 75mg/m2. The overall response rate to CDDP/TXT treatment was 62.5%, with a median survival time (MST) of 22.7 months. Common adverse reactions were myelosup...

  9. Two-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy within a single day combined with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: single institution experience and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Junyang; Kaidu, Motoki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Ayukawa, Fumio; Yamana, Nobuko; Sato, Hiraku; Tanaka, Kensuke; Kawaguchi, Gen; Ohta, Atsushi; Maruyama, Katsuya; Abe, Eisuke; Kasahara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the outcomes of treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) followed by two-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy within a single day (2-fr.-HDR-BT/day) at a single institution. A total of 156 consecutive Asian males (median age, 67 years) were enrolled. To compare our findings with those of other studies, we analyzed our results using the D'Amico classification, assigning the patients to low- ( n =5; 3.2%), ...

  10. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Jaimes-Reyes, Ethel Zulie; Arellano-Galindo, José; García-Jiménez, Xochiketzalli; Tiznado-García, Héctor Manuel; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortíz-Torres, María Guadalupe; Ortíz-Fernández, Antonio; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count 100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population. PMID:25922837

  11. Comparative Ananlysis of the Status Quo of the Function of Community Health Service Institutions Held by Different Sponsors%不同举办主体社区卫生服务机构功能实现情况比较分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许宗余; 甄雪燕; 姚岚

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare and analyze the implementation in service functions by various ownerships of community health service facilities in order to provide reference for the related policies. Methods: Six cities, including Nanjing in Jiangsu Province,Hangzhou in Zhejiang Province, Hefei in Anhui Province, Wuhan in Hubei Province, Xi'an in Shaanxi Province and Chengdu in Sichuan Province, were selected from 36 cities, who are nationally contacted in the surveillance data of construction of community health service system. Results: Overall the hospital owned community health facilities especially stations functioned worse than other types of facilities in primary public health services, and the private ones, as well as non-profit institutes owned ones, performed worse in offering programmed immunization service. Conclusions: Based on policy introduction and supervision, we should encourage the individuals or non-profit organizations to participate in community health service, in order to ensure public hospital owned facilities playing functions to public health.%目的:通过比较不同举办主体社区卫生服务机构功能实现情况,分析其在服务项目开展率、服务的数量和质量等方面的差异.方法:从36个全国社区卫生服务体系建设重点联系城市中抽取江苏省南京市、浙江省杭州市;安徽省合肥市、湖北省武汉市;陕西省西安市、四川省成都市等6市2009年常规监测数据进行分析.结果:公立医院举办的社区卫生服务站的公共卫生服务开展率和服务量方面均差于非政府举办的机构,民营社区卫生服务站在开展计划免疫服务以及提供规划内计划免疫服务方面要差于其他举办主体.结论:在加强政策引导和监管的基础上,应采取更积极的政策措施鼓励社会力量参与社区卫生服务.促进公立医院举办的社区卫生服务机构落实公共卫生功能.

  12. Proposal to establish a Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    In the present proposal, the publishers' subscription income from multiple institutions is replaced by an "author-side" funding. Journals are paid through contracts between publishers and a single financial partner, the "Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics" (SCOAP3). SCOAP3 is envisioned as a global network of funding agencies, research laboratories, and libraries that will contribute the necessary funding; each SCOAP3 partner will recover its contribution from the cancellation of journal subscriptions. This model avoids the obvious disadvantage of authors being directly charged for the OA publication of their articles, which is perceived as an even higher barrier than subscription charges, in particular for theoretical physicists from small institutions who account for the vast majority of HEP papers. The financing and governance of SCOAP3 will follow as much as possible the example of the memoranda of understanding governing large research collaborations. Its partners will c...

  13. Modelling Emotional and Attitudinal Evaluations of Major Sponsors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martensen, Anne; Hansen, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    equation model where the drivers are attitudes towards thesponsorship and emotions towards the sponsorship. It is found that the two classes ofvariables describe different aspects of the perception of sponsorships, and that they bothcontribute significantly to the overall value of sponsoring...... for a particular company. In thepresent paper, two cases are shown for two major sponsors. The specified Sponsor ValueModel is estimated by a partial least squares (PLS) method. It is found that the two sponsorsare perceived differently, both in terms of emotional and attitudinal responses. It is also foundthat...... the emotional responses aroused by the sponsorships are at least as important as thoseascribable to attitudinal elements.Key words: Sponsorship, emotional response, attitudes towards sponsorship, structuralequation model...

  14. Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequence of the so-called ''Heart-Valve-Affair'' in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced. (orig.)

  15. [Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, A H; Theilmann, M; Bolenz, M; Günther, R W

    2005-08-01

    As a consequence of the so-called "Heart-Valve-Affair" in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced. PMID:16021538

  16. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge generated by site representatives through their participation in clinical trials is valuable for testing new products in use and obtaining final market approval. The leverage of this important knowledge is however challenged as the former direct relationships between in-house staff...... in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract...... research exists on the full range of clinical practice insights obtained by investigators during and after clinical trials and how well these insights are transferred to study sponsors. This study explores the important knowledge-transfer processes between sites and sponsors and to what extent sites...

  17. Sponsor/contract laboratory communication: a team approach to quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, M; Franklin, W; Muncie, J A; Nelson, J; Ross, T; Russo, A S; Schulte, M C; Sottolano, L A; Vincifora, C J; Pappacena, B M

    1993-01-01

    The true measure of any successful quality endeavor is the final product. The final product generated at contract facilities conducting nonclinical studies is the final report. This should be accurate, complete, and consistent with regard to the raw data, and in compliance itself. The final report resulting from studies conducted at contract laboratories should be reflective of the collaborative efforts of sponsor and laboratory staffs. The dual interaction of the respective Quality Assurance Units (QAUs) in ensuring that optimal study performance is maintained from initiation through final report submission is of paramount importance. Key to any productive sponsor/contract laboratory relationship is communication. The multidirectional flow of information inherent in the conduct of nonclinical studies must be managed to maximize the strengths of the principals involved, while at the same time assuring that consistent emphasis is placed on team focus. Although the role of the QAUs representing the contract facilities and the sponsor both ensure the quality of study conduct, and ultimately the final product, their respective approaches may be from different perspectives. The contract QAU's primary focus is the specific study conduct, including appropriate inspections of ongoing critical phases and audits of raw data and reports, along with compliance to site Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), protocols and sponsor requirements. On the other hand, sponsor QAUs focus mainly on overall study conduct, assurance that contract QAUs are operating effectively, and ensuring that sponsor monitors are communicating adequately with contract facility personnel. Open communication between the respective QAUs is the most productive and useful way of ensuring that all quality criteria are met.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8156212

  18. Institute of Plastics Processing and Application of Light Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Institute of Plastics Processing and processing center sponsored by UNDP. University. Application of Light Industry was Since 1999, it has been attached set up in 1983, based on the plastics to Beijing Technology and Business

  19. Impact of tertiary Gleason pattern 5 on prostate cancer aggressiveness: Lessons from a contemporary single institution radical prostatectomy series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Koloff

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results emphasize the importance of TP5 and suggest that criteria for tertiary pattern reporting in prostate cancer should be standardized. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of tertiary patterns in prognostic models.

  20. Preoperative Nomograms for Predicting Extracapsular Extension in Korean Men with Localized Prostate Cancer: A Multi-institutional Clinicopathologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jae Seung; Choi, Han Yong; Song, Hae-Ryoung; Byun, Seok-Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Song, Cheryn; Cho, Jin Seon; Lee, Sang Eun; Ahn, Hanjong; Lee, Eun Sik; Kim, Won-Jae; Chung, Moon Kee; Jung, Tae Young; Yu, Ho Song; Choi, Young Deuk

    2010-01-01

    We developed a nomogram to predict the probability of extracapsular extension (ECE) in localized prostate cancer and to determine when the neurovascular bundle (NVB) may be spared. Total 1,471 Korean men who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer between 1995 and 2008 were included. We drew nonrandom samples of 1,031 for nomogram development, leaving 440 samples for nomogram validation. With multivariate logistic regression analyses, we made a nomogram to predicts the ECE probabi...

  1. Intraoperative radiation therapy delivered prior to lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer: a single institution study

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Wei; Lin, Zhi; Ju, Zhong-Jian; Li, Xi-Ru; ZHANG, YAN-JUN; Kong, Qing-Long; Gong, Han-Shun; Wang, Jian-Dong; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, cosmesis, and clinical outcome of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) delivered prior to lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods: From December 2008 to March 2012, 75 breast cancer patients (ages 34-66 years) were treated with IOERT during breast conservative surgery. IOERT was delivered using a mobile linear accelerator. Suitable energy and applicator size were chosen to ensure coverage of the tumor with anterior and posterior margin...

  2. Consumer Perceptions of Sponsors of Disease Awareness Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Danika V.; Jones, Sandra C.; Iverson, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In many countries there is emerging concern regarding alliances between the pharmaceutical industry and health non-profit organizations (NPOs), and the increase of co-sponsored marketing activities such as disease awareness advertising. The current study aims to explore Australian women's perceptions of disease awareness advertising with…

  3. 48 CFR 35.017-1 - Sponsoring agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.017-1 Sponsoring agreements. (a) In order... mission, and ensure a periodic reevaluation of the FFRDC, a written agreement of sponsorship between the... earnings (reserves) and the development of a plan for their use and disposition. (4) A prohibition...

  4. Risk sharing between competing health plans and sponsors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. van Barneveld (Erik); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn many countries, competing health plans receive capitation payments from a sponsor, whether government or a private employer. All capitation payment methods are far from perfect and have raised concerns about risk selection. Paying health plans partly on the basis of

  5. 7 CFR 225.14 - Requirements for sponsor participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 225.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM Sponsor and Site Provisions... Youth Sports Program; and (5) Private nonprofit organizations as defined in § 225.2. (c)...

  6. THE TAX EXCLUSION FOR EMPLOYER-SPONSORED HEALTH INSURANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Gruber

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the issues raised by and the impacts of the tax exclusion for employer-sponsored health insurance. After reviewing the arguments for and against this policy, I present evidence from a micro-simulation model on the impacts on federal revenue, insurance coverage, and income distribution of various reforms to the exclusion.

  7. 76 FR 48714 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Moxidectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    .... Do not slaughter cattle within 21 days of treatment. Because a withholding time for milk has not been... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 520, 522, and 524 New Animal Drugs; Change of... Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect a change of sponsor...

  8. 75 FR 68972 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor's Name

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 510 New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor's Name AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration... Nutrition Companies, Inc., to Provimi North America, Inc. DATES: This rule is effective November 10,...

  9. 76 FR 2807 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... from Biopure Corp. to OPK Biotech, LLC. DATES: This rule is effective January 18, 2011. FOR FURTHER... Biotech, LLC, 11 and 39 Hurley St., Cambridge, MA 02141. There is no change in drug labeler code... addition, OPK Biotech, LLC, is not currently listed in the animal drug regulations as a sponsor of...

  10. Survival in women with ovarian cancer before and after the introduction of adjuvant paclitaxel; a 25-year, single institution review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shireen, R

    2012-02-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy regime for ovarian cancer patients remains to be a contentious issue. The aim of this study was to compare the overall and progression-free survival of women with ovarian cancer before and after introduction of paclitaxel in our unit in 1992. A sample of 112 women who received adjuvant therapy following surgery for ovarian cancer was collected, 68 (61%) received platinum+alkylating agent before 1992 and later 44 (39%) received platinum+paclitaxel. Five-year survival was same in both treatment groups when there was no macroscopic disease after surgery (78% versus 70%) and when residual disease was <2 cm (50% versus 40%). Survival was greater in women with residual disease >2 cm in the platinum+paclitaxel group (50% versus 24%), (p = 0.04). However, progression-free survival was similar in both groups irrespective of stage or residual volume of disease. Therefore consideration to selective use of paclitaxel could reduce patient morbidity and costs significantly.

  11. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge generated by site representatives through their participation in clinical trials is valuable for testing new products in use and obtaining final market approval. The leverage of this important knowledge is however challenged as the former direct relationships between in-house staff in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract Research Organization) and thereby adding another link in the relationships between site and sponsor. These changes are intended to optimize the time-consuming and costly trial phases; however, there is a need to study whether valuable knowledge and experience is compromised in the process. Limited research exists on the full range of clinical practice insights obtained by investigators during and after clinical trials and how well these insights are transferred to study sponsors. This study explores the important knowledge-transfer processes between sites and sponsors and to what extent sites' knowledge gained in clinical trials is utilized by the industry. Responses from 451 global investigative site representatives are included in the study. The analysis of the extensive dataset reveals that the current processes of collaboration between sites and the industry restrict the leverage of valuable knowledge gained by physicians in the process of clinical trials. These restrictions to knowledge-transfer between site and sponsor are further challenged if CRO partners are integrated in the trial process. PMID:23454567

  12. The role of depression in the development of breast cancer: analysis of registry data from a single institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ali; Jarvandi, Soghra; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Haghighat, Shahpar; Ansari, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    Although controversial, the belief that developing breast cancer may be associated with psychological distress is not uncommon. The present study examined the role of psychological variables in the development of breast cancer in women attending a breast clinic for medical examination in Tehran, Iran. During a three-year period (1997-1999) a trained female nurse interviewed all women attending the Iranian Center for Breast Cancer (ICBC) before a confirmed diagnosis was made (N = 3000). Data were collected on demographic variables (age, education and marital status), known risk factors (age at menarche, age at first time full term pregnancy, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, and oral contraceptive use), psychological variables, including history of psychiatric medications, depression (depressed mood, hopelessness, and loss of interests and pleasures), anxiety (mental and somatic signs) and two single measures of overall health and quality of life. In all, 243 patients were diagnosed as having breast cancer. A total of 486 patients with benign disease were randomly selected from the original cohort as controls. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the predictive effect of each factor on the risk of breast cancer. There were no significant differences between cases and controls except for age at menarche (P = 0.007) and family history of breast cancer (P<0.001). With regard to psychological variables studied, the results showed that there were significant differences between cases and controls regarding depression (depressed mood P<0.0001, hopelessness P = 0.001, and loss of interest and pleasures P = 0.001), and anxiety (mental signs P = 0.006). Finally, after performing multiple logistic regression analysis in addition to family history and age at menarche, depressed mood and hopelessness showed significant results (odds ratios of 1.90, and 1.63 respectively). The findings of the present study suggest

  13. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  14. Hypofractionated Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy with simultaneous Elective Nodal Irradiation is feasible in prostate cancer patients: A single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed W. Hegazy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Hypo-fractionation dose escalation VMAT–SIB–ENI–WPRT using 2 arcs is a feasible technique for intermediate/high risk OC prostate cancer patients, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities, much favorable planning target volume (PTV coverage, and shorter overall treatment time. Prospective randomized controlled trials are encouraged to confirm its equivalence to other fractionation schemes.

  15. Prevalence based epigrammatic study of oral cancer and other mucosal disorders in elderly patients visiting dental institution of Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj T Bhagawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This report provides the descriptive information about the oral health among the elderly population. The objective is to assess the association of age, medical status, recent use of dental services, habits and dentures with that of oral cancer, and other mucosal disorders. Materials and Methods: Data from the interviews and clinical examination of 285 persons aged above 60 years were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups of 75 patients each with age group of 60-65 years, 66-70 years, and 71 years above, respectively. Patients were examined and questioned regarding the oral health complaints and the presence of cancer and other mucosal disorders. Results: There are no statistically significant differentiates between the three groups in terms of oral health complaint, medical status. The patients in all the three groups gave the history of consumption of betel quid/alcohol/smoking. About 22.1% patients in Group A, 18.9% in Group B, and 37.9% in Group C had associated mucosal lesion like oral cancer, growth, pigmentation, red lesion, ulcer, and white lesions. Association between deleterious habits and oral mucosal lesions was seen in 12, 15, and 16 patients in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. Conclusion: The oral cancer and oral mucosal lesions were associated with oral habits and the use of faulty dentures. Age had minimal influence but coexistence of multiple conditions might further complicate the oral health.

  16. Laparoscopic versus Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis of 163 Patients in a Single Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedirli, Abdulkadir; Salman, Bulent; Yuksel, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Background. The present study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of laparoscopic versus open surgery for colorectal cancers. Materials and Methods. The medical records from a total of 163 patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancers were retrospectively analyzed. Patient's demographic data, operative details and postoperative early outcomes, outpatient follow-up, pathologic results, and stages of the cancer were reviewed from the database. Results. The patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery showed significant advantages due to the minimally invasive nature of the surgery compared with those who underwent open surgery, namely, less blood loss, faster postoperative recovery, and shorter postoperative hospital stay (P 0.05). Open surgery resulted in more incisional infections and postoperative ileus compared with laparoscopic surgery (P < 0.05). There were no differences in the pathologic parameters between two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions. These findings indicated that laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer had the clear advantages of a minimally invasive surgery and relative disadvantage with longer surgery time and exhibited similar pathologic parameters compared with open surgery. PMID:25506425

  17. Assessment of treatment tolerance and response of elderly head and neck cancer patients: A single institution retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck (H and N cancers are the leading cancer in elderly Indian population especially in Central India. Poor socioeconomic (SE factors, lack of knowledge, and that of proper facilities is responsible for delayed presentation in advanced stages of the disease. Management of such patients is challenging for an oncologist. Aim: The present study evaluated the pattern of tolerance and response to treatment in elderly (>65 years H and N cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Medical records of elderly H and N cancer patients presenting from January to December 2014 to the Department of Radiotherapy, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal were reviewed, and data were collected from the departmental case files. Results: A total 112 patients were selected for this study. The mean age of presentation was 70 years. There was a marked male preponderance, with male to female ratio of 5.22:1. 102 patients presented in advanced stages (stage III and IV. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.5 months. Records of 99 patients were available and further analyzed. 59 patients were advised three courses of induction chemotherapy (CT out of which 44 patients completed the treatment. 28 of these patients showed a positive response to the treatment while 16 showed no response (NR/progression. Similarly, 24 patients were advised concurrent chemoradiotherapy out of which 17 patients completed the treatment. 13 of these patients showed a positive response while 04 showed NR/progression. On subgroup analysis, the difference between tolerance, response and overall treatment time between the two arms was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Treating elderly H and N cancer patients is a major therapeutic challenge for a clinician because of its poor prognosis, aggressive clinical behavior, associated co-morbidities, and SE factors. However, it is possible to achieve a quality outcome in select patients with basic CT and radiation.

  18. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this ... a combination of drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated ...

  19. Development, implementation and critique of a bioethics framework for pharmaceutical sponsors of human biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Therasse, Donald G; Klopfenstein, Mitchell; Levine, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceutical human biomedical research is a multi-dimensional endeavor that requires collaboration among many parties, including those who sponsor, conduct, participate in, or stand to benefit from the research. Human subjects' protections have been promulgated to ensure that the benefits of such research are accomplished with respect for and minimal risk to individual research participants, and with an overall sense of fairness. Although these protections are foundational to clinical research, most ethics guidance primarily highlights the responsibilities of investigators and ethics review boards. Currently, there is no published resource that comprehensively addresses bioethical responsibilities of industry sponsors; including their responsibilities to parties who are not research participants, but are, nevertheless key stakeholders in the endeavor. To fill this void, in 2010 Eli Lilly and Company instituted a Bioethics Framework for Human Biomedical Research. This paper describes how the framework was developed and implemented and provides a critique based on four years of experience. A companion article provides the actual document used by Eli Lilly and Company to guide ethical decisions regarding all phases of human clinical trials. While many of the concepts presented in this framework are not novel, compiling them in a manner that articulates the ethical responsibilities of a sponsor is novel. By utilizing this type of bioethics framework, we have been able to develop bioethics positions on various topics, provide research ethics consultations, and integrate bioethics into the daily operations of our human biomedical research. We hope that by sharing these companion papers we will stimulate discussion within and outside the biopharmaceutical industry for the benefit of the multiple parties involved in pharmaceutical human biomedical research.

  20. Development, implementation and critique of a bioethics framework for pharmaceutical sponsors of human biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Therasse, Donald G; Klopfenstein, Mitchell; Levine, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceutical human biomedical research is a multi-dimensional endeavor that requires collaboration among many parties, including those who sponsor, conduct, participate in, or stand to benefit from the research. Human subjects' protections have been promulgated to ensure that the benefits of such research are accomplished with respect for and minimal risk to individual research participants, and with an overall sense of fairness. Although these protections are foundational to clinical research, most ethics guidance primarily highlights the responsibilities of investigators and ethics review boards. Currently, there is no published resource that comprehensively addresses bioethical responsibilities of industry sponsors; including their responsibilities to parties who are not research participants, but are, nevertheless key stakeholders in the endeavor. To fill this void, in 2010 Eli Lilly and Company instituted a Bioethics Framework for Human Biomedical Research. This paper describes how the framework was developed and implemented and provides a critique based on four years of experience. A companion article provides the actual document used by Eli Lilly and Company to guide ethical decisions regarding all phases of human clinical trials. While many of the concepts presented in this framework are not novel, compiling them in a manner that articulates the ethical responsibilities of a sponsor is novel. By utilizing this type of bioethics framework, we have been able to develop bioethics positions on various topics, provide research ethics consultations, and integrate bioethics into the daily operations of our human biomedical research. We hope that by sharing these companion papers we will stimulate discussion within and outside the biopharmaceutical industry for the benefit of the multiple parties involved in pharmaceutical human biomedical research. PMID:26325424

  1. 77 FR 34958 - Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... 20852-1448 (1-800-835-4709 or 301-827-1800); or the Division of Small Manufacturers, International and... studies for which IRB oversight is being transferred; ensuring availability and retention of pertinent records; establishing an effective date for the transfer; conducting a review of research by the...

  2. The evolution of Japanese employer-sponsored retirement plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnes, David

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the development of Japanese voluntary employer-sponsored retirement plans with an emphasis on recent trends. Until 2001, companies in Japan offered retirement benefits as lump-sum severance payments and/or benefits from one of two types of defined benefit (DB) pension plans. One type of DB plan was based on the occupational pension model used in the United States before the adoption of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), but lacked the funding, vesting, and other protective features contained in ERISA. The other type of DB plan allowed companies to opt out of the earnings-related portion of social security, commonly referred to as "contracting out." Landmark laws passed in 2001 introduced a new generation of occupational retirement plans to employers and employees. One law increased funding requirements and enhanced employee protections for employer-sponsored DB plans, while a second law introduced defined contribution (DC) plans for several reasons, chiefly to increase retirement savings and help boost Japanese financial markets. These laws complemented earlier changes in the tax code and financial accounting standards already affecting employer-sponsored retirement plans. As a result, new retirement plan designs will replace most prereform era company retirement plans by 2012. In 2001, the experience of 401(k) plans in the United States, where 42 million participants had accumulated more than $1.8 trillion in assets over 20 years, attracted considerable attention among Japanese lawmakers finalizing provisions of the DC pension law. Even with government support and encouragement from the financial services industry, Japanese companies have not adopted these new DC plans in large numbers. As a result, occupational retirement plans in Japan have remained predominantly DB-a surprising development in light of the shift in a number of countries from DB to DC plans observed in recent decades. However, recent proposals to

  3. Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprile G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Aprile,1 Francesco Leone,2,3 Riccardo Giampieri,4 Mariaelena Casagrande,1 Donatella Marino,2,3 Luca Faloppi,4 Stefano Cascinu,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Mario Scartozzi5,6 1Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Department, University of Turin, 3Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin, Italy; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5Medical Oncology Department, University of Cagliari, 6General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: The 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (San Francisco, CA, USA; January 15–17 is the world-class conference co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, and the Society of Surgical Oncology, in which the most innovative research results in digestive tract oncology are presented and discussed. In its twelfth edition, the meeting has provided new insights focusing on the underpinning biology and clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies. More than 3,400 health care professionals gathered from all over the world to share their experiences on how to bridge the recent novelties in cancer biology with everyday medical practice. In this article, the authors report on the most significant advances, didactically moving on three different anatomic tracks: gastroesophageal malignancies, pancreatic and biliary cancers, and colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, target therapy, onartuzumab, AMG 337

  4. Study On The Prevalence Of Various Forms Of Cancer In Diabetic Patients Hospitalized In The National Institute Of Diabetes, Nutrition And Metabolic Diseases “Prof. N.C. Paulescu”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu-Vâlceanu Horaţiu-Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Epidemiological evidence suggests that people with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of developing various cancers. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of various cancers in diabetic patients admitted in the National Institute of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases “Prof. N.C. Paulescu” between 01.01.2011 and 01.09.2014.

  5. Predictive value of MTT assay as an in vitro chemosensitivity testing for gastric cancer: One institution's experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wu; Jin-Shui Zhu; Yi Zhang; Wei-Ming Shen; Qiang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the predictive clinical value of in vitro 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for directing chemosensitivity in patients with gastric cancer.METHODS: Results of a total of 353 consecutive patients with gastric cancer treated with MTT-directed chemotherapy or physician's empirical chemotherapy from July 1997 to April 2003 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively.RESULTS: The overall 5-year survival rate of MTTsensitive group (MSG) and control group (CG) was 47.5% and 45.1%, respectively. The results of subgroup analysis with Cox proportional-hazards model were favorable for the MSG-sensitive group. However, no statistically significant difference in survival rate was observed between the two groups.CONCLUSION: Individualized chemotherapy based on in vitro MTT assay is beneficial, but needs to be confirmed by further randomized controlled trials.

  6. From single-gene to multiplex analysis in lung cancer, challenges and accomplishments: a review of a single institution's experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Weiqiang; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular selection has led to the successful use of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). For instance, mutations in EGFR and translocations and fusions in ALK render tumor cells sensitive to some TKIs, leading to substantial clinical benefits. Molecular testing such as DNA sequencing or fragment analysis following PCR, and evaluation of copy number and gene positioning by FISH, have been developed and used clinically to identify mutations/fusions. ...

  7. Good Publication Practice for Communicating Company-Sponsored Medical Research: GPP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Wendy P; Wager, Elizabeth; Baltzer, Lise; Bridges, Dan; Cairns, Angela; Carswell, Christopher I; Citrome, Leslie; Gurr, James A; Mooney, LaVerne A; Moore, B Jane; Peña, Teresa; Sanes-Miller, Carol H; Veitch, Keith; Woolley, Karen L; Yarker, Yvonne E

    2015-09-15

    This updated Good Publication Practice (GPP) guideline, known as GPP3, builds on earlier versions and provides recommendations for individuals and organizations that contribute to the publication of research results sponsored or supported by pharmaceutical, medical device, diagnostics, and biotechnology companies. The recommendations are designed to help individuals and organizations maintain ethical and transparent publication practices and comply with legal and regulatory requirements. These recommendations cover publications in peer-reviewed journals and presentations (oral or poster) at scientific congresses. The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals invited more than 3000 professionals worldwide to apply for a position on the steering committee, or as a reviewer, for this guideline. The GPP2 authors reviewed all applications (n = 241) and assembled an 18-member steering committee that represented 7 countries and a diversity of publication professions and institutions. From the 174 selected reviewers, 94 sent comments on the second draft, which steering committee members incorporated after discussion and consensus. The resulting guideline includes new sections (Principles of Good Publication Practice for Company-Sponsored Medical Research, Data Sharing, Studies That Should Be Published, and Plagiarism), expands guidance on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' authorship criteria and common authorship issues, improves clarity on appropriate author payment and reimbursement, and expands information on the role of medical writers. By following good publication practices (including GPP3), individuals and organizations will show integrity; accountability; and responsibility for accurate, complete, and transparent reporting in their publications and presentations. PMID:26259067

  8. Good Publication Practice for Communicating Company-Sponsored Medical Research: GPP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Wendy P; Wager, Elizabeth; Baltzer, Lise; Bridges, Dan; Cairns, Angela; Carswell, Christopher I; Citrome, Leslie; Gurr, James A; Mooney, LaVerne A; Moore, B Jane; Peña, Teresa; Sanes-Miller, Carol H; Veitch, Keith; Woolley, Karen L; Yarker, Yvonne E

    2015-09-15

    This updated Good Publication Practice (GPP) guideline, known as GPP3, builds on earlier versions and provides recommendations for individuals and organizations that contribute to the publication of research results sponsored or supported by pharmaceutical, medical device, diagnostics, and biotechnology companies. The recommendations are designed to help individuals and organizations maintain ethical and transparent publication practices and comply with legal and regulatory requirements. These recommendations cover publications in peer-reviewed journals and presentations (oral or poster) at scientific congresses. The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals invited more than 3000 professionals worldwide to apply for a position on the steering committee, or as a reviewer, for this guideline. The GPP2 authors reviewed all applications (n = 241) and assembled an 18-member steering committee that represented 7 countries and a diversity of publication professions and institutions. From the 174 selected reviewers, 94 sent comments on the second draft, which steering committee members incorporated after discussion and consensus. The resulting guideline includes new sections (Principles of Good Publication Practice for Company-Sponsored Medical Research, Data Sharing, Studies That Should Be Published, and Plagiarism), expands guidance on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' authorship criteria and common authorship issues, improves clarity on appropriate author payment and reimbursement, and expands information on the role of medical writers. By following good publication practices (including GPP3), individuals and organizations will show integrity; accountability; and responsibility for accurate, complete, and transparent reporting in their publications and presentations.

  9. Application of the Western-based adjuvant online model to Korean colon cancer patients; a single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjuvant Online (AOL) is web-accessible risk-assessment model that predicts the mortality and the benefits of adjuvant therapy. AOL has never been validated for Asian colon cancer patients. Using the Yonsei Tumor Registry database, patients who were treated within the Yonsei University Health System between 1990 and 2005 for T1-4, N0-2, and M0 colon cancer were included in the calculations for survival. Observed and predicted 5-year overall survival was compared for each patient. The median age of the study population of 1431 patients was 60 years (range, 15–87 years), and the median follow-up duration was 7.9 years (range, 0.06–19.8 years). The predicted 5-year overall survival rate (77.7%) and observed survival (79.5%) was not statistically different (95% Confidential interval, 76.3–81.5) in all patients. Predicted outcomes were within 95% confidential interval of observed survival in both stage II and III disease, including most demographic and pathologic subgroups. Moreover, AOL more accurately predicted OS for patients with stage II than stage III. AOL tended to offer reliable prediction for 5-year overall survival and could be used as a decision making tool for adjuvant treatment in Korean colon cancer patients whose prognosis is similar to other Asian patients

  10. Cogeneration installation in combination with an emergency power supply at the Netherlands Cancer Institute. Warmte/kracht-noodstroominstallaatie bij het Nederlands Kankerinstituut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmerink, T.C.M. (Technische Dienst, Nederlands Kanker Instituut Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); De Boer, A. (Advies- en Energiedienstenbedrijf Electro Automatisering Energietechniek, Beverwijk (Netherlands))

    1994-10-01

    A tailor-made combined heat and power generating system was installed at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek hospital of the Netherlands Cancer Institute. After an intensive study of energy consumption and the options offered by existing installations it was decided to renovate the emergency and stand-by power system. A new gas engine was built-in, by which the safety and the output were improved considerably. This article is based on a report in which an overview is given of the existing situation at the hospital, the technical and economical innovation options for the electricity and heat supply and the emergency power system. In the report also a plan is elaborated for the installation of a cogeneration/emergency power supply installation in combination with peak load limitations by means of renovated diesel emergency power units. 8 ills.

  11. Cancer of Unknown Primary Site:A Review of 28 Cases and the Efficacy of Cisplatin/Docetaxel Therapy at a Single Institute in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimori,Hisakazu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin/docetaxel (CDDP/TXT chemotherapy and identified prognostic factors in Japanese patients with cancer of unknown primary site (CUP. Twenty-eight consecutive patients seen at a single institute were reviewed retrospectively. Sixteen patients were treated with TXT 80mg/m2, followed by CDDP 75mg/m2. The overall response rate to CDDP/TXT treatment was 62.5%, with a median survival time (MST of 22.7 months. Common adverse reactions were myelosuppression and hyponatremia. The MST of all 28 patients with CUP was 8.3 months, and the 1-year overall survival rate was 45.6%. Univariate analysis identified 5 prognostic factors:performance status, liver involvement, bone involvement, pleural involvement, and lymph node involvement. In conclusion, CDDP/TXT chemotherapy is effective with tolerable toxicity in patients with CUP. Japanese patients with CUP might be chemosensitive and may survive longer.

  12. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elva Jiménez-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count 100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population.

  13. Budget constraints and optimization in sponsored search auctions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yanwu

    2013-01-01

    The Intelligent Systems Series publishes reference works and handbooks in three core sub-topic areas: Intelligent Automation, Intelligent Transportation Systems, and Intelligent Computing. They include theoretical studies, design methods, and real-world implementations and applications. The series' readership is broad, but focuses on engineering, electronics, and computer science. Budget constraints and optimization in sponsored search auctions takes into account consideration of the entire life cycle of campaigns for researchers and developers working on search systems and ROI maximization

  14. Internet Regulation, Two-Sided Pricing, and Sponsored Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jullien, Bruno; Sand-Zantman, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    We consider a network that intermediates traffic between free content providers and consumers. Two-sided pricing of consumers and content providers allows profit extraction by the network and transmission of information on the social value of content. Profit maximizing tariffs give the content providers the option to sponsor the traffic of consumers. We show that a cost-oriented price-cap on the charge to content providers improves social welfare, while banning discrimination or imposing zero...

  15. The Effects of Government-Sponsored Venture Capital: International Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    James A. Brander; Qianqian Du; Hellmann, Thomas F

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of government-sponsored venture capitalists (GVCs) on the success of enterprises. Using international enterprise-level data, we identify a surprising non-monotonicity in the effect of GVC on the likelihood of exit via initial public offerings (IPOs) or third party acquisitions. Enterprises that receive funding from both private venture capitalists (PVCs) and GVCs outperform benchmark enterprises financed purely by private venture capitalists if only a moderate f...

  16. Gender and Interest Targeting for Sponsored Post Advertising at Tumblr

    OpenAIRE

    Grbovic, Mihajlo; Radosavljevic, Vladan; Djuric, Nemanja; Bhamidipati, Narayan; Nagarajan, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    As one of the leading platforms for creative content, Tumblr offers advertisers a unique way of creating brand identity. Advertisers can tell their story through images, animation, text, music, video, and more, and promote that content by sponsoring it to appear as an advertisement in the streams of Tumblr users. In this paper we present a framework that enabled one of the key targeted advertising components for Tumblr, specifically gender and interest targeting. We describe the main challeng...

  17. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Competition in Sponsored Search Market

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2010-01-01

    Sponsored search mechanisms have drawn much attention from both academic community and industry in recent years since the seminal papers of [13] and [14]. However, most of the existing literature concentrates on the mechanism design and analysis within the scope of only one search engine in the market. In this paper we propose a mathematical framework for modeling the interaction of publishers, advertisers and end users in a competitive market. We first consider the monopoly market model and ...

  19. Development of cancer cooperative groups in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2010-09-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical trials are essential for improving the standard of care for cancer patients, because pharmaceutical companies do not conduct trials that evaluate combination chemotherapy using drugs from different companies, surgery, radiotherapy or multimodal treatments. Government-sponsored cooperative groups have played a vital role in developing cancer therapeutics since the 1950s in the USA; however, the establishment of these groups in Japan did not take place until 30 years later. Methodological standards for multicenter cancer clinical trials were established in the 1980s by the National Cancer Institute and cooperative groups. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group, one of the largest cooperative groups in the country, was instituted in 1990. Its data center and operations office, formed during the 1990s, applied the standard methods of US cooperative groups. At present, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group consists of 14 subgroups, a Data Center, an Operations Office, nine standing committees and an Executive Committee represented by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group Chair. Quality control and quality assurance at the Japan Clinical Oncology Group, including regular central monitoring, statistical methods, interim analyses, adverse event reporting and site visit audit, have complied with international standards. Other cooperative groups have also been established in Japan since the 1980s; however, nobody figures out all of them. A project involving the restructuring of US cooperative groups has been ongoing since 2005. Learning from the success of this project will permit further progress of the cancer clinical trials enterprise in Japan. PMID:20670961

  20. Is Mail Service Pharmacy Cost Beneficial to Plan Sponsors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Vulakh, Student Pharmacist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe and compare prescription drug costs charged to a plan sponsor for the top 50 maintenance medications provided through retail and mail service procurement channels. Data were obtained for covered beneficiaries of a health plan sponsored by an employer with just over 3,000 covered employees The analytics team at the PBM administering the plan sponsor’s prescription drug benefit provided de-identified claims information for the top 50 maintenance prescription drugs delivered through either mail service or retail procurement methods for this employer over a one year period (7/1/2008 to 6/30/2009. Based on these data, (1 dollar amount difference (mail service minus retail, and (2 percentage difference between mail and retail costs (as a percentage of the lower net cost per day were computed. The findings revealed that 76 percent of the medication products studied were associated with a lower net cost per day to the plan sponsor through mail service procurement and 24 percent were associated with lower net cost through retail procurement.

  1. Whole-Pelvis or Bladder-Only Chemoradiation for Lymph Node–Negative Invasive Bladder Cancer: Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis (WP) concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the standard bladder preserving option for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The standard practice is to treat elective pelvic lymph nodes, so our aim was to evaluate whether bladder-only (BO) CCRT leads to results similar to those obtained by standard WP-CCRT. Methods and Materials: Patient eligibility included histopathologically proven muscle-invasive bladder cancer, lymph nodes negative (T2–T4, N−) by radiology, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor with normal hematologic, renal, and liver functions. Between March 2005 and May 2006, 230 patients were accrued. Patients were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (120 patients) and BO-CCRT (110 patients). Data regarding the toxicity profile, compliance, initial complete response rates at 3 months, and occurrence of locoregional or distant failure were recorded. Results: With a median follow-up time of 5 years (range, 3–6), WP-CCRT was associated with a 5-year disease-free survival of 47.1% compared with 46.9% in patients treated with BO-CCRT (p = 0.5). The bladder preservation rates were 58.9% and 57.1% in WP-CCRT and BO-CCRT, respectively (p = 0.8), and the 5-year overall survival rates were 52.9% for WP-CCRT and 51% for BO-CCRT (p = 0.8). Conclusion: BO-CCRT showed similar rates of bladder preservation, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates as those of WP-CCRT. Smaller field sizes including bladder with 2-cm margins can be used as bladder preservation protocol for patients with muscle-invasive lymph node–negative bladder cancer to minimize the side effects of CCRT.

  2. The challenge to bring personalized cancer medicine from clinical trials into routine clinical practice: the case of the Institut Gustave Roussy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnedos, Monica; André, Fabrice; Farace, Françoise; Lacroix, Ludovic; Besse, Benjamin; Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2012-04-01

    Research with high throughput technologies has propitiated the segmentation of different types of tumors into very small subgroups characterized by the presence of very rare molecular alterations. The identification of these subgroups and the apparition of new agents targeting these infrequent alterations are already affecting the way in which clinical trials are being conducted with an increased need to identify those patients harboring specific molecular alterations. In this review we describe some of the currently ongoing and future studies at the Institut Gustave Roussy that aim for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for cancer patients with the incorporation of high throughput technologies into daily practice including aCGH, next generation sequencing and the creation of a software that allows for target identification specific for each tumor. The initial intention is to enrich clinical trials with cancer patients carrying certain molecular alterations in order to increase the possibility of demonstrating benefit from a targeted agent. Mid and long term aims are to facilitate and speed up the process of drug development as well as to implement the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:22483534

  3. Virtual Screening of Specific Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R Inhibitors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI Molecular Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xin Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R is an attractive drug target for cancer therapy and research on IGF1R inhibitors has had success in clinical trials. A particular challenge in the development of specific IGF1R inhibitors is interference from insulin receptor (IR, which has a nearly identical sequence. A few potent inhibitors that are selective for IGF1R have been discovered experimentally with the aid of computational methods. However, studies on the rapid identification of IGF1R-selective inhibitors using virtual screening and confidence-level inspections of ligands that show different interactions with IGF1R and IR in docking analysis are rare. In this study, we established virtual screening and binding-mode prediction workflows based on benchmark results of IGF1R and several kinase receptors with IGF1R-like structures. We used comprehensive analysis of the known complexes of IGF1R and IR with their binding ligands to screen specific IGF1R inhibitors. Using these workflows, 17 of 139,735 compounds in the NCI (National Cancer Institute database were identified as potential specific inhibitors of IGF1R. Calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF with GROMACS were further conducted for three of the identified compounds to assess their binding affinity differences towards IGF1R and IR.

  4. Types of Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  5. Whole brain radiotherapy with a conformational external beam radiation boost for lung cancer patients with 1-3 brain metastasis: a multi institutional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the outcome of patients with brain metastasis (BM) from lung cancer treated with an external beam radiotherapy boost (RTB) after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). A total of 53 BM patients with lung cancer were treated sequentially with WBRT and RTB between 1996 and 2008 according to our institutional protocol. Mean age was 58.8 years. The median KPS was 90. Median recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and graded prognostic assessment (GPA) grouping were 2 and 2.5, respectively. Surgery was performed on 38 (71%) patients. The median number of BM was 1 (range, 1-3). Median WBRT and RTB combined dose was 39 Gy (range, 37.5 - 54). Median follow-up was 12.0 months. During the period of follow-up, 37 (70%) patients died. The median overall survival (OS) was 14.5 months. Only 13 patients failed in the brain. The majority of patients (n = 29) failed distantly. The 1-year OS, -local control, extracranial failure rates were 61.2%, 75.2% and 60.8%, respectively. On univariate analysis, improved OS was found to be significantly associated with total dose (≤ 39 Gy vs. > 39 Gy; p < 0.01), age < 65 (p < 0.01), absence of extracranial metastasis (p < 0.01), GPA ≥ 2.5 (p = 0.01), KPS ≥ 90 (p = 0.01), and RPA < 2 (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, total dose (p < 0.01) and the absence of extracranial metastasis (p = 0.03) retained statistical significance. The majority of lung cancer patients treated with WBRT and RTB progressed extracranially. There might be a subgroup of younger patients with good performance status and no extracranial disease who may benefit from dose escalation after WBRT to the metastatic site

  6. Breast cancer in malaysia: are our women getting the right message? 10 year-experience in a single institution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Nur Aishah; Yip, Cheng Har; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Ng, C J; Farizah, H

    2007-01-01

    The message that health care providers caring for patients with breast cancer would like to put forth, is that, not only early detection is crucial but early treatment too is important in ensuring survival. This paper examines the pattern of presentation at a single institution over a 10-year period from 1995 to 2005. In Malaysia, education outreach programmes are ongoing, with contributions not only from the public sector, but also private enterprise. Articles on breast cancer in local newspapers and women magazines and television are quite commonplace. However are our women getting the right message? Now is an appropriate time to bring the stakeholders together to formulate a way to reach all women in Malaysia, not excluding the fact that we are from different races, different education levels and backgrounds requiring differing ways of delivering health promotion messages. To answer the question of why women present late, we prospectively studied 25 women who presented with locally advanced disease. A quantitative, quasi-qualitative study was embarked upon, as a prelude to a more detailed study. Reasons for presenting late were recorded. We also looked at the pattern of presentation of breast lumps in women to our breast clinic in UMMC and in the surgical clinic in Hospital Kota Bharu, in the smaller capital of the state of Kelantan, in 2003. There is hope for the future, the government being a socially responsible one is currently making efforts towards mammographic screening in Malaysia. However understanding of the disease, acceptance of medical treatment and providing resources is imperative to ensure that health behaviour exhibited by our women is not self-destructive but self-preserving. Women are an integral part of not only the nation's workforce but the lifeline of the family - hopefully in the next decade we will see great improvement in the survival of Malaysian women with breast cancer. PMID:17477791

  7. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Badellino, Serena [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ceccarelli, Manuela [Cancer Epidemiology and CPO Piemonte, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Guarneri, Alessia [Radiation Oncology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Franco, Pierfrancesco [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Monagheddu, Chiara [Cancer Epidemiology and CPO Piemonte, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Spadi, Rosella [Medical Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Racca, Patrizia [Medical Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  8. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials

  9. Structural and Reliability Analysis of a Patient Satisfaction with Cancer-Related Care Measure: A Multi-Site Patient Navigation Research Program Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Fiscella, Kevin; Freund, Karen M; Clark, Jack; Darnell, Julie; Holden, Alan; Post, Doug; Patierno, Steven R; Winters, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction (PS) is an important outcome measure of quality of cancer care and one of the four core study outcomes of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) to reduce race/ethnicity-based disparities in cancer care. There is no existing PS measure that spans the spectrum of cancer-related care. Objective Develop a Patient Satisfaction with Cancer Care (PSCC) measure that is relevant to patients receiving diagnostic/therapeutic cancer-related care. Methods We developed a conceptual framework, an operational definition of PSCC, and an item pool based on literature review, expert feedback, group discussion and consensus. The 35-item PSCC measure was administered to 891 participants from the multi-site NCI-sponsored PNRP. Principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted for latent structure analysis. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach coefficient alpha (α). Divergent analysis was performed using correlation analyses between the PSCC, the Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy (CASE-Cancer), and demographic variables. Results The PCA revealed a one-dimensional measure with items forming a coherent set explaining 62% of the variance in PS. Reliability assessment revealed high internal consistency (α ranging from 0.95 to 0.96). The PSCC demonstrated good face validity, convergent validity and divergent validity as indicated by moderate correlations with subscales of the CASE-Cancer (all ps 0.05). Conclusion The PSCC is a valid tool for assessing satisfaction for cancer-related care for this sample. PMID:20922802

  10. Penile primary melanoma: analysis of 6 patients treated at Brazilian national cancer institute in the last eight years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ruschi Bechara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To describe our experience in treating penile melanoma in 06 patients followed at our institution. Materials and Methods Between 2004 and 2012 six consecutive patients with penile melanoma were treated at our Institution. Stage of the disease was classified according to the 2002 AJCC pathologic system. Melanoma in situ (TIS was diagnosed in one patient. One patient was staged as T1b, two patients as T2b and two patients as T4b. The clinical and pathological findings were evaluated. Immunohistochemical tests were performed for Melan-A, HNB-45, S-100 and C-KIT. All histological specimens were examined by the same pathologist (ABSS. The patients with Cis, stages T1b and one patient T2b underwent only local excision. One patient T2b underwent local excision and sentinel lymph node dissection. Two patients with melanoma stage T4b underwent partial penile amputation. One of these last patients had palpable inguinal lymph nodes at diagnosis and underwent bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy and received systemic chemotherapy (dacarbazine, 30 cycles. Results Mean follow-up was 36.3 months. One patient, with stage T2b, died after 12 months due to disease recurrence with bilateral inguinal involvement. The patient who underwent chemotherapy progressed with lung metastases and died after 14 months of follow up. The disease-free survival at five years was 33.3%. Conclusion: Penile melanoma is a disease with poor prognosis in most cases. Local excision or partial penile amputation may have effective control for stages T1 and T2 lesions. Patients who have clinically proven metastases died despite surgical and adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Next-generation sequencing in patients with advanced cancer: are we ready for widespread clinical use? A single institute's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenader, Tal; Tauber, Rachel; Shavit, Linda

    2016-10-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay targeting cancer-relevant genes has been adopted widely for use in patients with advanced cancer. The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of commercially available NGS. We retrospectively collected demographic and clinicopathologic data, recommended therapy, and clinical outcomes of 30 patients with a variety of advanced solid tumors referred to Foundation Medicine NGS. The initial pathologic examination was performed at the pathology department of the referring hospital. The comprehensive clinical NSG assay was performed on paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified FoundationOne platform. The median number of genomic alterations was 3 (0-19). The median number of therapies with potential benefit was 2 (0-8). In 12 cases, a comprehensive clinical NGS assay did not indicate any therapy with potential benefit according to the genomic profile. Ten of the 30 patients received treatments recommended by genomic profile results. In six of the 10 cases, disease progressed within 2 months and four patients died within 3 months of treatment initiation. Three of the 30 patients benefited from a comprehensive clinical NGS assay and the subsequent recommended therapy. The median PFS was 12 weeks (95% confidence interval 10-57) in patients treated with molecularly targeted agents chosen on the basis of tumor genomic profiling versus 48 weeks (95% confidence interval 8-38) in the control group treated with physician choice therapy (P=0.12). Our study suggests that NGS can detect additional treatment targets in individual patients, but prospective medical research and appropriate clinical guidelines for proper clinical use are vital. PMID:27384593

  12. Best supportive care compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy for unresectable gallbladder cancer: A tertiary care institute experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gallbladder represent the most common cancer among biliary tree, complete surgery offers only chance of cure, but most of patients with unresectable or metastatic stage, in such patients only palliative treatment be given. Aims: The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate efficacy of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX, and or with radiotherapy over best supportive care (BSC in unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC. Materials and Methods: Patients with unresectable GBC were evaluated from our center between 2008 and 2011. Three cohorts were identified. Group A, BSC, Group B chemotherapy with GEMOX two weekly for maximum of six cycles. Group C, Chemotherapy with GEMOX and Radiotherapy. Patients underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD or Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP when required. Results: Total 50 patients included in analysis. 19 are male and 31 are female. 14 patients in Group A. 18 patients in Group B and 18 in Group C. Median follow up was 8.8 month. The progression free survival (PFS of patients who received of BSC at 15 month was 18%. PFS of patients who received chemotherapy (CCT at 28 month was 30%. PFS of patients who received CCT Chemotherapy and radiotherapy PFS at 15 month was 38%. When compared all three group none is statically significant (P = 0.538. Conclusion: Judicious used of BSC along with chemotherapy and or with radiotherapy may help in increase in period of stable disease along with overall survival (OS in selected group. In our retrospective analysis CCT with GEMOX and with radiotherapy has helped in improving the OS and PFS in few patients who had good performance status.

  13. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  14. "This program contains advertising": How the timing of sponsorship disclosure influences critical processing of sponsored content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Boerman; E. van Reijmersdal; P. Neijens

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether the timing of sponsorship disclosure influences the processing of sponsored content. A model is proposed in which sponsorship disclosure activates persuasion knowledge, which leads to critical processing of the sponsored content, and ultimately negatively affects the

  15. New Product Development. Engineering and Commerce Students Join Forces with a Corporate Sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Josee; Pegna, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical engineering and business student teams developed new products using a corporate sponsor's technology in a simulated business setting. Students learned about product development and venture start-up, and the sponsor gained new applications for its patented technology. (SK)

  16. Merging Multiple Information Sources in Federated Sponsored Search Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Ceppi, Sofia; Gerding, Enrico H.; Gatti, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase of domain{specific search engines, able to discover information unknown by general-purpose search engines, leads to their federation into a single entity, called federated search engine. In this paper, we focus on how it can effectively merge sponsored search results, provided by the domain-specific search engines, into a unique list. In particular, we discuss the case in which the same ad can be provided by multiple sources, which requires information about the ad to be m...

  17. Employer-sponsored health insurance and the gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Schwab, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    During prime working years, women have higher expected healthcare expenses than men. However, employees' insurance rates are not gender-rated in the employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) market. Thus, women may experience lower wages in equilibrium from employers who offer health insurance to their employees. We show that female employees suffer a larger wage gap relative to men when they hold ESI: our results suggest this accounts for roughly 10% of the overall gender wage gap. For a full-time worker, this pay gap due to ESI is on the order of the expected difference in healthcare expenses between women and men. PMID:26614691

  18. Strategic management of government-sponsored R&D portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Barry Bozeman; Juan Rogers

    2001-01-01

    Although strategic management of R&D portfolios is common practice in private sector R&D, government R&D management tends to be more discrete and ad hoc, focusing on generating maximum output from individual projects. Often, there is no clear notion of the desired public sector output. Whereas private sector R&D evaluation is generally straightforward, with the function of R&D being measured in terms of a company's internal return on investment, the benefits of public-sponsored R&D tend to be...

  19. Provider-sponsored HMOs: make, buy, or joint venture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, S B

    1997-03-01

    Providers can sponsor their own HMOs in one of three ways: by creating their own HMO, by joint venturing with an existing HMO, or by purchasing an existing HMO. When selecting the best option, providers must consider various market conditions. Managed care penetration in the area, potential competitive responses of existing HMOs, market demand, provider reputation, and provider marketing ability will all influence the feasibility of each option. Providers also must examine their own organizational identity, their ability to raise the necessary capital to start an HMO, their managed care expertise and risk contracting experience, and their information systems capabilities.

  20. Outcome in Advanced Ovarian Cancer following an Appropriate and Comprehensive Effort at Upfront Cytoreduction: A Twenty-Year Experience in a Single Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marszalek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this retrospective evaluation of advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients was to compare outcome with published findings from other centers and to discuss future options for the management of advanced ovarian carcinoma patients. Methods. A retrospective series of 340 patients with a mean age of 58 years (range: 17–88 treated for FIGO stage III and IV ovarian cancer between January 1985 and January 2005 was reviewed. All patients had primary cytoreductive surgery, without extensive bowel, peritoneal, or systematic lymph node resection, thereby allowing initiation of chemotherapy without delay. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in combination with alkylating agents before 2000, whereas carboplatin and paclitaxel regimes were generally used after 1999-2000. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Results. With a mean followup of 101 months (range: 5 to 203, 280 events (recurrence or death were observed and 245 patients (72% had died. The mortality and morbidity related to surgery were low. The main prognostic factor for overall survival was postoperative residual disease (P<.0002, while the main prognostic factor for disease-free survival was histological tumor type (P<.0007. Multivariate analysis identified three significant risk factors: optimal surgery (RR=2.2 for suboptimal surgery, menopausal status (RR=1.47 for postmenopausal women, and presence of a taxane in the chemotherapy combination (RR=0.72. Conclusion. These results confirm that optimal surgery defined by an appropriate and comprehensive effort at upfront cytoreduction limits morbidity related to the surgical procedure and allows initiation of chemotherapy without any negative impact on survival. The impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to improve resectability while lowering the morbidity of the surgical procedure is discussed.

  1. Radiobiological evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments of patients with head and neck cancer: A dual-institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Narayanasamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, evaluation of clinical efficacy of treatment planning stems from the radiation oncologist's experience in accurately targeting tumors, while keeping minimal toxicity to various organs at risk (OAR involved. A more objective, quantitative method may be raised by using radiobiological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potential correlation of OAR-related toxicities to its radiobiologically estimated parameters in simultaneously integrated boost (SIB intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans of patients with head and neck tumors at two institutions. Lyman model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP and the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP models were used in the Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART analysis. In this study, 33 patients with oropharyngeal primaries in the head and neck region were used to establish the correlation between NTCP values of (a bilateral parotids with clinically observed rates of xerostomia, (b esophagus with dysphagia, and (c larynx with dysphagia. The results of the study indicated a strong correlation between the severity of xerostomia and dysphagia with Lyman NTCP of bilateral parotids and esophagus, respectively, but not with the larynx. In patients without complications, NTCP values of these organs were negligible. Using appropriate radiobiological models, the presence of a moderate to strong correlation between the severities of complications with NTCP of selected OARs suggested that the clinical outcome could be estimated prior to treatment.

  2. Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: multi-institutional comprehensive cancer centre review of multiphasic CT and MR imaging in 35 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kitchin, Douglas; Lubner, Meghan G. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Ganeshan, Dhakshina M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Bhalla, Sanjeev [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Covey, Anne M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-04

    To assess the imaging features of primary hepatic angiosarcoma on multiphasic CT and MR. Multi-institutional review identified 35 adults (mean age, 57.1 years; 22M/13F) with pathologically proven hepatic angiosarcoma and pretreatment multiphasic CT (n = 33) and/or MR (n = 7). Multifocal hepatic involvement was seen in all 35 cases, with at least 10 lesions in 74.3 % (26/35). Mean size of the dominant mass was 8.9 ± 4.7 cm (range, 2.6-20 cm). Individual nodules were typically circumscribed. Arterial-phase foci of hypervascular enhancement without washout were seen in 89.7 % (26/29). Heterogeneously expanding foci of enhancement generally followed blood pool in 88.6 % (31/35). Progressive centripetal (n = 16) or diffuse ''flash-fill'' (n = 4) enhancement pattern resembling cavernous haemangiomas predominated in 20 cases, whereas a ''reverse haemangioma'' centrifugal pattern predominated in 11 cases. Rapid interval growth was seen in 24 (96.0 %) of 25 cases with serial imaging. Vascular invasion was not seen in any case. Underlying cirrhotic morphology was seen in 42.3 % (15/35). Primary hepatic angiosarcomas typically manifest as aggressive multifocal tumors containing small heterogeneous hypervascular foci that progressively expand and follow blood pool. The appearance can mimic cavernous haemangiomas, but distinction is generally possible. In the setting of cirrhosis, lack of tumour washout and vascular invasion argue against multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma. (orig.)

  3. 42 CFR 423.553 - Effect of leasing of a PDP sponsor's facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of leasing of a PDP sponsor's facilities... Change of Ownership or Leasing of Facilities During Term of Contract § 423.553 Effect of leasing of a PDP sponsor's facilities. (a) General effect of leasing. If a PDP sponsor leases all or part of its...

  4. Feasibility of laparoscopic abdomino - perineal resection for large - sized anorectal cancers : A single - institution experience of 59 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Parul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopic surgery for anorectal carcinoma is steadily gaining acceptance. While feasibility has already been reported, there are no reports addressing the impact of the actual size of large tumors on laparoscopic resectability . Aim: To assess the feasibility and short-term results (including oncological surrogate end points of performing laparoscopic abdomino-perineal resection (APR for large rectal cancers. Materials And Methods: Data of 59 patients undergoing laparoscopic APR (LAPR for anorectal malignancies were reviewed retrospectively. Outcomes were evaluated considering the surgical procedure, surface area of the tumor and short-term outcomes. Results: Of the 59 cases, LAPR could be completed in 53 (89.8% patients. Thirty-one (58.4% patients had Astler-Coller C2 stage disease. The mean surface area of the tumors was 24±17.5 (4-83 cm2. The number of median lymph nodes harvested per case was 12 (1-48. Circumferential resection margin (CRM was positive in 11 (20.7% patients. No mortality was reported. Conclusion: This appears to be the first report analyzing the impact of the size of the rectal tumor in LAPR. The data clearly indicates that LAPR is not hampered by the size of the tumor. There appears to be a need for preoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy before undertaking surgery on larger tumors in view of the higher circumferential resection margin positivity.

  5. An editor's considerations in publishing industry-sponsored studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droller, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The fundamental responsibility of a journal editor is to assure that studies accepted for publication provide rigorous original scientific information and reviews that are considered important to the readership. The fundamental requirements of such reports from an editor's perspective include objectivity and transparency in each of the study design, implementation of investigation methods, acquisition of data, inclusive analysis and interpretation of results, appropriate application of statistical methods, presentation of outcomes in the context of a balanced and comprehensive review of relevant literature, and meaningful conclusions. In proceeding on these presumptions, editors then have the responsibility of obtaining rigorous, objective, and constructive reviews of these reports so that they can make an unbiased decision regarding their disposition. The fundamental objective in this is to enhance the ultimate scientific validity and value of the work if and when it is accepted for publication. Guidelines have been advanced by several organizations to identify how such editorial responsibilities can be fulfilled. These guidelines also pertain to investigators, authors, and sponsors of the studies, which the various reports and reviews describe. The present article reviews these guidelines as they relate to both industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated investigations and as relevant to the variety of reports that a scientific/medical journal such as Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations receives for publication.

  6. A Health Services Research Agenda for Cellular, Molecular and Genomic Technologies in Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideroff, Louise; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Ambs, Anita; Armstrong, Katrina; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Martin L.; Donaldson, Molla S.; Follen, Michele; Goldie, Sue J.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Khoury, Muin J.; Lewis, Graham; McLeod, Howard L.; Piper, Margaret; Powell, Isaac; Schrag, Deborah; Schulman, Kevin A.; Scott, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent decades, extensive resources have been invested to develop cellular, molecular and genomic technologies with clinical applications that span the continuum of cancer care. Methods In December 2006, the National Cancer Institute sponsored the first workshop to uniquely examine the state of health services research on cancer-related cellular, molecular and genomic technologies and identify challenges and priorities for expanding the evidence base on their effectiveness in routine care. Results This article summarizes the workshop outcomes, which included development of a comprehensive research agenda that incorporates health and safety endpoints, utilization patterns, patient and provider preferences, quality of care and access, disparities, economics and decision modeling, trends in cancer outcomes, and health-related quality of life among target populations. Conclusions Ultimately, the successful adoption of useful technologies will depend on understanding and influencing the patient, provider, health care system and societal factors that contribute to their uptake and effectiveness in ‘real-world’ settings. PMID:19367091

  7. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  8. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  9. Alectinib's activity against CNS metastases from ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a single institution case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metro, Giulio; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Bennati, Chiara; Chiarini, Pietro; Sperduti, Isabella; Ricciuti, Biagio; Marcomigni, Luca; Costa, Cinzia; Crinò, Lucio; Floridi, Piero; Gori, Stefania; Chiari, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we assessed the activity of the next-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (-TKI) alectinib, in patients with ALK-postive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and central nervous system (CNS) metastases. NSCLCs with ALK-positive disease, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and CNS metastases were treated with alectinib 600 mg BID. Included patients were followed prospectively in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, with particular emphasis on activity in the CNS. Eleven consecutive patients were enrolled. The majority of them were pretreated with crizotinib (n = 10, 90.9 %), and cranial radiotherapy (n = 8, 72.7 %). Six of the seven patients with measurable CNS disease experienced a CNS response, including three patients who were naïve for cranial radiation. Median duration of response was 8 months. For the whole population, median CNS-progression-free survival (-PFS), systemic-PFS, overall-PFS, overall survival, and 1-year survival were 8, 11, 8, 13 months, and 31.1 %, respectively. Two patients experiencing a CNS response were assessed for alectinib's concentrations in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and showed a CSF-to-serum ratio ranging from 0.001 to 0.003 ng/mL. Alectinib is highly active against CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLCs, irrespective of prior treatment(s) with ALK-TKI(s) and/or cranial radiotherapy. The low CSF-to-serum ratio of alectinib suggests that measuring the concentrations of the drug in the CSF may not be a reliable surrogate of its distribution into the CNS. PMID:27324494

  10. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  11. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  12. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  13. Bloodstream infections in febrile neutropenic patients at a tertiary cancer institute in South India: A timeline of clinical and microbial trends through the years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Govind Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Febrile neutropenia (FN is an oncological emergency. The choice of empiric therapy depends on the locally prevalent pathogens and their sensitivities, the sites of infection, and cost. The Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines are being followed for the management of FN in India. Methods: This is a prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary care cancer centre from September 2012 to September 2014. Objectives: The objectives of this study were as follows: (1 To review the pattern of microbial flora, susceptibility pattern, and important clinical variables among bloodstream infections in febrile neutropenic patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies. (2 As per the institutional protocol to periodically review the antibiotic policy and susceptibility pattern, and compare the findings with an earlier study done in our institute in 2010. This was a prospective study conducted from September 2012 to September 2014. Results: About 379 episodes of FN were documented among 300 patients. About 887 blood cultures were drawn. Of these, 137 (15% isolates were cultured. Isolates having identical antibiograms obtained from a single patient during the same hospitalization were considered as one. Hence, 128 isolates were analyzed. About 74 (58% cultures yielded Gram-negative bacilli, 51 (40% were positive for Gram-positive cocci, and 3 (2% grew fungi. Among Gram-negative organisms, Escherichia coli followed by Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae accounted for 78% of the isolates. Among Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus species accounted for 84% of the isolates. We have noted a changing trend in the antibiotic sensitivity pattern over the years. Following the switch in empirical antibiotics, based on the results of the study done in 2010 (when the empirical antibiotics were ceftazidime + amikacin, the sensitivity to cefoperazone-sulbactam has plunged from about 80% to 60%%. Similar reduction in

  14. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. 20-year experience from a single institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K.; Sauer, T.; Klemm, S.; Bayer, C.; Haller, B.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To report the efficacy and toxicity of radio(chemo)therapy (RCT) in the management of squamous cell anal carcinoma (SQ-AC) and to evaluate the prognostic factors influencing the outcomes. Patients and methods: A consecutive cohort of 138 patients with cT1-4, cN0-3, cM0 SQ-AC were treated with RCT between 1988 and 2011 at our department. Median follow-up time for surviving patients from the start of RCT was 98 months (range, 1-236 months). Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 56 Gy (range, 4-61 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 119 patients (86%). Results: The survival rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 88 {+-} 3, 82 {+-} 4, and 59 {+-} 6%, respectively, with a median overall survival (OS) of 167 months. The cumulative incidence for local recurrence at 2 and 5 years was 8 {+-} 2 and 11 {+-} 3%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) times were 132 and 135 months, respectively. In 19 patients (14%), a distant metastasis was diagnosed after a median time of 19 months. In the multivariate analysis, UICC (International Union Against Cancer) stage I-II, female gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1, and good/moderate histologic differentiation (G1-2) were significantly associated with a better OS, DFS, and CFS. Conformal radiotherapy planning techniques were significantly associated with a lower cumulative incidence of local recurrence (11 {+-} 3% vs. 38 {+-} 19% at 5 years, p = 0.006). A higher radiation dose beyond 54 Gy was not associated with an improvement in outcome, neither for smaller - (T1/T2) nor for larger tumors (T3/T4). Conclusion: RCT leads to excellent outcomes - especially in patients with stage I/II and G1/G2 tumors - with acceptable toxicity. The probable advantages of high-dose radiotherapy should be considered carefully against the risk of a higher rate of toxicity. Future studies are needed to investigate the role of a more

  15. A single-institution experience with bevacizumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and in conjunction with liver resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlund, Pia; Peltonen, Reetta; Alanko, Tuomo; Bono, Petri; Isoniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab is active in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, efficacy of bevacizumab has predominantly been evaluated on selected patients with relatively good performance status and minor comorbidities. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in unselected patients with mCRC, some of whom underwent liver resection. Material and methods All patients with inoperable mCRC, fit for combination chemotherapy (n=180), who were initially not resectable, not included into studies and without contraindications to bevacizumab, and initiated on bevacizumab at the Helsinki University Central Hospital between April 2004 and December 2005 were included (n=114). Most (n=70) received 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin/irinotecan plus bevacizumab as first-line therapy. The remainder (n=44) of the patients received bevacizumab in combination with oxaliplatin or irinotecan with or without 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Minimum follow-up was 7 years. Treatment response was evaluated every 8–10 weeks according to RECIST criteria. Results Median age was 59.6 years (range 35–79); male/female ratio was 54%/46%; World Health Organization performance status 0/1/2–3 was 33%/55%/11%, respectively; and the number of metastatic sites, one/two/three or more, was 31%/21%/48%, respectively. Median duration of bevacizumab therapy was 7.8 months (range 0.5–70.5 with pauses). In first-line (n=40), response rate (RR) was 62%, progression-free survival (PFS) 11.7 months, and overall survival (OS) 22.1 months. In second-line (n=43), RR was 44%, PFS 8.7 months, and OS 18.7 months. In later lines (n=31), RR was 14%, PFS 6.7 months, and OS 14.2 months. Ten patients with initially unresectable liver metastases became operable and R0 resection was achieved in 90% (9/10 resections). In 23% (7/31) of operated metastases, no vital tumor cells were found in histologic examination. Operative morbidity was low: two mild infections, no increased bleeding tendency

  16. "Food company sponsors are kind, generous and cool": (Misconceptions of junior sports players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Lesley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing influences their food knowledge, preferences and consumption. Sport sponsorship by food companies is widespread and industry investment in this marketing is increasing. This study aimed to assess children's awareness of sport sponsors and their brand-related attitudes and purchasing intentions in response to this marketing. Methods Sports clubs known to have food sponsors and representing the most popular sports for Australian children across a range of demographic areas were recruited. Interview-based questionnaires were conducted at clubs with children aged 10-14 years (n = 103 to examine their recall of local sports club and elite sport sponsors, and their attitudes towards sponsors and sponsorship activities. Results Most children (68% could recall sponsors of their sports club, naming a median of two sponsors, including a median of one food company sponsor each. Almost half (47% of children could recall any sponsors of their favourite elite sporting team. Children aged 10-11 years were more likely than older children to report that they thought about sponsors when buying something to eat or drink (P Conclusions Children's high recall of food and beverage company sport sponsors and their positive attitudes towards these sponsors and their promotions is concerning as this is likely to be linked to children's food preferences and consumption. Limiting children's exposure to this marketing is an important initiative to improve children's nutrition.

  17. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer. I. Analysis of tumor parameters, tumor dose and local control: the experience of the Gustave-Roussy Institute and the Princess Margaret Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study involved 463 breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at the Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients either had operable tumors, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Results were analyzed according to tumor response, local recurrence rate, tumor size, tumor fixation, nodal fixation and tumor dose. Conventional statistical analysis of local control showed two significant factors: tumor dose and tumor size. Multivariate analysis permitted to define an ''individual risk'' (IR) of local recurrence according to three independent factors: tumor size, tumor fixation, and nodal fixation. It was shown that the IR was a good prognostic factor for local control. Increase in tumor dose gave a similar effect in the local recurrence relative risk for all the IR groups. According to the slope of the dose-effect curve, it was deduced that a dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of local recurrence 2-fold. In fact, it was shown that tumor dose was the most significant independent factor on local control, able to produce up to a 10-fold increase compared to 2-fold decrease for tumor size. If the IR of local recurrence is known, a theoretical predictive value on local control, taking into account the tumor dose, can be determined according to the present data

  18. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  19. Long-term outcomes for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated on The Cancer Institute of New Jersey ALL trial (CINJALL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachtman, Richard A; Masterson, Margaret; Shenkerman, Angela; Vijayanathan, Veena; Cole, Peter D

    2016-10-01

    The Cancer Institute of New Jersey Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial (CINJALL) employed a post-induction regimen centered on intensive oral antimetabolite therapy, with no intravenous methotrexate (MTX). Fifty-eight patients enrolled between 2001 and 2005. A high rate of induction death (n = 3) or induction failure (n = 1) was observed. Among those who entered remission, five-year DFS is 80 ± 8.9% for those at standard risk of relapse and 76 ± 7.8% for high-risk patients, with median follow up over six years. The estimated cumulative incidence of testicular relapse among boys was elevated (13 ± 7.2%) compared to the rate observed on contemporary protocols. We conclude that post-induction therapy using intensive oral antimetabolites for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can result in overall long-term DFS comparable to that observed among children treated with regimens including intravenous MTX. However, an increased risk of late extramedullary relapse among boys was observed, supporting the prevailing opinion that high-dose MTX improves outcome for children with ALL. PMID:26879921

  20. Surgical Excision with Forehead Flap as Single Modality Treatment for Basal Cell Cancer of Central Face: Single Institutional Experience of 50 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdeep Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common skin cancer worldwide. The WHO has defined it as “a locally invasive, slowly spreading tumor which rarely metastasizes, arising in the epidermis or hair follicles and in which the peripheral cells usually simulate the basal cells of the epidermis.” Here we discuss the management of BCCs of central face with surgical excision and reconstruction with forehead flap as single modality treatment. Material and Methods. This is a retrospective review of 50 patients who underwent surgical excision of BCC involving the facial region followed by primary reconstruction using forehead flaps at a single institution. There were 20 males and 30 females, mean age of 59 years. Results. No recurrence at primary site was observed during the follow-up of 1–4 yrs. There was no ectropion or exposure sequela. However, epiphora was evident. Size of lesions ranged from 2 to 6 cm. Keloid formation was seen in 2 (4% patients. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion. For the face, the best reconstructive effort eventually fails in the face of tumor recurrence. The forehead flap represents one of the best methods for repair of extensive facial defects. Complete tumor extirpation, the primary event, is the key.

  1. Government-sponsored microfinance program: Joint liability vs. individual liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Kusum Mukherjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Swarnajayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY is a government-sponsored microfinance program. The scheme is based on four features: group lending with joint liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. We propose a new model of SGSY having these features: group lending with individual liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. “Joint liability” clause of the existing model is replaced with individual liability in the new model. The paper shows that problem of adverse selection is removed in both models, i.e. in “SGSY with group lending and joint liability” and “SGSY with group lending and individual liability.” The problem of “moral hazard” is more severe in the existing model of SGSY compared with the proposed model of SGSY. Borrowers are also benefitted from participation in the proposed scheme of SGSY than that in the existing model of SGSY.

  2. Prostate cancer screenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000846.htm Prostate cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this ... Intern Med . 2011;155(11):762-71. National Cancer Institute. Prostate Cancer Screening -- for health professionals. Revised April 2, ...

  3. Unbundling Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Daron Acemoglu; Simon Johnson

    2003-01-01

    This paper evaluates the importance of property rights institutions', which protect citizens against expropriation by the government and powerful elites, and contracting institutions', which enable private contracts between citizens. We exploit exogenous variation in both types of institutions driven by colonial history, and document strong first-stage relationships between property rights institutions and the determinants of European colonization (settler mortality and population density bef...

  4. Global Optimization for Advertisement Selection in Sponsored Search

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔卿; 白峰杉; 高斌; 刘铁岩

    2015-01-01

    Advertisement (ad) selection plays an important role in sponsored search, since it is an upstream component and will heavily influence the effectiveness of the subsequent auction mechanism. However, most existing ad selection methods regard ad selection as a relatively independent module, and only consider the literal or semantic matching between queries and keywords during the ad selection process. In this paper, we argue that this approach is not globally optimal. Our proposal is to formulate ad selection as such an optimization problem that the selected ads can work together with downstream components (e.g., the auction mechanism) to achieve the maximization of user clicks, advertiser social welfare, and search engine revenue (we call the combination of these ob jective functions as the marketplace ob jective for ease of reference). To this end, we 1) extract a bunch of features to represent each pair of query and keyword, and 2) train a machine learning model that maps the features to a binary variable indicating whether the keyword is selected or not, by maximizing the aforementioned marketplace ob jective. This formalization seems quite natural; however, it is technically difficult because the marketplace objective is non-convex, discontinuous, and indifferentiable regarding the model parameter due to the ranking and second-price rules in the auction mechanism. To tackle the challenge, we propose a probabilistic approximation of the marketplace objective, which is smooth and can be effectively optimized by conventional optimization techniques. We test the ad selection model learned with our proposed method using the sponsored search log from a commercial search engine. The experimental results show that our method can significantly outperform several ad selection algorithms on all the metrics under investigation.

  5. Ethics committees and externally - sponsored research in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Larijani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Globally, there have been considerable debates on the ethical conduct and review of collaborative international researches. One of the great challenges is to conduct clinical trials in developing countries as Externally-Sponsored Researches (ESR. "nThis descriptive survey has reviewed the status of this type of researches in Iran during 2002 to 2003. This study was carried out in 44 universities of medical sciences and 32 research centers. The questionnaires containing closed and open-ended questions were sent to their Ethics Review Committees (ECs. After collection of data and coding, they were analyzed by means of SPSS software version 11.5. "nForty one universities and 25 research centers have been responded but only 35 ECs retrieved the questionnaire. According to the collected data, 26 and 54 studies have been carried out as a collaborative research or externally-sponsored researches in Iran in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Although more than half of ECs' members have received necessary preliminary educations but there were professional educational courses in only 25% of ECs. About 17% of ESR projects have not been examined in ECs, although they have been evaluated in the Scientific Research Council. Only one of the evaluated ESR proposals has been rejected and the rest have been approved and conducted. Socio-cultural issues and religious beliefs, scientific validity, and national priorities were the most important factors for proposals evaluation. "nThe ethical issues concerning international collaboration for clinical research in developing countries are complex. We should enhance educational programs for researchers and establish appropriate regulatory guidelines at national and international levels.

  6. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  7. Confucius Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Confucius Institute(simplified Chinese:孔子学院;traditional Chinese:孔子學院;pinyin:kǒngzǐ xuéyuàn)is a non-profit public institute which aims at promoting Chinese language and culture and supporting local Chinese teaching internationally through affiliated Confucius Institutes.

  8. [Non-commercial clinical trials--who will be the legal sponsor? Sponsorship of investigator-initiated clinical trials according to the German Drug Law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger-Döring, G; Boos, J

    2006-07-01

    Non-commercial clinical trials may be of great benefit to the patients concerned. The 12th amendment to the German Drug Law (AMG) changed legal liability of the initiators of investigator-initiated clinical trials with extensive consequences for traditional project leaders. The central point under discussion is the sponsor's responsibility according to the AMG. Presently leading management divisions of university hospitals and universities are developing proceedings to assume sponsor responsibility by institutions (institutional sponsorship), which should enable investigator-initiated clinical trials to be conducted according to legal requirements in the future. Detailed problems and special questions can only be resolved in a single-minded fashion, and if necessary political processes should be catalyzed. PMID:16763801

  9. Workshop on The Epidemiology of the ATM Gene: Impact on Breast Cancer Risk and Treatment, Present Status and Future Focus, Lillehammer, Norway, 29 June 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) heterozygosity in cancer is uncertain. In vitro studies of cells from ATM heterozygotes provide strong evidence of radiation sensitivity. Some, but not all, clinical studies suggest an increased risk of breast cancer among ATM gene carriers, and this risk may be greater among those exposed to radiation. This possible excess risk of breast cancer associated with ATM heterozygosity constitutes the basis for several genetic epidemiological studies designed to clarify the role that the ATM gene plays in the etiology of breast and other cancers. The primary focus of this international, multidisciplinary, National Cancer Institute-sponsored workshop was to discuss ongoing and planned epidemiologic studies aimed at understanding the complexities of the ATM gene and its role in carcinogenesis. The invited participants were from diverse disciplines including molecular and clinical genetics, radiation biology and physics, epidemiology, biostatistics, pathology, and medicine. In the present meeting report, the aims of each project are described

  10. 76 FR 6844 - Agency Information Collection (Compliance Report of Proprietary Institutions) Activity Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... institutions receiving Federal financial assistance comply with applicable civil rights statute and regulations... treatment of minority group members. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required...

  11. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  12. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  13. Continuing professional development for volunteers working in palliative care in a tertiary care cancer institute in India: A cross-sectional observational study of educational needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayita Kedar Deodhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Training programs for volunteers prior to their working in palliative care are well-established in India. However, few studies report on continuing professional development programs for this group. Aims: To conduct a preliminary assessment of educational needs of volunteers working in palliative care for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program for this group. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study conducted in the Department of Palliative Medicine of a tertiary care cancer institute in India. Materials and Methods: Participant volunteers completed a questionnaire, noting previous training, years of experience, and a comprehensive list of topics for inclusion in this program, rated in order of importance according to them. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics for overall data and Chi-square tests for categorical variables for group comparisons were applied using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 18. Results: Fourteen out of 17 volunteers completed the questionnaire, seven having 5-10-years experience in working in palliative care. A need for continuing professional development program was felt by all participants. Communication skills, more for children and elderly specific issues were given highest priority. Spiritual-existential aspects and self-care were rated lower in importance than psychological, physical, and social aspects in palliative care. More experienced volunteers (>5 years of experience felt the need for self-care as a topic in the program than those with less (<5-years experience ( P < 0.05. Conclusions: Understanding palliative care volunteers′ educational needs is essential for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program and should include self-care as a significant component.

  14. Radiotherapeutic management of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A critical review of 601 cases treated at the Cancer Institute in the period 1947 to 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results presented in this paper are based upon information obtained from a critical review of 601 records of nasopharyngeal carcinoma retrieved from the files of the Cancer Institute. The records cover a period of 22 years. An analysis of the age and sex distribution revealed a male excess with a ratio of 2.2:1. No other significant age and sex differences were elucidated. About 80% of all the patients were found to manifest Stage II lesions. Early signs and symptoms were usually mild and non-incapacitating, which the patients usually ignored and may have misled the general practitioners. Single biopsy studies were conducted on 429 patients. The results have shown that more than 95% showed the presence of cell types I, III and IV, (36%, 31%, 31%, respectively), and these were mostly seen in patients manifesting Stage II lesions. Whether the cell type/stage relationship as observed is the true picture could not be ascertained, since the majority of the patients manifested Stage II lesions. The cell type(s) may however be an important factor in the evaluation of biologic response to radiotherapy and may further influence the dose/response relationship. Using port sizes of 6cm x 7cm to 6cm x 8cm, 178 patients were irradiated with doses ranging from about 4000 to 7000 rad (40-70Gy). The results have shown that 74 to 78% of the patients showing a 100% response (complete disappearance of the mass) were irradiated with doses in the range 5000 to 7000 rad (50 to 70Gy). 4000 to 5000 rad (40-50Gy) on the average resulted in optimum response rates to whole-neck irradiation. (author)

  15. Development and implementation of the National Cancer Institute's Food Attitudes and Behaviors Survey to assess correlates of fruit and vegetable intake in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope O Erinosho

    Full Text Available Low fruit and vegetable (FV intake is a leading risk factor for chronic disease globally as well as in the United States. Much of the population does not consume the recommended servings of FV daily. This paper describes the development of psychosocial measures of FV intake for inclusion in the U.S. National Cancer Institute's 2007 Food Attitudes and Behaviors Survey.This was a cross-sectional study among 3,397 adults from the United States. Scales included conventional constructs shown to be correlated with fruit and vegetable intake (FVI in prior studies (e.g., self-efficacy, social support, and novel constructs that have been measured in few- to- no studies (e.g., views on vegetarianism, neophobia. FVI was assessed with an eight-item screener. Exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha, and regression analyses were conducted.Psychosocial scales with Cronbach's alpha ≥0.68 were self-efficacy, social support, perceived barriers and benefits of eating FVs, views on vegetarianism, autonomous and controlled motivation, and preference for FVs. Conventional scales that were associated (p<0.05 with FVI were self-efficacy, social support, and perceived barriers to eating FVs. Novel scales that were associated (p<0.05 with FVI were autonomous motivation, and preference for vegetables. Other single items that were associated (p<0.05 with FVI included knowledge of FV recommendations, FVI "while growing up", and daily water consumption.These findings may inform future behavioral interventions as well as further exploration of other potential factors to promote and support FVI.

  16. Concurrent Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced (Stage III) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Single Institution Experience With 600 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav, E-mail: nebareje@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia); Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Our institutional experience with the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (RT-CHT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer was reviewed. Methods and Materials: Three phase III and two phase II studies included a total of 600 patients. Hyperfractionated RT alone was given to 127 patients, and hyperfractionated RT-CHT was given to 473 patients. RT doses were 64.8 Gy and 69.6 Gy (using 1.2 Gy twice daily) and 67.6 Gy (using 1.3 Gy twice daily). CHT consisted of concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide to 409 patients and concurrent administration of carboplatin and paclitaxel to 64 patients. Results: The median survival times were 19 months, 21 months, and 12 months for all, RT-CHT, and RT-only patients, respectively. The survival difference between the RT-CHT and RT group was significant (p < 0.0001). Four-year rates of local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 29% and 35%, respectively, for the entire group. The RT-CHT group had significantly better LPFS rates than the RT group (31% for the RT-CHT group vs. 16% for the RT group; p = 0.0015) but not DMFS rates (36% for the RT-CHT group vs. 36% for the RT group, p = 0.0571). Acute high-grade esophagitis, pneumonitis, and hematological toxicities were seen most frequently and in 11%, 9%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Late high-grade esophageal and bronchopulmonary toxicity were each seen in 6% of patients. Conclusions: Compared to the majority of existing phase II and III studies, this study reconfirmed the excellent results achieved with concurrent RT-CHT, including low toxicity. Concurrent RT-CHT results in survival benefit primarily by increasing LPFS, not DMFS.

  17. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women: the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study1234

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yikyung; Brinton, Louise A.; Subar, Amy F; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although dietary fiber has been hypothesized to lower risk of breast cancer by modulating estrogen metabolism, the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status is unclear.

  18. How Effective Are Clinical Pathways With and Without Online Peer-Review? An Analysis of Bone Metastases Pathway in a Large, Integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Flickinger, John C.; Rakfal, Susan M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rodgers, Edwin [Via Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Clinical pathways are an important tool used to manage the quality in health care by standardizing processes. This study evaluated the impact of the implementation of a peer-reviewed clinical pathway in a large, integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network. Methods: In 2003, we implemented a clinical pathway for the management of bone metastases with palliative radiation therapy. In 2009, we required the entry of management decisions into an online tool that records pathway choices. The pathway specified 1 or 5 fractions for symptomatic bone metastases with the option of 10-14 fractions for certain clinical situations. The data were obtained from 13 integrated sites (3 central academic, 10 community locations) from 2003 through 2010. Results: In this study, 7905 sites were treated with 64% of courses delivered in community practice and 36% in academic locations. Academic practices were more likely than community practices to treat with 1-5 fractions (63% vs. 23%; p < 0.0001). The number of delivered fractions decreased gradually from 2003 to 2010 for both academic and community practices (p < 0.0001); however, greater numbers of fractions were selected more often in community practices (p < 0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that a significantly greater selection of 1-5 fractions developed after implementation online pathway monitoring (2009) with an odds ratio of 1.2 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.4) for community and 1.3 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) for academic practices. The mean number of fractions also decreased after online peer review from 6.3 to 6.0 for academic (p = 0.07) and 9.4 to 9.0 for community practices (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: This is one of the first studies to examine the efficacy of a clinical pathway for radiation oncology in an integrated cancer network. Clinical pathway implementation appears to be effective in changing patterns of care, particularly with online clinical

  19. Strategic Bidding Behaviors in Nondecreasing Sponsored Search Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Kun Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To realize the specific results in the sponsored search auctions, most advertisers submit particular bid prices. The bidding behaviors with specific purposes are called as the strategic bidding. However, some strategic bidding behaviors will result in negative effects, such as the elimination of the equilibrium and the payment increase for some advertisers. The bidding behaviors with negative results are termed as the vindictive bidding. We survey four strategic bidding behaviors which include a rational bidding and three vindictive bidding strategies. In this paper, we study the relationship between the effects resulted by the vindictive bidding and the valuations of the vindictive advertisers. In our experiments, the search engine provider (SEP is benefited by all vindictive bidding behaviors, and the increment of the SEP's revenue is proportional to the degree of the vindictiveness. Bidding vindictively without sacrificing the own utility improves the advertiser's utility with high probability. Moreover, we observe that the SEP's revenue is improved by the following situations. First, the vindictive advertiser with low valuation in the keywords with high market value results in more SEP's revenue than that in the keywords with low market value. The second case is to raise the bidding competition between advertisers.

  20. For-profit mediators in sponsored search advertising

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Sudhir K; Gunadhi, Himawan; Rezaei, Behnam A

    2007-01-01

    A mediator is a well-known construct in game theory, and is an entity that plays on behalf of some of the agents who choose to use its services, while the rest of the agents participate in the game directly. We initiate a game theoretic study of sponsored search auctions, such as those used by Google and Yahoo!, involving {\\em incentive driven} mediators. We refer to such mediators as {\\em for-profit} mediators, so as to distinguish them from mediators introduced in prior work, who have no monetary incentives, and are driven by the altruistic goal of implementing certain desired outcomes. We show that in our model, (i) players/advertisers can improve their payoffs by choosing to use the services of the mediator, compared to directly participating in the auction; (ii) the mediator can obtain monetary benefit by managing the advertising burden of its group of advertisers; and (iii) the payoffs of the mediator and the advertisers it plays for are incentive compatible with the advertisers who do dot use its servi...

  1. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Fuchs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In colon cancer patients, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high dietary glycemic load have been associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown. METHODS: We assessed the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on cancer recurrence and mortality in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients who completed food frequency questionnaires as part of a U.S. National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated with Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Patients consuming ≥ 2 servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day experienced an adjusted HR for disease recurrence or mortality of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.68, compared with those consuming <2 servings per month (P(trend = 0.02. The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2 and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18 (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend = 0.0025. CONCLUSION: Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

  2. FIOH-sponsored newsletter misrepresents asbestos hazards in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailar, J.C.; Ballal, S.G.; Boback, M.; Castleman, B.; Chee, H.L.; Cherniack, M.; Christiani, D.; Cicolella, A.; Pool, D' J.F.; Egilman, D.; Frank, A.L.; Garcia, M.A.; Giannasi, F.; Greenberg, M.; Harrison, R.J.; Huff, J.; Souza, E.J.; Joshi, T.K.; Kamuzora, P.; Kazan-Allen, L.; Kern, D.G.; Kromhout, H.; Kuswadji, S.; Ladou, J.; Lemen, R.A.; Levenstein, C.; Luethje, B.; Mancini, F.; Meel, B.L.; Mekonnen, Y.; Mendes, R.; Murie, D.; Myers, J.E.; O'Neill, R.; Cisaro, E.; Paek, D.; Richter, E.; Robertson, H.; Rosskam, E.; Samuels, S.W.; Soskolne, C.L.; Stuckey, R.; Teitelbaum, D.T.; Terracini, B.; Thebaud-Mony, A.; Vanhoorne, M.; Wang, X.R.; Watterson, A.; Wedeen, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) has received support from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Labor Office (ILO) to publish the African Newsletter on Occupational Health and Safety. The African Newsletter on Occupational Health and Safety should not be a med

  3. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF INTEL-SPONSORED REAL-TIME MULTIVIEW FACE DETECTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Gan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a case study of design and implementation of Intel-sponsored real-time face detection system conducted in University of Michigan—Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute (JI. This work is teamed up totally by 15 JI students and developed in three phases during 2013 and 2014. The system design of face detection is based on Intel High Definition (HD 4000 graphics and OpenCL. With numerous techniques including the accelerated pipeline over CPU and GPU, image decomposition, two-dimensional (2D task allocation, and the combination of Viola-Jones algorithm and continuously adaptive mean-shift (Camshift algorithm, the speed reaches 32 fps for real-time multi-view face detection. Plus, the frontal view detection accuracy obtains 81% in Phase I and reaches 95% for multi-view detection, in Phase III. Furthermore, an innovative application called face-detection game controller (FDGC is developed. At the time of this writing, the technology has been implemented in wearable devices and mobile with Intel cores.

  4. Reforms speed initiation of NCI-sponsored clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The process of opening a cancer clinical trial for patient accrual often takes years, and research has shown that trials which are slow to register patients often fail to finish. Following a thorough review, NCI’s Operational Efficiency Working Group prod

  5. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    In the chapter, I discuss the role day care institutions play in the construction of the idea of proper childhood in Denmark. Drawing on findings from research on ethnic minority children in two Danish day care institutions, I begin with a discussion of how childcare institutions act as civilising...... agents, empowered with the legitimate right to define and control normality and proper ways of behaving oneself. I aim to show how institutions come to define the normal child and proper childhood in accordance with current efforts toward reinventing national culture, exemplified by legislation requiring...... current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  6. Corporate sponsored education initiatives on board the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Ian T.; Durham, Alyson S.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Brod, Lawrence B.; Durham, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of a corporate sponsored ``Lecture from Space'' program on board the International Space Station (ISS) with funding coming from a host of new technology and marketing spin-offs. This program would meld existing education initiatives in NASA with new corporate marketing techniques. Astronauts in residence on board the ISS would conduct short ten to fifteen minute live presentations and/or conduct interactive discussions carried out by a teacher in the classroom. This concept is similar to a program already carried out during the Neurolab mission on Shuttle flight STS-90. Building on that concept, the interactive simulcasts would be broadcast over the Internet and linked directly to computers and televisions in classrooms worldwide. In addition to the live broadcasts, educational programs and demonstrations can be recorded in space, and marketed and sold for inclusion in television programs, computer software, and other forms of media. Programs can be distributed directly into classrooms as an additional presentation supplement, as well as over the Internet or through cable and broadcast television, similar to the Canadian Discovery Channel's broadcasts of the Neurolab mission. Successful marketing and advertisement can eventually lead to the creation of an entirely new, privately run cottage industry involving the distribution and sale of educationally related material associated with the ISS that would have the potential to become truly global in scope. By targeting areas of expertise and research interest in microgravity, a large curriculum could be developed using space exploration as a unifying theme. Expansion of this concept could enhance objectives already initiated through the International Space University to include elementary and secondary school students. The ultimate goal would be to stimulate interest in space and space related sciences in today's youth through creative educational marketing initiatives while at the

  7. EU-sponsored photovoltaic systems for rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesch, Gerhard [Joint Research Centre of the European Union, JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Development and proliferation of renewable energies are sponsored since 1983 by the European Union, normally up to 40% of the cost. (Programme THERMIE and predecessors). In the frame of this programme for more than one hundred projects of all kinds with thousands of photovoltaic energy supply systems have been implemented in Europe, 29 of these projects with 939 single pv-systems concern electrification of rural sites (e.g. agriculture) or isolated sites (e.g. mountain huts). Most of the single systems are of small size, 50 to 1000 Wp. A few of the systems are larger, up to 25 kWp, and supply local isolated mini-grids. In this paper the main features of the systems in six european countries are presented: The technical, economical and social results as well as the contributions of the Electric Power Utility (EPU`s) to these electrification are discussed. [Espanol] Desde 1983 la Union Europea ha auspiciado normalmente hasta el 40% del costo del desarrollo y proliferacion de las energias renovables. (Programa THERMIE y predecesores). En el marco de este programa con mas de cien proyectos de todos tipos, con miles de sistemas fotovoltaicos de suministro de energia, han sido implantados en Europa, 29 de estos proyectos con 929 sistemas fotovoltaicos sencillos se relacionan con la electrificacion de sitios rurales (por ejemplo agricultura) o de sitios aislados (por ejemplo cabanas en la montana). La mayoria de los sistemas sencillos son de pequeno tamano, 50 a 1000 Wp. Unos pocos de los sistemas son mas grandes, hasta de 25 kWp y alimentan mini-redes locales aisladas. En este articulo se presentan las caracteristicas principales de los sistemas en seis paises europeos: se analizan los resultados tecnicos, economicos y sociales, asi como las contribuciones de las empresas electricas.

  8. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  9. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Oberije, Cary [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Wiersma, Terry [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gy eonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); DeRuyck, Kim [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Warner, Andrew [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palma, David A. [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  10. A Case Study of Teaching Marketing Research Using Client-Sponsored Projects: Method, Challenges, and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Liliana L.; Davies, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    This case study outlines the use of client-sponsored research projects in a quantitative postgraduate marketing research subject conducted in a 12-week semester in a research-intensive Australian university. The case study attempts to address the dearth of recent literature on client-sponsored research projects in the discipline of marketing.…

  11. 29 CFR 4043.29 - Change in contributing sponsor or controlled group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... solely in a reorganization involving a mere change in identity, form, or place of organization, however... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Change in contributing sponsor or controlled group. 4043.29... Events § 4043.29 Change in contributing sponsor or controlled group. (a) Reportable event. A...

  12. 14 CFR 152.105 - Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning. 152.105 Section 152.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....105 Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project...

  13. 42 CFR 440.350 - Employer-sponsored insurance health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.350 Employer-sponsored insurance health plans. (a) A State may provide benchmark or benchmark-equivalent coverage by obtaining employer sponsored health plans (either alone...

  14. Carotid blowout syndrome in pharyngeal cancer patients treated by hypofractionated stereotactic re-irradiation using CyberKnife: A multi-institutional matched-cohort analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Although reirradiation has attracted attention as a potential therapy for recurrent head and neck tumors with the advent of modern radiotherapy, severe rate toxicity such as carotid blowout syndrome (CBOS) limits its potential. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors of CBOS after hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and patients: We conducted a matched-pair design examination of pharyngeal cancer patients treated by CyberKnife reirradiation in four institutes. Twelve cases with CBOS were observed per 60 cases without CBOS cases. Prognostic factors for CBOS were analyzed and a risk classification model was constructed. Results: The median prescribed radiation dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions with CyberKnife SBRT after 60 Gy/30 fractions of previous radiotherapy. The median duration between reirradiation and CBOS onset was 5 months (range, 0–69 months). CBOS cases showed a median survival time of 5.5 months compared to 22.8 months for non-CBOS cases (1-year survival rate, 36% vs.72%; p = 0.003). Univariate analysis identified an angle of carotid invasion of >180°, the presence of ulceration, planning treatment volume, and irradiation to lymph node areas as statistically significant predisposing factors for CBOS. Only patients with carotid invasion of >180° developed CBOS (12/50, 24%), whereas no patient with tumor involvement less than a half semicircle around the carotid artery developed CBOS (0/22, 0%, p = 0.03). Multivariate Cox hazard model analysis revealed that the presence of ulceration and irradiation to lymph nodes were statistically significant predisposing factors. Thus, we constructed a CBOS risk classification system: CBOS index = (summation of risk factors; carotid invasion >180°, presence of ulceration, lymph node area irradiation). This system sufficiently separated the risk groups. Conclusion: The presence of ulceration and lymph node irradiation are risk factors of CBOS. The CBOS index

  15. Comparing docetaxel with gemcitabine as second-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A single institute randomized phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the backbone of treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC however second-line treatment options are controversial particularly in patients with borderline performance status (PS of 2. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy and toxicity of weekly docetaxel versus gemcitabine in this clinical setting. Patients and methods: A total of 70 patients with advanced (stage IIIB, IV NSCLC entered this single institute study. Cases of this study had experienced disease progression after the first-line platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, with PS 0- 2 in “Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group” scale. They were randomly assigned by stratified blocks to receive docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (Arm A, n=34 or gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 (Arm B, n=36 days 1, 8 and 15, every three weeks, for up to six cycles. Primary end point was progression free survival (PFS and secondary end points were objective response rate, disease control rate, median overall survival (OS and toxicity. Dose modification was permitted upon clinician’s discretion for each individual patient. Results: Median of PFS was 2.02 months in arm A and 2.63 months in arm B (HR= 1.279; 95% CI: 0.710-2.304, P= 0.551. Although median OS for arm A was numerically greater (9.2 months than arm B (8.3 months it was statistically non-significant (HR= 1.384; 95% CI: 0.632 to 2.809, P= 0.59. Objective response was higher in Arm B than that in Arm A (P= 0.20 but disease control rates were statistically different in both arms (P= 0.034. Statistically significant differences in term of leukopenia was seen in arm B (P= 0.013. Conclusion: This study, with limited number of cases, indicates that in advanced NSCLC, weekly docetaxel and gemcitabine are reasonable second-line treatment options with statistically similar effectiveness in terms of PFS and median OS with manageable toxicities in patients with PS 0-2.

  16. Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Christina H; Singh, Vikesh K; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wasan, Ajay D; Yadav, Dhiraj; Andersen, Dana K

    2015-11-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into 6 sessions: 1) Introduction and Overview; 2) Keynote Address; 3) New Approaches to the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis; 4) Biomarkers of Pain and Inflammation; 5) New Approaches to the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer; and 6) Shed Exosomes, Shed Cells, and Shed Proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the noninvasive determination of pancreatic pathology; the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy; and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease were repeatedly emphasized. PMID:26465948

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website ... an endorsement by NIH or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products ...

  18. Institutional economics

    OpenAIRE

    Rossiaud, Sylvain; Locatelli, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The discipline of institutional economics has gained increasing prominence in recent years, because standard economic explanations can often not come to grips with major contemporary policy issues, such as economic reform in affluent, but dysfunctional economies, the transformation of the failed socialist command economies and the governance problems of the new industrial economies. Institutional economists point out that rule systems matter greatly to explaining these problems and that insti...

  19. Analysis of Sociodemographic parameters of patients admitted in a newly established palliative care center in a regional cancer institute of north-west India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Palliative care services are an indispensable part of a tertiary regional cancer care center. The oncologists should be made aware of the requirement of better relief of pain and other distressing symptoms to provide better quality of life to the patients suffering from advanced cancer.

  20. Improving Student Performance Outcomes and Graduation Rates through Institutional Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggow, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores a grant-sponsored program and examines the role of departmental and institutional collaborations in advancing student performance outcomes. It provides a theoretical framework and a description of best practices for ensuring the success of first-generation urban community college students.

  1. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  2. Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations; Strafrechtliche Bedeutung des Sponsorings in der Medizin: Gesetzliche Rahmenbedingungen und Handlungsempfehlungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany); Theilmann, M. [Rechtsanwalt Martin Theilmann, Osnabrueck (Germany); Bolenz, M. [Fakultaet Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Fachhochschule Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    As a consequence of the so-called ''Heart-Valve-Affair'' in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced. (orig.)

  3. Collaborators | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TARGET initiative is jointly managed within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) by the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)Opens in a New Tab.

  4. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    New results from the NCI-sponsored PLCO Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care.

  5. The Influence of Sponsor-Event Congruence in Sponsorship of Music Festivals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Hutabarat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses the research on the Influence of Sponsor-Event Congruence toward Brand Image, Attitudes toward the Brand and Purchase Intention. Having reviewed the literatures and arranged the hypotheses, the data has been gathered by distributing the questionnaire to 155 audiences at the Java Jazz Music Festival, firstly with convenience sampling and then snowballing sampling approach. The analysis of data was executed with Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The result shows the sponsor-event congruence variable has a positive impact toward brand image and attitudes toward the brand sponsor. Brand Image also has a positive impact toward purchase intention; in contrary attitudes toward the brand do not have a positive purchase intention. With those results, to increase the sponsorship effectiveness, the role of congruency is very significant in the sponsorship event. Congruency is a key influencer to trigger the sponsorship effectiveness. Congruency between the event and the sponsor is able to boost up the brand image and bring out favorable attitudes towards the brand for the success of marketing communication programs, particularly sponsorship. In addition to it, image transfer gets higher due to the congruency existence (fit between sponsor and event and directs the intention creation to buy sponsor brand product/service (purchase intention. In conclusion, sponsor-event congruence has effect on consumer responds toward sponsorship, either on the cognitive level, affective and also behavior.

  6. Retsmedicinsk Institut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Gregersen, Markil Ebbe Gregers

    1996-01-01

    Retsmedicinsk Institut hører under Aarhus Universitet og har pligt til at undervise og forske, men adskiller sig fra andre institutter ved at have en omfattende virksomhed med rekvireret arbejde, idet Statsobducenturet for Nørrejylland er henlagt til instituttet. Professoren, som også er statsobd......Retsmedicinsk Institut hører under Aarhus Universitet og har pligt til at undervise og forske, men adskiller sig fra andre institutter ved at have en omfattende virksomhed med rekvireret arbejde, idet Statsobducenturet for Nørrejylland er henlagt til instituttet. Professoren, som også er...... institut. De bygningsmæssige forhold er utidssvarende og medfører arbejdsmæssige og retssikkerhedsmæssige problemer, En snarlig udflytning er derfor nødvendig....

  7. Unimagined Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, Mikkel Bruun

    2007-01-01

    and methodology. Accordingly, it is suggested that scholars from the humanities in particular aggressively seek to develop new types of research institutions and methods in order to deal with the manifold forms of overlap between warfare and aesthetics. In empirical terms, focus is limited to the current......In this paper it is argued that war contains inherent and thus necessary aesthetic traits (ranging from sensory data to narrative features), but that existing research institutions throughout the West have failed to address this issue adequately, in terms of research policy, recruitment...

  8. Institutional Investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkmose, Hanne Søndergaard; Strand, Therese

    institutional investors in two Scandinavian countries with diminutive legal and cultural distance in general. Research Findings/Insights: Using data on shareholder proposals from Danish and Swedish annual general meetings from 2006 throughout 2010, we find that institutional investors are approximately......, as such a setup transfers power from the board to the owners. Presumably, this reduces the impact of free rider and collective action problems, and increases the shareholders’ inclination to make proposals, which is also what we find. Theoretical/Academic Implications: We contribute to literature by investigating...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute ...

  10. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  11. Strategies for Biochemical and Pathologic Quality Assurance in a Large Multi-Institutional Biorepository; The Experience of the PROCURE Quebec Prostate Cancer Biobank

    OpenAIRE

    Brimo, Fadi; Aprikian, Armen; Latour, Mathieu; Têtu, Bernard; Doueik, Alexandre; Scarlata, Eleonora; Hamel, Lucie; McKercher, Ginette; Saad, Fred; Lacombe, Louis; Carmel, Michel; Chevalier, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Well-characterized, high-quality fresh-frozen prostate tissue is required for prostate cancer research. As part of the PROCURE Prostate Cancer Biobank launched in 2007, four University Hospitals in Quebec joined to bank fresh frozen prostate tissues from radical prostatectomies (RP). As the biobank progressed towards allocation, the nature and quality of the tissues were determined. RP tissues were collected by standardized alternate mirror-image or biopsy-based targeted methods, and frozen f...

  12. Knowledge of risk factors, beliefs and practices of female healthcare professionals towards breast cancer in a tertiary institution in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Odusanya Olumuyiwa O; Ibrahim Nasiru A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Breast cancer is the leading female malignancy in Nigeria. Screening for early detection has led to reduction in mortality from the disease. It is known that attitudes of physicians and motivation by community nurses influence uptake of screening methods by women. This study aims to investigate knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, beliefs about treatment and practice of screening methods among a cohort of female healthcare professionals in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods A cro...

  13. Institution Morphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  14. Cancer of the Testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1975-2013 Browse the Tables and Figures Access CSR Contents in PDF Generate Custom Reports About the ... Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2013/ , based on November 2015 SEER data ...

  15. Cancer of the Anus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1975-2013 Browse the Tables and Figures Access CSR Contents in PDF Generate Custom Reports About the ... Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2013/ , based on November 2015 SEER data ...

  16. Cancer of the Larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1975-2013 Browse the Tables and Figures Access CSR Contents in PDF Generate Custom Reports About the ... Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2013/ , based on November 2015 SEER data ...

  17. Cultural Artefact, Ideology Export or Soft Power? Confucius Institute in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a critical analysis of the transnational interplay of cultural, educational and economic forces that culminated with the establishment of a Chinese language and cultural centre in Peru, the Confucius Institute. Confucius Institutes are government-sponsored cultural centres devoted mainly to Chinese language education around the…

  18. Strategies for Biochemical and Pathologic Quality Assurance in a Large Multi-Institutional Biorepository; The Experience of the PROCURE Quebec Prostate Cancer Biobank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprikian, Armen; Latour, Mathieu; Têtu, Bernard; Doueik, Alexandre; Scarlata, Eleonora; Hamel, Lucie; McKercher, Ginette; Saad, Fred; Lacombe, Louis; Carmel, Michel; Chevalier, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Well-characterized, high-quality fresh-frozen prostate tissue is required for prostate cancer research. As part of the PROCURE Prostate Cancer Biobank launched in 2007, four University Hospitals in Quebec joined to bank fresh frozen prostate tissues from radical prostatectomies (RP). As the biobank progressed towards allocation, the nature and quality of the tissues were determined. RP tissues were collected by standardized alternate mirror-image or biopsy-based targeted methods, and frozen for banking. Clinical/pathological parameters were captured. For quality control, two presumed benign and two presumed cancerous frozen, biobanked tissue blocks per case (10/site) were randomly selected during the five years of collection. In a consensus meeting, 4 pathologists blindly evaluated slides (n=160) and graded quality, Gleason score (GS), and size of cancer foci. The quality of tissue RNA (37/40 cases) was assessed using the RNA Integrity Number. The biobank included 1819 patients of mean age: 62.1 years; serum PSA: 8ng/ml; prostate weight: 47.8 g; GS: 7; and pathological stage: T2 in 64.5%, T3A in 25.5% and T3B in 10% of cases. Of the 157 evaluable slides, 79 and 78 had benign and cancer tissue, respectively. GS for the 37 cancer-positive cases were: 6 in 9, 7 in 18 and >7 in 10 and, in most instances, in concordance with final GS. In 40% of slides containing cancer, foci occupied ≥50% of block surface and 42% had a diameter ≥1 cm. Tissue was well preserved and consistently yielded RNA of very good quality with RNA Integrity Number (RIN) >7 for 97% of cases (mean=8.7±0.7) during the five-year collection period. This study confirms the high quality of randomly selected benign and cancerous fresh-frozen prostate tissues of the PROCURE Quebec Prostate Cancer Biobank. These results strengthen the uniqueness of this large prospective resource for prostate cancer research. PMID:24194978

  19. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shingo, E-mail: s_kato@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, International Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, Gunma (Japan); Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Cao, Jianping [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Soochow University, Soochow (China); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Hospital Umum Sarawak, Kuching (Malaysia); Calaguas, Miriam J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City, the Philippines (Philippines); Reyes, Rey H. de los [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center, Manila, the Philippines (Philippines); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dung, To Anh [Department of Breast and Gynecology Radiotherapy, National Cancer Institute, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Supriana, Nana [Department of Radiation Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta (Indonesia); Erawati, Dyah [Division of Radiotherapy, Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya (Indonesia); Mizuno, Hideyuki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences of Japan, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  20. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m2) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival

  1. Strategic considerations for provider sponsored organizations entering the risk-bearing Medicare market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treash, M; Thomson, K

    1997-01-01

    This article considers Michael Porter's five forces of industry competition as it relates to provider sponsored organizations and asks four important questions on marketing differentiation, quality, size of market, and product/service scope. PMID:10175719

  2. Motivation of managers assigned to a Federal agency towards participation in government-sponsored training

    OpenAIRE

    Nason, Alan Barry

    1998-01-01

    MOTIVATION OF MANAGERS ASSIGNED TO A FEDERAL AGENCY TOWARDS PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED TRAINING Alan B. Nason (ABSTRACT) This study examined the motivations of managers in a Federal government agency to participate or not participate in voluntary government-sponsored training. The researcher distributed a questionnaire, via agency electronic mail, to managers and supervisors in the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The questionnaire comprised items selected f...

  3. The Economics of Quality Sponsored Data in Non-Neutral Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan; Sarkar, Saswati; Sundaresan, Karthikeyan; Khojastepour, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for data has driven the Service Providers (SPs) to provide differential treatment of traffic to generate additional revenue streams from Content Providers (CPs). While SPs currently only provide best-effort services to their CPs, it is plausible to envision a model in near future, where CPs are willing to sponsor quality of service for their content in exchange of sharing a portion of their profit with SPs. This quality sponsoring becomes invaluable especially when the avai...

  4. An Empirical Analysis of Search Engine Advertising: Sponsored Search in Electronic Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Anindya Ghose; Sha Yang

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of sponsored search advertising--where advertisers pay a fee to Internet search engines to be displayed alongside organic (nonsponsored) Web search results--is gaining ground as the largest source of revenues for search engines. Using a unique six-month panel data set of several hundred keywords collected from a large nationwide retailer that advertises on Google, we empirically model the relationship between different sponsored search metrics such as click-through rates, conve...

  5. Business Model Innovation and Competitive Imitation: The Case of Sponsor-Based Business Models

    OpenAIRE

    Casadesus-Masanell, Ramon; Zhu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the first formal model of business model innovation. Our analysis focuses on sponsor-based business model innovations where a firm monetizes its product through sponsors rather than setting prices to its customer base. We analyze strategic interactions between an innovative entrant and an incumbent where the incumbent may imitate the entrant's business model innovation once it is revealed. The results suggest that an entrant needs to strategically choose whether to reveal ...

  6. INSTITUTIONS MATTER

    OpenAIRE

    .

    1994-01-01

    Successful development policy entails an understanding of the dynamics of economic change if the policies pursued are to have the desired consequences. And a dynamic model of economic change entails as an integral part of that model analysis of the polity since it is the polity that specifies and enforces the formal rules. While we are still some distance from having such a model the structure that is evolving in the new institutional economics, even though incomplete, suggests radically diff...

  7. La radiothérapie du cancer de l'endomètre: expérience de l'institut national d'oncologie à propos de 52 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezouri, Imane; Berhili, Soufiane; Mouhajir, Nawal; Bellefqih, Sara; Elkacemi, Hanan; Kebdani, Tayeb; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Le cancer de l'endomètre est le cancer gynécologique le plus fréquent en occident. Il concerne principalement les femmes ménopausées. L'objectif de notre travail est de rapporter l'expérience du service de radiothérapie à l'Institut National d'Oncologie (INO) dans la prise en charge du cancer de l'endomètre. Nous avons analysé rétrospectivement 52 cas de cancer de l'endomètre traités dans le service de radiothérapie de l'INO entre 2007 à 2009. Les données collectées à partir des dossiers médicaux de nos patientes concernaient les aspects épidémiologiques, cliniques, thérapeutiques et évolutifs de ce cancer. La médiane d’âge des patientes était de 57 ans, 87% étaient ménopausées. Le délai moyen de consultation était de six mois. Le maitre symptôme était des métrorragies chez 51 patientes. Le diagnostic histologique a été porté sur un curetage biopsique de l'endomètre dans 51% des cas. L'examen anatomopathologique a montré un adénocarcinome endométrioïde dans 92% des cas. Après le bilan, 27% des patientes étaient stade I, 30% stade II, 20% stade III et 1% stade IVA selon la classification de la Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie Obstétrique (FIGO). Après la chirurgie, 51% des patientes ont reçu une radiothérapie externe. La dose délivrée était de 46 Gray (Gy). Une curiethérapie du fond vaginal a été délivrée chez toutes les patientes. Sur le plan évolutif, 83% des patientes étaient toujours suivies en situation de bon contrôle de leur maladie, 8% ont eu une récidive locorégionale et 4% avaient des métastases à distance. Ainsi, le cancer de l'endomètre est un cancer dont le traitement repose sur la chirurgie. La radiothérapie est le traitement adjuvant principal. PMID:27279969

  8. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPCPH). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INSTPH) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPCPH and INSTPH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPCPH and INSTPH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INSTPH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPCPH and INSTPH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies

  9. Usefulness of Ultrasound and Ultrasound-guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy for Axillary Staging in Breast Cancer: Analysis of 327 patients at a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Mi Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Lyou, Chae Yeon; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Sung Won; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Yu Jung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Aspiration biopsy (FNAB) for the diagnosis of metastasis in the axillary lymph node (LN) of patients with breast cancer. A retrospective review of the data was performed on 327 breast cancer patients that underwent axillary US from Jun 2006 to July 2008. US guided FNAB was performed when a LN indicated suspicious findings. Results of FNAB were compared with those of subsequent surgery. Of the 327 patients, 111 showed suspicious findings on US and underwent FNAB. Among the 111 cases, 73 (66%) were positive for cancer, while 38 (34%) were negative results. A Total of 254 patients who had normal findings on US (n=216) and negative results on FNAB (n=38) underwent SNB, of which 56 (22%) were proven to have metastasis. Sensitivity and specificity of US were 61.9% and 81.8%, respectively, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 65.8% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 79.2%. Sensitivity and specificity of US-guided FNAB were 86.9% and 100%, respectively, with a PPV of 100% and a NPV of 71.7%. US and US-guided FNAB performed for axillary staging are useful methods with a high specificity and positive predictive value in invasive breast cancer patients

  10. Clinical outcome and dosimetric parameters of chemo-radiation including MRI guided adaptive brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators for cervical cancer patients: A single institution experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, C.N.; Leeuw, A.A. de; Roesink, J.M.; Tersteeg, R.J.; Moerland, M.A.; Witteveen, P.O.; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Dorst, E.B. van; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate dosimetric parameters and clinical outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemo-radiation and MR-image guided adaptive brachytherapy (MR-IGABT) using tandem-ovoid applicators for intracavitary or combined intracavitary/interstitial approaches. METHOD: This retrospecti

  11. Late tamoxifen in patients previously operated for breast cancer without postoperative tamoxifen: 5-year results of a single institution randomised study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidoli Ettore

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A population of breast cancer patients exists who, for various reasons, never received adjuvant post-operative tamoxifen (TAM. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of late TAM in these patients. Methods From 1997 to 2003, patients aged 35 to 75 years, operated more than 2 years previously for monolateral breast cancer without adjuvant TAM, with no signs of metastases and no contraindication to TAM were randomized to TAM 20 mg/day orally for 2 years or follow-up alone. Events were categorized as locoregional relapse, distant metastases, metachronous breast cancer, tumours other than breast cancer and death from any causes, whichever occurred first. The sample size (197 patients per arm, plus 10% allowance was based on the assumption of a 30% decrease in the number of events occurring at a rate of 5% annually in the 10 years following randomization. Four hundred and thirty-three patients were randomized in the study (TAM 217, follow-up 216. Patients characteristics (TAM/follow-up included: median age 55/55 years, median time from surgery 25/25 months (range, 25-288/25-294, in situ carcinoma 18/24, oestrogen receptor (ER positive in 75/68, negative in 70/57, unknown in 72/91 patients. Previous adjuvant treatment included chemotherapy in 131/120 and an LHRH analogue in 11/13 patients. Results Thirty-six patients prematurely discontinued TAM after a median of 1 month, mostly because of subjective intolerance. Eighty-three events (TAM 39, follow-up 44 occurred: locoregional relapse in 10/8, distant metastases in 14/16, metachronous breast cancer in 4/10, other tumours in 11/10 patients. Less ER-positive secondary breast cancers occurred in the TAM treated patients than in follow-up patients (1 vs 10, p = 0.005. Event-free survival was similar in both groups of patients. Conclusions This 5-year analysis revealed significantly less metachronous ER-positive breast cancers in the TAM treated patients. No other statistically

  12. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  13. AACR 2010: Strategy for Mapping of 20 Cancers - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    TCGA held an NCI-sponsored session at the American Association for Cancer Research's (AACR) 101st Annual Meeting 2010 to address the program’s Phase II structure and strategies for sample acquisition, evolving technologies, data management and analysis.

  14. Biological Markers May Indicate Poor Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team of researchers has found an association between breast cancer survival and two proteins that, when present in the blood in high levels, are indicators of inflammation. Using data from the Health, Eating, Activity and Lifestyle (HEAL) study sponsor

  15. Institutional Ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    The study of M&As is dominated by positivist and functionalist world views and the use of quantitative methods. Although extant research also uses qualitative and mixed methods, it can be criticized for viewing its subject matter through an abstract and external lens. The researcher is placed in ......, and point to some of the problems in M&A studies identified through this lens. Finally, we argue why institutional ethnography, in comparison with other methods of inquiry, is particularly fruitful in the study of mergers and acquisitions....

  16. 76 FR 7574 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... Extramural Research and Training, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615...: Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERC) State of the...

  17. Pilot study investigating the prognostic significance of thymidine phosphorylase expression in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a single institution retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedeschi AL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anna Lisa Tedeschi,1 Zohreh Eslami,2 Evgenia Garoufalis,1 Ramy R Saleh,3 Atilla Omeroglu,2 Gulbeyaz Altinel,2 Maria Ait-Tihyaty,4 Bertrand Jean-Claude,4 Catalin Mihalcioiu1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Medicine, McGill University, 4Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada Background: The thymidine phosphorylase (TP enzyme is expressed in higher levels in cancer tissue when compared with normal tissue. It is involved in the intratumoral activation of widely prescribed pyrimidine-derived antimetabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine and capecitabine (Xeloda®. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical correlation between TP expression in tumor tissue and the clinical outcome of capecitabine-based therapy in patients with locally advanced (stage III or metastatic breast cancer (stage IV.Methods: The following variables were analyzed as potential determinants of benefit from a capecitabine-based therapy: TP expression, estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status, and Ki67 status. This was accomplished by immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded cancer tissues from 18 patients with breast cancer treated with at least one cycle of capecitabine. Clinical outcome was measured as time to progression.Results: TP staining intensities in both the invasive and in situ components in patients with lobular and ductal carcinomas were reported. Higher levels of TP in the invasive component were expressed in ER-negative tumors when compared with ER-positive tumors (P<0.05. The ER-positive group expressing lower levels of TP had a median time to progression of 13 months compared with the ER-negative group expressing higher levels of TP which had a median time

  18. Clinico-pathological spectrum of primary ovarian malignant mixed mullerian tumors (OMMMT) from a tertiary cancer institute: A series of 27 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Menon; Kedar Deodhar; Bharat Rekhi; Rahul Dhake; Sudeep Gupta; Jaya Ghosh; Amita Maheshwari; Umesh Mahantshetty; Shyam Shrivastva; Atul Budukh; Tongaonkar, Hemant B; Rajendra Kerkar

    2013-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To study the clinico-pathological characteristics of primary ovarian malignant mixed mullerian tumor (OMMMT) and assess the prognostic factors associated with treatment outcome and survival. Materials and methods: The pathology database was searched for primary ovarian carcinosarcoma diagnosed and/or managed at our institute from period of January 2004 to July 2010. The histological sections were reviewed, with emphasis on type and grade of epithelial and sarcomatous comp...

  19. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  20. Anal cancer precursor lesions in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients seen at a tertiary health institution in Brazil Lesões precursoras do câncer anal em pacientes HIV-positivos e HIV-negativos atendidos numa instituição de saúde terciária no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Tramujas da Costa e Silva; José Ribamar de Araújo; Rosilene Viana de Andrade; Celso Rômulo Barbosa Cabral; Felicidad Santos Gimenez; Adriana Gonçalves Daumas Pinheiro Guimarães; Ticiane Costa Martins; Lucília Rocha Lopes; Luiz Carlos de Lima Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL) or anal cancer in patients attended at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas. Methods: 344 patients consecutively attended at the institution, in 2007/2008, were distributed in the following strata according to presence/abscense of at risk conditions for anal cancer: Group 1 _ HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (101); Group 2 _ HIV-positive females (49); Group 3 _ patients without any at risk con...

  1. Inspiration Was Just Floating in the Natural Air-Research in Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry of CAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by NSFC,CAS,and Ministry of Science and Technology,the Key Lab of Organic Solids in Institute of Chemistry of CAS developed tungsten oxide "light switch" membrane,which has wetting and discolorment abilities.

  2. Outcomes of active surveillance for the management of clinically localized prostate cancer in the prospective, multi-institutional Canary PASS cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Lisa F.; Thompson, Ian M.; Boyer, Hilary D.; Brooks, James D.; Carroll, Peter R.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Dash, Atreya; Ellis, William J.; Fazli, Ladan; Feng, Ziding; Gleave, Martin E.; Kunju, Priya; Lance, Raymond S.; McKenney, Jesse K.; Meng, Maxwell V.; Nicolas, Marlo M.; Sanda, Martin G.; Simko, Jeffry; So, Alan; Tretiakova, Maria S.; Troyer, Dean A.; True, Lawrence D.; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Virgin, Jeff; Wagner, Andrew A.; Wei, John T.; Zheng, Yingye; Nelson, Peter S.; Lin, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Active surveillance represents a strategy to address the overtreatment of prostate cancer, yet uncertainty regarding individual patient outcomes remains a concern. We evaluated outcomes in a prospective multi-center study of active surveillance. Methods We studied 905 men in the prospective Canary Prostate cancer Active Surveillance Study (PASS) enrolled between 2008 to 2013. We collected clinical data at study entry and at pre-specified intervals and determined associations with adverse reclassification defined as increased Gleason grade or greater cancer volume on follow-up biopsy. We also evaluated the relationships of clinical parameters with pathology findings in participants who underwent surgery after a period of active surveillance. Results During a median follow-up of 28 months, 24% of participants experienced adverse reclassification, of whom 53% underwent treatment while 31% continued active surveillance. Overall, 19% of participants received treatment, 68% with adverse reclassification while 32% opted for treatment without disease reclassification. In multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, percent of biopsy cores with cancer, BMI, and PSA density were associated with adverse reclassification (P = 0.01, 0.04, 0.04). Of 103 participants subsequently treated by radical prostatectomy, 34% had adverse pathology, defined as primary pattern 4–5 or non-organ confined disease, including two with positive lymph nodes, with no significant relationship between risk category at diagnosis and findings at surgery (P = 0.76). Conclusion Most men remain on active surveillance at five years without adverse reclassification or adverse pathology at surgery. However, clinical factors had only modest association with disease reclassification, supporting the need for approaches that improve prediction of this outcome. PMID:26327354

  3. El Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas en el control del cáncer en el Perú The role of the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in the control of cancer in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Rosario Salazar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La incidencia estimada de cáncer en el Perú es de 150 casos x 100 000 habitantes. Este ocupa el segundo lugar de las causas mortalidad a nivel nacional y se estima que el 75% de los casos se diagnostican en etapa avanzada y principalmente en Lima. En ese contexto, el Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN ha promovido la descentralización de la atención oncológica con la creación de los institutos regionales de enfermedades neoplásicas, las unidades oncológicas y los preventorios. Asimismo ha diseñado, desarrollado e implementado el Programa Presupuestal de Prevención y Control de Cáncer, por lo que desde el año 2011, más de 7000 establecimientos del país asignan recursos para la prevención, promoción y detección precoz de los cánceres más frecuentes en el Perú. Con el financiamiento del seguro estatal, se integraron los ejes estratégicos básicos para una atención integral del cáncer en la población de menores recursos. De esta manera y dentro de una política de estado integradora y articulada con el sector salud, nace el Plan Nacional para la Atención Integral del Cáncer y el Mejoramiento del Acceso a los Servicios Oncológicos en el Perú, denominado “Plan Esperanza”. En este artículo, desarrollamos el papel que viene cumpliendo el INEN en el control del cáncer como problema de salud pública, destacando la importancia del Programa Estratégico Presupuestal de Prevención y Control del Cáncer y de su papel en el “Plan Esperanza”With a mortality rate that constitutes the second nationwide, the estimated incidence of cancer in Peru is 150 cases x 100 000 inhabitants. Around 75% of the cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mainly in Lima. In this context, the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN has promoted the decentralization of oncological care creating regional institutes of neoplastic diseases, oncological units and prevention centers. In addition, INEN has designed

  4. The Role of Large-Format Histopathology in Assessing Subgross Morphological Prognostic Parameters: A Single Institution Report of 1000 Consecutive Breast Cancer Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Tot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer subgross morphological parameters (disease extent, lesion distribution, and tumor size provide significant prognostic information and guide therapeutic decisions. Modern multimodality radiological imaging can determine these parameters with increasing accuracy in most patients. Large-format histopathology preserves the spatial relationship of the tumor components and their relationship to the resection margins and has clear advantages over traditional routine pathology techniques. We report a series of 1000 consecutive breast cancer cases worked up with large-format histology with detailed radiological-pathological correlation. We confirmed that breast carcinomas often exhibit complex subgross morphology in both early and advanced stages. Half of the cases were extensive tumors and occupied a tissue space ≥40 mm in its largest dimension. Because both in situ and invasive tumor components may exhibit unifocal, multifocal, and diffuse lesion distribution, 17 different breast cancer growth patterns can be observed. Combining in situ and invasive tumor components, most cases fall into three aggregate growth patterns: unifocal (36%, multifocal (35%, and diffuse (28%. Large-format histology categories of tumor size and disease extent were concordant with radiological measurements in approximately 80% of the cases. Noncalcified, low-grade in situ foci, and invasive tumor foci <5 mm were the most frequent causes of discrepant findings.

  5. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  6. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Consortium of Prospective Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Collins, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fuller, Donald [Genesis Healthcare Partners, San Diego, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Katz, Alan [Flushing Radiation Oncology, Flushing, New York (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the early and late health-related quality of life (QOL) outcomes among prostate cancer patients following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patient self-reported QOL was prospectively measured among 864 patients from phase 2 clinical trials of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Data from the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) instrument were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals up to 6 years. SBRT delivered a median dose of 36.25 Gy in 4 or 5 fractions. A short course of androgen deprivation therapy was given to 14% of patients. Results: Median follow-up was 3 years and 194 patients remained evaluable at 5 years. A transient decline in the urinary and bowel domains was observed within the first 3 months after SBRT which returned to baseline status or better within 6 months and remained so beyond 5 years. The same pattern was observed among patients with good versus poor baseline function and was independent of the degree of early toxicities. Sexual QOL decline was predominantly observed within the first 9 months, a pattern not altered by the use of androgen deprivation therapy or patient age. Conclusion: Long-term outcome demonstrates that prostate SBRT is well tolerated and has little lasting impact on health-related QOL. A transient and modest decline in urinary and bowel QOL during the first few months after SBRT quickly recovers to baseline levels. With a large number of patients evaluable up to 5 years following SBRT, it is unlikely that unexpected late adverse effects will manifest themselves.

  8. Full-dose intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons in breast cancer. First report on late toxicity and cosmetic results from a single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to investigate the feasibility of applying exclusive intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) after conservative surgery in limited-stage breast carcinoma and to evaluate late effects and cosmetic results after this new conservative treatment. Patients and methods: from October 2000 to November 2002, 47 consecutive patients with unifocal breast carcinoma up to a diameter of 2 cm received conservative surgery followed by IORT with electrons as the sole adjuvant local therapy. Three different dose levels were used: 20 Gy (seven patients), 22 Gy (20 patients), and 24 Gy (20 patients). Patients were evaluated using RTOG/EORTC scale to assess the incidence of late complications. During follow-up, a radiologic assessment with mammography and sonography was periodically performed and any breast-imaging alterations were reported. Results: after a follow-up ranging from 36 to 63 months (median, 48 months), 15 patients developed breast fibrosis (grade 2 in 14 patients, grade 3 in one patient), two patients presented with grade 3 skin changes, one patient developed a clinically relevant fat necrosis, and one patient showed breast edema and pain. Two patients developed contralateral breast cancer and one distant metastases; no local relapses occurred. Asymptomatic findings of fat necrosis were observed at mammography in twelve patients (25.5%), while an hypoechoic area was revealed by sonography in ten patients (21.5%). In four patients (8%), mammographic and sonographic findings suggested malignant lesions and required a rebiopsy to confirm the benign nature of the lesion. Conclusion: IORT in breast carcinoma is still an experimental treatment option for select patients with breast cancer and its application should be restricted to prospective trials. Although preliminary data on local control are encouraging, a longer follow-up is needed to confirm the efficacy of IORT in breast cancer and to exclude that severe late complications compromise the cosmetic results or

  9. Full-dose intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons in breast cancer. First report on late toxicity and cosmetic results from a single-institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussari, S.; Busana, L.; Vanoni, V.; Tomio, L. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy); Sala, W.S. della [Dept. of Radiology, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy); Eccher, C.; Zani, B. [Dept. of Surgery, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy); Menegotti, L. [Dept. of Health Physics, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: to investigate the feasibility of applying exclusive intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) after conservative surgery in limited-stage breast carcinoma and to evaluate late effects and cosmetic results after this new conservative treatment. Patients and methods: from October 2000 to November 2002, 47 consecutive patients with unifocal breast carcinoma up to a diameter of 2 cm received conservative surgery followed by IORT with electrons as the sole adjuvant local therapy. Three different dose levels were used: 20 Gy (seven patients), 22 Gy (20 patients), and 24 Gy (20 patients). Patients were evaluated using RTOG/EORTC scale to assess the incidence of late complications. During follow-up, a radiologic assessment with mammography and sonography was periodically performed and any breast-imaging alterations were reported. Results: after a follow-up ranging from 36 to 63 months (median, 48 months), 15 patients developed breast fibrosis (grade 2 in 14 patients, grade 3 in one patient), two patients presented with grade 3 skin changes, one patient developed a clinically relevant fat necrosis, and one patient showed breast edema and pain. Two patients developed contralateral breast cancer and one distant metastases; no local relapses occurred. Asymptomatic findings of fat necrosis were observed at mammography in twelve patients (25.5%), while an hypoechoic area was revealed by sonography in ten patients (21.5%). In four patients (8%), mammographic and sonographic findings suggested malignant lesions and required a rebiopsy to confirm the benign nature of the lesion. Conclusion: IORT in breast carcinoma is still an experimental treatment option for select patients with breast cancer and its application should be restricted to prospective trials. Although preliminary data on local control are encouraging, a longer follow-up is needed to confirm the efficacy of IORT in breast cancer and to exclude that severe late complications compromise the cosmetic results or

  10. Prediction of pathological and oncological outcomes based on extended prostate biopsy results in patients with prostate cancer receiving radical prostatectomy: a single institution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaki Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of pathological outcomes prior to surgery remains a challenging problem for the appropriate surgical indication of prostate cancer. This study was performed to identify preoperative values predictive of pathological and oncological outcomes based on standardized extended prostate biopsies with core histological results diagrammed/mapped in patients receiving radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer clinically diagnosed as localized or locally advanced disease. Methods In 124 patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (cT1c–cT3a without prior treatment, pathological outcomes on the surgical specimen including seminal vesicle involvement (SVI, positive surgical margin (PSM, and perineural invasion (PNI were studied in comparison with clinical parameters based on the results of 14-core prostate biopsies comprising sextant, laterally-directed sextant, and bilateral transition zone (TZ sampling. Results Concerning the association of pathological outcomes with oncological outcomes, patients with PSM and PNI on surgical specimens had poorer biochemical-progression-free survival than those without PSM (logrank p = 0.002 and PNI (p = 0.003; it was also poorer concerning SVI, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.120. Concerning the impact of clinical parameters on these pathological outcomes, positive TZ and multiple positive biopsy cores in the prostatic middle were independent values predictive of SVI with multivariate analyses (p = 0.020 and p = 0.025, respectively; both positive TZ and multiple positive prostatic middle biopsies were associated with larger tumor volume (p  Conclusions %positive cores and Gleason score in extended biopsies were independent values predictive of PSM and PNI in prostate cancer clinically diagnosed as localized or locally advanced disease, respectively, which were associated with poorer oncological outcomes. When

  11. Pilot study investigating the prognostic significance of thymidine phosphorylase expression in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a single institution retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tedeschi AL; Eslami Z; Garoufalis E; Saleh RR; Omeroglu A; Altinel G; Ait-Tihyaty M; Jean-Claude B; Mihalcioiu C

    2015-01-01

    Anna Lisa Tedeschi,1 Zohreh Eslami,2 Evgenia Garoufalis,1 Ramy R Saleh,3 Atilla Omeroglu,2 Gulbeyaz Altinel,2 Maria Ait-Tihyaty,4 Bertrand Jean-Claude,4 Catalin Mihalcioiu1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Medicine, McGill University, 4Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, QC, C...

  12. 骨转移前列腺癌的临床诊治研究报道%Clinical features and management of prostate cancer with bone metastases: the first report of our Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijian Shen; Honglin Xie; Chaojun Wang; Songliang Cai; Liping Xie; Suo Wang; Zhigen Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of diagnosis and treatment outcomes for bone metastatic prostate cancer. Methods: A retrospective study with a total of 128 prostate cancer (Pca) was performed from 2000 to 2005, in our institute. We analyzed the clinical features and outcomes of patients with bone metastases and the data and follow-up of 63 bone metastases was collected by one registrar. Cochran Armitage trend test was used for statistic analysis and a P-value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: The mean age was 73 (range 55 to 87) years. The PSA level was from 0.083 ng/mL to 6462 ng/mL. Bone metastases morbidity had good relationship with PSA level. With the mean follow up of 30 (range 6 to 72) months for 52/63 (82.5%) patients, 15 (28.8%) died from Pea with a mean survival of 21 months and 1 patient with PSA less than 4 ng/mL at the time died from cerebrovascular suddenness 6 months post-treatment. Conclusion: The early effect of endocrine treatment for bone metastases is obvious, and palliative prostatectomy is satisfactory and able to improve the quality of life rapidly for patients with obstructive symptoms.

  13. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  14. Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size 10 (α/β = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6–39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7–72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%–100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%–98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%–100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade ≥1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%–28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%–8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade ≥3 cases were observed for genitourinary/gastrointestinal late complications. Conclusions: These results suggest that definitive radiotherapy using HDR-ICBT with a low cumulative dose schedule (BED, 62 Gy10 at point A) can provide excellent local control without severe toxicity in nonbulky (<4-cm) early-stage cervical cancer.

  15. Historically aggressive types of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer often have radioactive avid distant metastases: a study of 314 patients with distant metastases at a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tala, H.P.; Rondeau, G.; Fagin, J.A.; Tuttle, R.M. [Endocrinology Division, Department of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine Division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New-York (United States); Ghossein, R.A. [Pathology Department, Nuclear Medecine Division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New-York (United States); Grewal, R.K.; Larson, S.M. [Radiology Department, Nuclear Medicine Division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New-York (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) remains one of the primary treatment options for metastatic, follicular cell derived thyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that metastatic lesions arising from one of the aggressive thyroid cancer histologies [tall cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (TCV-PTC), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) and Hurthle cell carcinoma (HCC)] would demonstrate sufficient RAI avidity for visualization on RAI scanning and therefore could potentially benefit from RAI therapy. The study shows that in patients selected for RAI scanning or therapy at our center, RAI avid lesions can be identified in more than two thirds of the patients with distant metastases arising in the setting of C-PTC, WD-FTC, FV-PTC, TCV-PTC, or PDTC primary tumors. While RAI avidity on a post-therapy scan does not always correlate with clinically significant tumor killing activity, it is likely that some of these patients with RAI avid metastatic disease did obtain a clinical benefit

  16. From Clinical Trials to the Front Line: Vinflunine for Treatment of Urothelial Cell Carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute of Naples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Gaetano; Della Pepa, Chiara; Cavaliere, Carla; Cecere, Sabrina C.; Di Napoli, Marilena; D'Aniello, Carmine; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Maiolino, Piera; Tramontano, Teresa; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Pisconti, Salvatore; Montella, Maurizio; Berretta, Massimiliano; Sorrentino, Domenico; Perdonà, Sisto; Pignata, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of Vinflunine, after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Urothelial Tract, TCCU, has been demonstrated in an international, randomized, phase III trial comparing Vinflunine plus Best Supportive Care, BSC, with BSC alone. On the basis of that study vinflunine has been approved by the European Medicine Association, EMA, for treatment of TCCU patients after failure of a platinum treatment. However, since data in clinical trials often differ from routine clinical practice due to unselected population and less strict monitoring, “real life” experiences are very helpful to verify the efficacy of a new therapy. Methods: This was a spontaneous, observational, retrospective study involving 43 patients with metastatic TCCU treated with vinflunine at our cancer center, data about demographics, disease characteristics, and previous treatments were collected and outcome and toxicities of vinflunine were analyzed. Results: 41 of 43 patients were eligible for RR analysis, the Overall RR was 12%, the Disease Control Rate was 29%; when including only patients treated in II line the DCR rose to 33%; the median PFS and the median OS were 2.2 and 6.9 months, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings were consistent with the outcome data emerged in the phase III randomized trial and in the other observational studies conducted all around Europe in the last 2–3 years. This experience supports the use of vinflunine in patients with advanced TTCU as effective and manageable antineoplastic drug. PMID:27199753

  17. Instituting Commoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . STEALTH.unlimited

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the origins of the notion of management, this paper explores how commons governance is constituted by the earlier influential research of Elinor Ostrom, and pursues this with reference to scholars such as Saki Bailey, who emphasises that the choice of regulatory frame is ultimately a political one. We then argue that commons have to be ‘instituted’ in an open manner in order to remain accessible. This demands a set of scripts, rules or agreements that keep the process of commoning in place, and, simultaneously, keep commoning in a constant process of reproduction. We examine this tension and look at the shift in understanding about what ‘institutions of the commons’ have entailed in practice over the course of the last century and a half. Finally, we return to the political dimension to touch upon the question of whether, with the disappearance of the welfare state, a coherent concept of society can emerge from the current upsurge of commons initiatives.

  18. Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160133.html Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk A third of ... at the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). "Obesity is now linked to 11 types of cancer ...

  19. About DCP | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) is the primary unit of the National Cancer Institute devoted to cancer prevention research. DCP provides funding and administrative support to clinical and laboratory researchers, community and multidisciplinary teams, and collaborative scientific networks. |

  20. Major Sponsors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Society of Rare Earths Director General: Prof. Bi Qun Tel: 86 10 62182748 Fax: 86 10 62173501 Treibacher Industrie AG President: Mr. Reinhard Iro Managing Director Responsible For RE Business: Mr. Alexander Bouvier Tel:0043 4262 505 570 Fax:0043 4262 2898

  1. Major Sponsors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Society of Rare Earths Director General: Prof. Bi Qun Tel: 86 10 62182748 Fax: 86 10 62173501 Treibacher Industrie AG President: Mr. Reinhard Iro Managing Director Responsible For RE Business: Mr. Alexander Bouvier Tel:0043 4262 505 570 Fax:0043 4262 2898 AMR Technologies Inc. President: Peter V. Gundy Tel: 001 416 3678588 Fax: 001 416 3675471

  2. Major Sponsors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Society of Rare Earths Director General: Prof. Tel: 86 10 62182748 Fax: 86 10 62173501 Treibacher Industrie AG President: Mr. Reinhard Iro Managing Director Responsible For RE Business: Mr. Alexander Bouvier Tel:0043 4262 505 570 Fax:0043 4262 2898 AMR Technologies Inc. President: Peter V. Gundy Tel: 001 416 3678588 Fax: 001 416 3675471 Rhodia Electronics & Catalysis Vice President: Zhu Mingyue Tel: 86 21 54422630 Fax: 86 21 54422302 Baotou Rare Earth Hi-Tech Development Zone Director: Prof. Su Wenq...

  3. Sports sponsorship : Brand awareness, brand image and purchase intention of sport audience towards linked and unlinked sponsors

    OpenAIRE

    Alzubaidi, Huda; Bou Assaf, Aida; Johansson, Helen

    2013-01-01

    purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to research in the two different types of sponsors i.e. linked and unlinked sponsors. An investigation of whether a difference between these two types of sponsors exists. This difference is measured in terms of brand awareness and brand image and how these two affect the purchase intention. Background: Sponsorship is today used by companies as a major marketing tool. A long existence of sponsorship has throughout the years followed the same philosophy, i...

  4. How do staff members at science and technology centres consider the impact of sponsors on the scientific content of exhibitions?

    OpenAIRE

    Davidsson, Eva; Sørensen, Helene

    2009-01-01

    Sponsors and donors have become increasingly important for exhibition construction during the latest decades. It seems, however, as this risk bringing consequences on the choice of exhibition content and design when it comes to traditional museums such as natural history museums, art museums or historical museums. But in what ways may sponsors impact exhibition content and design at science and technology centres? This study seeks to explore how staff members consider the impact of sponsors a...

  5. 76 FR 40229 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of... Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect a change of sponsor for a new animal drug... informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in, NADA 092-150 for...

  6. Tax Information for Refugees and Their Sponsors: Questions and Answers. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal Revenue Service (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This guide provides Federal income tax information for refugees and their sponsors. Issues covered in a question and answer format include: (1) the tax status of refugees; (2) the criteria for declaring a refugee a dependent; (3) deductions for contributions to refugees or organizations that support them; (4) the distinction between resident and…

  7. 76 FR 2807 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Follicle Stimulating Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ...; Follicle Stimulating Hormone AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The... sponsor for a new animal drug application (NADA) for follicle stimulating hormone from Ausa International... hormone) to Therio, Inc., 8801 Anderson Ave., Manhattan, KS 66503. Accordingly, the Agency is amending...

  8. Marketing Capstone Models "The Apprentice" Television Show with Client-Sponsored Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Marketing faculty use cases, simulations, and client-sponsored projects to achieve learning objectives in the marketing capstone class. This class typically aims to integrate and apply previously learned material and to transition students into their careers. Drawing on the professional school, creative problem solving and constructivist learning…

  9. 7 CFR 226.13 - Food service payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CARE FOOD PROGRAM Payment Provisions § 226.13 Food service payments to sponsoring organizations for day... amount of food service payments shall be disbursed to each day care home on the basis of the number of meals served, by type, to enrolled children. For tier II day care homes, the full amount of food...

  10. Meaningful Learning? Gendered Experiences with an NGO-Sponsored Literacy Program in Rural Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhriman, Addie; Ballif-Spanvill, Bonnie; Ward, Carol; Solomon, Yodit; Widdison-Jones, Kacey

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of an NGO-sponsored literacy program in rural Mali. The study employs ethnographic techniques to examine the type of literacy instruction provided, the level of participation, the meanings of literacy to participants, and the contextual factors that influence the social and personal effects of literacy. The…

  11. 29 CFR 4042.4 - Disclosure of information by plan administrator or plan sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or plan sponsor has submitted to PBGC in connection with the plan termination. (2) Requirements. A... connection with the plan termination; (iii) State the name of the person making the request for information... the definition of affected party under § 4001.2 of this chapter; and (iv) Be signed by the...

  12. 45 CFR 2553.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... community participation? 2553.24 Section 2553.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by...: (1) Knowledgeable about human and social needs of the community; (2) Competent in the field...

  13. 77 FR 69631 - Draft Guidance for IRBs, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB Responsibilities for Reviewing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... Reducing Burden, Delay, and Ambiguity for Investigators,'' in the Federal Register of July 26, 2011 (76 FR... Sponsors: IRB Responsibilities for Reviewing the Qualifications of Investigators, Adequacy of Research... Responsibilities for Reviewing the Qualifications of Investigators, Adequacy of Research Sites, and...

  14. Effects of Diversity Education on College Students in Military Sponsored Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Orbie L.

    2010-01-01

    The central purpose of this study was to determine if teaching the subject matter of diversity or social psychology to military sponsored college students would change the level of sensitivity (behavior and attitude) to diversity as measured by an instrument called The Inventory of Cross Cultural Sensitivity developed by Kenneth Cushner (1986).…

  15. Marveling at "The Man Called Nova": Comics as Sponsors of Multimodal Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Dale

    2007-01-01

    This essay theorizes the ways in which comics, and Marvel Comics in particular, acted as sponsors of multimodal literacy for the author. In doing so, the essay demonstrates the possibilities that exist in examining comics more closely and in thinking about how literacy sponsorship happens in multimodal texts. (Contains 1 figure and 13 notes.)

  16. Rights-Based Education for South Asian Sponsored Wives in International Arranged Marriages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Noorfarah

    2008-01-01

    The Family Class Category of Canada's Immigration Policy exists with the key objective of family unification. Among Canada's second largest immigrant group, the South Asians, the cultural practice of arranged marriage is applied across international borders, leading to spousal sponsorship. Existing research on South Asian sponsored wives suggests…

  17. Sponsored Neo-Conservative Challenges to Diversity and Intercultural Competence in the US Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Steven

    2013-01-01

    For the past six decades, conservative foundations in the United States have targeted their funding on a transformation of the public's understanding of markets, culture , and the undergraduate course of study. These foundations, and their sponsored researchers, have specifically challenged the place of diversity and intercultural competence…

  18. How do staff members at science and technology centres consider the impact of sponsors on the scientific content of exhibitions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsson, Eva; Sørensen, Helene

    2009-01-01

    interview with staff members, who work with planning and constructing new exhibitions at their science and technology centre. The results suggest that sponsors may interfere in exhibition construction both directly and indirectly. This means that sponsors could put explicit demands when it comes...... to the choice of scientific content and design and thereby interfere directly. Indirect impact, on the other hand, refers to implicit demands of sponsors where staff members take into account for what they believe are views of the sponsors through self-censorship....

  19. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  20. Sunitinib Plus Androgen Deprivation and Radiation Therapy for Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Phase 1 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of administering sunitinib in combination with androgen deprivation therapy and external-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (XRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventeen men with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate with cT2c-cT4 or Gleason 8-10 or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL received initial androgen deprivation (leuprolide 22.5 mg every 12 weeks plus oral bicalutamide 50 mg daily) for 4-8 weeks before oral sunitinib 12.5, 25, or 37.5 mg daily for 4 weeks as lead-in, then concurrently with and 4 weeks after XRT (75.6 Gy in 42 fractions to prostate and seminal vesicles). A 3+3 sequential dose-escalation design was used to assess the frequency of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and establish a maximal tolerated dose of sunitinib. Results: Sunitinib at 12.5- and 25-mg dose levels was well tolerated. The first 4 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg experienced a DLT during lead-in, and a drug interaction between sunitinib and bicalutamide was suspected. The protocol was revised and concurrent bicalutamide omitted. Of the next 3 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg, 2 of 3 receiving concurrent therapy experienced DLTs during radiation: grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 proctitis, respectively. Only 1 of 7 patients completed sunitinib at 37.5 mg daily, whereas 3 of 3 patients (25 mg as starting dose) and 3 of 4 patients (25 mg as reduced dose) completed therapy. Conclusions: The feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor therapy, androgen deprivation, and radiation therapy for prostate cancer was established. Using a daily dosing regimen with lead-in, concurrent, and post-XRT therapy, the recommended phase 2 dose of sunitinib is 25 mg daily

  1. A Single-Institutional Experience of 15 Years of Treating T3 Laryngeal Cancer With Primary Radiotherapy, With or Without Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes, toxicity, quality of life, and voice quality of patients with T3 laryngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify subgroups of patients in whom the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy is necessary. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and November 2009, 170 consecutive patients with T3 tumor were treated with (chemo)radiotherapy. Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), late toxicity, quality of life, and voice handicap index. Results: After a median follow-up time of 32 months (range, 7–172), the 3-year actuarial rates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 73%, 70%, 64%, and 61%, respectively, and the 5-year figures were 68%, 65%, 60%, and 49%, respectively. At last follow-up, 84 patients (49.5%) were still alive, 65 of them (77.3%) without local progression. Laryngectomy was performed in 16 patients, leaving 49 patients with anatomic organ preservation, corresponding to an actuarial laryngectomy-free survival of 58.3% at 3 years. The figures for patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone were 76.8% and 53.5%, respectively (p = 0.001). Chemoradiotherapy was the only significant predictor for LC on multivariate analysis. The overall 5-year cumulative incidence of late Grade ≥2 toxicity was 28.2%. Chemoradiotherapy, compared with radiotherapy alone, resulted in slight increase in late toxicity and slight deterioration of quality of life and voice-handicap-index scores. However, the differences were statistically not significant. Conclusion: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy in T3 laryngeal cancer significantly improved LC and laryngectomy-free survival without statistically significant increases in late toxicity or deterioration of quality of life or voice handicap index.

  2. A Single-Institutional Experience of 15 Years of Treating T3 Laryngeal Cancer With Primary Radiotherapy, With or Without Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tans, Lisa; Rooij, Peter van; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes, toxicity, quality of life, and voice quality of patients with T3 laryngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify subgroups of patients in whom the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy is necessary. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and November 2009, 170 consecutive patients with T3 tumor were treated with (chemo)radiotherapy. Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), late toxicity, quality of life, and voice handicap index. Results: After a median follow-up time of 32 months (range, 7-172), the 3-year actuarial rates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 73%, 70%, 64%, and 61%, respectively, and the 5-year figures were 68%, 65%, 60%, and 49%, respectively. At last follow-up, 84 patients (49.5%) were still alive, 65 of them (77.3%) without local progression. Laryngectomy was performed in 16 patients, leaving 49 patients with anatomic organ preservation, corresponding to an actuarial laryngectomy-free survival of 58.3% at 3 years. The figures for patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone were 76.8% and 53.5%, respectively (p = 0.001). Chemoradiotherapy was the only significant predictor for LC on multivariate analysis. The overall 5-year cumulative incidence of late Grade {>=}2 toxicity was 28.2%. Chemoradiotherapy, compared with radiotherapy alone, resulted in slight increase in late toxicity and slight deterioration of quality of life and voice-handicap-index scores. However, the differences were statistically not significant. Conclusion: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy in T3 laryngeal cancer significantly improved LC and laryngectomy-free survival without statistically significant increases in late toxicity or deterioration of quality of life or voice handicap index.

  3. Sunitinib Plus Androgen Deprivation and Radiation Therapy for Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corn, Paul G., E-mail: pcorn@mdanderson.org [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Song, Danny Y. [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heath, Elisabeth; Maier, Jordan [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Meyn, Raymond [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DePetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mathew, Paul, E-mail: pmathew@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of administering sunitinib in combination with androgen deprivation therapy and external-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (XRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventeen men with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate with cT2c-cT4 or Gleason 8-10 or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL received initial androgen deprivation (leuprolide 22.5 mg every 12 weeks plus oral bicalutamide 50 mg daily) for 4-8 weeks before oral sunitinib 12.5, 25, or 37.5 mg daily for 4 weeks as lead-in, then concurrently with and 4 weeks after XRT (75.6 Gy in 42 fractions to prostate and seminal vesicles). A 3+3 sequential dose-escalation design was used to assess the frequency of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and establish a maximal tolerated dose of sunitinib. Results: Sunitinib at 12.5- and 25-mg dose levels was well tolerated. The first 4 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg experienced a DLT during lead-in, and a drug interaction between sunitinib and bicalutamide was suspected. The protocol was revised and concurrent bicalutamide omitted. Of the next 3 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg, 2 of 3 receiving concurrent therapy experienced DLTs during radiation: grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 proctitis, respectively. Only 1 of 7 patients completed sunitinib at 37.5 mg daily, whereas 3 of 3 patients (25 mg as starting dose) and 3 of 4 patients (25 mg as reduced dose) completed therapy. Conclusions: The feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor therapy, androgen deprivation, and radiation therapy for prostate cancer was established. Using a daily dosing regimen with lead-in, concurrent, and post-XRT therapy, the recommended phase 2 dose of sunitinib is 25 mg daily.

  4. Multi-institutional analysis of T3 subtypes and adjuvant radiotherapy effects in resected T3N0 non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Lee, Ik Jae; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of T3 subtypes and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with resected the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IIB T3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). T3N0 NSCLC patients who underwent resection from January 1990 to October 2009 (n = 102) were enrolled and categorized into 6 subgroups according to the extent of invasion: parietal pleura chest wall invasion, mediastinal pleural invasion, diaphragm invasion, separated tumor nodules in the same lobe, endobronchial tumor <2 cm distal to the carina, and tumor-associated collapse. The median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 55.3 months and 51.2 months, respectively. In postoperative T3N0M0 patients, the tumor size was a significant prognostic factor for survival (OS, p = 0.035 and DFS, p = 0.035, respectively). Patients with endobronchial tumors within 2 cm of the carina also showed better OS and DFS than those in the other T3 subtypes (p = 0.018 and p = 0.016, respectively). However, adjuvant radiotherapy did not cause any improvement in survival (OS, p = 0.518 and DFS, p = 0.463, respectively). Only patients with mediastinal pleural invasion (n = 25) demonstrated improved OS and DFS after adjuvant radiotherapy (n = 18) (p = 0.012 and p = 0.040, respectively). The T3N0 NSCLC subtype that showed the most favorable prognosis is the one with endobronchial tumors within 2 cm of the carina. Adjuvant radiotherapy is not effective in improving survival outcome in resected T3N0 NSCLC.

  5. Links Between Metabolism and Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD John H. Glick Professor of Medicine Director, Abramson Cancer Center and Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Philadelphia, PA |

  6. Prevalence and Determinants of Physician Participation in Conducting Pharmaceutical-sponsored Clinical Trials and Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, Bimal H; Miller, Redonda G; Getz, Kelly J; Powe, Nell R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry is controversial because of the potential for conflicts of interest. However, little empirical evidence exists on the extent of physician participation in activities sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. OBJECTIVES To determine the prevalence of participation of internal medicine physicians in clinical trials and lectures sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and to describe factors that are associated with such participation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a cross-sectional regional survey of 1,000 Maryland internal medicine physicians between February 2000 and January 2001 in order to measure the prevalence of physician participation in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and lectures. We also collected economic and demographic information to examine potential associations between physician characteristics and engagement in such activities. RESULTS Of 835 eligible physicians 444 (53%) responded, of whom 37% reported engaging in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures to supplement their incomes. In our multivariable analysis, subspecialists versus generalist physicians (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 2.99), physicians in private group-single specialty and academic practice versus physicians in solo practice (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 4.44 and OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.17 to 5.61, respectively), and physicians with higher versus lower annual incomes (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.44) had a greater odds of participation in these activities. Additionally, physicians dissatisfied with their income had a 140% greater odds of participation (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.45 to 3.83) than those who were satisfied with their income. CONCLUSIONS A substantial number of internists engage in pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures in an effort to supplement their incomes. Physician dissatisfaction with income appears to

  7. Clinical studies in orthodontics--an overview of NIDR-sponsored clinical orthodontic studies in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S

    1998-11-01

    A number of clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) use rigorous methods of data acquisition and analysis previously developed in fundamental biology and the physical sciences. The naive expectation that these trials would lead relatively rapidly to definitive answers concerning the therapeutic strategies and techniques under study is dispelled. This presentation focuses on delineating differences between the study of central tendencies and individual variation, more specifically on the strategy to study this variation: measure additional sources of variance within each patient at more timepoints and perhaps with greater precision. As rigorous orthodontic research is still in its infancy, the problem of defining the proper mix between prospective and retrospective trials is discussed. In view of the high costs of prospective clinical trials, many of the questions germane to orthodontics can be answered by well-conducted retrospective trials, assuming that properly randomized sampling procedures are employed. Definitive clinical trials are likely to require better theoretical constructs, better instrumentation, and better measures than now available. Reasons for concern are the restricted resources available and the fact that current mensurational approaches may not detect many of the individual differences. The task of constructing sharable databases and record bases stored in digital form and available either remotely from servers, or locally from CD-ROMs or optical disks, is crucial to the optimization of future investigations.

  8. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWRs, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research contracts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolving questions arising from nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SBR) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig./HP)

  9. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWRs, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research contracts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolving questions arising from nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SBR) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig.)

  10. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, C Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C; Dorschner, Michael O; Schmechel, Stephen C; Martins, Timothy J; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Burton, Kimberly A; Komashko, Vitalina M; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A; Linenberger, Michael L; Becker, Pamela S; Senecal, Francis M; Mecham, Brigham H; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient's evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs.

  11. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, C. Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B.; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Martins, Timothy J.; Mahen, Elisabeth M.; Burton, Kimberly A.; Komashko, Vitalina M.; Radenbaugh, Amie J.; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P.; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R.; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A.; Linenberger, Michael L.; Becker, Pamela S.; Senecal, Francis M.; Mecham, Brigham H.; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L.; Stilwell, Jackie L.; Kaldjian, Eric P.; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient’s evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. PMID:26733551

  12. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  13. Study Protocol: A randomized controlled trial of patient navigation-activation to reduce cancer health disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseau Sally

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer health disparities affecting low-income and minority patients are well documented. Root-causes are multifactorial, including diagnostic and treatment delays, social and financial barriers, and poor communication. Patient navigation and communication coaching (activation are potential interventions to address disparities in cancer treatment. The purpose of this clinical trial is to test the effectiveness of an intervention combining patient navigation and activation to improve cancer treatment. Methods/Design The Rochester Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP is a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, patient-level randomized trial (RCT of patient navigation and activation, targeting newly-diagnosed breast and colorectal cancer patients in Rochester, NY. The goal of the program is to decrease cancer health disparities by addressing barriers to receipt of cancer care and promoting patient self-efficacy. The intervention uses trained, paraprofessional patient navigators recruited from the target community, and a detailed training and supervisory program. Recruited patients are randomly assigned to receive either usual care (except for baseline and follow-up questionnaires and interviews or intervention. The intervention patients receive tailored assistance from their patient navigators, including phone calls, in-person meetings, and behind-the-scenes coordination of care. A total of 344 patients have been recruited. Outcomes measured at three month intervals include timeliness of care, patient adherence, patient satisfaction, quality of life, self-efficacy, health literacy, and cancer knowledge. Discussion This unique intervention combining patient navigation and patient activation is designed to address the multifactorial problem of cancer health disparities. If successful, this study will affect the design and implementation of patient navigation programs. Trials Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT

  14. Institutional Repositories in BRICS Countries : A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dhanavandan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An institutional repository includes digital assets generated by academics, such as administrative documents, course notes, learning objects, or conference proceedings. It will provide a window that gives open access to improve the sponsoring institution’s visibility and status. This paper discusses the growth and development of Institutional Repositories available in BRICS Countries. The relevant data was collected from the directory of OpenDOAR. Based on the data in OpenDOAR, 242 repositories are represented from BRICS countries. Among the 242, 84 (34.71% repositories are from Brazil, 39 (16.12% from China, 68 (28.10% repositories from India, 22 (9.109% repositories from Russia, and 29(11.98% repositories from South Africa. Brazil has the largest number of records (11, 17,688 among BRICS Countries repositories.

  15. Genomic Datasets for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of datasets from genome-wide association studies of cancer and other genotype-phenotype studies, including sequencing and molecular diagnostic assays, are available to approved investigators through the Extramural National Cancer Institute Data Access Committee.

  16. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approach

  17. Good News About Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases, resistance to therapy, hereditary diseases and the psychological effects of catastrophic diseases. The Latest Research The National Cancer Institute (NCI) funds a large number of studies ...

  18. Involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) versus elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for 239 esophageal cancers: a single institutional retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study on early and locally advanced esophageal cancer was conducted to evaluate locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy. We assessed all patients with esophageal cancer of stages I-IV treated with definitive radiotherapy from June 2000 to March 2014. Between 2000 and 2011, ENI was used for all cases excluding high age cases. After Feb 2011, a prospective study about IFRT was started, and therefore IFRT was used since then for all cases. Concurrent chemotherapy regimen was nedaplatin (80 mg/m2 at D1 and D29) and 5-fluorouracil (800 mg/m2 at D1-4 and D29-32). Of the 239 consecutive patients assessed (120 ENI vs. 119 IFRT), 59 patients (24.7 %) had stage IV disease and all patients received at least one cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 34.0 months. There were differences in 3-year local control (44.8 % vs. 55.5 %, p = 0.039), distant control (53.8 % vs. 69.9 %, p = 0.021) and overall survival (34.8 % vs. 51.6 %, p = 0.087) rates between ENI vs. IFRT, respectively. Patients treated with IFRT (8 %) demonstrated a significantly lower risk (p = 0.047) of high grade late toxicities than with ENI (16 %). IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures (27.5 % in ENI and 13.4 % in IFRT). Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Both tendencies of improved loco-regional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate favored the IFRT arm over the ENI arm in this study

  19. Chronic adverse events and quality of life after radiochemotherapy in anal cancer patients. A single institution experience and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report on chronic adverse events (CAE) and quality of life (QOL) after radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with anal cancer (AC). Patients and methods: Of 83 patients who had received RCT at our department between 1988 and 2011, 51 accepted the invitation to participate in this QOL study. CAE were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v. 4.0 and QOL was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Results: CAE could be evaluated in 49 patients. There was a tendency toward a higher rate of grade 3 CAE in female patients, i.e. 18 out of 37 (49 %) vs. 2 out of 12 (17 %) male patients (p = 0.089). The most common grade 3 CAE were dyspareunia and vaginal symptoms (itching, burning and dryness) in 35 and 22 % of female patients, respectively, followed by stool incontinence in 13 % of all patients (6 out of 49). Both FACT-C and CAE information were available for 42 patients, allowing evaluation of the impact of CAE on QOL. The median total FACT-C score was 110 (40-132) out of a possible maximum of 136. The absence of grade 3 CAE (115 vs. 94, p = 0.001); an interval of ≥ 67 months after the end of the treatment (111 vs. 107, p = 0.010), no stool incontinence vs. grade 3 stool incontinence (111 vs. 74, p = 0.009), higher education (114 vs. 107, p = 0.013) and no dyspareunia vs. grade 3 dyspareunia (116 vs. 93, p = 0.012) were significantly associated with a higher median FACT-C score. Conclusion: The majority of AC patients treated with RCT have acceptable overall QOL scores, which are comparable to those of the normal population. Patients with grade 3 CAE - particularly dyspareunia and fecal incontinence - have a poorer QOL compared to patients without CAE. In order to improve long-term QOL, future strategies might aim at a reduction in dose to the genitalia and more intensive patient support measures. (orig.)

  20. Chronic adverse events and quality of life after radiochemotherapy in anal cancer patients. A single institution experience and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Bochum, Marienhospital Herne (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncoalogy; Sauer, T.; Klemm, S.; Molls, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncoalogy; Dinkel, A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy; Schuster, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncoalogy; Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To report on chronic adverse events (CAE) and quality of life (QOL) after radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with anal cancer (AC). Patients and methods: Of 83 patients who had received RCT at our department between 1988 and 2011, 51 accepted the invitation to participate in this QOL study. CAE were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v. 4.0 and QOL was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Results: CAE could be evaluated in 49 patients. There was a tendency toward a higher rate of grade 3 CAE in female patients, i.e. 18 out of 37 (49 %) vs. 2 out of 12 (17 %) male patients (p = 0.089). The most common grade 3 CAE were dyspareunia and vaginal symptoms (itching, burning and dryness) in 35 and 22 % of female patients, respectively, followed by stool incontinence in 13 % of all patients (6 out of 49). Both FACT-C and CAE information were available for 42 patients, allowing evaluation of the impact of CAE on QOL. The median total FACT-C score was 110 (40-132) out of a possible maximum of 136. The absence of grade 3 CAE (115 vs. 94, p = 0.001); an interval of {>=} 67 months after the end of the treatment (111 vs. 107, p = 0.010), no stool incontinence vs. grade 3 stool incontinence (111 vs. 74, p = 0.009), higher education (114 vs. 107, p = 0.013) and no dyspareunia vs. grade 3 dyspareunia (116 vs. 93, p = 0.012) were significantly associated with a higher median FACT-C score. Conclusion: The majority of AC patients treated with RCT have acceptable overall QOL scores, which are comparable to those of the normal population. Patients with grade 3 CAE - particularly dyspareunia and fecal incontinence - have a poorer QOL compared to patients without CAE. In order to improve long-term QOL, future strategies might aim at a reduction in dose to the genitalia and more intensive patient support measures. (orig.)