WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer institute monograph

  1. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  2. NTP Monograph: Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated With Cancer Chemotherapy Use During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) conducted an evaluation of the developmental effects and pregnancy outcomes associated with cancer chemotherapy use during pregnancy in humans. The final NTP monograph was completed in May 2013 (available at http:// ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/36495). The incidence of cancer during pregnancy has been reported to occur from 17 to 100 per 100,000 pregnant women. Chemotherapy is a common treatment for cancer; however, most chemotherapy agents are classified as known or suspected human teratogens. Cancer chemotherapy use during pregnancy was selected for evaluation by the NTP because of the: (1) paucity of comprehensive reviews on the pregnancy outcomes following cancer chemotherapy use during pregnancy in humans, including the integration of the developmental animal toxicology literature with the observational studies in humans, and (2) growing public interest in the developmental effects of chemotherapy on offspring exposed to cancer chemotherapy during gestation due to the expected incidence of cancer diagnosed during pregnancy as women delay pregnancy to later ages. Of the approximately 110 cancer chemotherapeutic agents currently in use, the NTP monograph includes data on 56 agents used during 1,261 pregnancies for which pregnancy outcomes were documented. Overall, the NTP evaluation found that treatment with chemotherapy for cancer appeared to be associated with: (1) a higher rate of major malformations following exposure during the first trimester compared to exposure in the second and/or third trimester; (2) an increase the rate of stillbirth following exposure in the second and/ or third trimester; abnormally low levels of amniotic fluid (primarily attributable to Trastuzumab); and (3), also data are insufficient, impaired fetal growth and myelosuppression. Treatment with chemotherapy for cancer during pregnancy did not appear to increase spontaneous preterm birth, or impair

  3. Rune Frederiksen, Elizabeth R. Gebhard & Alexander Sokolicek (eds.), The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, Monographs of the Danish Institute, Volume 17 (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press and The Danish Institute at Athens, 2015)

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Miller

    2017-01-01

    A review of the book: Rune Frederiksen, Elizabeth R. Gebhard & Alexander Sokolicek (eds.), The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, Monographs of the Danish Institute, Volume 17 (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press and The Danish Institute at Athens, 2015)

  4. 76 FR 51034 - Availability of Draft NTP Monograph on Potential Developmental Effects of Cancer Chemotherapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Availability of Draft NTP Monograph on Potential... Meeting To Peer Review Draft Monograph AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP...: Availability of Draft Monograph; Request for Comments; Announcement of a Peer Review Panel Meeting. SUMMARY...

  5. Peralta Cancer Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The investigators in the cell biology program at PCRI have pioneered in the development of techniques for culturing human epithelial cells. The cancer diagnosis program has been concerned with researching new techniques for early diagnosis of breast cancer in women. The cancer treatment program has been concerned with applying cell biology and biochemistry advances to improve cancer management

  6. Rune Frederiksen, Elizabeth R. Gebhard & Alexander Sokolicek (eds., The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, Monographs of the Danish Institute, Volume 17 (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press and The Danish Institute at Athens, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Miller

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the book: Rune Frederiksen, Elizabeth R. Gebhard & Alexander Sokolicek (eds., The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, Monographs of the Danish Institute, Volume 17 (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press and The Danish Institute at Athens, 2015

  7. Clinical roundtable monograph: new and emerging treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel J; Kantoff, Philip W; Lin, Daniel W

    2011-06-01

    Historically, the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been limited to chemotherapeutic regimens that did not improve patient survival. In 2004, clinical studies began to demonstrate significant improvements in patient outcomes, including overall survival, with docetaxel versus mitoxantrone chemotherapy. Since these pivotal trials, the combination of docetaxel plus prednisone has become a standard of care for patients with metastatic CRPC. However, the limited survival benefit achieved with this regimen prompted several investigations into the development of alternative therapeutic options. Recent advances have now led to an unprecedented number of new drug approvals within the past year, providing many new treatment options for patients with metastatic CRPC. Sipuleucel-T, considered a new paradigm in cancer treatment, is the first such immunotherapeutic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other successes include abiraterone acetate, the first androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, and cabazitaxel, a novel microtubule inhibitor, both of which have demonstrated improved survival following docetaxel failure. The bone-targeting agent denosumab, also recently approved in this setting, offers these patients significant improvement in the prevention of skeletal-related events. The data supporting the approval of each of these agents are described in this monograph, as are current approaches in the treatment of metastatic CRPC and ongoing clinical trials of novel treatments and strategies. The experts also discuss several of the issues regarding the introduction of these novel agents into clinical practice for metastatic CRPC patients.

  8. National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... programs, and connect with NCI researchers via Twitter chats. Facebook Connect with NCI on its Facebook page to get updates on cancer information, including the latest research, and engage with us on topics of interest to you. View this video on YouTube. On October 18 at 12:00 ...

  9. Choosing Self-Employment. A Monograph by the Rural Institute Linkages to Employment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Ellen; Brown, Kim

    2007-01-01

    The Rural Institute: Center for Excellence in Disability Education, Research, and Service, is one of sixty-four Centers for Excellence in Disability Education across the nation. It is an inter-disciplinary organization that promotes full participation in rural life for individuals with disabilities. The Rural Institute accomplishes this goal by…

  10. Thyroid cancer: experiences of Cancer Institute, Madras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, R. Ravi; Mahajan, V.; Ganesh, M.S.; Ayyappan, S.; Suresh, V.; Suryasen, S.

    1999-01-01

    It has been long recognized that Thyroid Cancer (TC) envelopes under its umbrella a spectrum of cancers from the relatively indolent well differentiated papillary and follicular cancers to the aggressive and rapidly fatal anaplastic cancers. Medullary cancers fall in between the two extremes. Recently, poor prognostic variants of well-differentiated cancers have been described. There is also a move to define a group of poorly differentiated TC including the insular variants distinguishing them from anaplastic carcinomas. Of the 1168 patients with thyroid nodules seen at the Cancer Institute (WIA), Chennai between 1956 and 1996, 670 cases proved to be malignant either cytologically or histologically. This report is based on the follow-up of these patients which at 10 years was 75%

  11. Provincial Coordination and Inter-Institutional Collaboration in British Columbia's College, University College and Institute System. Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Devron

    This document addresses a study that aimed to better understand the historical development of British Columbia community college, university college, and institute system with special attention given to recent changes in inter-institutional collaboration in relation to provincial coordination. The study also addresses centralization and…

  12. Use of high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening data in cancer hazard evaluations by IARC Monograph Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Evidence regarding carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph evaluations. Three recent IARC Working Groups pioneered inclusion of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program high-throughput screening (HTS) data to supplement other mechanistic evidence. In Monograph V110, HTS profiles were compared between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and prototypical activators across multiple nuclear receptors. For Monograph V112-113, HTS assays were mapped to 10 key characteristics of carcinogens identified by an IARC expert group, and systematically considered as an additional mechanistic data stream. Both individual assay results and ToxPi-based rankings informed mechanistic evaluations. Activation of multiple nuclear receptors in HTS assays showed that PFOA targets not only peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, but also other receptors. ToxCast assays substantially covered 5 of 10 key characteristics, corroborating literature evidence of "induces oxidative stress" and "alters cell proliferation, cell death or nutrient supply" and filling gaps for "modulates receptor-mediated effects." Thus, ToxCast HTS data were useful both in evaluating specific mechanistic hypotheses and in contributing to the overall evaluation of mechanistic evidence. However, additional HTS assays are needed to provide more comprehensive coverage of the 10 key characteristics of carcinogens that form the basis of current IARC mechanistic evaluations.

  13. IARC Monographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, Neil; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. CONCLUSIONS: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public's health. CITATION......, Stallones L, Stayner LT, Steenland K, Stenzel M, Stewart BW, Stewart PA, Symanski E, Terracini B, Tolbert PE, Vainio H, Vena J, Vermeulen R, Victora CG, Ward EM, Weinberg CR, Weisenburger D, Wesseling C, Weiderpass E, Zahm SH. 2015. IARC Monographs: 40 years of evaluating carcinogenic hazards to humans...

  14. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Phytochemicals in your food Red and processed meat Sugar and cancer risk Alcohol and cancer risk Physical Activity Are ... Updates: Diabetes Rates are High and Rising, That Links with Cancer Apples and Oranges, What Americans are Eating and ...

  15. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nucleic Acid Analysis for the Molecular Characterization of... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  16. 76 FR 14675 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...-7565, [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Molecular... Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  17. 77 FR 19674 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer (R21). Date: June 26... Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  18. 75 FR 5092 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Quantitative Cell-Based Imaging....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  19. I. Monographic Section
    Hospitals, money and other riches. Writing and practising economy in late medieval Italian charitable institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Gazzini (a cura di); Antonio Olivieri (a cura di)

    2016-01-01

    The section contains contributions focusing on the practices and records relating to the economics of hospitals in late medieval Italy. Experts from different disciplines – economic historians, historians of the document, historians of the Middle Ages and of welfare institutions – offer a significant overview of hospitals situated in the north, the center and the south of the Italian peninsula between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries. They investigate the mechanisms of funding of charit...

  20. Clinical roundtable monograph: effective management of quality of life in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Twelves; Gradishar, William J; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Bramsen, Betsy; Lurie, Robert H

    2014-02-01

    Quality of life is accepted as an important consideration in the management of patients with metastatic breast cancer, which remains incurable. Recent clinical trials of newer agents, such as eribulin and trastuzumab emtansine, have incorporated quality of life analyses. Quality of life is impacted by multiple patient-related, disease-related, and treatment-related factors. Therapies most beneficial for maintaining or improving quality of life include those that can effectively reduce tumor burden and tumor-related symptoms, but have toxicity profiles that are well tolerated and easily managed. Overall outcomes of patients with metastatic breast cancer improve when therapy is focused not only on the disease itself, but also on the goals of minimizing diseaserelated and treatment-related symptoms. A paradigm shift now reflected in major guidelines is the incorporation of palliative care strategies earlier in the course of metastatic disease management. The selection and sequence of treatments should be made in cooperation with the patient and after consideration of her particular priorities.

  1. 76 FR 9353 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ....gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Molecular Pharmacodynamic... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  2. 77 FR 33476 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Biopsy Instruments and Devices That Preserve Molecular Profiles... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  3. Breast cancer: surgery at the South egypt cancer institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed A S; Salem, Mohamed Abou Elmagd; Abbass, Hamza

    2010-09-30

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In Egypt, it is the most common cancer among women, representing 18.9% of total cancer cases (35.1% in women and 2.2% in men) among the Egypt National Cancer Institute's (NCI) series of 10,556 patients during the year 2001, with an age-adjusted rate of 49.6 per 100,000 people. In this study, the data of all breast cancer patients presented to the surgical department of the South Egypt cancer Institute (SECI) hospital during the period from Janurary 2001 to December 2008 were reviewed .We report the progress of the availability of breast cancer management and evaluation of the quality of care delivered to breast cancer patients. The total number of patients with a breast lump presented to the SECI during the study period was 1,463 patients (32 males and 1431 females); 616 patients from the total number were admitted at the surgical department .There was a decline in advanced cases. Since 2001, facilities for all lines of comprehensive management have been made accessible for all patients. We found that better management could lead to earlier presentation, and better overall outcome in breast cancer patients.The incidence is steadily increasing with a tendency for breast cancer to occur in younger age groups and with advanced stages.

  4. I. Monographic Section Hospitals, money and other riches. Writing and practising economy in late medieval Italian charitable institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gazzini (a cura di

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The section contains contributions focusing on the practices and records relating to the economics of hospitals in late medieval Italy. Experts from different disciplines – economic historians, historians of the document, historians of the Middle Ages and of welfare institutions – offer a significant overview of hospitals situated in the north, the center and the south of the Italian peninsula between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries. They investigate the mechanisms of funding of charities, the social and public implications of hospital care, the techniques and the accounting systems of revenue and expenditure, and finally, the religious merits connected not only to the care of the poor and sick, but also to the scriptures that recorded this activity.

  5. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... Emphasis Panel; Validation and Advanced Development of Emerging Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  6. 76 FR 52960 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Emphasis Panel, Mechanisms of Cell Signaling in Cancer. Date: October 13-14, 2011. Time: 3 to 5 p.m. Agenda..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  7. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  8. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo

    2009-06-29

    The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology.In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization supporting clinical trial recruitment

  9. 76 FR 31619 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SBIR Phase IIB...: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive...

  10. Bibliometrics of NIHR HTA monographs and their related journal articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Pamela; Waugh, Norman

    2015-02-18

    A bibliometric analysis of the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) monographs and their related journal articles by: (1) exploring the differences in citations to the HTA monographs in Google Scholar (GS), Scopus and Web of Science (WoS), and (2) comparing Scopus citations to the monographs with their related journal articles. A study of 111 HTA monographs published in 2010 and 2011, and their external journal articles. Citations to the monographs in GS, Scopus and WoS, and to their external journal articles in Scopus. The number of citations varied among the three databases, with GS having the highest and WoS the lowest; however, the citation-based rankings among the databases were highly correlated. Overall, 56% of monographs had a related publication, with the highest proportion for primary research (76%) and lowest for evidence syntheses (43%). There was a large variation in how the monographs were cited, compared to journal articles, resulting in more frequent problems, with unlinked citations in Scopus and WoS. When comparing differences in the number of citations between monograph publications with their related journal articles from the same project, we found that monographs received more citations than their journal articles for evidence syntheses and methodology projects; by contrast, journal articles related to primary research monographs were more highly cited than their monograph. The numbers of citations to the HTA monographs differed considerably between the databases, but were highly correlated. When a HTA monograph had a journal article from the same study, there were more citations to the journal article for primary research, but more to the monographs for evidence syntheses. Citations to the related journal articles were more reliably recorded than citations to the HTA monographs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  11. 77 FR 48995 - Draft National Toxicology Program (NTP) Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... Program (NTP) Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated With Cancer... the panel completes its peer review of the draft monograph. Topic: Peer review of the draft NTP Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated with Cancer Chemotherapy Use during...

  12. Breast Cancer: Surgery at the South Egypt Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A.S. Salem

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In Egypt, it is the most common cancer among women, representing 18.9% of total cancer cases (35.1% in women and 2.2% in men among the Egypt National Cancer Institute’s (NCI series of 10,556 patients during the year 2001, with an age-adjusted rate of 49.6 per 100,000 people. In this study, the data of all breast cancer patients presented to the surgical department of the South Egypt cancer Institute (SECI hospital during the period from Janurary 2001 to December 2008 were reviewed .We report the progress of the availability of breast cancer management and evaluation of the quality of care delivered to breast cancer patients. The total number of patients with a breast lump presented to the SECI during the study period was 1,463 patients (32 males and 1431 females; 616 patients from the total number were admitted at the surgical department .There was a decline in advanced cases. Since 2001, facilities for all lines of comprehensive management have been made accessible for all patients. We found that better management could lead to earlier presentation, and better overall outcome in breast cancer patients.The incidence is steadily increasing with a tendency for breast cancer to occur in younger age groups and with advanced stages.

  13. 78 FR 50068 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Strategic Plan; Proposed Organizational Change: Division..., Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis... Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS...

  14. 77 FR 19024 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI SPORE in Lymphoma, Leukemia, Brain, Esophageal and Gastrointestinal..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer...

  15. 78 FR 28235 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: June 13, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  16. The IARC monographs: critics and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet, Jonathan M

    2015-07-01

    The monograph program of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which relies on the efforts of volunteer Working Groups, uses a transparent approach to evaluate the carcinogenicity of agents for which scoping has determined that there is sufficient evidence to warrant a review. Because of the potentially powerful implications of the conclusions of the monographs and the sometimes challenging nature of the evidence reviewed, the monographs and the IARC process have been criticized from time to time. This commentary describes the IARC monograph process and addresses recent criticisms of the program, drawing on a recent defense of the program authored by 124 researchers. These authors concluded that the IARC processes are robust and transparent and not flawed and biased as suggested by some critics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. 77 FR 4052 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Breast, Endometrial, and... Special Emphasis Panel, The Role of Microbial Metabolites in Cancer Prevention and Etiology. Date: March..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer...

  18. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Breast Cancer Biology. Date: May 20, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To..., [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Molecular... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  19. 78 FR 55750 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... Innovative Molecular Analysis Technology Development for Cancer Research (R21). Date: October 24, 2013. Time...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Integrative Cancer Biology. Date: October 29, 2013. Time... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  20. The Reform of Qatar University. Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moini, Joy S.; Bikson, Tora K.; Neu, C. Richard; DeSisto, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the State of Qatar engaged the RAND-Qatar Policy Institute to assist Qatar University, the nation's first and only public higher education institution, with reform of its major administrative and academic structures, policies, and practices. This monograph summarizes that reform effort, which formally lasted from October 2003 through…

  1. Archives: African Studies Monographs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives: African Studies Monographs. Journal Home > Archives: African Studies Monographs. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 5 of 5 Items. 2007. Vol 8 (2007) ...

  2. 76 FR 5597 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Vaccine for Prevention of HIV Infection. Date: February 24, 2011... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... concerning individuals associated with the grant applications and/or contract proposals, the disclosure of...

  3. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ...; Development of Molecular Diagnostics Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: February 15, 2011. Time... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Collaborative Research in Integrative Cancer Biology and the Tumor... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  4. 75 FR 3242 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Developing Research Capacity in Africa for the Studies on HIV-Associated... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated...

  5. 77 FR 76057 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...--Institutional Training and Education Institutional Training and Education Grant. Date: February 25-26, 2013...

  6. African Studies Monographs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Studies Monographs is a serial that promotes research and scholarship on the African perspective worldwide. This includes matters of philosophy, history, literature, arts and culture, environment, gender, politics, administration crisis management, etc.

  7. Monographs and Open Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Crossick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the project that I led for HEFCE on the implications of OA (open access for monographs and other long-form research publications. The likely requirement that books should be OA if submitted to the REF (Research Excellence Framework after next means that OA development must be based on an understanding of the importance of the monograph in the AHSS (arts, humanities and social sciences as well as the challenges involved in making the transition to online OA. The project focused on three issues and each is summarized in turn in the article: What is the place of the monograph and other long-form publications in AHSS disciplines that makes it so important? What is happening to the monograph and is there a crisis as some suggest? What are the issues involved in moving monographs into a digital and OA environment – not just the challenge of effective business models but also many other aspects of sustaining and enhancing the qualities of the monograph? These include third-party rights, technical challenges, licences and the need for international collaboration.

  8. 76 FR 61704 - Availability of Draft NTP Monograph on the Health Effects of Low-Level Lead; Request for Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Availability of Draft NTP Monograph on the Health Effects... Monograph AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health. ACTION: Availability of Draft NTP Monograph...

  9. Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0531 TITLE: Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0531 Cancer Scholars Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Prostate Cancer Scholars Program is designed to encourage students from under-represented minority groups to enter graduate training and ultimately

  10. 78 FR 8156 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, Montgomery County Conference Center... Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 703, Room 7072, Bethesda, md 20892-8329, 301-594-1408, Stoicaa2...

  11. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets Across Cancer Types | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dana Farber Cancer Institute CTD2 Center focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  12. 76 FR 57748 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard... Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202. Contact Person: Sergei Radaev, PhD..., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National...

  13. African Studies Monographs: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Manuscripts should be sent to The Series Editor, African Studies Monographs, OOP Ltd, P.O. Box 4893, Somolu, Lagos State, Nigeria or Dr Karo Ogbinaka, Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. Electronic submission should be on Microsoft Word and ...

  14. 76 FR 55391 - Notice of Postponement of Release of Draft NTP Monograph on Potential Developmental Effects of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Notice of Postponement of Release of Draft NTP Monograph... Review Draft Monograph AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of... NTP monograph and peer review panel meeting. SUMMARY: The NTP is postponing the release of the Draft...

  15. 77 FR 5029 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Community; Cancer Drug Shortages: Economic, Regulatory, and Manufacturing Issues; The Role of the Cancer... security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors...

  16. 75 FR 44274 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nanotechnology Imaging and Sensing Platforms for Improved Diagnosis of Cancer. Date: August 31, 2010. Time: 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... 20852 (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Kenneth L. Bielat, PhD, Scientific Review Officer...

  17. 78 FR 64222 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Conference Call). Contact Person: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division....D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  18. 77 FR 68136 - National Cancer Institute Amended; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Regency Bethesda Hotel, Old Georgetown Room, One Metro Center, Bethesda, MD 20814. The NCAB ad hoc... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute..., Building 31C, Wing C, Conference Room 10, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 which was published in the...

  19. HER2-positive male breast cancer with thyroid cancer: an institutional report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Pooja; Bui, Marilyn M; Minton, Susan; Loftus, Loretta; Carter, W Bradford; Laronga, Christine; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare finding of two male breast cancer patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who also developed thyroid cancer. We reviewed 45 male breast cancer patients treated in our institution from 2003 to 2008. Only five male breast cancer patients were HER2-positive. In reviewing the published data, we found no cases of thyroid cancer and concurrent breast cancer in men. However, breast cancer and thyroid cancer have shown close association in women. This finding therefore provokes speculation as to whether we should investigate whether women with HER2-positive breast cancer are at a higher risk for thyroid cancer. Although this observation seems to be clinically prevalent, publications are sparse in clinical research areas linking thyroid cancer to breast cancer.

  20. Meeting the Challenge: The National Cancer Institute's Central Institutional Review Board for Multi-Site Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massett, Holly A; Hampp, Sharon L; Goldberg, Jacquelyn L; Mooney, Margaret; Parreco, Linda K; Minasian, Lori; Montello, Mike; Mishkin, Grace E; Davis, Catasha; Abrams, Jeffrey S

    2018-03-10

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a new policy that requires a single institutional review board (IRB) of record be used for all protocols funded by the NIH that are carried out at more than one site in the United States, effective January 2018. This policy affects several hundred clinical trials opened annually across the NIH. Limited data exist to compare the use of a single IRB to that of multiple local IRBs, so some institutions are resistant to or distrustful of single IRBs. Since 2001, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has funded a central IRB (CIRB) that provides human patient reviews for its extensive national cancer clinical trials program. This paper presents data to show the adoption, efficiencies gained, and satisfaction of the CIRB among NCI trial networks and reviews key lessons gleaned from 16 years of experience that may be informative for others charged with implementation of the new NIH single-IRB policy.

  1. Roswell Park Cancer Institute/ Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of Expression of Androgen Receptor in ABCG2+ CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cells” 4.) Morenike Olu, K Miller, I Gelman, Dept. Cancer Genetics ... rubric for the Directed Readings course sequence. Training in the use of the web conferencing software will be provided by the Project Director at

  2. Institutional Retention Strategies at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Their Effects on Cohort Default Rates: 1987-1995. Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Fred J.; Swail, Watson Scott

    This study analyzed institutional factors that significantly affect cohort default rates at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and assessed the potential for reducing these rates. It has been hypothesized that the HBCUs most successful in lowering student cohort default rates are those that have also succeeded in increasing…

  3. Professional Monograph Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildeová Stanislava

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Title of the monograph: Systems Approach to Knowledge Modelling. Authors: dr. Ludmila Dömeová; dr. Milan Houška; dr. Martina Houšková Beránková. Cover designer: Olga Čermáková. Interior designer: Roman Kvasnička. Publisher: Graphical Studio Olga Čermáková, Czech Republic. Place: Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. Year of publication: 2008. Number of pages: 282. Recommended price of the book: 39.90 EUR. First edition. Reviewer : dr. Stanislava Mildeová; Department of Systems Analysis, Faculty of Informatics and Statistics, University of Economics, Prague.

  4. 75 FR 48699 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group, Subcommittee I--Career Development, NCI-I Career Development. Date: September 21, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and.... Contact Person: Sergei Radaev, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch...

  5. 76 FR 1625 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group; Subcommittee I--Career Development, Career Development. Date: February 22-23, 2011. Time: February 22, 2011, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate to review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Alexandria Old Town...

  6. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ...., as amended. The contract proposals and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or... with the contract proposals, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SBIR Topic 304...

  7. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ...., as amended. The grant applications and/or contract proposals and the discussions could disclose... concerning individuals associated with the grant applications and/or contract proposals, the disclosure [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, SBIR Topic 258...

  8. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Legacy Hotel and Meeting Center, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Lalita D. Palekar, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Cancer Nanotechnology Training (R25) and Career Development Award (K99...

  9. Report on carcinogens monograph on 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on 1 bromopropane for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for 1 bromopropane in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to 1-bromopropane. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on 1 bromopropane, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that 1 bromopropane be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane caused skin tumors in male rats, large intestine tumors in female and male rats, and lung tumors in female mice. Also noted was that 1 bromopropane, either directly or via reactive metabolites, caused molecular alterations that typically are associated with carcinogenesis, including genotoxicity, oxidative stress, and glutathione depletion. These alterations, observed in mainly in vitro and toxicity studies in rodents, are relevant to possible mechanisms of human carcinogenicity and support the relevance of the cancer studies in

  10. Report on carcinogens monograph on cumene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on cumene for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for cumene in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to cumene. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on cumene, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that cumene be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found that cumene exposure caused lung tumors in male and female mice and liver tumors in female mice. Several proposed mechanisms of carcinogenesis support the relevance to humans of the lung and liver tumors observed in experimental animals. Specifically, there is evidence that humans and experimental animals metabolize cumene through similar metabolic pathways. In addition, mutations of the K-ras oncogene and p53 tumor-suppressor gene observed in cumene-induced lung tumors in mice, along with altered expression of many other genes, resemble molecular alterations found in human lung and other cancers.

  11. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  12. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Multidisciplinary Management at the Colombian National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garavito, Gloria; Llamas O, Augusto; Cadena, Enrique; De Los Reyes, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant disease of the endocrine system. Two hundred and twenty-one new cases were diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia (NCI) in 2006, roughly 4% of all new cancer cases. Weekly multidisciplinary decision-making meetings on thyroid cancer management have been held at the NCI since 1994. This article covers the body of knowledge gathered through 14 years of interdisciplinary collaboration where experience has been combined with the best available evidence.

  13. New Collective Monograph: The Golden Horde in World History (Kazan: Sh.Marjani Institute of History of AS RT, 2016. 968 p. + 28 p. of col. ins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Favereau-Doumenjou

    2016-12-01

    deeply influenced its surrounding world. This world included the successors states of the Mongol empire in China, Afghanistan, India, Persia and Anatolia as well as Byzantium, Russia, Europe and the Middle East. The density of the connections from the Mediterranean Sea to the Caspian Sea and as far as China illustrates how deeply the ulus of Jöchi was enmeshed with the wider world. Therefore, the history of the Golden Horde should not be disconnected from this world-shaping phenomenon. Nationalist historiographies are inclined to distort history, to create and disseminate self-serving clichés. The first task of historians is to avoid inaccurate terminology such as “the Tatar Yoke”, in order to encourage inquiries into more important questions: how to deal with the notion of a collective history when it crosses the borders of modern nations? What then are the role and the legacy of the Golden Horde in world history? The Golden Horde in World History gives some answers to these important questions. It achieves a twofold aim: to bring to a larger academic audience a cutting-edge research that remains barely known outside the circle of specialists and to integrate this research into the broader perspective of world history. It combines diverse approaches and questions not only to offer an exhaustive picture of the state of the field, but also to herald the most profitable directions of research and the most fruitful advances made. This comprehensive new synthesis is the result of the collaboration of leading scholars coming from major academic institutions: Sh.Marjani Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Institute of Russian History of Russian Academy of Sciences and Oxford University. I wish to address my deepest thanks to those who turned a bold editorial project into this impressively compelling collective book: Rafael Khakimov, Ilnur Mirgaleev, Roman Hautala, Vadim Trepavlov. Thanks to the fantastic energy of our colleagues from the Sh

  14. Monographs - SEER Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    In-depth publications on topics in cancer statistics, including collaborative staging and registry data, cancer survival from a policy and clinical perspective, a description of cancer in American Indians/Alaska Natives, and measures of health disparities.

  15. The flat‐funding years and the National Cancer Institute: Consequences for cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Hitt, Emma

    2008-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), the principal federal agency for cancer research and training in the US, has contended with a flat budget since 2004, which according to the institute's director is preventing the organisation from keeping pace with the increasing costs of biomedical research. Although the impact of these budget shortfalls are still being debated, Niederhuber believes these so‐called “flat‐funding years” may pave the way for worrying future trends, resulting in a paucity o...

  16. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  17. African Studies Monographs: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The African Studies Monographs is a serial that promotes research and scholarship on the African perspective worldwide. This includes matters of philosophy, history, literature, arts and culture, environment, gender, politics, administration crisis management, etc.

  18. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  19. Role of the National Cancer Institute in the National Cancer Program on environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamm, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the need for the National Cancer Institute to coordinate all cancer-related activities at the federal level and the desirability of programming so as to exploit the best opportunities for alleviating the mortality, morbidity, and incidence of cancer in the United States; need for assessing opportunities for prevention of environmental carcinogenesis; creation of the Smoking and Health Program in the NCI; development of cancer atlases from a nationwide survey; and role of the NCI with respect to waterborne carcinogens. (HLW)

  20. Monograph of Coccinia (Cucurbitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    This monograph deals with all 95 names described in the Cucurbitaceae genus Coccinia and recognizes 25 species. Taxonomic novelties are Cocciniaadoensisvar.aurantiaca (C.Jeffrey) Holstein, stat. nov., Cocciniasessilifoliavar.variifolia (A.Meeuse) Holstein, stat. nov., and Cocciniaadoensisvar.jeffreyana Holstein, var. nov. For the 25 species 3157 collections were examined, of which 2024 were georeferenced to produce distribution maps. All species are distributed in sub-Saharan Africa with one species, Cocciniagrandis, extending from Senegal in West Africa east to Indonesia and being naturalized on Pacific Islands, in Australia, the Caribbean, and South America. Coccinia species are dioecious creepers or climbers with simple or bifid tendrils that occupy a range of habitats from arid scrubland, woodlands to lowland rainforest and mist forest. The corolla of Coccinia species is sympetalous, usually pale yellow to orange, and 1 to 4.5 cm long. Pollination is by bees foraging for pollen or nectar. After pollination, the developing ovary often exhibits longitudinal mottling, which usually disappears during maturation. All species produce berries with a pericarp in reddish colors (orange-red through to scarlet red), hence the generic name. The globose to cylindrical fruits contain numerous grayish-beige flat to lenticular seeds. Chromosome numbers are 2n = 20, 24, and 22 + XX/XY. Many Coccinia species are used for food, either as roasted tubers, greens as spinach, or the fruits as vegetables. Medicinal value is established in Cocciniagrandis, of which leaves and sap are used against diabetes.

  1. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets in KRAS Driven Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  2. Demographic pattern of male breast cancer: an institutional based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanseem, S.; Khan, M.M.; Khan, M.M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Male breast cancer incidence rises with age with peak in the sixth and seventh decade. It is one of the rare diseases and accounts for less than 1% of all malignancies worldwide. It is usually diagnosed in the late stage with poor prognosis. Objective: The purpose of this study was to know the demographic pattern and tumour characteristic of breast cancer in men reported at Institute of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine (IRNUM), Peshawar. Methods: Retrospective data was collected from the (IRNUM), Peshawar for a period of three years (2006-2008). The evaluation was done from the histopathological reports of mastectomy and biopsy specimens. All male patients in the age group 26 -86 year with breast cancer were included in the study. The age of the patients and tumour characteristics recorded were size, grade, type, skin involvement and stage. Results: Total number of male patients with breast cancer were 31 (2.1%) out of the total patients with breast malignancy during the study period with the mean age of 58.3 years. Tumour size ranged from 2 to 12 Cm. with average of 3.6 Cm. Invasive ductal carcinoma was found in 87% , papillary carcinoma in 6.5%, each of malignant fibrous histocytoma and sarcoma in 3.2% cases. Maximum number of patients was of grade II (41%). Patients in whom stage of the disease was know n were 22 cases with 45.5% had stage III disease and 32% had stage IV disease. Skin involvement was found positive in 8 (25.8%). Conclusion: Due to poor health care system breast cancer is diagnosed in a late stage of the disease and prognosis is poor. (author)

  3. Monograph gender in academic writing context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Regina Rodrigues de Souza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The monograph genre is a social action which organizes the academic culture at the conclusion stage of a Graduation and a Specialization university course, as well as it is a textual action laid out in written production. For this article, we select six copies of this genre, from Letters and Social Sciences courses, through a multiple case study, with a descriptive-interpretativist methodology, to analyze this genre and its recurring movements in your introduction section. Supported by sociorhetorical approaches, as Swales (1990; 2004 and Bhatia (2004; 2009, we investigate monographs in continuous with other initiation genres in the scientific domain. We  conclude that they reveal a prototypicality marked by more general movements, as identifying theme, object presentation, question and research objectives. In addition, for more specific movements, in the case of our data, such as the information searches are derived from projects developed in the institutional promotion programme for the training of researchers (PIBIC, adapting to the situational context and communicative that evokes.

  4. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  5. 78 FR 57400 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... Organizational Engagement; and Proposed Organizational Change: Division of Extramural Activities. Place: National....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  6. 77 FR 70170 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398...

  7. 78 FR 41072 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398...

  8. The national cancer institute (NCI) and cancer biology in a 'post genome world'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) exists to reduce the burden of all cancers through research and discovery. Extensive restructuring of the NCI over the past year has been aimed at assuring that the institution functions in all ways to promote opportunities for discovery in the laboratory, in the clinic, and in the community. To do this well requires the difficult and almost paradoxical problem of planning for scientific discovery which, in turn is based on the freedom to pursue the unanticipated. The intellectual and structural landscape of science is changing and it places new challenges, new demands and new opportunities for facilitating discovery. The nature of cancer as a disease of genomic instability and of accumulated genetic change, coupled with a possibility of the development of new technologies for reading, utilizing, interpreting and manipulating the genome of single cells, provides unprecedented opportunities for a new type of high through-put biology that will change the nature of discovery, cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic decision-making and therapeutic discovery. To capture these new opportunities will require attention to be paid to integrate the development of technology and new scientific discoveries with the ability to apply advances rapidly and efficiently through clinical trials

  9. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  10. A monograph proposing the use of canine mammary tumours as a model for the study of hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Katie; Merner, Nancy D

    2017-05-01

    Canines are excellent models for cancer studies due to their similar physiology and genomic sequence to humans, companion status and limited intra-breed heterogeneity. Due to their affliction to mammary cancers, canines can serve as powerful genetic models of hereditary breast cancers. Variants within known human breast cancer susceptibility genes only explain a fraction of familial cases. Thus, further discovery is necessary but such efforts have been thwarted by genetic heterogeneity. Reducing heterogeneity is key, and studying isolated human populations have helped in the endeavour. An alternative is to study dog pedigrees, since artificial selection has resulted in extreme homogeneity. Identifying the genetic predisposition to canine mammary tumours can translate to human discoveries - a strategy currently underutilized. To explore this potential, we reviewed published canine mammary tumour genetic studies and proposed benefits of next generation sequencing canine cohorts to facilitate moving beyond incremental advances.

  11. Leveraging National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration for Uterine Cervix Cancer Patient Accrual in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Kunos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Women in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (PR have a higher age-adjusted incidence rate for uterine cervix cancer than the U.S. mainland as well as substantial access and economic barriers to cancer care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI funds a Minority/Underserved NCI Community Oncology Research Program in PR (PRNCORP as part of a national network of community-based health-care systems to conduct multisite cancer clinical trials in diverse populations. Participation by the PRNCORP in NCI’s uterine cervix cancer clinical trials, however, has remained limited. This study reports on the findings of an NCI site visit in PR to assess barriers impeding site activation and accrual to its sponsored gynecologic cancer clinical trials. Qualitative, semi-structured individual, and group interviews were conducted at six PRNCORP-affiliated locations to ascertain: long-term trial accrual objectives; key stakeholders in PR that address uterine cervix cancer care; key challenges or barriers to activating and to enrolling patients in NCI uterine cervix cancer treatment trials; and resources, policies, or procedures in place or needed on the island to support NCI-sponsored clinical trials. An NCI-sponsored uterine cervix cancer radiation–chemotherapy intervention clinical trial (NCT02466971, already activated on the island, served as a test case to identify relevant patient accrual and site barriers. The site visit identified five key barriers to accrual: (1 lack of central personnel to coordinate referrals for treatment plans, medical tests, and medical imaging across the island’s clinical trial access points; (2 patient insurance coverage; (3 lack of a coordinated brachytherapy schedule at San Juan-centric service providers; (4 limited credentialed radiotherapy machines island-wide; and (5 too few radiology medical physicists tasked to credential trial-specified positron emission tomography scanners island-wide. PR offers a unique opportunity to

  12. 76 FR 42719 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  13. 76 FR 10381 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  14. Prevalence of bone marrow necrosis in Egyptian cancer patients referring to the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgamal, B.M.; Rashed, R.A.; Raslan, H.N.

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow necrosis; Egyptian cancer patients Abstract Background: Bone marrow necrosis is a relatively rare entity which has been associated with a poor prognosis. It is most commonly found in patients with neoplastic disorders and severe infections. Methods: study comprised examination of 5043 bone marrow biopsy specimens performed at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, over 7 years period (March 2004-March 2011). It included 5 years retrospective (2867 archived samples) and 2 years prospective (2176 samples). Results: Bone marrow necrosis was diagnosed in fifteen out of 5043 examined specimens with a percentage of 0.3% and ranged from mild to massive according to semiquantitative estimation. Prognosis of all patients was poor with survival not exceeding 6 months from the date of marrow necrosis diagnosis. Conclusion: In Egyptian patients, bone marrow necrosis in association with malignancy is a rare disorder which is accompanied by a poor outcome

  15. 75 FR 79010 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Leukemia, and Myeloma. Date: February 2-3, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395...

  16. 77 FR 36564 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Prevention Method: State of the, Science and Evidence. Place: Hilton San Francisco Financial District, 750... applicable, the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. Information is also available... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396...

  17. 77 FR 64526 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the disclosure of... Cancer Advisory Board, Ad hoc Subcommittee on Communications. Open: November 28, 2012, 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Agenda: Discussion on Cancer Information and Communications. Place: Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One...

  18. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A pooling project of studies participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; McClain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This paper describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. PMID:28600297

  19. 77 FR 5032 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Initiatives; RFA and RFP Concept Reviews; and Scientific Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health... Group(s); and Budget Presentations; Reports of Special Initiatives; RFA and RFP Concept Reviews; and Scientific Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, 6th Floor, Conf...

  20. American Cancer Society: the world's wealthiest "nonprofit" institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S S

    1999-01-01

    The American Cancer Society is fixated on damage control--diagnosis and treatment--and basic molecular biology, with indifference or even hostility to cancer prevention. This myopic mindset is compounded by interlocking conflicts of interest with the cancer drug, mammography, and other industries. The "nonprofit" status of the Society is in sharp conflict with its high overhead and expenses, excessive reserves of assets and contributions to political parties. All attempts to reform the Society over the past two decades have failed; a national economic boycott of the Society is long overdue.

  1. NTP monograph on health effects of low-level lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Although reductions in lead (Pb) exposure for the U.S. population have resulted in lower blood Pb levels over time, epidemiological studies continue to provide evidence of health effects at lower and lower blood Pb levels. Low-level Pb was selected for evaluation by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) because of (1) the availability of a large number of epidemiological studies of Pb, (2) a nomination by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for an assessment of Pb at lower levels of exposure, and (3) public concern for effects of Pb in children and adults. This evaluation summarizes the evidence in humans and presents conclusions on health effects in children and adults associated with low-level Pb exposure as indicated by less than 10 micrograms of Pb per deciliter of blood (Monograph on Health Effects of Low-Level Lead. The document and appendices are available at http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/evals. This document provides background on Pb exposure and includes a review of the primary epidemiological literature for evidence that low-level Pb is associated with neurological, immunological, cardiovascular, renal, and/or reproductive and developmental effects. The NTP Monograph presents specific conclusions for each health effect area. Overall, the NTP concludes that there is sufficient evidence that blood Pb levels Monograph on November 17-18, 2011 (http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/37090.

  2. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that

  3. School Programs To Prevent Smoking: The National Cancer Institute Guide to Strategies That Succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Thomas J.

    This guide to school-based smoking prevention programs for educators is the product of five years of work to prevent cancer. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is currently funding 23 coordinated intervention trials directed at youth. Although not all the studies are complete, sufficient results are available to recommend the most effective…

  4. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation..., Behavioral Scientist/ Health Science Administrator, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 6130... text message smoking cessation intervention designed for young adult smokers ages 18-29. The Smokefree...

  5. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  6. 77 FR 31627 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... 20892, (301) 496-7628, [email protected] . In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport...

  7. 77 FR 31628 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before being allowed on campus...

  8. 78 FR 53463 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before...

  9. 78 FR 313 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... affiliation of the interested person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  10. 77 FR 64817 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... affiliation of the interested person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  11. 77 FR 31030 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before...

  12. 78 FR 10622 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ..., Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-7628, [email protected] . In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport...

  13. 77 FR 1703 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... professional affiliation of the interested person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport...

  14. 76 FR 62079 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    [email protected] . In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected...

  15. 77 FR 58851 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... of the interested person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  16. 76 FR 26310 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Group(s); and Budget Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive... entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  17. Clinical roundtable monograph: Recent advances in taxanes for the first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Spigel, David

    2012-10-01

    Treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are based on the broad categories of squamous or non-squamous histology. Frontline treatment options include pemetrexed and cisplatin, pemetrexed and a taxane, gemcitabine with cisplatin, and the addition of bevacizumab to a taxane and carboplatin. Pemetrexed is used for maintenance therapy for non-squamous NSCLC, whereas patients with squamous NSCLC lack easy options for maintenance therapy. nab-Paclitaxel overcomes the solubility and toxicity issues of solvent-based paclitaxel, and the albumin in nab-paclitaxel improves the concentration of the drug in the tumor. A recent phase III trial in NSCLC compared nab-paclitaxel with carboplatin versus solvent-based paclitaxel with carboplatin, and found improved overall response rates (ORRs) in the nab-paclitaxel arm (33% vs 25%; P=.005). In a subset analysis, NSCLC patients with squamous histology had a higher ORR (41%) with nab-paclitaxel than with solvent-based paclitaxel (24%; P<.001). Another subset analysis found that patients ages 70 years and older had improved overall survival (median 19.9 months) with nab-paclitaxel compared with solvent-based paclitaxel (median 10.4 months; P=.009). Patients in the nab-paclitaxel arm had less neuropathy, less hearing loss, and fewer interruptions in daily living than patients in the solvent-based paclitaxel arm.

  18. Technical books and monographs 1976 catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Citations and abstracts are presented for books and monographs on biology and medicine, chemistry, computers, energy, engineering and instrumentation, environment health physics, isotope separation, metallurgy, physics, reactors, and vacuum technology

  19. Design criteria monograph for pressurized metal cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Organiation and presentation of data pertaining to design of solid propellant rocket engine cases are discussed. Design criteria are presented in form of monograph based on accumulated experience and knowledge. Improvements in reliability, cost effectiveness, and engine efficiency are stressed.

  20. 78 FR 66034 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance and the competence of individual investigators... Cancer Advisory Board; Ad hoc Subcommittee on Communications. Open: December 9, 2013, 7:45 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Agenda: Discussion on Communications. Place: Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One Bethesda Metro Center...

  1. 76 FR 69744 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... and Therapeutic Agents Enabled by Nanotechnology. Date: November 29, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference... Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer...

  2. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Emphasis Panel; SBIR Topic 255 Development of Anticancer Agents Meeting I. Date: May 14, 2012. Time: 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health... Panel; SBIR Topic 255 Development of Anticancer Agents Meeting II. Date: May 15, 2012. Time: 12 p.m. to...

  3. 78 FR 58322 - National Cancer Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel, November 06, 2013, 06:30 p.m. to November 07, 2013, 04:00 p.m., Hilton... August 16, 2013, 78 FR 50065. The meeting notice is amended to change the location from the Hilton...

  4. 77 FR 28613 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... Nanotechnology. Date: July 11-12, 2012. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant.... to 3:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health... Call). Contact Person: Adriana Stoica, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics...

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use: Influence of Patients’ Satisfaction with Medical Treatment among Breast Cancer Patients at Uganda Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Kiwanuka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is high among cancer patients especially breast cancer patients. This study sought to evaluate Complementary and alternative medicine use in breast cancer patients and how its use is influencedby patient’s satisfaction with conventional medical treatment among breast cancer patients attending Uganda Cancer Institute. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used in this study. Participants who were diagnosed histologically with breast cancer at Uganda Cancer Institute took part in the study. A questionnaire was developed and used to interview the participants and medical records of the respondents were also reviewed. Results: A total of 235 participants completed the study. The prevalence of CAM use was 77%. CAM therapies used included herbal medicines, prayer for health, vitamins/minerals, native healers, Chinese medicines, massage, yoga, Ayurvedic medicine, Acupuncture, reflexolog, Support group attendance, meditation, Magnetic and Bio-fieldmanipulation. Satisfaction with medical treatment was significantlyassociated with CAM use. Patients who are not satisfiedwith medical treatment were more likely to use CAM. Conclusion: There is a high number of breast cancer patients using CAM, various categories of therapies are being used and patients’ satisfaction with medical treatment triggers off a patients decision to use CAM therapies.

  6. Employer Relations and Recruitment Services: An Essential Part of Postsecondary Career Services. Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Myrna P.; Lenz, Janet G.; Garis, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is intended for any career services provider seeking a guide for developing employer relations and recruitment services at a postsecondary institution. It serves to inform readers about the changing meaning of "placement" over the years and the role it currently plays in career services. The publication describes…

  7. Retrospective study on risk habits among oral cancer patients in Karnataka Cancer Therapy and Research Institute, Hubli, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, D S; Prasad, K V V; Shavi, Girish R; Ariga, Jitendra; Rajesh, G; Krishna, Madhusudan

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective studies on oral cancer patient profiles related to risk habits could provide etiologic clues for prevention in specific geographic areas. To study risk habit characteristics of oral cancer patients. A cross sectional retrospective case record study of oral cancer patients who reported during 1991-2000 to Karnataka Cancer Therapy and Research Institute, Hubli, India was conducted. Data on socio-demography, histopathology, site of cancer and risk habit profiles of the patients were recorded in a predesigned Performa by one calibrated examiner with internal validity checks. The 1,472 oral cancer patients constituted 11% of total cancer patients. Mean age of the patients was 55 years, ranging from 12-88, with a male: female ratio of 2:1. 1,110 (75%) oral cancer patients had risk habits, 55% were habituated for >10 years and 25% were habit free. 751(51%) patients had individual and 359(24%) had combined risk habits. Majority 59% were chewers of betel quid alone (17%)/betel quid with tobacco (42%); smokers were (31%) and alcohol users were (14%) of patients. Chewers of gutkha, khaini were more in 40 years. Risk habituates were highest (87%) in patients with cancer of buccal mucosa, commonly affected site attributed to chewing habit in (51%) of patients. The prevalence of oral cancer was higher among elderly males predominantly with risk habits of betel quid/tobacco chewing and smoking for more than 10 years.

  8. Identifying occupational carcinogens: an update from the IARC Monographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Dana; Guha, Neela; Hall, Amy L; Straif, Kurt

    2018-05-16

    The recognition of occupational carcinogens is important for primary prevention, compensation and surveillance of exposed workers, as well as identifying causes of cancer in the general population. This study updates previously published lists of known occupational carcinogens while providing additional information on cancer type, exposure scenarios and routes, and discussing trends in the identification of carcinogens over time. Data were extracted from International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs covering the years 1971-2017, using specific criteria to ensure occupational relevance and provide high confidence in the causality of observed exposure-disease associations. Selected agents were substances, mixtures or types of radiation classified in IARC Group 1 with 'sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity' in humans from studies of exposed workers and evidence of occupational exposure documented in the pertinent monograph. The number of known occupational carcinogens has increased over time: 47 agents were identified as known occupational carcinogens in 2017 compared with 28 in 2004. These estimates are conservative and likely underestimate the number of carcinogenic agents present in workplaces. Exposure to these agents causes a wide range of cancers; cancers of the lung and other respiratory sites, followed by skin, account for the largest proportion. The dominant routes of exposure are inhalation and dermal contact. Important progress has been made in identifying occupational carcinogens; nevertheless, there is an ongoing need for research on the causes of work-related cancer. Most workplace exposures have not been evaluated for their carcinogenic potential due to inadequate epidemiologic evidence and a paucity of quantitative exposure data. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  10. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Corrêa Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%, with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71% patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2% patients. In 50 patients (86%, sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%, hypothyroidism (43%, mucositis (33% and diarrhea (29%. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%, hypertension (12%, thrombocytopenia (7%, neutropenia (5% and hand-foot syndrome (5%. Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS.

  11. Outcome and treatment strategy in female lung cancer: a single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicenas, S.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Smailyte, G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate of female lung cancer treated at the Institute of Oncology of the Vilnius University, Lithuania during the period between 1996-2005. Materials and Methods: During the period between 1996-2005, 471 women diagnosed with lung cancer were treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery and Oncology of the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. Data on morphology, stage and treatment was collected from the medical records. All lung cancer cases by histology were classified in two groups: non-small cell lung cancer (includes squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and other less common types) and small cell lung cancer. The vital status of the study group was assessed as of December 31, 2007, by passive follow-up, using data from the population registry. It was found that 411 (87.3%) of the patients had died. Survival was estimated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median survival of female lung cancer diagnosed during 1996-2005 in Lithuania show to be 8.7 months (8.4 (95% CI 7.2-10.8) months with non-small cell lung cancer and 9.3 (95% CI 6.3-13.0) months with small-cell lung cancer). Survival was more than 20 months in resectable non-small cell lung cancer (stages I, II, IIIA). Non-small cell lung cancer survival in advanced stages was less than 7 months. Small-cell lung cancer patients median survival at limited and extended stages of the disease were 9.5 (95% CI 2.9-18.4) compared to 9.2 (95% CI 6.2-13.7) months. Non-small cell lung cancer patients most frequently were treated by surgery (27.0%), surgery and chemotherapy or radiotherapy (19.6%). Small cell lung cancer patient treatment included chemo and radiotherapy (27.0%), chemotherapy (19.0%), radiotherapy (17.5%), surgery (27.9%). Conclusions: The single center study of female lung cancer diagnosed during 1996-2005 in Lithuania show a significantly better chance of survival in resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Advanced stages of

  12. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000–2013: a systematic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000–2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Design Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Setting and participants Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000–2013. Main outcome measures Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Results We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded—the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Conclusions Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies

  13. Case Study in International Cooperation: Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center and Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rachel; Reid, Mary; Segal, Brahm; Abrams, Scott I; Lee, Kelvin

    2018-04-01

    In 1961, the USA severed diplomatic relations with Cuba, and in 1962 an embargo was imposed on trade and financial relations with that country. It was not until five decades later that the USA and Cuba would reestablish relations. This opened the way for the New York State Trade Mission to Cuba in April 2015, during which Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center and Buffalo, New York's Roswell Park Cancer Institute signed a formal agreement that would set in motion biotechnology research collaboration to address one of the most important causes of death in both countries. Significant research from Cuba led to this groundbreaking collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this cooperation, from the Molecular Immunology Center's initial investigations, through the opening of a phase I clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute with therapies developed at the Center. This cooperation was responsible for the first clinical trial for CIMAvax-EGF involving advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients in the USA. A license was also approved by the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control authorizing a commercial partnership for development of biotechnology products, combining the cancer research efforts of both institutions. This unusual collaboration between Cuba and the USA-the US economic embargo and travel restrictions not withstanding-opens good prospects for expanded medical research between the two countries. While political and logistical challenges remain, the shared mission and dedication of these Cuban and US scientists points the way towards relationships that can lead to development, testing, approval and use of promising new therapies for cancer patients. KEYWORDS Biotechnology, clinical trials, cancer vaccines, cancer immunotherapy, non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC, Cuba, USA.

  14. Delivering prostate cancer prevention messages to the public: how the National Cancer Institute (NCI) effectively spread the word about the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Kara Smigel; Ryan, Anne; Morzenti, Thuy; Cave, Lynn; Maze-Gallman, Tamara; Ford, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was the first clinical trial to show that a direct intervention (5 mg of finasteride daily for 7 years) could reduce a man's risk of developing prostate cancer. Initial results also suggested that men taking finasteride had an increased risk of developing what appeared to be higher-grade disease (Gleason score 7-10). The National Cancer Institute has a congressional mandate to communicate health information to the public and has established methods to reach the public directly and to reach information intermediaries in the media, professional societies, and advocacy groups. The groundbreaking yet complicated results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial were widely disseminated by National Cancer Institute using the social marketing and public-relations strategies and tactics detailed here. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cost of the Cervical Cancer Screening Program at the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Granados-García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the annual cost of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Materials and methods. This cost analysis examined regional coverage rates reported by IMSS. We estimated the number of cytology, colposcopy, biopsy and pathology evaluations, as well as the diagnostic test and treatment costs for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II and III (CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer. Diagnostic test costs were estimated using a micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results. The cost to perform 2.7 million cytology tests was nearly 38 million dollars, which represents 26.1% of the total program cost (145.4 million. False negatives account for nearly 43% of the program costs. Conclusion. The low sensitivity of the cytology test generates high rates of false negatives, which results in high institutional costs from the treatment of undetected cervical cancer cases.

  16. [Review on community herbal monographs for traditional herbal medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenjun; Qu, Liping; Ye, Zuguang; Ji, Jianxin; Li, Bogang

    2011-12-01

    This article discusses the characteristics of cmmunity herbal monographs for traditional herbal medicinal products and its establishment procedure. It also reviews the new development of cmmunity traditional herbal monographs. The purpose is to clarify the relationship between cmmunity herbal monographs and simplified registration for traditional herbal medicinal product in European Union and provide reference to the registration of taditional Chinese mdicinal products in Europe.

  17. 21 CFR 330.11 - NDA deviations from applicable monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false NDA deviations from applicable monograph. 330.11... EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED Administrative Procedures § 330.11 NDA deviations from applicable monograph. A new drug application requesting approval of an OTC drug deviating in any respect from a monograph that...

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canzian, Federico; Calle, Eugenia E; Chanock, Stephen; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Dossus, Laure; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lenner, Per; Lund, Eiliv; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Quiros, Jose R; Riboli, Elio; Stram, Daniel O; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J; Cox, David G; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Gils, Carla H van; Ziegler, Regina G; Henderson, Katherine D; Henderson, Brian E; Berg, Christine; Bingham, Sheila; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians

  20. A monograph on Strophanthus DC. (Apocynaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentje, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    1. This monograph is written on the genus Strophanthus, and is mainly based on the study of herbarium material.

    2. The genus occurs in Africa including Madagascar, and in South Asia.

    3. From the 141 taxonomic names existing, 38 species are recognized, one of which has 2 varieties.

  1. Sport Law. NOLPE Monograph Series, No. 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Linda A.

    The first chapter of this monograph on sport law presents tort issues, primarily negligence. A discussion of some fundamental negligence concepts is followed by three sections devoted to the prime risk areas in school and collegiate settings. A review of the principles of risk management is included. The second chapter focuses on contractual…

  2. Sport Law. NOLPE Monograph Series, No. 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Linda A.

    Three primary areas of concern for those who confront sport law matters in public school or collegiate settings are the focus of this monograph. The first chapter presents tort issues, primarily negligence. A brief overview of fundamental negligence concepts is followed by discussions of major risk areas: supervision, conduct of the activity, and…

  3. Oceanography for Landlocked Classrooms. Monograph V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr., Ed.; Hounshell, Paul B., Ed.

    This monograph attempts to show the importance of bringing marine biology into science classrooms, discusses what makes the ocean so important and explains why oceanography should be included in the science curriculum regardless of where students live. Section I, "Getting Started," includes discussions on the following: (1) "Why Marine Biology?";…

  4. A comparative study of breast cancer mass screening using ultrasonography and mammography at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Tsuguo; Takahashi, Naohiko; Ueda, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasonic screening for breast cancer (US group) in comparison with mammographic screening (MMG group), we analyzed 78,214 breast screening examinees presenting between 2007 and 2008 at our institution. The cancer detection rate in the US group was lower than that in the MMG group. However, the average age in the US group was significantly younger than that in the MMG group, and the rate of annual screening was significantly higher in the former than in the latter. In the US subgroup who underwent annual screening, the recall rate and the cancer detection rate were significantly lower, and the rate of detection of early breast cancers was significantly higher than that in the subgroup who underwent screening biennially or at longer intervals, and there was no significant inter-group difference in the cancer detection rate between women in their 40s and those aged 50 or above who underwent annual screening. The proportion of early breast cancers detected was almost the same in the both groups. In summary, US screening as well as MMG screening seems to be useful for detection of early breast cancer. Although a high recall rate for US screening has been reported previously, annual screening and sufficient quality control based on the guidelines proposed by the Japan Association of Breast and Thyroid Sonology (JABTS) are considered to reduce the recall rate. (author)

  5. Nutritional status of cancer patients admitted for chemotherapy at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, J E; Domingo, F; Luna, C A; Berroya, R M; Catli, C A; Ginete, J K; Sanchez, O S; Juat, N J; Tiangco, B J; Jamias, J D

    2010-11-01

    Malnutrition is common among cancer patients. This study aimed to determine the overall prevalence of malnutrition among patients undergoing chemotherapy and to determine the predictors of malnutrition among cancer patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 88 cancer patients admitted for chemotherapy at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, Philippines, from October to November 2009. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), anthropometric data and demographic variables were obtained. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA and logistic regression analysis were performed between the outcome and variables. A total of 88 cancer patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.7 +/- 14.8 years. The mean duration of illness was 9.7 +/- 8.7 months and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.9 kg/m2. The mean Karnofsky performance status was 79.3. 29.55 percent of the patients had breast cancer as the aetiology of their illness. 38 patients (43.2 percent) had SGA B and four (4.5 percent) had SGA C, giving a total malnutrition prevalence of 47.7 percent. The patients were statistically different with regard to their cancer stage (p is less than 0.001), weight (p is 0.01), BMI (p is 0.004), haemoglobin level (p is 0.001) and performance status by Karnofsky score (p is less than 0.001), as evaluated by ANOVA. Logistic regression analysis showed that cancer stage and Karnofsky performance score were predictors of malnutrition. About 47.7 percent of cancer patients suffer from malnutrition, as classified by SGA. Only cancer stage and Karnofsky performance status scoring were predictive of malnutrition in this select group of patients.

  6. Environmental dose in the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres U, C. L.; Avila A, O. L.; Medina V, L. A.; Buenfil B, A. E.; Brandan S, M. E.; Trujillo Z, F. E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.

    2009-01-01

    The dosimeters TLD-100 and TLD-900 were used to know the levels of environmental dose in areas of the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer. The dosimeters calibration was carried out in the Metrology Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. The radioisotopes used in the studied areas are 131 I, 18 F, 67 Ga, 99m Tc, 111 In, 201 Tl and 137 Cs with gamma energies between 93 and 662 KeV. Dosimeters were placed during five months in the diagnostic, injection, waiting and PET rooms as well as hot room, waste room, enclosed corridors to patient rooms treated with 131 I and 137 Cs and witness dosimeters to know the bottom. The values found vary between 0.3 and 70 major times that those of bottom. The maximum doses were measured in the waste room and in the enclosed corridor to the patient rooms with cervical uterine cancer treated with 137 Cs. (Author)

  7. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000-2013: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-04-20

    To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000-2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000-2013. Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded-the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies. Funding agencies and industry should openly document their research investments to

  8. Some radiation protection problems in a cancer hospital and associated research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, N.G.; Anderson, W.; Davis, R.P.; Carden, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Experience gained at the Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research has shown that with attention to the design of facilities and procedures and an active personnel monitoring policy, relatively large scale radiation commitments can proceed with individual whole body doses to staff being held well below 15 mSv/annum. In spite of detailed attention to control of radiation work, traumatic radiation incidents may still occur. (H.K.)

  9. Exercise recommendations for childhood cancer survivors exposed to cardiotoxic therapies: an institutional clinical practice initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Maki; Meeske, Kathleen A; Menteer, Jondavid; Freyer, David R

    2012-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors who have received treatment with anthracyclines are at risk for developing cardiomyopathy in dose-dependent fashion. Historically, restrictions on certain types of physical activity that were intended to preserve cardiac function have been recommended, based on a mixture of evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations. In the LIFE Cancer Survivorship & Transition Program at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, the authors reevaluated their recommendations for exercise in survivors who were exposed to anthracyclines, with or without irradiation in proximity to the myocardium. The primary goal was to develop consistent, specific, practical, safe, and (where possible) evidence-based recommendations for at-risk survivors in the program. To accomplish this, the authors referred to current exercise guidelines for childhood cancer survivors, consulted recent literature for relevant populations, and obtained input from the program's pediatric cardiology consultant. The resulting risk-based exercise recommendations are designed to complement current published guidelines, maximize safe exercise, and help childhood cancer survivors return to a normal life that emphasizes overall wellness and physical activity. This article describes a single institution's experience in modifying exercise recommendations for at-risk childhood survivors and includes the methods, findings, and current institutional practice recommendations along with sample education materials.

  10. Patterns of use of medical cannabis among Israeli cancer patients: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waissengrin, Barliz; Urban, Damien; Leshem, Yasmin; Garty, Meital; Wolf, Ido

    2015-02-01

    The use of the cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) for the palliative treatment of cancer patients has been legalized in multiple jurisdictions including Israel. Yet, not much is currently known regarding the efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis in this setting. To analyze the indications for the administration of cannabis among adult Israeli cancer patients and evaluate its efficacy. Efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis were evaluated using physician-completed application forms, medical files, and a detailed questionnaire in adult cancer patients treated at a single institution. Of approximately 17,000 cancer patients seen, 279 (cannabis from an authorized institutional oncologist. The median age of cannabis users was 60 years (range 19-93 years), 160 (57%) were female, and 234 (84%) had metastatic disease. Of 151 (54%) patients alive at six months, 70 (46%) renewed their cannabis permit. Renewal was more common among younger patients and those with metastatic disease. Of 113 patients alive and using cannabis at one month, 69 (61%) responded to the detailed questionnaire. Improvement in pain, general well-being, appetite, and nausea were reported by 70%, 70%, 60%, and 50%, respectively. Side effects were mild and consisted mostly of fatigue and dizziness. Cannabis use is perceived as highly effective by some patients with advanced cancer and its administration can be regulated, even by local authorities. Additional studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of cannabis as part of the palliative treatment of cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Survey of Policies and Guidelines on Antioxidant Use for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Survivorship in North American Cancer Centers: What Do Institutions Perceive as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeongyeon; White, Jennifer; Zhong, Lihong; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-07-01

    Health care policies and guidelines that are clear and consistent with research evidence are important for maximizing clinical outcomes. To determine whether cancer centers in Canada and the United States had policies and/or guidelines about antioxidant use, and whether policies were aligned with the evidence base, we reviewed current research evidence in the field, and we undertook a survey of the policies and guidelines on antioxidant use at cancer institutions across North America. A survey of policies and guidelines on antioxidant use and the development and communication of the policies and guidelines was conducted by contacting cancer institutions in North America. We also conducted a Website search for each institution to explore any online resources. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant use were collected from 78 cancer institutions. Few cancer institutions had policies (5%) but most provided guidelines (69%). Antioxidants from diet were generally encouraged at cancer institutions, consistent with the current research evidence. In contrast, specific antioxidant supplements were generally not recommended at cancer institutions. Policies and guidelines were developed using evidence-based methods (53%), by consulting another source (35%), or through discussions/conference (26%), and communicated mainly through online resources (65%) or written handouts (42%). For cancer institutions that had no policy or guideline on antioxidants, lack of information and lack of time were the most frequently cited reasons. Policies and guidelines on antioxidants from diet were largely consistent with the research evidence. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant supplements during treatment were generally more restrictive than the research evidence might suggest, perhaps due to the specificity of results and the inability to generalize findings across antioxidants, adding to the complexity of their optimal and safe use. Improved communication of comprehensive research

  12. Drug Monographs: Avelumab and Ribociclib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, J Aubrey; Solimando, Dominic A

    2017-07-01

    The complexity of cancer chemotherapy requires pharmacists be familiar with the complicated regimens and highly toxic agents used. This column reviews various issues related to preparation, dispensing, and administration of antineoplastic therapy, and the agents, both commercially available and investigational, used to treat malignant diseases. Questions or suggestions for topics should be addressed to Dominic A. Solimando, Jr, President, Oncology Pharmacy Services, Inc, 4201 Wilson Blvd #110-545, Arlington, VA 22203, email: OncRxSvc@comcast.net; or J. Aubrey Waddell, Professor, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy; Oncology Pharmacist, Pharmacy Department, Blount Memorial Hospital, 907 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Maryville, TN 37804, e-mail: waddfour@charter.net.

  13. Cancer incidence and mortality in children in the Mexican Social Security Institute (1996-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Pachuca-Vázquez, Adriana; Allende-López, Aldo; Fajardo-Yamamoto, Liria Mitzuko; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique

    2016-04-01

    To identify the cancer incidence and mortality in Mexican Social Security Institute beneficiary (MSSI-B) children during 1996-2013. Both cancer cases (n=4 728) and deaths (n=2 378) were analyzed in MSSI-B children who were registered in five states of the Mexican Republic. The incidence and mortality trends and the incidences (rate x 1 000 000 children / year) of the type of cancer, age, sex, and place of residence were obtained. For both indicators (incidence and mortality), there was a downward trend for the period of 1996-2001 and a stable trend for 2002-2013. This occurred in the overall mortality and incidence trends of the Estado de México and Chiapas and in the leukemia and the acute lymphoid subgroups. The annual overall incidence was 128 cases per 1 000 000 children. Leukemia, lymphomas, and central nervous system tumors were the principal cancer groups. Cancer mortality for the period of 2002-2013 did not diminish. Interinstitutional and/or international research should be designed to improve the care of these children.

  14. Adjuvant chemo radiation in completely resected gastric cancer: experience of the National Cancer Institute of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa O, Nicolas; Russo N, Moises; Lopez V, Hernan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal tumors in the Chilean population. Aim: To report the results of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Material and Methods: Review of medical records of patients with locoregionally advanced gastric cancer, subjected to a curative resection and treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The treatment was based on he INT 0116/SSWOG protocol, which includes 5-fluorouracil as a single agent. Patients were followed for a median of 58 months. Results: The records of 168 patients (99 men) treated between 2004 nd 2011, were reviewed. Median survival as 41 months. Median lapses between surgery and onset of chemo and radiotherapy were 12 and 17 weeks, respectively. Overall three and five years survival was 53 and 41%, respectively. On multivariate analysis the factors associated with a lower survival were an antral location of the tumor, presence of signet ring cells and more than 5 involved lymph nodes. Conclusions: Three and five years survival of gastric cancer patients subjected to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was 53 and 41% respectively.These results are similar to those reported elsewhere

  15. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  16. International Perspectives on the First-Year Experience in Higher Education. The First-Year Experience Monograph Series No. 52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Diane, Ed.; Calderon, Denis, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Students around the globe have unique first-year experiences but struggle with many of the same challenges. This monograph focuses on their journeys and provides insights for educators interested in learning about how institutions across the globe provide supports to students dealing with first-year transition issues. Based on the successful…

  17. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... award performance and the effectiveness of the program as a whole. The respondents are the Principal Investigators of the awards, along with their institutional business officials. The awards are administered by... costs to respondents other than their time. The estimated annualized burden hours are 72. Estimated...

  18. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Health National Cancer Institute What if the tools you need to quit smoking were as easy ... habits with an easy-to-use calendar Includes motivational reminders that coincide with progress, Sends health milestones ...

  19. Drug Monographs: Ixazomib and Necitumumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Fern E; Waddell, J Aubrey; Solimando, Dominic A

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of cancer chemotherapy requires pharmacists be familiar with the complicated regimens and highly toxic agents used. This column reviews various issues related to preparation, dispensing, and administration of antineoplastic therapy, and the agents, both commercially available and investigational, used to treat malignant diseases. Questions or suggestions for topics should be addressed to Dominic A. Solimando, Jr, President, Oncology Pharmacy Services, Inc., 4201 Wilson Blvd #110-545, Arlington, VA 22203, e-mail: OncRxSvc@comcast.net; or J. Aubrey Waddell, Professor, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy; Oncology Pharmacist, Pharmacy Department, Blount Memorial Hospital, 907 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Maryville, TN 37804, e-mail: waddfour@charter.net.

  20. Variation in Definitive Therapy for Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Luca F. [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bobiak, Sarah N.; Zornosa, Carrie [National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Pisters, Katherine M. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dexter, Elisabeth U. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Niland, Joyce C. [Department of Information Sciences, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kapadia, Nirav S., E-mail: Nirav.S.Kapadia@hitchcock.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.

  1. Variation in Definitive Therapy for Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, Luca F.; Jagsi, Reshma; Bobiak, Sarah N.; Zornosa, Carrie; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Pisters, Katherine M.; Dexter, Elisabeth U.; Niland, Joyce C.; Hayman, James A.; Kapadia, Nirav S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.

  2. Small molecules, big players: the National Cancer Institute's Initiative for Chemical Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolliday, Nicola; Clemons, Paul A; Ferraiolo, Paul; Koehler, Angela N; Lewis, Timothy A; Li, Xiaohua; Schreiber, Stuart L; Gerhard, Daniela S; Eliasof, Scott

    2006-09-15

    In 2002, the National Cancer Institute created the Initiative for Chemical Genetics (ICG), to enable public research using small molecules to accelerate the discovery of cancer-relevant small-molecule probes. The ICG is a public-access research facility consisting of a tightly integrated team of synthetic and analytical chemists, assay developers, high-throughput screening and automation engineers, computational scientists, and software developers. The ICG seeks to facilitate the cross-fertilization of synthetic chemistry and cancer biology by creating a research environment in which new scientific collaborations are possible. To date, the ICG has interacted with 76 biology laboratories from 39 institutions and more than a dozen organic synthetic chemistry laboratories around the country and in Canada. All chemistry and screening data are deposited into the ChemBank web site (http://chembank.broad.harvard.edu/) and are available to the entire research community within a year of generation. ChemBank is both a data repository and a data analysis environment, facilitating the exploration of chemical and biological information across many different assays and small molecules. This report outlines how the ICG functions, how researchers can take advantage of its screening, chemistry and informatic capabilities, and provides a brief summary of some of the many important research findings.

  3. Institutional clinical trial accrual volume and survival of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J; Zhang, Qiang; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Fortin, André; Silverman, Craig L; Raben, Adam; Kim, Harold E; Horwitz, Eric M; Read, Nancy E; Harris, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Le, Quynh-Thu; Gillison, Maura L

    2015-01-10

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receive treatment at centers with expertise, but whether provider experience affects survival is unknown. The effect of institutional experience on overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III or IV HNC was investigated within a randomized trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 0129), which compared cisplatin concurrent with standard versus accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. As a surrogate for experience, institutions were classified as historically low- (HLACs) or high-accruing centers (HHACs) based on accrual to 21 RTOG HNC trials (1997 to 2002). The effect of accrual volume on OS was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Median RTOG accrual (1997 to 2002) at HLACs was four versus 65 patients at HHACs. Analysis included 471 patients in RTOG 0129 (2002 to 2005) with known human papillomavirus and smoking status. Patients at HLACs versus HHACs had better performance status (0: 62% v 52%; P = .04) and lower T stage (T4: 26.5% v 35.3%; P = .002) but were otherwise similar. Radiotherapy protocol deviations were higher at HLACs versus HHACs (18% v 6%; P accounting for radiotherapy protocol deviations. Institutional experience substantially influences survival in locally advanced HNC. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Lumboaortic radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Experience of the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Becerra S, Sergio; Gayan G, Patricio; Carcamo I, Marcela; Bianchi G, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Uterine cancer is still a prevalent disease in Chile. Is common to treat patients with tumors in stages IIB and IIIB where the risk of pelvic and paraortic limph node involvement is very high. Its treatment is radio-chemotherapy. Objective: To present a retrospective analysis of patients that suffered cervix-uterine cancer who were treated with radiotherapy including the aortic-lumbar area. Methods: From the revision of patients who were treated of cervix-uterine cancer between the years 1995 and 2007, 39 were treated including aortic-lumbar chains. Evolution and toxicity were analyzed. Two radiotherapy techniques were used. The first one, during the nineties, included two parallel previous and later and opposed fields, and a second technique, currently used, where pelvis and paraortic are radiated at the same time through four lateral (AP-PA) fields. Results: The dosimeter analysis of both techniques shows that there is a higher volume of radiated normal tissue with the two fields techniques, mainly in the small bowel. On the other hand, the toxicity was significantly different being today's technique less toxic and showing low gastrointestinal

  5. Adherence to the cancer prevention recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research and mortality: a census-linked cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Tina; Faeh, David; Bopp, Matthias; Rohrmann, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Modifiable lifestyle factors linked to cancer offer great potential for prevention. Previous studies suggest an association between adherence to recommendations on healthy lifestyle and cancer mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether adherence to the cancer prevention recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) is associated with reduced all-cause, total cancer, and specific cancer type mortality. We built a lifestyle score that included 3 categories, based on the recommendations of the WCRF/AICR. Applying Cox regression models, we investigated the association with all-cause, total cancer, and specific cancer type mortality; in addition, we included cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. We used census- and death registry-linked survey data allowing a mortality follow-up for ≤32 y. Our analysis included 16,722 participants. Information on lifestyle score components and confounders was collected at baseline. Over a mean follow-up of 21.7 y, 3730 deaths were observed (1332 cancer deaths). Comparing best with poorest category of the lifestyle score showed an inverse association with all-cause (HR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.89) and total cancer (men only, HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.84) mortality. We estimated that ∼13% of premature cancer deaths in men would have been preventable if lifestyle score levels had been high. Inverse associations were observed for lung, upper aerodigestive tract, stomach, and prostate cancer mortality [men and women combined, HR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.99; HR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.92; HR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.83; HR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.28, 0.82 (men only), respectively]. CVD mortality was not associated with the lifestyle score (men and women combined, HR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.13). Our results support the importance of adhering to recommendations for a healthy lifestyle with regard to all-cause and cancer mortality. To reduce the burden of cancer in the

  6. Drug Monographs: Olaratumab and Rucaparib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimando, Dominic A; Waddell, J Aubrey

    2017-04-01

    The complexity of cancer chemotherapy requires pharmacists be familiar with the complicated regimens and highly toxic agents used. This column reviews various issues related to preparation, dispensing, and administration of antineoplastic therapy, and the agents, both commercially available and investigational, used to treat malignant diseases. Questions or suggestions for topics should be addressed to Dominic A. Solimando, Jr, President, Oncology Pharmacy Services, Inc., 4201 Wilson Blvd #110-545, Arlington, VA 22203, e-mail: OncRxSvc@comcast.net; or J. Aubrey Waddell, Professor, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy; Oncology Pharmacist, Pharmacy Department, Blount Memorial Hospital, 907 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Maryville, TN 37804, e-mail: waddfour@charter.net. The information presented in this review is based on published data and clinical expertise and includes information not included in the product labeling. Incorporation of such published data provides a more robust assessment of the drugs and assists pharmacists in evaluation of orders for off-label use of these agents.

  7. Drug Monographs: Atezolizumab and Everolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Matthew A; Waddell, J Aubrey; Solimando, Dominic A

    2016-11-01

    The complexity of cancer chemotherapy requires pharmacists be familiar with the complicated regimens and highly toxic agents used. This column reviews various issues related to preparation, dispensing, and administration of antineoplastic therapy, and the agents, both commercially available and investigational, used to treat malignant diseases. Questions or suggestions for topics should be addressed to Dominic A. Solimando, Jr., President, Oncology Pharmacy Services, Inc., 4201 Wilson Blvd #110-545, Arlington, VA 22203, email: OncRxSvc@comcast.net; or J. Aubrey Waddell, Professor, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy; Oncology Pharmacist, Pharmacy Department, Blount Memorial Hospital, 907 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Maryville, TN 37804, e-mail: waddfour@charter.net. The authors are not employees of, under contract to, recipients of funding to review products from, or in any other way affiliated with either Genentech, Inc. or Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. The information presented in this review is based on published data and clinical expertise and includes information not included in the product labeling. Incorporation of such published data provides a more robust assessment of the drugs and assists pharmacists in evaluation of orders for off-label use of these agents.

  8. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soejarto, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with

  9. Brachytherapy or Conformal External Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Single-Institution Matched-Pair Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the absence of randomized study data, institutional case series have shown brachytherapy (BT) to produce excellent biochemical control (bNED) in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with alternative curative treatments. This study was designed to overcome some of the limitations of case series studies by using a matched-pair design in patients treated contemporaneously with BT and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Six hundred one eligible patients treated between 1998 and 2001 were prospectively followed up in our institutional databases and matched on a 1:1 basis for the following known prognostic variables: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, T stage, the use and duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, and the percentage of positive tissue core samples. Two hundred seventy-eight perfect matches of patients (139 in each group) with low- and intermediate-risk cancer were further analyzed. bNED (Phoenix definition) was the primary endpoint. Other endpoints were toxicity, PSA kinetics, and the secondary use of androgen deprivation therapy. Results: The 5-year bNED rates were 95% (BT) and 85% (EBRT) (p < 0.001). After 7 years, the BT bNED result was unchanged, but the rate in EBRT patients had fallen to 75%. The median posttreatment PSA nadirs were 0.04 ng/mL (BT) and 0.62 ng/mL (EBRT, p < 0.001), which predicted a higher ongoing treatment failure rate in association with EBRT use than with BT use. Late urinary toxicity and rectal/bowel toxicity were worse in patients treated with BT and EBRT, respectively. Conclusions: BT for both low-risk and selected intermediate-risk cancers achieves exceptional cure rates. Even with dose escalation, it will be difficult for EBRT to match the proven track record of BT seen over the past decade.

  10. Sexual outcomes after partial penectomy for penile cancer: results from a multi-institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sansalone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer is an uncommon malignancy. Surgical treatment is inevitably mutilating. Considering the strong impact on patients′ sexual life we want to evaluate sexual function and satisfaction after partial penectomy. The patients in this study (n = 25 represented all those who attended our institutions and were diagnosed and treated for penile cancer from October 2011 to November 2013. All patients underwent partial penectomy and followed-up (mean: 14 months; range: 12-25. Sexual presurgical baseline was estimated using the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction 15 (IIEF-15. Sexual outcomes of each patient were estimated considering four standardized and validated questionnaires. We analyzed the means and ranges of IIEF-15 including erectile function (IIEF-1-5 and -15, orgasmic function (IIEF-9 and -10, sexual desire (IIEF-11 and -12, intercourse satisfaction (IIEF-6-8, and overall satisfaction (IIEF-13 and -14. Then, we also used Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ, Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS and Self-Esteem and Relationship (SEAR to evaluate the sexual function and satisfaction of our patients. The final results showed that penile cancer leads to several sexual and psychosexual dysfunctions. Nevertheless, patients who undergo partial penectomy for penile cancer can maintain the sexual outcomes at levels slightly lower to those that existed in the period before surgery.

  11. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. Preliminary results of robotic colorectal surgery at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, A.S.; Mahmoud, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The available literature on minimally invasive colorectal cancer demonstrates that laparoscopic approach is feasible and associated with better short term outcomes than open surgery while maintaining equivalent oncologic safety. Reports have shown that robotic surgery may overcome some of the pitfalls of laparoscopic intervention. Objective of the work: To evaluate early results of robotic colorectal surgery, in a cohort of Egyptian patients, regarding operative time, operative and early post-operative complications, hospital stay and pathological results. Patients and methods: A case series study which was carried out in surgical department at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Ten Egyptian cases of colorectal cancer (age ranged from 30 to 67, 5 males and 5 females) were recruited from the period of April 2013 to April 2014. Robotic surgery was performed to all cases. Results: Three patients had low anterior resection, three anterior resection, one total proctectomy, one abdominoperineal resection, one left hemicolectomy and one colostomy. The study reported no mortalities and two morbidities. The mean operative time was 333 min. The conversion to open was done in only one patient. A total mesorectal excision with negative circumferential margin was accomplished in all patients, distal margin was positive in one patient. Mean lymph nodes removed was 10.7. Mean hospital stay was 7.4 days. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the outcomes of robotic colorectal cancer intervention in Egyptian patients. Our preliminary results suggest that robotic- assisted surgery for colorectal cancer can be carried out safely and according to oncological principles

  13. Calibrating the parameters: changing hearts and minds about open access monographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Professor Michael C R Davies

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of open access (OA publishing presents welcome new opportunities for reducing the barriers of cost and time to the dissemination of research work in UK universities. However, it does present some challenges to the traditional model of monograph publication in the humanities and social sciences. In common with many other academic institutions, the University of Sussex is developing policies that will permit it to embrace OA publication. This paper describes how, in doing this, Sussex is addressing the challenges associated with OA to ensure that the careers of doctoral students, academics and researchers are not affected adversely by the change in the publishing landscape for monographs both in the UK and internationally.

  14. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  15. Breast cancer mammographic diagnosis performance in a public health institution: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Juliana M R B; Bittelbrunn, Fernando P; Rockenbach, Marcio A B C; May, Guilherme G; Vedolin, Leonardo M; Kruger, Marilia S; Soldatelli, Matheus D; Zwetsch, Guilherme; de Miranda, Gabriel T F; Teixeira, Saone I P; Arruda, Bruna S

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the quality assurance of mammography results at a reference institution for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in southern Brazil, based on the BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) 5th edition recommendations for auditing purposes. Retrospective cohort and cross-sectional study with 4502 patients (9668 mammographies)) who underwent at least one or both breast mammographies throughout 2013 at a regional public hospital, linked to a federal public university. The results were followed until 31 December 2014, including true positives (TPs), true negatives (TNs), false positives (FPs), false negatives (FNs), positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity and specificity, with a confidence interval of 95%. The study showed high quality assurance, particularly regarding sensitivity (90.22%) and specificity (92.31%). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) was 65.35%, and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 98.32%. The abnormal interpretation rate (recall rate) was 12.26%. The results are appropriate when compared to the values proposed by the BIRADS 5th edition. Additionally, the study provided self-reflection considering our radiological practice, which is essential for improvements and collaboration regarding breast cancer detection. It may stimulate better radiological practice performance and continuing education, despite possible infrastructure and facility limitations. • Accurate quality performance rates are possible despite financial and governmental limitations. • Low-income institutions should develop standardised teamwork to improve radiological practice. • Regular mammography audits may help to increase the quality of public health systems.

  16. [Leon Daraszkiewicz and his monograph on hebephrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinowski, Filip

    2012-01-01

    Leon Daraszkiewicz (1866-1931) was a Polish psychiatrist, a pupil and co-worker of E. Kraepelin and V. Tsiz on the University of Dorpat (now Tartu, Estonia), the author of highly regarded monograph on hebephrenia (1891). In his work on the basis of over 20 case histories, he described a natural history of hebephrenia and his own views on its aetiology and prognosis. Hebephrenia as described by Daraszkiewicz, served as a clinical model for the Kraepelinian concept of dementia praecox. In the article, the life and career of Daraszkiewicz is covered, with particular emphasis on the role of his doctoral dissertation on hebephrenia in the history of the concept of schizophrenia.

  17. Creating a "culture of research" in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Eileen P; St Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-06-01

    The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important component yet often challenging to

  18. Mycotoxins as human carcinogens-the IARC Monographs classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostry, Vladimir; Malir, Frantisek; Toman, Jakub; Grosse, Yann

    2017-02-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to mycotoxins (e.g. aflatoxins, ochratoxins), mainly via food intake of plant and animal origin. The health risks stemming from mycotoxins may result from their toxicity, in particular their carcinogenicity. In order to prevent these risks, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon (France)-through its IARC Monographs programme-has performed the carcinogenic hazard assessment of some mycotoxins in humans, on the basis of epidemiological data, studies of cancer in experimental animals and mechanistic studies. The present article summarizes the carcinogenic hazard assessments of those mycotoxins, especially aflatoxins (aflatoxin B 1 , B 2 , G 1 , G 2 and M 1 ), fumonisins (fumonisin B 1 and B 2 ) and ochratoxin A (OTA). New information regarding the genotoxicity of OTA (formation of OTA-DNA adducts), the role of OTA in oxidative stress and the identification of epigenetic factors involved in OTA carcinogenesis-should they indeed provide strong evidence that OTA carcinogenicity is mediated by a mechanism that also operates in humans-could lead to the reclassification of OTA.

  19. Salvage radical prostatectomy for radiation-recurrent prostate cancer: a multi-institutional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Daher C; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Cronin, Angel M; Savage, Caroline J; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Blute, Michael L; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; van der Poel, Henk G; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven; Godoy, Guilherme; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Gleave, Martin E; Dall'Oglio, Marcos; Srougi, Miguel; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-08-01

    Oncologic outcomes in men with radiation-recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) treated with salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) are poorly defined. To identify predictors of biochemical recurrence (BCR), metastasis, and death following SRP to help select patients who may benefit from SRP. This is a retrospective, international, multi-institutional cohort analysis. There was a median follow-up of 4.4 yr following SRP performed on 404 men with radiation-recurrent PCa from 1985 to 2009 in tertiary centers. Open SRP. BCR after SRP was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 0.1 or ≥ 0.2 ng/ml (depending on the institution). Secondary end points included progression to metastasis and cancer-specific death. Median age at SRP was 65 yr of age, and median pre-SRP PSA was 4.5 ng/ml. Following SRP, 195 patients experienced BCR, 64 developed metastases, and 40 died from PCa. At 10 yr after SRP, BCR-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) probabilities were 37% (95% confidence interval [CI], 31-43), 77% (95% CI, 71-82), and 83% (95% CI, 76-88), respectively. On preoperative multivariable analysis, pre-SRP PSA and Gleason score at postradiation prostate biopsy predicted BCR (p = 0.022; global p 75% of patients 10 yr after surgery. Patients with lower pre-SRP PSA levels and lower postradiation prostate biopsy Gleason score have the highest probability of cure from SRP. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prioritizing Chemicals for Risk Assessment Using Chemoinformatics: Examples from the IARC Monographs on Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Neela; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Loomis, Dana; Barupal, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Identifying cancer hazards is the first step towards cancer prevention. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs Programme, which has evaluated nearly 1,000 agents for their carcinogenic potential since 1971, typically selects agents for hazard identification on the basis of public nominations, expert advice, published data on carcinogenicity, and public health importance. Here, we present a novel and complementary strategy for identifying agents for hazard evaluation using chemoinformatics, database integration, and automated text mining. To inform selection among a broad range of pesticides nominated for evaluation, we identified and screened nearly 6,000 relevant chemical structures, after which we systematically compiled information on 980 pesticides, creating network maps that allowed cluster visualization by chemical similarity, pesticide class, and publicly available information concerning cancer epidemiology, cancer bioassays, and carcinogenic mechanisms. For the IARC Monograph meetings that took place in March and June 2015, this approach supported high-priority evaluation of glyphosate, malathion, parathion, tetrachlorvinphos, diazinon, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), lindane, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). This systematic approach, accounting for chemical similarity and overlaying multiple data sources, can be used by risk assessors as well as by researchers to systematize, inform, and increase efficiency in selecting and prioritizing agents for hazard identification, risk assessment, regulation, or further investigation. This approach could be extended to an array of outcomes and agents, including occupational carcinogens, drugs, and foods. Citation: Guha N, Guyton KZ, Loomis D, Barupal DK. 2016. Prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment using chemoinformatics: examples from the IARC Monographs on Pesticides. Environ Health Perspect 124:1823-1829; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP186.

  1. Prioritizing Chemicals for Risk Assessment Using Chemoinformatics: Examples from the IARC Monographs on Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Neela; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Loomis, Dana; Barupal, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying cancer hazards is the first step towards cancer prevention. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs Programme, which has evaluated nearly 1,000 agents for their carcinogenic potential since 1971, typically selects agents for hazard identification on the basis of public nominations, expert advice, published data on carcinogenicity, and public health importance. Objectives: Here, we present a novel and complementary strategy for identifying agents for hazard evaluation using chemoinformatics, database integration, and automated text mining. Discussion: To inform selection among a broad range of pesticides nominated for evaluation, we identified and screened nearly 6,000 relevant chemical structures, after which we systematically compiled information on 980 pesticides, creating network maps that allowed cluster visualization by chemical similarity, pesticide class, and publicly available information concerning cancer epidemiology, cancer bioassays, and carcinogenic mechanisms. For the IARC Monograph meetings that took place in March and June 2015, this approach supported high-priority evaluation of glyphosate, malathion, parathion, tetrachlorvinphos, diazinon, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), lindane, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Conclusions: This systematic approach, accounting for chemical similarity and overlaying multiple data sources, can be used by risk assessors as well as by researchers to systematize, inform, and increase efficiency in selecting and prioritizing agents for hazard identification, risk assessment, regulation, or further investigation. This approach could be extended to an array of outcomes and agents, including occupational carcinogens, drugs, and foods. Citation: Guha N, Guyton KZ, Loomis D, Barupal DK. 2016. Prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment using chemoinformatics: examples from the IARC Monographs on Pesticides. Environ Health Perspect 124:1823–1829;

  2. Managing hospital supplies: process reengineering at Gujarat Cancer Research Institute, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, K V

    2006-01-01

    Aims to give an overview of the re-engineering of processes and structures at Gujarat Cancer Research Institute (GCRI), Ahmedabad. A general review of the design, development and implementation of reengineered systems in order to address concerns about the existing systems. Findings GCRI is a comprehensive cancer care center with 550 beds and well equipped with modern diagnostic and treatment facilities. It serves about 200,000 outpatients and 16,000 inpatients annually. The approach to a better management of hospital supplies led to the design, development, and implementation of an IT-based reengineered and integrated purchase and inventory management system. The new system has given GCRI a saving of about 8 percent of its annual costs of purchases, and improved the availability of materials to the user departments. Shows that the savings obtained are used not only for buying more hospital supplies, but also to buy better quality of hospital supplies, and thereby satisfactorily address the GCRI responsibility towards meeting its social obligations for cancer care.

  3. Cost comparison of curative therapies for localized prostate cancer in Japan. A single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01

    In addition to open surgery, curative therapies for prostate cancer now include endoscopic surgery and radiation therapies. Because of the expansion and subdivision of treatment methods for prostate cancer, the medical fee point schedule in Japan was revised in fiscal year 2006. We examined changes in medical income and expenditure after this revision of the medical fee system. We studied income and expenditure, after institution of the new medical fee schedule, for the five types of therapies for prostate cancer performed at our hospital: two surgical therapies (radical retropubic prostatectomy and laparoscopic prostatectomy) and three radiation therapies (three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, 192 Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and 125 I low-dose-rate brachytherapy). Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was found to be associated with a profit of 199 yen per patient. Laparoscopic prostatectomy, a highly advanced medical treatment that the fee revision changed from a partially insured to an insured procedure, yielded a profit of 75672 yen per patient. However, high-dose-rate brachytherapy was associated with a loss of 654016 yen per patient. Given the loss in hospital income per patient undergoing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, the medical fee point system for this procedure should be reassessed. (author)

  4. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  5. Institutional Clinical Trial Accrual Volume and Survival of Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Zhang, Qiang; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Fortin, André; Silverman, Craig L.; Raben, Adam; Kim, Harold E.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Read, Nancy E.; Harris, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Le, Quynh-Thu; Gillison, Maura L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receive treatment at centers with expertise, but whether provider experience affects survival is unknown. Patients and Methods The effect of institutional experience on overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III or IV HNC was investigated within a randomized trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 0129), which compared cisplatin concurrent with standard versus accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. As a surrogate for experience, institutions were classified as historically low- (HLACs) or high-accruing centers (HHACs) based on accrual to 21 RTOG HNC trials (1997 to 2002). The effect of accrual volume on OS was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Results Median RTOG accrual (1997 to 2002) at HLACs was four versus 65 patients at HHACs. Analysis included 471 patients in RTOG 0129 (2002 to 2005) with known human papillomavirus and smoking status. Patients at HLACs versus HHACs had better performance status (0: 62% v 52%; P = .04) and lower T stage (T4: 26.5% v 35.3%; P = .002) but were otherwise similar. Radiotherapy protocol deviations were higher at HLACs versus HHACs (18% v 6%; P < .001). When compared with HHACs, patients at HLACs had worse OS (5 years: 51.0% v 69.1%; P = .002). Treatment at HLACs was associated with increased death risk of 91% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.65) after adjustment for prognostic factors and 72% (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.40) after radiotherapy compliance adjustment. Conclusion OS is worse for patients with HNC treated at HLACs versus HHACs to cooperative group trials after accounting for radiotherapy protocol deviations. Institutional experience substantially influences survival in locally advanced HNC. PMID:25488965

  6. Technical books and monographs. 1977 catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Books and monographs sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and by the organizations brought together to form ERDA under the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 are listed. In general, information for each published book, and for each book in press when known, includes title; author and author affiliation; publisher and publication date; page count; size of book; price; availability information if the book is not available from the publisher; Library of Congress card number (LC); International Standard Book Number (ISBN); a brief descriptive statement concerning the book; and for the more recent books a list or a description of the contents. The books and monographs are grouped under thirteen subject categories. Recent published symposiums from ERDA projects and recent and relevant bibliographies appear in special sections at the end of each subject category. Also, at the end of the catalog are described the following ERDA publications: ERDA Energy Research Abstracts, Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis, Solar Energy Update, Fossil Energy Update, Nuclear Safety, and Power Reactor Docket Information

  7. Technical books and monographs: 1978 catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This publication is a bibliography of books and monographs sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by the earlier organizations that were brought together to form DOE. In general, information for each published book, and for each book in press when known, includes title; author and author affiliation; publisher and publication date; page count; size of book; price; availability information if the book is not available from the publisher; Library of Congress card number (LC), with CIP to indicate books that have cataloging information in the publication; International Standard Book Number (ISBN); a brief descriptive statement concerning the book; and for the more recent books a list or a description of the contents. The books and monographs are grouped under thirteen subject categories. At the end of each subject category are separate sections listing recent published symposiums and bibliographies that received support from DOE or one of the earlier organizations. Also, at the end of the catalog are described the following DOE publications: Energy Research Abstracts, Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis, Energy Conservation Update, Fossil Energy Update, F usion Energy Update, Geothermal Energy Update, Solar Energy Update, Nuclear Safety, and Power Reactor Docket Information

  8. Technical books and monographs. 1979 catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This publication is a bibliography of books and monographs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by the earlier organizations that were brought together to form DOE. In general, information for each published book, and for each book in press when known, includes title, author, and author affiliation, publisher and publication date, page count, size of book, price, availability information if the book is not available from the publisher, Library of Congress card number (LC) (with CIP to indicate books that have cataloging information in the publication), International Standard Book Number (ISBN), a brief descriptive statement concerning the book, and (for the more recent books) a list or a description of the contents. The books and monographs are grouped under thirteen subject categories. At the end of each subject category are separate sections listing recently published symposium proceedings and bibliographies that received support from DOE or one of the earlier organizations. Also, at the end of the catalog are described the following DOE publications: Energy Research Abstracts, Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis, Energy Conservation Update, Fossil Energy Update, Fusion Energy Update, Geothermal Energy Update, Solar Energy Update, and Nuclear Safety

  9. Chronological changes in lung cancer surgery in a single Japanese institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Haruhiko Nakamura, Hiroki Sakai, Hiroyuki Kimura, Tomoyuki Miyazawa, Hideki Marushima, Hisashi Saji Department of Chest Surgery, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the chronological changes in epidemiological factors and surgical outcomes in patients with lung cancer who underwent surgery in a single Japanese institution.Patients and methods: A clinicopathological database of patients with lung cancer who underwent surgery with curative intent from January 1974 to December 2014 was reviewed. The chronological changes in various factors, including patient’s age, sex, histological type, tumor size, pathological stage (p-stage, surgical method, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, 30-day mortality, and postoperative overall survival (OS, were evaluated.Results: A total of 1,616 patients were included. The numbers of resected patients, females, adenocarcinomas, p-stage IA patients, and age at the time of surgery increased with time, but tumor size decreased (all P<0.0001. Concerning surgical methods, the number of sublobar resections increased, but that of pneumonectomies decreased (P<0.0001. The mean operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and the postoperative 30-day mortality rate decreased (all P<0.0001. When the patients were divided into two groups (1974–2004 and 2005–2014, the 5-year OS rates for all patients and for p-stage IA patients improved from 44% to 79% and from 73% to 89%, respectively (all P<0.0001. The best 5-year OS rate was obtained for sublobar resection (73%, followed by lobectomy (60%, combined resection (22%, and pneumonectomy (21%; P<0.0001.Conclusion: Changes in epidemiological factors, a trend toward less invasive surgery, and a remarkably improved postoperative OS were confirmed, which demonstrated the increasingly important role of surgery in therapeutic strategies for lung cancer. Keywords: lung cancer, surgery, sublobar

  10. Locally advanced cervix cancer: chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery or radiotherapy. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, C.; O'Donnell, A.; Tattersall, M.H.N.; Dalrymple, C.; Firth, I.

    2001-01-01

    Primary or neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy has potential advantages for locally advanced cervix cancer. It can down stage a cancer and allow definitive local therapy to be technically possible (surgery), or potentially more effective (radiotherapy). It can also eradicate subclinical systemic metastases. This report reviews a single institution's experience of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy for cervix cancer over a 13-year period. One hundred and six patients were treated with this intent. The patients were analysed for their response to chemotherapy, treatment received, survival, relapse and toxicity. The chemotherapy was feasible and the majority of patients had a complete or partial response (58.5%). Eight patients did not proceed to local treatment. Forty-six patients had definitive surgery and 52 had definitive radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival was 27% and the majority of patients died with disease. The first site of relapse was usually in the pelvis (46.2%). Late complications that required ongoing medical therapy (n = 6) or surgical intervention (n = 2) were recorded in eight patients (7.5%). On univariate analysis stage (P= 0.04), tumour size (P = 0.01), lymph node status (P=0.003), response to chemotherapy (P = 0.045) and treatment (P = 0.003) were all significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, tumour size (P < 0.0001) and nodal status (P = 0.02) were significant predictors of survival. Despite the impressive responses to chemotherapy of advanced cervix cancer, there is evidence from randomized trials that it does not improve or compromise survival prior to radiotherapy. As its role prior to surgery remains unclear, it should not be used in this setting outside a prospective randomized trial. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Radiogenomics of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer: Multireader Multi-Institutional Study from the Cancer Genome Atlas Ovarian Cancer Imaging Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Huang, Erich P; Lakhman, Yulia; Ippolito, Joseph E; Bhosale, Priya; Mellnick, Vincent; Shinagare, Atul B; Anello, Maria; Kirby, Justin; Fevrier-Sullivan, Brenda; Freymann, John; Jaffe, C Carl; Sala, Evis

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To evaluate interradiologist agreement on assessments of computed tomography (CT) imaging features of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), to assess their associations with time-to-disease progression (TTP) and HGSOC transcriptomic profiles (Classification of Ovarian Cancer [CLOVAR]), and to develop an imaging-based risk score system to predict TTP and CLOVAR profiles. Materials and Methods This study was a multireader, multi-institutional, institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective analysis of 92 patients with HGSOC (median age, 61 years) with abdominopelvic CT before primary cytoreductive surgery available through the Cancer Imaging Archive. Eight radiologists from the Cancer Genome Atlas Ovarian Cancer Imaging Research Group developed and independently recorded the following CT features: characteristics of primary ovarian mass(es), presence of definable mesenteric implants and infiltration, presence of other implants, presence and distribution of peritoneal spread, presence and size of pleural effusions and ascites, lymphadenopathy, and distant metastases. Interobserver agreement for CT features was assessed, as were univariate and multivariate associations with TTP and CLOVAR mesenchymal profile (worst prognosis). Results Interobserver agreement for some features was strong (eg, α = .78 for pleural effusion and ascites) but was lower for others (eg, α = .08 for intraparenchymal splenic metastases). Presence of peritoneal disease in the right upper quadrant (P = .0003), supradiaphragmatic lymphadenopathy (P = .0004), more peritoneal disease sites (P = .0006), and nonvisualization of a discrete ovarian mass (P = .0037) were associated with shorter TTP. More peritoneal disease sites (P = .0025) and presence of pouch of Douglas implants (P = .0045) were associated with CLOVAR mesenchymal profile. Combinations of imaging features contained predictive signal for TTP (concordance index = 0.658; P = .0006) and CLOVAR profile (mean

  12. Awareness and behavior of oncologists and support measures in medical institutions related to ongoing employment of cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koji; Ohtsu, Mayumi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tagaya, Nobumi; Takahashi, Miyako

    2012-04-01

    Improved outcomes of cancer treatment allow patients to undergo treatment while working. However, support from oncologists and medical institutions is essential for patients to continue working. This study aimed to clarify oncologists' awareness and behavior regarding patients who work during treatment, support in medical institutions and their association. A questionnaire was mailed to all 453 diplomates and faculty of the subspecialty board of medical oncology in the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology and all 1016 surgeons certified by the Japanese Board of Cancer Therapy living in the Kanto area. The questionnaire assessed demographics, oncologist awareness and behavior regarding patient employment and support measures at their medical institutions. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of awareness and behavior of oncologists with support measures at their institutions. A total of 668 individuals participated. The overall response rate was 45.5%. Only 53.6% of respondents advised patients to tell their supervisors about prospects for treatment and ask for understanding. For medical institutions, 28.8% had a nurse-involved counseling program and adjustments in radiation therapy (28.0%) and chemotherapy (41.9%) schedules to accommodate patients' work. There was a significant correlation between awareness and behavior of oncologists and medical institutions' measures to support employed cancer patients. There is room for improvement in awareness and behavior of oncologists and support in medical institutions for cancer patients continuing to work. Oncologists could support working patients by exerting influence on their medical institutions. Conversely, proactive development of support measures by medical institutions could alter the awareness and behavior of oncologists.

  13. Awareness and behavior of oncologists and support measures in medical institutions related to ongoing employment of cancer patients in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Koji; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Ohtsu, Mayumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tagaya, Nobumi; Takahashi, Miyako

    2012-01-01

    Improved outcomes of cancer treatment allow patients to undergo treatment while working. However, support from oncologists and medical institutions is essential for patients to continue working. This study aimed to clarify oncologists' awareness and behavior regarding patients who work during treatment, support in medical institutions and their association. A questionnaire was mailed to all 453 diplomates and faculty of the subspecialty board of medical oncology in the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology and all 1016 surgeons certified by the Japanese Board of Cancer Therapy living in the Kanto area. The questionnaire assessed demographics, oncologist awareness and behavior regarding patient employment and support measures at their medical institutions. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of awareness and behavior of oncologists with support measures at their institutions. A total of 668 individuals participated. The overall response rate was 45.5%. Only 53.6% of respondents advised patients to tell their supervisors about prospects for treatment and ask for understanding. For medical institutions, 28.8% had a nurse-involved counseling program and adjustments in radiation therapy (28.0%) and chemotherapy (41.9%) schedules to accommodate patients' work. There was a significant correlation between awareness and behavior of oncologists and medical institutions' measures to support employed cancer patients. There is room for improvement in awareness and behavior of oncologists and support in medical institutions for cancer patients continuing to work. Oncologists could support working patients by exerting influence on their medical institutions. Conversely, proactive development of support measures by medical institutions could alter the awareness and behavior of oncologists. (author)

  14. Science, institutional archives and open access: an overview and a pilot survey on the Italian cancer research institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, Elisabetta; Truccolo, Ivana; Di Benedetto, Corrado; Castelli, Mauro; Mazzocut, Mauro; Cognetti, Gaetana

    2010-12-20

    The Open Archive Initiative (OAI) refers to a movement started around the '90 s to guarantee free access to scientific information by removing the barriers to research results, especially those related to the ever increasing journal subscription prices. This new paradigm has reshaped the scholarly communication system and is closely connected to the build up of institutional repositories (IRs) conceived to the benefit of scientists and research bodies as a means to keep possession of their own literary production. The IRs are high-value tools which permit authors to gain visibility by enabling rapid access to scientific material (not only publications) thus increasing impact (citation rate) and permitting a multidimensional assessment of research findings. A survey was conducted in March 2010 to mainly explore the managing system in use for archiving the research finding adopted by the Italian Scientific Institutes for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (IRCCS) of the oncology area within the Italian National Health Service (Servizio Sanitario Nazionale, SSN). They were asked to respond to a questionnaire intended to collect data about institutional archives, metadata formats and posting of full-text documents. The enquiry concerned also the perceived role of the institutional repository DSpace ISS, built up by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) and based on a XML scheme for encoding metadata. Such a repository aims at acting as a unique reference point for the biomedical information produced by the Italian research institutions. An in-depth analysis has also been performed on the collection of information material addressed to patients produced by the institutions surveyed. The survey respondents were 6 out of 9. The results reveal the use of different practices and standard among the institutions concerning: the type of documentation collected, the software adopted, the use and format of metadata and the conditions of accessibility to the IRs. The

  15. The Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of the National Cancer Institute - its resources to assist patients with bone marrow failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the bone marrow transplantation center of the brazilian National Cancer Institute, which is responsible for the cancer control in Brazil. The document also describes the resources available in the Institute for assisting patients presenting bone marrow failures. The Center provides for allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplants, peripheral stem cell transplants, umbilical cord collections and transplants, and a small experience with unrelated bone marrow transplants. The Center receives patient from all over the country and provides very sophisticated medical care at no direct cost to the patients

  16. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported significantly higher concerns about diet (44.3 vs. 25.4 %,) and exercise (40.4 vs. 19.7 %,) during the course of treatment. Compared to whites, blacks also had significantly higher concern about treatment-related issues (white vs. black mean, 25.52 vs. 31.78), self-image issues (7.03 vs. 8.60), family-related issues (10.44 vs. 12.84), and financial concerns (6.42 vs. 8.90, all p < 0.05). Blacks, compared to whites, also had significantly greater post-treatment information needs regarding follow-up tests (8.17 vs. 9.44), stress management (4.12 vs. 4.89), and handling stigma after cancer treatment (4.21 vs. 4.89) [all p < 0.05]. Pre-treatment concerns and post-treatment information needs differed by race, with black patients reporting greater information needs and concerns. In clinical practice, tailored approaches may work particularly well in addressing the needs and concerns of black patients.

  17. [Nutritional status in patients first hospital admissions service hematology National Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar Luna, E; Omaña Guzmán, L I; Ortiz Hernández, L; Ñamendis-Silva, S A; De Nicola Delfin, L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the nutritional status of patients admitted to hospital for the first time the hematology service and who have not received treatment for cancer, to know if the nutritional status assessed by the EGS-GP and serum albumin related mortality of patients A longitudinal, prospective, analytical. EGS-Through GP assessed the nutritional status of patients, we used SPSS 19.0 for data analysis. Evaluaron 119 patients, 52.1% female and 47.9% male. The most common diagnosis was non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 43.7%. According to the EGS-GP 50.4% of patients had some degree of malnutrition or was at risk of suffering of which: 31.1% had moderate and 19.3% had severe malnutrition. The 49.6% of patients had an adequate nutritional status. 30.3% of the patients who died, 37% had severe malnutrition and 50% severe decrease in albumin concentration. The prevalence of malnutrition in hematological patients treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico that have not received medical treatment was high. There is an association between nutritional status and mortality in this patient group. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronological changes in lung cancer surgery in a single Japanese institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Haruhiko; Sakai, Hiroki; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Tomoyuki; Marushima, Hideki; Saji, Hisashi

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the chronological changes in epidemiological factors and surgical outcomes in patients with lung cancer who underwent surgery in a single Japanese institution. Patients and methods A clinicopathological database of patients with lung cancer who underwent surgery with curative intent from January 1974 to December 2014 was reviewed. The chronological changes in various factors, including patient’s age, sex, histological type, tumor size, pathological stage (p-stage), surgical method, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, 30-day mortality, and postoperative overall survival (OS), were evaluated. Results A total of 1,616 patients were included. The numbers of resected patients, females, adenocarcinomas, p-stage IA patients, and age at the time of surgery increased with time, but tumor size decreased (all P<0.0001). Concerning surgical methods, the number of sublobar resections increased, but that of pneumonectomies decreased (P<0.0001). The mean operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and the postoperative 30-day mortality rate decreased (all P<0.0001). When the patients were divided into two groups (1974–2004 and 2005–2014), the 5-year OS rates for all patients and for p-stage IA patients improved from 44% to 79% and from 73% to 89%, respectively (all P<0.0001). The best 5-year OS rate was obtained for sublobar resection (73%), followed by lobectomy (60%), combined resection (22%), and pneumonectomy (21%; P<0.0001). Conclusion Changes in epidemiological factors, a trend toward less invasive surgery, and a remarkably improved postoperative OS were confirmed, which demonstrated the increasingly important role of surgery in therapeutic strategies for lung cancer. PMID:28331339

  19. Why providers participate in clinical trials: considering the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L

    2012-11-01

    The translation of research evidence into practice is facilitated by clinical trials such as those sponsored by the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) that help disseminate cancer care innovations to community-based physicians and provider organizations. However, CCOP participation involves unsubsidized costs and organizational challenges that raise concerns about sustained provider participation in clinical trials. This study was designed to improve our understanding of why providers participate in the CCOP in order to inform the decision-making process of administrators, clinicians, organizations, and policy-makers considering CCOP participation. We conducted a multi-site qualitative study of five provider organizations engaged with the CCOP. We interviewed 41 administrative and clinician key informants, asking about what motivated CCOP participation, and what benefits they associated with involvement. We deductively and inductively analyzed verbatim interview transcripts, and explored themes that emerged. Interviewees expressed both "altruistic" and "self-interested" motives for CCOP participation. Altruistic reasons included a desire to increase access to clinical trials and feeling an obligation to patients. Self-interested reasons included the desire to enhance reputation, and a need to integrate disparate cancer care activities. Perceived benefits largely matched expressed motives for CCOP participation, and included internal and external benefits to the organization, and quality of care benefits for both patients and participating physicians. The motives and benefits providers attributed to CCOP participation are consistent with translational research goals, offering evidence that participation can contribute value to providers by expanding access to innovative medical care for patients in need. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancer: a single-institution review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuber, Simon; Weiß, Susan; Baaske, Dieter; Schöpe, Michael; Stevens, Simon; Bodis, Stephan; Zwahlen, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting the five-year biochemical control, toxicity profile and dosimetric parameters using iodine-125 low dose rate brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer at a single institution. Between April 2006 and December 2010, 169 men with early stage prostate cancer were treated with BT. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL). Treatment-related morbidities, including urinary, rectal and sexual function, were measured, applying the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the 7-grade Quality of Life Scale (QoL) and medical status, the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ), the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v4.03). Seed migration and loss, dosimetric parameters and learning effects were also analyzed. Medium follow-up time was 50 months (range, 1–85 months). The five-year biochemical failure rate was 7%. Acute proctitis rates were 19% (grade 1) and 1% (grade 2), respectively. The overall incidence of incontinence was 19% (mild), 16% (moderate) and < 1% (severe). An increase in IPSS ≥ 5 points was detected in 59% of patients, with 38% regaining their baseline. Seed dislocation was found in 24% of patients and correlated with D90 and V100. A learning curve was found for seed migration, D90 and V100. QoL correlated with the general health condition of patient, incontinence symptoms and IPSS. BT for early stage prostate cancer offers excellent five-year biochemical control with low toxicities. QoL aspects are favorable. A learning curve was detected for procedural aspects but its impact on patient relevant endpoints remains inconclusive

  1. Open access monographs: a humanities research perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Jim Cheshire

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the thoughts of a humanities researcher in relation to open access (OA publishing. Digital media have dramatically improved access to historic texts but library e-books are frustrating due to software and loan arrangements. Authors of illustrated books risk losing control of book design, although new media offer opportunities to improve image quality and access. Alfred Tennyson's career shows that authors have been sensitive about the physical form of their work since the Victorian period and ignoring the material significance of the book could make us overlook the fundamental changes that the e-book represents. Monographs retain value as a way of evaluating substantive research projects and those published through the OA process will have great advantages over the commercial e-book. ‘Green’ OA publishing is impractical for humanities scholars and funded ‘gold’ OA publishing is likely to involve a labour-intensive application process.

  2. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  3. Cervical cancer screening: knowledge, attitude and practices among nursing staff in a tertiary level teaching institution of rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Sharma, Chanderdeep; Thakur, Sita; Raina, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of the nursing staff knowledge, attitude and practices about cervical cancer screening in a tertiary care teaching institute of rural India. A cross sectional, descriptive, interview- based survey was conducted with a pretested questionnaire among 262 staff nurses of a tertiary care teaching and research institute. In this study 77% respondents knew that Pap smear is used for detection of cervical cancer, but less than half knew that Pap smear can detect even precancerous lesions of cervix. Only 23.4% knew human papilloma virus infection as a risk factor. Only 26.7% of the respondents were judged as having adequate knowledge based on scores allotted for questions evaluating knowledge about cervical cancer and screening. Only 17 (7%) of the staff nurses had themselves been screened by Pap smear, while 85% had never taken a Pap smear of a patient. Adequate knowledge of cervical cancer and screening, higher parity and age >30 years were significantly associated with self screening for cervical cancer. Most nurses held a view that Pap test is a doctor procedure, and nearly 90% of nurses had never referred a patient for Pap testing. The majority of nursing staff in rural India may have inadequate knowledge about cervical cancer screening, and their attitude and practices towards cervical cancer screening could not be termed positive.

  4. The UNO Aviation Monograph Series: The Airline Quality Rating 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    1998-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline performance on combined multiple factors important to consumers. Development history and calculation details for the AQR rating system are detailed in The Airline Quality Rating 1991 issued in April, 1991, by the National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University. This current report, Airline Quality Rating 1998, contains monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 1997. Additional copies are available by contacting Wichita State University or University of Nebraska at Omaha. The Airline Quality Rating 1998 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the ten major U.S. airlines operating during 1997. Using the Airline Quality Rating system and monthly performance data for each airline for the calendar year of 1997, individual and comparative ratings are reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for major airlines domestic operations for the 12 month period of 1997, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 1991 through 1996 are included to provide a longer term view of quality in the industry.

  5. The UNO Aviation Monograph Series: The Airline Quality Rating 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    1997-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline performance on combined multiple factors important to consumers. Development history and calculation details for the AQR rating system are detailed in The Airline Quality Rating 1991 issued in April, 1991, by the National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University. This current report, Airline Rating 1997, contains monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 1996. Additional copies are available by contacting Wichita State University or the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) 1997 is a summary of a month-by-month quality ratings for the nine major domestic U.S. airlines operating during 1996. Using the Airline Quality Rating system and monthly performance data for each airline for the calendar year of 1996, individual and comparative ratings are reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for major domestic airlines across the 12 month period of 1996, and industry average results. Also comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 1991 through 1995 are included to provide a longer term view of quality in the industry.

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: david_sher@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liptay, Michael J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  7. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Liptay, Michael J.; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  8. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T.

    1990-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy

  9. Evaluation of the cost of cervical cancer at the National Institute of Oncology, Rabat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Amine; El Majjaoui, Sanaa; Ismaili, Nabil; Cheikh, Zakia; Bouajaj, Jamal; Nejjari, Chakib; El Hassani, Amine; Cherrah, Yahya; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the heavy and costly diseases for the population and the health system. We want to know through this study, the first in Morocco, the annual cost of the treatment of this disease at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO) in Rabat, we also want to explore the possibility of flat-rate management of this disease in order to standardize medical practices and improve reimbursement by health insurance funds. Methods 550 patients were treated for their cervical cancer in the Rabat's NIO. Data of all of medical and surgical services offered to patients were collected from the NIO registry. The cost of care was assessed using the method of micro-costing. We will focus to the total direct cost of all the services lavished to patients in NIO. Results The global cost was about US$ 1,429,673 with an average estimated at US$ 2,599 ± US$ 839. Radiotherapy accounts for 55% of total costs, followed by brachytherapy (27%) and surgery (7%). This three services plus chemotherapy influence the overall cost of care (p <0.001). Other services (radiology, laboratory tests and consultations) represent only 10%. The overall cost is influenced by the stage of the disease, this cost decreased significantly evolving in the stage of CC (p <0.001). Conclusion The standardization of medical practices is essential to the equity and efficiency in access to care. The flat-rate or lump sum by stage of disease is possible and interesting for standardizing medical practices and improving the services of the health insurance plan. PMID:27347298

  10. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  11. Demographics of Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanova, Martina; Dzhenkov, Deyan L; Ghenev, Peter; Sapundzhiev, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Head and neck cancer (HNC) comprises a diverse group of oncological entities, originating from various tissue types and organ localizations, situated in the topographical regions of the head and neck (H&N). This single institution retrospective study was aimed at establishing the HNC patient demographics and categorizing the individual incidence of H&N malignancies, regarding their organ of origin and main histopathological type. Materials and methods All histologically verified cases of HNC from a single tertiary referral center were reviewed in a descriptive retrospective manner. Data sampling period was 47 months. Results Male to female ratio of the registered HNC cases was 3.24:1. The mean age of diagnosis was 63.84 ± 12.65 years, median 65 years. The most common HNC locations include the larynx 30.37% (n = 188), lips and oral cavity 29.08% (n = 180), pharynx 20.03% (n = 124) and salivary glands 10.94% (n = 68), with other locations such as the external nose, nasal cavity and sinuses and auricle and external ear canal harboring a minority of the cases. The main histopathological groups include squamous cell carcinoma 76.74% (n = 475) and adenocarcinoma 6.14% (n = 38), with other malignant entries such as other epithelial malignancies, primary tonsillar, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue or parenchymal lymphomas, connective tissue neoplasias, neuroendocrine and vascular malignancies diagnosed in a minority of cases. Conclusion Considered to be relatively rare, HNC represents a diverse group of oncological entities with individual and specific demographic characteristics. The reported single institution results appear representative of the national incidence and characteristics of HNC. PMID:28875091

  12. Chemotherapy Regimen in Nonagenarian Cancer Patients: A Bi-Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, Romain; Chargari, Cyrus; Kullab, Sharif; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Moriceau, Guillaume; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Annede, Pierre; Méry, Benoîte; Moncharmont, Coralie; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Vedrine, Lionel; Merrouche, Yacine; Fournel, Pierre; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population in Western countries is growing and constitutes a public health issue. Concomitantly, age-related diseases such as cancer increase. There are few data on the efficacy, tolerability and toxicity of specific anticancer therapy in the very elderly patients; therefore, their management is not standardized. In this bi-institutional study, we reviewed medical records of patients who received or continued specific anticancer therapy beyond the age of 90 years. Geriatric assessment was not reported for our patients. Twelve patients were enrolled. Their general health condition was good, and half of them were living in elderly institutions. Ten patients had a solid tumor and 2 were treated for hematological malignancies. Most were diagnosed with a locally advanced or metastatic disease, and the goal of treatment was curative for only 1 patient. Six patients received chemotherapy as first-line treatment, 4 patients received targeted therapy and 2 received concomitant chemoradiation. Four patients received a second-line treatment. Despite a significant reduction in treatment posology in half of the patients, 8 acute grade 3/4 toxicities were reported and 2 patients died of treatment-related septic shock. Median duration of first-line treatment was 3.2 months, and progression-free survival ranged from 18 to 311 days. Overall survival ranged from 18 days to 11 years. Aging is a heterogeneous process, and management of elderly patients is a multidisciplinary approach. Geriatric assessment helps to identify older patients with a higher risk of morbidity/mortality and allows to assess the risks and benefits of specific anticancer therapy. The choice of treatment should be based primarily on the expected symptomatic benefit, and treatment should not compromise the quality of life. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Writing on Your Feet: Reflective Practices in City as Text™. A Tribute to the Career of Bernice Braid. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ada, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    City as Text™ (CAT) is one of the earliest structural forms of experiential learning created and practiced in the United States. This monograph explores the centrality of writing in the process of active learning, focusing primarily on the Faculty Institutes and Honors Semesters that foster CAT experiences. All manifestations of this pedagogical…

  14. National Cancer Institute's leadership role in promoting State and Community Tobacco Control research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginexi, Elizabeth M; Vollinger, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has been at the vanguard of funding tobacco control research for decades with major efforts such as the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) in 1988 and the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) in 1991, followed by the Tobacco Research Initiative for State and Community Interventions in 1999. Most recently, in 2011, the NCI launched the State and Community Tobacco Control (SCTC) Research Initiative to address gaps in secondhand smoke policies, tax and pricing policies, mass media countermeasures, community and social norms and tobacco marketing. The initiative supported large scale research projects and time-sensitive ancillary pilot studies in response to expressed needs of state and community partners. This special issue of Tobacco Control showcases exciting findings from the SCTC. In this introductory article, we provide a brief account of NCI's historical commitment to promoting research to inform tobacco control policy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Evaluation of leakage in cobalt-60 unit in National Cancer Institute (NCI) Wad Medani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadlellah, R. A.

    2013-08-01

    This study has been conducted primarily to evaluate the leakages radiation in cobalt-60 unit in National Cancer Institute Wad Medani, which represent the basic risky factor in this unit for the radio therapists who spend much time during patient set up, also they need to stand near the head of the machine to fix some accessories. The measurements which done using survey meter give normal level of occupational exposure compared with IAEA references except one situation that the radio therapist to be close contact to the head of unit for long time which may increase the received dose, in this situation. The radio therapist either not well trained, or there is insufficient accessories to reduce the time inside the room. Radiotherapy department need a special considerations from the beginning of construction till starting of treatment. It is important to contain separate rooms, for planning to determine treatment area, another one for molding to shape lead blocks to protect normal parts and an optimum designed room for treatment to enable workers to apply basic radiation protection principles. (Author)

  16. Treatment outcomes of female germ cell tumors: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, M.M.; Zeeneldin, A.A.; El Gammal, M.M.; Salem, S.E.; Darweesh, A.D.; Abdelaziz, A.A.; Monir, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Female germ cell tumors (GCTS) are rare tumors that carry a good prognosis. Aim: To report the experience of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute (ENCI) in managing female GCTs. Methods: This retrospective study included 19 females with ovarian GCTs presenting to the ENCI between 2006 and 2010. Results: The median age was 23 years. Ovaries were the primary site in all patients. Dysgerminoma and teratoma were the predominant pathologies followed by mixed GCT in females. Unilateral ovariectomy or ovarian tumorectomy were the classic surgical procedures with R0 resection being feasible in most cases. Surveillance was adopted in six patients with stage I disease. Chemotherapy was administered in 63% of ovarian GCTs with BEP being the commonest regimen with reasonable tolerability and good response rates. The median OS and EFS were not reached. The projected 5-year OS rate was 93.8%. Both OS and EFS were better in patients responding to chemotherapy than non-responders (p< 0.002). Stage of disease did not significantly affect OS or EFS. Conclusions: Female GCTs rarely affect Egyptian females. They have good prognosis.

  17. Physical properties of a linear accelerator-based stereotactic installed at national cancer institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attala, E.M.; Deiab, N.A.; Elawady, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the dosimetry and mechanical accuracy of the first dedicated Siemens PRIMUS M6/6ST linear accelerator-based Stereotactic installed in National Cancer Institute for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy (SRS/SRT). The data were obtained during the installation, acceptance test procedure, and commissioning of the unit. The Primus M6/6ST has a single 6-MV beam with the same beam characteristics as that of the mother unit, the Siemens. The dosimetric data were taken using pin point ion chamber. The cone sizes vary from 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter. The mechanical stability of the entire system was verified. The variations in isocenter position with table, gantry, and collimator rotation were found to be < 0.5 mm with a compounded accuracy of < or = 1.0 mm. The beam profiles of all cones in the x and y directions were within +/- 0.5 mm and match with the physical size of the cone. The basic dosimetry parameters such as tissue maximum ratio (TMR), off-axis ratio (OAR) and cone factor needed for patient treatment were evaluated. The mechanical and dosimetric characteristics including dose linearity of this unit are presented and found to be suitable for SRS/SRT. The difficulty in absolute dose measurement for small cone is discussed

  18. Possible misdiagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma as tuberculosis among patients attending Uganda Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyego, Paul; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ddungu, Henry; Walimbwa, Stephen; Nalwanga, Damalie; Reynolds, Steven J; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind

    2017-03-14

    Early diagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma is challenging because the definitive diagnostic procedure of biopsy, requires skills and equipment that are not readily available. As a consequence, diagnosis may be delayed increasing the risk of mortality. We set out to determine the frequency and risk factors associated with the misdiagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma as tuberculosis (TB) among patients attending the Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). A retrospective cohort study design was used among HIV patients with associated lymphoma patients attending the UCI, Kampala, Uganda between February and March 2015. Eligible patient charts were reviewed for information on TB treatment, socio-demographics, laboratory parameters (Hemoglobin, CD4cells count and lactate dehydrogenase) and clinical presentation using a semi structured data extraction form. A total of 183 charts were reviewed; 106/183 were males (57.9%), the median age was 35 (IQR, 28-45). Fifty six (30.6%) patients had a possible misdiagnosis as TB and their median time on TB treatment was 3.5 (1-5.3) months. In multivariate analysis the presence of chest pain had an odd ratio (OR) of 4.4 (95% CI 1.89-10.58, p HIV associated lymphoma attending UCI are misdiagnosed and treated as TB. Chest pain and stage III and IV of lymphoma were associated with an increased risk of a possible misdiagnosis of lymphoma as TB.

  19. Malignant lymphoma. Prognostic factors and response to treatment of 473 patients at the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.; DeVita, V.T. Jr.; Simon, R.M.; Berard, C.W.; Canellos, G.P.; Garvin, A.J.; Young, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Treatment results were reviewed in 473 consecutively staged and treated patients at the National Cancer Institute over a 22-year period from 1953 to 1975. Responses correlated with histologic pattern and stage of disease. Complete responses to radiotherapy were frequent in nodular lymphoma patients. Similar treatment regimens were less effective in diffuse lymphoma patients. Using chemotherapy or combined modality approaches, complete responses were obtained in a high proportion of advanced nodular disease patients. Patients with nodular lymphoma tend to have higher complete response rates and longer survivals than their counterparts with diffuse histologic types. Patients with nodular lymphocytic lymphoma had a better survival than those with mixed or ''histiocytic'' histologic types. Patients with diffuse well differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma survived significantly longer than patients with other diffuse histologic types. Percentage and prominence of nodularity were not of prognostic significance in those patients with combined nodular and diffuse patterns of disease. When compared by histologic type, patient sex did not appear to be an important prognostic factor. The presence of B-symptoms was associated with a poorer survival in patients with nodular disease and in patients with diffuse disease. Over the years of this study, survival appears to have improved in each histologic subtype except diffuse poorly differentiated lymphoma

  20. Institutional (mis)trust in colorectal cancer screening: a qualitative study with Greek, Iranian, Anglo-Australian and Indigenous groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Paul R; Coffey, Cushla; Javanparast, Sara; Wilson, Carlene; Meyer, Samantha B

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has the second highest cancer mortality rate in Australia. The Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) aims to increase early detection of CRC by offering free Faecal Occult Blood Testing (FOBT), although uptake is low for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups. To present data on trust and mistrust in the NBCSP by population groups with low uptake and thus to highlight areas in need of policy change. A qualitative study was undertaken in South Australia, involving interviews with 94 people from four CALD groups: Greek, Iranian, Anglo-Australian, and Indigenous peoples. Our study highlights the complexities of institutional trust, which involves considerations of trust at interpersonal, local and national levels. In addition, trust and mistrust was found in more abstract systems such as the medical knowledge of doctors to diagnose or treat cancer or the scientific procedures in laboratories to test the FOBTs. The object of institutional (mis)trust differed between cultural groups - Anglo-Australian and Iranian groups indicated a high level of trust in the government, whereas Indigenous participants were much less trusting. The level and nature of trust in the screening process varied between the CALD groups. Addressing program misconceptions, clarifying the FOBT capabilities and involving medical services in collecting and transporting the samples may increase trust in the NBCSP. However, broader and more enduring mistrust in services and institutions may need to be dealt with in order to increase trust and participation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of prostate health index to identify aggressive prostate cancer. An Institutional validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, J; Celma, A; Planas, J; Placer, J; Ferrer, R; de Torres, I; Pacciuci, R; Olivan, M

    2016-01-01

    New generations of tumor markers used to detect prostate cancer (PCa) should be able to discriminate men with aggressive PCa of those without PCa or nonaggressive tumors. The objective of this study has been to validate Prostate Health Index (PHI) as a marker of aggressive PCa in one academic institution. PHI was assessed in 357 men scheduled to prostatic biopsy between June of 2013 and July 2014 in one academic institution. Thereafter a subset of 183 men younger than 75 years and total PSA (tPSA) between 3.0 and 10.0 ng/mL, scheduled to it first prostatic biopsy, was retrospectively selected for this study. Twelve cores TRUS guided biopsy, under local anaesthesia, was performed in all cases. Total PSA, free PSA (fPSA), and [-2] proPSA (p2PSA) and prostate volume were determined before the procedure and %fPSA, PSA density (PSAd) and PHI were calculated. Aggressive tumors were considered if any Gleason 4 pattern was found. PHI was compared to %fPSA and PSAd through their ROC curves. Thresholds to detect 90%, 95% of all tumors and 95% and 100% of aggressive tumors were estimated and rates of unnecessary avoided biopsies were calculated and compared. The rate of PCa detection was 37.2% (68) and the rate of aggressive tumors was 24.6% (45). The PHI area under the curve was higher than those of %fPSA and PSAd to detect any PCa (0.749 vs 0.606 and 0.668 respectively) or to detect only aggressive tumors (0.786 vs 0.677 and 0.708 respectively), however, significant differences were not found. The avoided biopsy rates to detect 95% of aggressive tumors were 20.2% for PHI, 14.8% for %fPSA, and 23.5% for PSAd. Even more, to detect all aggressive tumors these rates dropped to 4.9% for PHI, 9.3% for %fPSA, and 7.9% for PSAd. PHI seems a good marker to PCa diagnosis. However, PHI was not superior to %fPSA and PSAd to identify at least 95% of aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-Institutional Experience of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Stage I Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gajjar, Sameer R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Zhen, Weining [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Matthiesen, Chance L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Dilling, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Allen, Bryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Nichols, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: For inoperable stage I (T1-T2N0) small cell lung cancer (SCLC), national guidelines recommend chemotherapy with or without conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. The present multi-institutional cohort study investigated the role of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for this population. Methods and Materials: The clinical and treatment characteristics, toxicities, outcomes, and patterns of failure were assessed in patients with histologically confirmed stage T1-T2N0M0 SCLC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the survival outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified predictors of outcomes. Results: From 24 institutions, 76 lesions were treated in 74 patients (median follow-up 18 months). The median age and tumor size was 72 years and 2.5 cm, respectively. Chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation were delivered in 56% and 23% of cases, respectively. The median SABR dose and fractionation was 50 Gy and 5 fractions. The 1- and 3-year local control rate was 97.4% and 96.1%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) duration was 49.7 months. The DFS rate was 58.3% and 53.2% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year disease-specific survival was 52.3 months, 84.5%, and 64.4%, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year overall survival (OS) was 17.8 months, 69.9%, and 34.0% respectively. Patients receiving chemotherapy experienced an increased median DFS (61.3 vs 9.0 months; P=.02) and OS (31.4 vs 14.3 months; P=.02). The receipt of chemotherapy independently predicted better outcomes for DFS/OS on multivariate analysis (P=.01). Toxicities were uncommon; 5.2% experienced grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Post-treatment failure was most commonly distant (45.8% of recurrence), followed by nodal (25.0%) and “elsewhere lung” (20.8%). The median time to each was 5 to 7 months. Conclusions: From the findings of the largest report of SABR for stage T1-T2N0 SCLC to date, SABR (≥50

  3. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. IARC monographs: 40 years of evaluating carcinogenic hazards to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Neil; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public's health.

  5. Definitive Radiotherapy for T1–2 Hypopharyngeal Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Aya; Nishiyama, Kinji; Morimoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miyagi, Ken; Fujii, Takashi; Yoshino, Kunitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in T1–2 hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with T1–2 hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radical RT between March 2000 and June 2008 at our institution were analyzed. Pre-RT neck dissection (ND) was performed in 26 patients with advanced neck disease. Chemotherapy was used concurrently with RT in 14 patients. Sixty patients were associated with synchronous or metachronous malignancies. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. Results: The 3-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 70% and 79%, respectively. The 3-year local control rates were 87% for T1 and 83% for T2 disease. The ultimate local control rate was 89%, including 7 patients in whom salvage was successful. The ultimate local control rate with laryngeal preservation was 82%. Tumors of the medial wall of the pyriform sinus tended to have lower control rates compared with tumors of the lateral or posterior pharyngeal wall. Among patients with N2b–3 disease, the 3-year regional control rates were 74% for patients with pre-RT ND and 40% for patients without ND. The 3-year locoregional control rates were as follows: Stage I, 100%; Stage II, 84%; Stage III, 67%; Stage IVA, 43%; Stage IVB, 67%. Forty-two patients developed disease recurrence, with 29 (70%) patients developing recurrence within the first year. Of the 103 patients, 6 developed late complications higher than or equal to Grade 3. Conclusions: Definitive RT accomplished a satisfactory local control rate and contributed to organ preservation.

  6. Monographs for medicines on WHO's Model List of Essential Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lukas; Adler, Melissa; Jain, Tanvi; Bempong, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    To raise awareness about the importance of public pharmaceutical standards, identify if and, if so, where current pharmacopeias are falling short in the development of new and complete monographs and foster collaboration among the various pharmacopeias, to prioritize, develop and make available standards for those key medicines for which no complete monographs exist. In August 2017, we mined eight pharmacopeias to identify which of the 669 medicines in the 20th edition of the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines were covered by complete or incomplete monographs. The pharmacopeias we included were the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia, the British Pharmacopoeia, the Indian Pharmacopeia Commission, the International Pharmacopoeia, the Japanese Pharmacopoeia, the Mexican Pharmacopoeia, the Pharmacopeia of the People's Republic of China and the United States Pharmacopeia. For 99 (15%) of the medicines on the Model List, no monographs were available in any of the eight pharmacopeias investigated. Only 3% (1/30) of the cardiovascular medicines listed, but 28% (9/32) of the antiretroviral medicines and 23% (6/26) of the antimalarial medicines lacked monographs. There appear to be no public standards for many so-called essential medicines. To address this shortfall, a greater collaboration in the global health community is needed.

  7. Identification of the Mechanisms Underlying Antiestrogen Resistance: Breast Cancer Research Partnership between FIU-UM Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Deodutta

    2008-01-01

    This research proposal has two primary objectives which are to (1) increase FIU investigators' research expertise and competitive ability to succeed as independent breast cancer researchers; and (2...

  8. A monograph of Otidea (Pyronemataceae, Pezizomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olariaga, I; Van Vooren, N; Carbone, M; Hansen, K

    2015-12-01

    The easily recognised genus Otidea is subjected to numerous problems in species identification. A number of old names have undergone various interpretations, materials from different continents have not been compared and misidentifications occur commonly. In this context, Otidea is monographed, based on our multiple gene phylogenies assessing species boundaries and comparative morphological characters (see Hansen & Olariaga 2015). All names combined in or synonymised with Otidea are dealt with. Thirty-three species are treated, with full descriptions and colour illustrations provided for 25 of these. Five new species are described, viz. O. borealis, O. brunneoparva, O. oregonensis, O. pseudoleporina and O. subformicarum. Otidea cantharella var. minor and O. onotica var. brevispora are elevated to species rank. Otideopsis kaushalii is combined in the genus Otidea. A key to the species of Otidea is given. An LSU dataset containing 167 sequences (with 44 newly generated in this study) is analysed to place collections and determine whether the named Otidea sequences in GenBank were identified correctly. Fourty-nine new ITS sequences were generated in this study. The ITS region is too variable to align across Otidea, but had low intraspecific variation and it aided in species identifications. Thirty type collections were studied, and ITS and LSU sequences are provided for 12 of these. A neotype is designated for O. cantharella and epitypes for O. concinna, O. leporina and O. onotica, along with several lectotypifications. The apothecial colour and shape, and spore characters are important for species identification. We conclude that to distinguish closely related or morphologically similar species, a combination of additional features are needed, i.e. the shape of the paraphyses, ectal excipulum structure, types of ectal excipulum resinous exudates and their reactions in Melzer's reagent and KOH, tomentum and basal mycelium colours and exudates. The KOH reaction of

  9. Monograph of Diplachne (Poaceae, Chloridoideae, Cynodonteae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Neil; Peterson, Paul M; Romaschenko, Konstantin; Simon, Bryan K

    2018-01-01

    Diplachne P. Beauv. comprises two species with C 4 (NAD-ME) photosynthesis. Diplachne fusca has a nearly pantropical-pantemperate distribution with four subspecies: D. fusca subsp. fusca is Paleotropical with native distributions in Africa, southern Asia and Australia; the widespread Australian endemic D. f. subsp. muelleri; and D. f. subsp. fascicularis and D. f. subsp. uninervia occurring in the New World. Diplachne gigantea is known from a few widely scattered, older collections in east-central and southern Africa, and although Data Deficient clearly is of conservation concern. A discussion of previous taxonomic treatments is provided, including molecular data supporting Diplachne in its newer, restricted sense. Many populations of Diplachne fusca are highly tolerant of saline substrates and most prefer seasonally moist to saturated soils, often in disturbed areas. Some populations of Diplachne fusca in southern Asia combine nitrogen-fixation, high salinity tolerance and palatibilty to livestock, which should be pursued with further research for purposes of soil reclamation. Diplachne fusca subsp. uninervia is the most invasive of the subspecies and is becoming weedy in some non-native areas, including in the Old World. This monograph provides detailed descriptions of all taxa, a key to the species and subspecies, geographic distributions and information on the anatomy of leaves, stems, lemmatal micromorphology and discussions of the chromosome numbers. Lectotypes are designated for: Atropis carinata Grisb.; Diplachne acuminata Nash; Diplachne capensis (Nees) Nees var. concinna Nees; Diplachne capensis (Nees) Nees var. obscura Nees, Diplachne capensis (Nees) Nees var. prolifera subvar. minor Nees, Diplachne halei Nash, Diplachne maritima E.P. Bicknel, Diplachne muelleri Benth., Diplachne reverchonii Vasey, Diplachne tectoneticola Backer, Leptochloa imbricata Thurb., Leptochloa neuroglossa Peter, Leptochloa uninervia var. typica fo. abbreviata Parodi, Triodia

  10. Colon cancer modulation by a diabetic environment: A single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Isabel; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Gonzalez, Nieves; Portal-Nuñez, Sergio; Zazo, Sandra; Corton, Marta; Minguez, Pablo; Gomez-Guerrero, Carmen; Arce, Jose Miguel; Sanz, Ana Belen; Mas, Sebastian; Aguilera, Oscar; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Esbrit, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto; Ayuso, Carmen; Egido, Jesus; Rojo, Federico; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Multiple observational studies suggest an increased risk of colon cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This can theoretically be the result of an influence of the diabetic environment on carcinogenesis or the tumor biologic behavior. To gain insight into the influence of a diabetic environment on colon cancer characteristics and outcomes. Retrospective analysis of clinical records in an academic tertiary care hospital with detailed analysis of 81 diabetic patients diagnosed of colon cancer matched with 79 non-diabetic colon cancer patients. The impact of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the growth of colon cancer xenografts was studied in mice. The incidence of DM in 1,137 patients with colorectal cancer was 16%. The diabetic colon cancer cases and non-diabetic colon cancer controls were well matched for demographic and clinical variables. The ECOG Scale Performance Status was higher (worse) in diabetics (ECOG ≥1, 29.1% of controls vs 46.9% of diabetics, p = 0.02), but no significant differences were observed in tumor grade, adjuvant therapy, tumor site, lymphovascular invasion, stage, recurrence, death or cancer-related death. Moreover, no differences in tumor variables were observed between patients treated or not with metformin. In the xenograft model, tumor growth and histopathological characteristics did not differ between diabetic and nondiabetic animals. Our findings point towards a mild or negligible effect of the diabetes environment on colon cancer behavior, once cancer has already developed.

  11. Breast cancer amongst Filipino migrants: a review of the literature and ten-year institutional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jory S; Briggs, Kaleigh; George, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    As one migrates from an area of low to high incidence of breast cancer their personal risk of developing breast cancer increases. This is however not equally distributed across all races and ethnicities. This paper specifically examines Filipino migrants. A literature review was conducted to summarize breast cancer incidence, screening practices and trends in treatment amongst Filipino migrants. In addition, a retrospective cohort study was conducted specifically examining the age in which Filipino women were diagnosed with breast cancer compared to Asian and Caucasian counterparts. Filipino women are diagnosed with breast cancer at a statistically significant younger age (53.2) compared to their Asian (55.1) and Caucasian (58.4) counterparts. In addition, they are at an increased risk of developing more aggressive breast cancer with noteworthy disparities in the care they are receiving. The evidence suggest this group is worthy of special focus when diagnosing and treating breast cancer.

  12. Pharmacogenetics in cancer therapy - 8 years of experience at the Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavic, Milena; Krivokuca, Ana; Boljevic, Ivana; Brotto, Ksenija; Jovanovic, Katarina; Tanic, Miljana; Filipovic, Lana; Zec, Manja; Malisic, Emina; Jankovic, Radmila; Radulovic, Sinisa

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is a study of possible mechanism by which an individual's response to drugs is genetically determined by variations in their DNA sequence. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to identify the optimal drug and dose for each individual based on their genetic constitution, i.e. to individualize drug treatment. This leads to achieving the maximal therapeutic response for each patient, while reducing adverse side effects of therapy and the cost of treatment. A centralized pharmacogenetics service was formed at the Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia (IORS) with the aim to provide a personalized approach to cancer treatment of Serbian patients. Analyses of KRAS mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer, EGFR mutations in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, CYP2D6 polymorphism in breast cancer, DPD polymorphism in colorectal cancer and MTHFR polymorphism in osteosarcoma have been performed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Mutation testing analyses were successful for 1694 KRAS samples and 1821 EGFR samples, while polymorphism testing was successful for 9 CYP2D6 samples, 65 DPD samples and 35 MTHFR samples. Pharmacogenetic methods presented in this paper provide cancer patients in Serbia the best possible choice of treatment at the moment.

  13. Evaluation of the quality of the mammography study in the radio-diagnostic service of the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio Laverde, Alba Lucia; Pineros Petersen, Marion; Betancourt Gil, Claudia

    2003-01-01

    The development of mammography quality control programs at radiology services has had an important progress in the last decades, mainly in developed countries. Although breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality and incidence in Colombia, quality control programs for mammography screening are just beginning to be considered. This article describes the results of a baseline evaluation aimed at establishing a quality control program at the Radiology Unit of the National Cancer Institute, in Colombia. The mammography equipment, the film processing, and all main physical parameters were checked and compared to international standards. Quality of the image in 301 mammographic X-ray plates was evaluated. In order to implement a good quality control program, the need for acquiring essential instruments, improving physical facilities and starting a continuous training program is imperative

  14. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  15. A pilot study to assess the level of depression and the coping strategies adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitumoni Konwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer, the second most common cause of death, has become a major health problem. Depression is the most common psychological problem encountered in patients with cancer. The coping skills adopted may affect the mental health of patients. Therefore, this research is undertaken to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by the patients diagnosed with cancer. Materials and methods: A descriptive study to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl was carried out from April to May 2014 with 30 convenient samples. Depression was assessed by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS developed by Zigmond and Snaith in 1983. Coping strategy adopted by patients were assessed by revised version of the Ways of Coping Checklist developed by Folkman and Lazarus in 1985. Results: Findings of the study showed that depression was universal to all the cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients (66.5% had moderate depression while 13.26% of the cancer patients had severe depression, and only 6.7% of them reported to have low depression. The most effective coping strategy adopted was reappraisal, followed by distancing. There is significant correlation between depression and reappraisal (r=-0.538, p<0.002, and also with depression and acceptance (r=-0.415, p<0.022 strategies. Conclusion: As depression is universal to all cancer patients, use of appropriate coping strategy is very essential to improve their quality of life. The recognition of coping strategies by health team may enable appropriate information and interventions to be provided at optimal times for each individual.

  16. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently ...biomarker platforms in our multi-center, prospectively accrued prostate cancer active surveillance cohort – the Canary Prostate Active Surveillance...prostate cancers currently diagnosed are low risk tumors for which there is substantial evidence that the cancer will not cause harm if left untreated

  17. Comparison of Serum Selenium Levels in Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy People at a Cancer Institute in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Maleki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast Cancer is one of the most important fatal cancers in women. The mean age of breast cancer in Iran is 48.8 years which is very lower than other countries. Selenium can play an important role in reduction of cancer in several ways, for example selenium increases immunity response and protects cells from oxidation of free radicals and also decreases carcinogenic metabolites. Breast cancer is one of the most important cancers in our country because its incidence is very high and the mean age of patients is very low. Different studies have shown the benefits of selenium in prevention of cancer and since many years selenium has been used as a dietary supplement in advanced countries. Several studies regarding relationship between selenium levels and breast cancer have been done in different countries. We therefore planned a study to evaluate serum selenium levels in breast cancer patients and compare them with a healthy control group. Methods: We selected 45 patients younger than 48 years old and 33 patients older than 48 years old who had not yet received any therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, etc for their cancer as a case group and 46 healthy people who were matched with the patients as a control group and included 23 persons younger and 23 persons older than 48 years old. From each participant, 5cc blood was derived and in several stages, serum selenium levels were evaluated using atomic absorption technology. Data about type of cancer, stage, grade, IHC and cigarette smoking were also collected. Results: The mean Se level was 161.20 μg/l (SD=46.27 μg/l in the patients and 189.13 μg/l (SD=48.75 μg/l in the control group that was statistically significant (P48 years old was 155.39 μg/l (SD=46.68 μg/l that was lower than the control groups. Difference in serum selenium levels between patients and controls in the older group was significant (P=0.007, but in the younger group, it was not statistically significant (P=0

  18. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Beland, Frederick A.; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Bucher, John R.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W.; Christiani, David C.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A.; Dement, John M.; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K.; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A.; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lynge, Elsebeth; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A.; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E.; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F.; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P.; Perry, Melissa J.; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B.; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M.; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandler, Dale P.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Spinelli, John J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T.; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E.; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G.; Ward, Elizabeth M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. Objectives: The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. Discussion: We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. Conclusions: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public’s health. Citation: Pearce N, Blair A, Vineis P, Ahrens W, Andersen A, Anto JM, Armstrong BK, Baccarelli AA, Beland FA, Berrington A, Bertazzi PA, Birnbaum LS, Brownson RC, Bucher JR, Cantor KP

  19. Screening mammography. A missed clinical opportunity? Results of the NCI [National Cancer Institute] Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and national health interview survey studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Data from seven studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were used to determine current rates of breast cancer screening and to identify the characteristics of and reasons for women not being screened. All seven studies were population-based surveys of women aged 50 to 74 years without breast cancer. While over 90% of non-Hispanic white respondents had regular sources of medical care, 46% to 76% had a clinical breast examination within the previous year, and only 25% to 41% had a mammogram. Less educated and poorer women had fewer mammograms. The two most common reasons women gave for never having had a mammogram were that they did not known they needed it and that their physician had not recommended it. Many physicians may have overlooked the opportunity to recommend mammography for older women when performing a clinical breast examination and to educate their patients about the benefit of screening mammography

  20. 78 FR 4419 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and Cumene; Availability of Documents...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and Cumene; Availability of Documents; Request for Comments; Notice of Meeting SUMMARY: Peer review meeting of the Draft Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for 1-Bromopropane and... monographs will be available by January [[Page 4420

  1. 75 FR 30838 - Drometrizole Trisiloxane Eligibility for Potential Inclusion in Sunscreen Monograph; Over-the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... Monograph; Over-the-Counter Sunscreen Drug Products for Human Use; Request for Safety, Effectiveness, and...) sunscreen active ingredients found in the sunscreen monograph. We reviewed a time and extent application... our OTC drug monograph system. We will evaluate the submitted safety and effectiveness data and...

  2. An Examination of the Use of Monographs in the Communication Journal Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Steven D.; Chapman, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This study examines references from three journals, "Communication Monographs," "Communication Research," and "Journal of Communication," for the years 1985, 1995, and 2005 to investigate the role of the scholarly monograph in the discipline of communication. The authors found that both the percentage of references to monographs and the average…

  3. Epidemiology and management of breast carcinoma in Egyptian males: Experience of a single Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshafiey, M.M.; Elsebai, H.I.; Attia, A.A.; Zeeneldin, A.A.; Moneer, M.; Mohamed, D.B.; Gouda, I.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the epidemiological and clinico-pathological features, surgical and reconstructive techniques, adjuvant treatments and clinical outcome of breast carcinoma in males (BCM) at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute (NCI). Patients and methods: Thirty-two males with breast carcinoma presented to NCI between January 2000 and December 2002. They were evaluated by complete history, physical examination, laboratory and radiological investigations. Results: Median age was 59 years. Left sided and retroareolar breast lumps were the commonest presentations. Grade 11 tumors positive for hormone receptors were very common. Stage I, II, 111 and IV disease were encountered in 6.2%, 34.4%, 34.4% and 25.0% of patients, respectively. Curative surgery was done in 22 patients; they received adjuvant hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy in 22,16 and 10 patients, respectively. Eight metastatic patients were treated with palliative measures. Surgery was done in 25 patients; the most common procedure was modified radical mastectomy (40.6%). Primary closure was feasible in 17 patients (68%), local flaps were needed in 4 cases (16%), while myocutaneous flap was done in 3 cases (12%). The commonest complication was development of seroma (9 cases). The overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 65.4%. The disease free survival (DPS) at 5 years was 53.9%. Stage and curative surgery significantly affected OS, while type of surgery was the only variable significantly affecting DPS. Conclusion: Male breast carcinoma occurs at older ages than females, usually in advanced stage. This necessitates directing attention of males and awareness on the prevalence and risk factors for this disease.needed in 4 cases (16%), while myocutaneous flap was done in 3 cases (12%). The commonest complication was development of seroma (9 cases). The overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 65.4%. The disease free survival (DPS) at 5 years was 53.9%. Stage and curative surgery significantly affected OS

  4. A foundation monograph of Convolvulus L. (Convolvulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John R I; Williams, Bethany R M; Mitchell, Thomas C; Carine, Mark A; Harris, David J; Scotland, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    .R.I.Wood & R.W.Scotland, comb. et stat. nov., Convolvuluscalvertiisubsp.ruprechtii (Boiss.) J.R.I.Wood & R.W.Scotland, stat. nov., Convolvuluscephalopodussubsp.bushiricus (Bornm.) J.R.I.Wood & R.W.Scotland, stat. nov. The status of various infraspecific taxa is clarified and numerous taxa are lectotypified. This account represents a new initiative in terms of taxonomic monography, being an attempt to bring together the global approach of the traditional monograph with the more pragmatic and identification-focussed approach of most current floras while at the same time being informed by insights from molecular systematics.

  5. Remembering Ruby Special monograph edition: Remembering Ruby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Johnson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Remembering Ruby’ is a tribute to Doctor Ruby Langford Ginibi, a remarkable woman and an important Australian writer. Winner of numerous awards for her contribution to literature, as well as to Australian culture, Ruby was an Aboriginal Elder of the Bundjalung nation and a tireless campaigner for the rights of her people. Ruby’s writing is passionate, sincere and heart-felt, as well as extraordinarily funny and articulate. She knew that getting people to listen to her story would be fundamental to naming the hidden history of Indigenous Australia and to changing cultural perceptions in a broader context. As an elder she took on the complex and demanding role of ‘edumacation’, as she called it, and her representations of life and culture continue to provide important reflections, from an Indigenous perspective, on the effects of ignorance, racism and colonisation in an Australian context. As Aboriginal mother, aunty, teacher and scholar her writing represents a particular Australian experience for a readership of people interested in human rights and equality the world over. This monograph, in honouring Ruby Langford Ginibi, is the written expression of an ongoing dialogue between the two authors about their experiences living in Australia and the way that Ruby has interconnected with us and influenced our experiences of growing up in an Australian cultural context. It also brings into focus the many ways that Ruby Langford Ginibi’s writing has been central to challenging and changing prevailing perspectives on the lives of Indigenous people over the last twenty-five years. An excellent communicator with a wicked sense of humour, Ruby’s tireless telling of the truth about the impacts of invasion on Indigenous people makes her an important cultural ambassador for all Australians. Ruby’s totem, the Willy Wagtail, is connected to being a messenger for her people and in writing ‘Remembering Ruby’ we aim to contribute to keeping

  6. Retrospective assessment of occupational asbestos exposure among 220 patients with respiratory cancer hospitalized at Vilnius University Institute of Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrauskaite Everatt, R.; Jankauskas, R.; Tossavainen, A.; Cicenas, S.; Smolianskiene, G.

    2005-01-01

    No cases of lung cancer or mesothelioma have ever been diagnosed or compensated as asbestos-related in Lithuania. This paper attempts to estimate the proportion of those occupationally exposed to asbestos among respiratory cancer patients. Occupational exposure to asbestos was assessed retrospectively for 218 lung cancer and 2 mesothelioma patients admitted to Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. The evaluation was based on personal interview data using an internationally established questionnaire. Cumulative exposure to asbestos at work was evaluated in fibre-years. A cumulative asbestos exposure of ≥25 fibre-years was found for 7 patients (3.2%), in further 135 (61.2%) a cumulative exposure from 0.01 to 24.99 fibre-years was assessed. The most common occupations among heavily (≥25 fibre-years) exposed patients were smith, welder or insulator in foundries, construction, shipyard as well as asbestos cement and glass industry. Preliminary findings indicate that a fraction (3.2%) of the respiratory cancer cases could be attributed to occupational exposure to asbestos. Since 1560 or more cases of lung cancer are registered every year in Lithuania, about 50 cases per year could be predicted to be asbestos-related. (author)

  7. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    25 4 1. INTRODUCTION Although prostate - specific antigen (PSA) testing and the resulting treatment of...details of this work are described in the attached paper titled “Refined analysis of prostate specific antigen kinetics to predict prostate cancer...Wagner; Daniel W. Lin,; and Yingye Zheng. “Refined analysis of prostate specific antigen kinetics to predict prostate cancer active surveillance outcomes

  8. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research cancer prevention recommendations and breast cancer risk in the Cancer de Màma (CAMA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanidi, Anouar; Ferrari, Pietro; Biessy, Carine; Ortega, Carolina; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the association between adherence to the recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) and breast cancer (BC) risk in the Cancer de Màma (CAMA) study in a Mexican population. Population-based case-control study. Incident BC cases (n 1000) and controls (n 1074) matched on age, region and health-care system were recruited. In-person interviews were conducted to assess BC risk factors and habitual diet was assessed with an FFQ. Conformity to the WCRF/AICR recommendations was evaluated through a score incorporating seven WCRF/AICR components (body fatness, physical activity, foods and drinks that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and breast-feeding), with high scores indicating adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations. No statistically significant associations between WCRF/AICR score and risk of BC were observed. After excluding BMI from the WCRF/AICR score, the top quartile was associated with a decreased BC risk overall, with ORQ4-Q1=0.68 (95% CI 0.49, 0.92, P trend=0.03), and among postmenopausal women, with ORQ4-Q1=0.60 (95% CI 0.39, 0.94, P trend=0.03). Inverse associations were observed between BMI and risk of BC overall and among premenopausal women, with OR=0.57 (95% CI 0.42, 0.76, P trend <0.01) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.31, 0.73, P trend<0.01), respectively. Physical activity level was inversely associated with BC risk. The WCRF/AICR index was not related with BC risk in the CAMA study. A combination of six components excluding BMI showed strong protective associations, particularly in postmenopausal women. Further prospective studies are required to clarify the role of adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations, particularly with respect to BMI, in the Mexican population.

  9. The Utility of Expert Diagnosis in Surgical Neuropathology: Analysis of Consultations Reviewed at 5 National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Janet M; Louis, David N; McLendon, Roger; Rosenblum, Marc K; Archambault, W Tad; Most, Susan; Tihan, Tarik

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and degree of discrepancies between non-expert and expert diagnoses of CNS tumors to identify the value of consultations in surgical neuropathology. Neuropathology experts from 5 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions participated in the review of 1281 consultations selected based on inclusion criteria. The consultation cases were re-reviewed at the NCCN headquarters to determine concordance with the original diagnoses. Among all consultations, 249 (19.4%) were submitted for expert diagnoses without final diagnoses from the submitting institution. Within the remaining 1032 patients, the serious/major discrepancy rate was 4.8%, and less serious and minor discrepancies were seen in 19.4% of the cases. The discrepancy rate was higher among patients who were referred to NCCN institutions for consultation compared to those who were referred for treatment only. The discrepancy rates, patient demographics, type of consultations and submitting institutions varied among participating NCCN institutions. Expert consultations identified a subset of cases with significant diagnostic discrepancies, and constituted the initial diagnoses in some cases. These data indicate that expert consultations in glial tumors and all types of pediatric CNS tumors can improve accurate diagnosis and enable appropriate management. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The significance of field work in monographic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

  11. Probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power plants: a monograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanki, R.B.; Prasad, Mahendra

    2007-11-01

    This monograph on probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is addressed to the wide community of professionals engaged in the nuclear industry and concerned with the safety issues of nuclear power plants (NPPs). While the monograph describes PSA of NPPs, the principles described in this monograph can be extended to other facilities like spent fuel storage, fuel reprocessing plants and non-nuclear facilities like chemical plants, refineries etc. as applicable. The methodology for risk assessment in chemical plants or refineries is generally known as quantitative risk analysis (QRA). The fundamental difference between NPP and chemical plant is that in NPPs the hazardous material (fuel and fission products) are contained at a single location (i.e. inside containment), whereas in a chemical plant and reprocessing plants, the hazardous material is present simultaneously at many places, like pipelines, reaction towers, storage tanks, etc. Also unlike PSA, QRA does not deal with levels; it uses an integrated approach combining all the levels. The monograph covers the areas of broad interest in the field of PSA such as historical perspective, fundamentals of PSA, strengths and weaknesses of PSA, applications of PSA, role of PSA in the regulatory decision making and issues for advancement of PSA

  12. Natural risks assessment and management (project of monograph)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragozin, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: large-scale theoretic and practical works on the issue of natural risk assessment and management started in Russia in the end of the 80's. By now there has been made a considerable progress, which allowed for the preparation of a collective monograph on the subject mentioned in the title of this abstract. It is supposed to be published in 1999 in order to become a Russian contribution to the International Decade of Natural Disasters Reduction. The monograph included 6 chapters with the following titles: 1. Methodological foundations of natural risk analysis and assessment. 2. Investigating and forecasting natural hazards for the purpose of risk assessment. 3. Assessment of economic, social and ecological damage from natural hazards. 4, Theory of natural risk assessment. 5. Examples of natural risk assessment and mapping. 6. Natural risk management. In the report there is described the content of the monograph and unsolved questions are discussed. Executive editor offers all international experts to cooperate in the compilation of this monograph, which is to be completed by the end of 1998, especially of chapter 5 and 6. (author)

  13. A monograph of the Vochysiaceae ̶ I. Salvertia and Vochysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stafleu, F.A.

    1948-01-01

    This publication is intended to be the first part of a taxonomic monograph of the family Vochysiaceae and deals with the genera Salvertia and Vochysia. Since Warming’s excellent treatise of the Brazilian species of this family in the Flora Brasiliensis (Vol. XIII, II,1875) a large number of new

  14. Studies in Annonaceae. XI. Monograph of Rollinia: preliminary notes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, P.J.M.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    1988-01-01

    In this precursory paper to the forthcoming Flora Neotropica monograph of Rollinia 12 new species are described. One new combination is made, and there is a note on the correct author citation for Rollinia dolabripetala. Mr. E. J. van Marle, a former student at the University of Utrecht, contributed

  15. Busing, Taxes, and Desegregation. Special Monograph No. 4. Management Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMont, Roger, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph summarizes recent developments in school law in the areas of school segregation, school finance, and interdistrict integration in order to project future developments in these areas. The content of this publication has been taken in part from transcripts of a conference on law and public education. (Detroit, Michigan, October 27,…

  16. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  17. Modern European monographs for quality control of Chinese herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Rudolf; Franz, Gerhard

    2010-12-01

    The actual concern about the safety and efficacy of herbal drugs originating from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is based on observations that these medicinal plants may have a high risk potential due to insufficient definitions, problems with identity, purity and falsifications. No uniform legal status for these groups of herbal drugs currently exists in the European Union. For quality control, monographs for TCM herbs can mainly be found in the Pharmacopoeia of the Peoples Republic of China. Based on these facts the Commission of the European Pharmacopoeia decided in 2005 to establish TCM-herbal drug monographs for the most important medicinal plants imported from Far East. These new monographs had to be established and evaluated on the basis of existing monographs in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (ChP), English edition 2005. Due to important differences in the overall features of EP and ChP, a simple adapt/adopt procedure was not feasible. Therefore, specialist groups were mandated with a corresponding working programme. Some results and actual problems related to this working programme will be presented and discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Lord Northcliffe: Trans-Atlantic Influences. Journalism Monographs Number 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert N.

    This monograph examines the extent to which Lord Northcliffe, generally conceded to be the dominant force in the popularization of journalism in Britain and what was once the British Empire, influenced or was influenced by American developments in journalism. The first section, entitled "The Legacy," briefly reviews the popular press in…

  19. Systematic organization of medicinal plant information: a monograph template proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C.B. Carvalho

    Full Text Available The use of medicinal plants in Brazil is widespread and is supported by public policies; it has the objective of providing the population with safe and effective herbal medicines of adequate quality. An action in these policies is to develop medicinal plant monographs to gather published information and decide which medicinal plants should be financed by the Brazilian government and distributed by the public health system. Currently, the monographs published worldwide do not present unified information regarding medicinal plants, and generally, they do not cover enough requirements for herbal medicine registration. The aim of this study is to develop a monograph model with standardized information not only about botany, agronomy, quality control, safety, and efficacy but also about relating regulatory aspects that support herbal medicine regulation. The development of standardized monographs favors the fast authorization and distribution of herbal medicines in the public system. The model also points out the lacking studies that should be carried out to supplement the necessary regulatory information of medicinal plants.

  20. Sex Bias in ASAT? ACER Research Monograph No. 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Raymond J.

    The Australian Scholastic Test (ASAT) was first used as a moderating device in the Australian Capitol Territory in 1977. Differences have been observed in the average performance of males and females on the test. The study reported in this monograph investigated the nature and origin of the score differences recorded for ASAT The research focused…

  1. European Apprenticeship. CIRF Monographs, Vol. 1, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland). Human Resources Dept.

    This monograph provides an analytical comparison of the background and evaluation of apprenticeship in the eight European countries of Austria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, France, The Federal Republic of Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Its primary purpose is to determine how the rules and conditions of apprenticeship…

  2. Monograph - The Numerical Integration of Ordinary Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, T. E.

    The materials presented in this monograph are intended to be included in a course on ordinary differential equations at the upper division level in a college mathematics program. These materials provide an introduction to the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, and they can be used to supplement a regular text on this…

  3. Chambers of Commerce and Career Education. Monographs on Career Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth B.

    This monograph, summarizing the ideas of participants attending a two-day mini-conference, was developed to help educators better understand some of the problems to be overcome in gaining support from their local chamber of commerce for career education. This booklet first presents the educator with five facts of life regarding the goals,…

  4. Advertising and the Poor. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Lawrence

    This monograph examines the impact of media advertising on the poor. The first half of the report discusses research on the conceptual styles of the poor, mass communication among the poor, and advertising and the low-income consumer. The second half describes the methodology and results of a study of the advertising evaluation capacity and…

  5. Critical appraisal of the suitability of translational research models for performance assessment of cancer institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, A.; Sullivan, R.; Bakker, S.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations.

  6. Could EU herbal monographs contribute to Malta's treatment armamentarium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, B; Attard, E; Serracino-Inglott, A; Borg, J J

    2015-03-15

    Ten years have passed since Directive 2004/24/EC regulating herbal medicinal products across the EU were published. The directive created the Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products within the European Medicines Agency whose remit includes the creation and publishing of official EU monographs on herbal medicinal products. These monographs include the official uses of the products and their evidence for efficacy and safety. To this effect, we are interested in analysing the potential impact herbal product EU monographs could have on the therapeutic treatment options available for prescribers in Malta. Therefore our aim was two-fold. First, to rationalise the spread of indications of the herbal substances listed in the community herbal monograph inventory and subsequently determine if these herbal substances could potentially contribute to the treatment options available in our local scenario (Malta). 128 EU monographs were analysed resulting in a total of 230 indications which subsequently codified into 42 unique ATC codes. The Malta Medicines List contains 1456 unique ATC codes. Comparative analysis of the Malta Medicines List revealed that the 21 therapeutic areas had 4 or less pharmaceutically used substances (5th level ATC codes) registered and therefore in our opinion are areas with limited therapeutic choice. The following 4 therapeutic areas, A05 bile and liver therapy, A13 tonics, A15 appetite stimulants and D03 preparations for treatment of wounds and ulcers, could potentially benefit from the registration of herbal medicinal products according to the EU herbal monographs. If such registration is effected the aforementioned areas would no longer be considered limited because more than 4 therapeutic choices would be available to prescribers. This study is the first study across the EU to analyse the potential impact of published EU herbal monographs on therapeutic coverage in an EU member state and confirms the notion that herbal products could potentially

  7. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    aim 2: Evaluate a panel of four-kallikrein plasma-based markers to determine the presence of or progression to clinically relevant prostate cancer...and sent to Genomic Health, Inc. for processing. Task 3: Analysis of scientific Aim 2: Evaluate a panel of four-kallikrein plasma-based markers to...site: FHCRC) PCA3 and the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion are prostate cancer-specific biomarkers that hold promise for stratifying risk in the setting of AS

  8. Colon cancer modulation by a diabetic environment: A single institutional experience

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto, Isabel; del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Gonzalez, Nieves; Portal-Nu?ez, Sergio; Zazo, Sandra; Corton, Marta; Minguez, Pablo; Gomez-Guerrero, Carmen; Arce, Jose Miguel; Sanz, Ana Belen; Mas, Sebastian; Aguilera, Oscar; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Esbrit, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Background Multiple observational studies suggest an increased risk of colon cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This can theoretically be the result of an influence of the diabetic environment on carcinogenesis or the tumor biologic behavior. Aim To gain insight into the influence of a diabetic environment on colon cancer characteristics and outcomes. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of clinical records in an academic tertiary care hospital with detailed analysis of 81...

  9. Connecting the Dots: A Comparative Global Multi-Institutional Study of Prohibitive Factors Affecting Cancer Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoatey Odonkor, Charles; Addison, William; Smith, Sean; Osei-Bonsu, Ernest; Tang, Teresa; Erdek, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the attitudes, beliefs, and barriers interfering with cancer pain management, the degree of barrier interference with trainees’ care of patients, and the relationships among prohibitive factors to pain management for physicians in a low–middle-income countries (LMICs) vs high-income countries (HICs). A multi-institutional cross-sectional survey of physicians in specialties with a focus in pain management training was performed. All surveys were completed anonymously from July 1, 2015, to November 30, 2015. One hundred and twenty physicians participated in the survey. Surveys were based on prior questionnaires published in the literature. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and chi-square (ℵ2) analysis, Fisher’s exact test, and Spearman rank correlation analyses were performed. Compared with their peers in HICs, physicians in LMICs reported less experience with cancer pain management despite seeing more cancer patients with advanced disease (41% vs 15.2%, p pain (84% vs 76%) and lack of training and expertise (87% vs 78%) were significantly more prohibitive for physicians in LMICs than those in HICs; p pain management among trainee physicians in low- vs high-resource environments. Understanding these differences may spur further collaboration in the design of contextually relevant solutions, which could potentially help improve the adequacy of cancer pain management

  10. One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification in Breast Cancer Sentinel Lymph Node: A Single Institutional Experience and a Short Review

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, Tatiana; Fiamengo, Barbara; Tinterri, Corrado; Testori, Alberto; Grassi, Massimo Maria; Sciarra, Amedeo; Abbate, Tommaso; Gatzemeier, Wolfgang; Roncalli, Massimo; Di Tommaso, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) examination is a standard in breast cancer patients, with several methods employed along its 20 years history, the last one represented by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA). The latter is a intra-operative molecular assay searching for CK19 mRNA as a surrogate of metastatic cells. Our 3 years experience with OSNA (1122 patients) showed results overlapping those recorded in the same institution with a morphological evaluation (930 patients) of SLN. In detail,...

  11. Breast cancer in women aging 35 years old and younger: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute (NCI) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, A D; Helal, A M; Aly El-Din, N H; Solaiman, L L; Amin, A

    2017-02-01

    The aim is to identify the epidemiological and clinicopathological features associated with young breast cancer (BC) patients and to discuss factors affecting tumor recurrence and DFS. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on medical records from young females patients aged ≤35 years with pathologically confirmed primary breast cancer treated during 2008-2010 at NCI. Cases with non invasive cancer and non carcinoma histology are excluded. Of the 5408 cases diagnosed with breast cancer, 554 were young. Four hundred & fifty eight patients representing 9.2% were within our inclusion criteria. Almost half of the patients (45.9%) presented with stage III. Axillary nodes involvement was in 63.9%, 83.3% were grade 2. More than one quarter of tumors was hormone receptors negative (28.8%) & Her2 was over-expressed in 30%. Mastectomy was offered in 72% while conservative breast surgery in 26%, 69.2% received chemotherapy either adjuvant, neoadjuvant or both, 82.5% received adjuvant radiotherapy, 68.6% received hormonal therapy. Metastatic disease developed in 51.3%, with 31% having more than one site of metastases. After a median follow up period of 66 months, the median DFS of patients was 60 months. The median DFS was significantly shorter among patients with positive lymph nodes (P Breast cancer in young women is aggressive from the time of diagnosis. Our results provide baseline data of young BC in the Middle East & North Africa region; thus, contributing to future epidemiological and hospital-based researches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Awareness on cytology procedure in oral cancer detection among undergraduates: An institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Gayathri; Pathak, Rajeev; Pathak, Sunita; Raj, Amrita; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Anuradha

    2017-11-01

    The screening and the early detection of the premalignant and malignant lesions are the only means for controlling the oral cancer which is known to be one of the leading causes for mortality worldwide. Oral exfoliative cytology though not a substitute for biopsy can be a powerful tool for its early detection. Dental Surgeons can play a great role in this direction. The present study was undertaken to assess the self-reported knowledge and attitude regarding the early detection of oral cancer and exfoliative cytology among the undergraduates of Rama Dental College, Kanpur. A pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study consisting of twenty four questions was conducted among hundred randomly selected students from third year, final year and intern's batch. According to 73% of students biopsy was the special test done in oral cancer detection and only 59% had heard regarding oral cytology technique. Formalin was the fixative known for cytology smears among 61%. Significance of toluidine blue staining was not known by 62%. Seventy seven percent of students were not aware about classes of cytology reporting. Eighty six percent of students felt that the adequacy of training in cytology was lagging. This survey identified an existing gap in the knowledge among the dental students regarding cytology as a diagnostic aid in oral cancer detection. This emphasizes the need to provide training for undergraduates at clinical level on regular basis and also through CDE and oral can-cer detection workshops.

  13. Decreased early mortality associated with the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia at National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gwendolyn; Wun, Ted; Muffly, Lori; Li, Qian; Brunson, Ann; Rosenberg, Aaron S; Jonas, Brian A; Keegan, Theresa H M

    2018-05-01

    To the authors' knowledge, few population-based studies to date have evaluated the association between location of care, complications with induction therapy, and early mortality in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using linked data from the California Cancer Registry and Patient Discharge Dataset (1999-2014), the authors identified adult (aged ≥18 years) patients with AML who received inpatient treatment within 30 days of diagnosis. A propensity score was created for treatment at a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center (NCI-CC). Inverse probability-weighted, multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine associations between location of care, complications, and early mortality (death ≤60 days from diagnosis). Of the 7007 patients with AML, 1762 (25%) were treated at an NCI-CC. Patients with AML who were treated at NCI-CCs were more likely to be aged ≤65 years, live in higher socioeconomic status neighborhoods, have fewer comorbidities, and have public health insurance. Patients treated at NCI-CCs had higher rates of renal failure (23% vs 20%; P = .010) and lower rates of respiratory failure (11% vs 14%; P = .003) and cardiac arrest (1% vs 2%; P = .014). After adjustment for baseline characteristics, treatment at an NCI-CC was associated with lower early mortality (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.57). The impact of complications on early mortality did not differ by location of care except for higher early mortality noted among patients with respiratory failure treated at non-NCI-CCs. The initial treatment of adult patients with AML at NCI-CCs is associated with a 53% reduction in the odds of early mortality compared with treatment at non-NCI-CCs. Lower early mortality may result from differences in hospital or provider experience and supportive care. Cancer 2018;124:1938-45. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  14. Medical care costs incurred by patients with smoking-related non-small cell lung cancer treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Quintana-Carrillo, Roger Humberto; Ahumada-Curiel, Gabriel; Corona-Cruz, Jose Francisco; Correa-Acevedo, Elma; Zinser-Sierra, Juan; de la Mata-Moya, Dolores; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a public health problem in Mexico and worldwide; its economic impact on developing countries has not been well documented. The aim of this study was to assess the direct medical costs attributable to smoking incurred by lung cancer patients treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The study was conducted at INCan in 2009. We carried out a cost of illness (COI) methodology, using data derived from an expert panel consensus and from medical chart review. A panel of experts developed a diagnostic-therapeutic guide that combined the hospital patient pathways and the infrastructure, human resources, technology, and services provided by the medical units at INCan. Cost estimates in Mexican pesos were adjusted by inflation and converted into US Dollars using the 2013 FIX exchange rate for foreign transactions (1 USD = 13.06 Mexican pesos). A 297 incident cases diagnosed with any type of lung cancer were analyzed. According to clinical stage, the costs per patient were 13,456; 35,648; 106,186; and 144,555 USD, for lung cancer stages I, II, III, and IV respectively. The weighted average annual cost/patient was and 139,801 USD and the average annual cost/patient that was attributable to smoking was 92,269 USD. This cost was independent of the clinical stage, with stage IV representing 96% of the annual cost. The total annual cost of smoking-related lung cancer at INCan was 19,969,781 USD. The medical care costs of lung cancer attributable to smoking represent a high cost both for INCan and the Mexican health sector. These costs could be reduced if all provisions established in the Framework Convention of Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization were implemented in Mexico.

  15. Training in European Enterprises. Monograph Series; 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Frederic

    A comparison was made of the division of responsibility for preparation of workers for employment as between private and public institutions in France, Great Britain, Italy, and West Germany. First, the effects of the Industrial Revolution on job qualifications, apprenticeship, and secondary education were noted. Next, postwar changes and trends…

  16. Whom to treat? Factors associated with chemotherapy recommendations and outcomes among patients with NHL at the Uganda Cancer Institute.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Menon

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment options in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce despite an increasing burden of disease. Identification of those cancer patients who would benefit most from the limited resources available would allow broader and more effective therapy.We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients over the age of 18 at the time of a pathologic diagnosis of NHL between 2003 and 2010 who were residents of Kyandondo County (Uganda and presented to the Uganda Cancer Institute for care.A total of 128 patients were included in this analysis. Chemotherapy was recommended to 117 (91.4% of the patients; the odds of recommending chemotherapy decreased for each additional month of reported symptoms prior to diagnosis. Of the 117 patients to whom chemotherapy was recommended, 111 (86.7% patients received at least 1 cycle of chemotherapy; HIV infected patients, as well as those with a lower hemoglobin and advanced disease at the time of diagnosis were significantly less likely to complete therapy. Among the patients who initiated chemotherapy, twenty patients died prior to treatment completion (including nine who died within 30 days. Hemoglobin level at the time of presentation was the only variable associated with early mortality in the adjusted model.In resource-poor areas, it is essential to align health care expenditures with interventions likely to provide benefit to affected populations. Targeting cancer therapy to those with a favorable chance of responding will not only save limited resources, but will also prevent harm in those patients unlikely to realize an effect of cancer-directed therapy.

  17. Meningiomas after cranial radiotherapy for childhood cancer: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Francesco; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Garbossa, Diego; Biasin, Eleonora; Rudà, Roberta; Daniele, Dino; Arvat, Emanuela; Corrias, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Brignardello, Enrico

    2015-07-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT) are at risk of developing meningiomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cumulative incidence of meningiomas in a cohort of CCS who previously underwent CRT. We considered all CCS who received CRT and were followed up at the "Transition Unit for Childhood Cancer Survivors" in Turin. Even though asymptomatic, they had at least one brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed at a minimum interval of 10 years after treatment for pediatric cancer. We identified 90 patients (median follow-up 24.6 years). Fifteen patients developed meningioma (median time from pediatric cancer, 22.5 years). In four patients, it was suspected on the basis of neurological symptoms (i.e., headache or seizures), whereas all other cases, including five giant meningiomas, were discovered in otherwise asymptomatic patients. Multiple meningiomas were discovered in four CCS. Ten patients underwent surgical resection. An atypical meningioma (grade II WHO) was reported in four patients. One patient with multiple meningiomas died for a rapid growth of the intracranial lesions. A second neoplasm (SN) other than meningioma was diagnosed in five out of the 15 patients with meningioma and in ten out of the 75 CCS without meningioma. Cox multivariate analysis showed that the occurrence of meningioma was associated with the development of other SNs, whereas age, sex, or CRT dose had no influence. CCS at risk of the development of meningioma deserve close clinical follow-up, especially those affected by other SNs.

  18. Risk-reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy in Women at Higher Risk of Ovarian and Breast Cancer: A Single Institution Prospective Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Enzo; Tomao, Federica; Aletti, Giovanni; Bazzurini, Luca; Bocciolone, Luca; Boveri, Sara; Landoni, Fabio; Lapresa, Maria Teresa; Maruccio, Matteo; Parma, Gabriella; Peccatori, Fedro; Petrella, Maria Cristina; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Colombo, Nicoletta; Maggioni, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    Occult cancers' reported rates vary from 2-12% and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) have been identified in 3-12% of the prophylactically removed tubes of women carrying a BRCA mutation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of tubal minor epithelial atypia (STIL), STIC, and occult invasive cancer and to evaluate the cancer-specific mortality in a prospective series of women at higher risk of ovarian and breast cancer undergoing risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) n a tertiary cancer center. A series of RRSO specimens (including endometrial biopsy) from women carrying a BRCA mutation, BRCA-unknown and BRCA-negative were collected between January 1998 and April 2016 at the Division of Gynecology at the European Institute of Oncology. Inclusion criteria were: asymptomatic women who had a negative gynecologic screening within 3 months prior to RRSO. Exclusion criteria were: women with ovarian/tubal cancer prior to RRSO. A total of 411 women underwent RRSO. Median age at RRSO was 47.0 years (range=32-70 years); 75.2% had a history of breast cancer. Fifteen women were diagnosed with an occult cancer (7 STIC, 4 invasive cancers, 2 breast cancers metastatic to the adnexa, 2 endometrial cancer) (3.6%). Sixteen showed a STIL (3.9%). When excluding cases with preoperative positive markers, the occult invasive cancer rate drops to 1.5%. Our study, covering an 18-year period, shows a substantial low risk of occult cancer among a high-risk population of women undergoing RRSO. Our data still support the indication for RRSO in higher-risk patients. An endometrial biopsy should also be routinely obtained as it raises the chances of detecting occult endometrial cancers that may be otherwise missed. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. The vital few meet the trivial many: unexpected use patterns in a monographs collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test three related hypotheses about monographs circulation at academic health sciences libraries: (1) Juran's "Vital Few" Principle, sometimes incorrectly referred to as the "Pareto Principle"; (2) most (> 30%) new monographs will not circulate within four years; and, (3) Trueswell's 20/80 rule concerning intensity of monographs circulation. METHODS: Retrospective circulation study conducted at a major academic health sciences library in November 1997 on monographs acquired during 1993, utilizing an online review file. RESULTS: Unexpectedly, most monographs (84%) had circulated at least once in the four years following acquisition. Combining circulation and in-house data revealed that 90.7% of the monographs acquired in 1993 had been used at least once. Small percentages of these monographs produced disproportionately high circulation levels. CONCLUSION: Monographs circulation rates confirm Juran's Vital Few principle. Most monographs circulated at least once in contrast to results reported by the Pittsburgh Study or other studies reported by Hardesty and Fenske. The results do not comply with Trueswell's 20/80 ratio rule. Further research needs to investigate the effects of low students to books ratios and problem-based learning (PBL) curricula upon monographs utilization. PMID:9803291

  20. Evaluation of intratumoral HER-2 heterogeneity by fluorescence in situ hybridization in invasive breast cancer: a single institution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Jung, Woohee; Hong, Soon-Won; Koo, Ja Seung

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence and characteristics of HER-2 gene heterogeneity in invasive breast cancer in a single institution. Included were 971 cases of primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 2008 and 2010. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) image files were retrospectively reviewed and HER-2 gene heterogeneity was defined as more than 5% but less than 50% of analyzed invasive tumor cells with a HER-2/Chr17 ratio higher than 2.2, according to the College of American Pathologists guidelines. HER-2 gene heterogeneity was identified in 24 (2.5%) cases. The mean proportion of invasive tumor cells with a HER-2/chromosome 17 ratio higher than 2.2 was 11.6% (range: 5%-25%). Of 24 cases, HER-2 gene status was not amplified in 8, showed borderline amplification in 2, and amplification in 14. All HER-2 amplification cases were low-grade. In conclusion, HER-2 gene heterogeneity of invasive breast cancer is identified in routine FISH examination. This may affect the results of HER-2 gene amplification status in FISH studies.

  1. Overview of the National Cancer Institute's activities related to exposure of the public to fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachholz, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) was directed by Congress to assess the risk of thyroid cancer from 131I associated with fallout from the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) was requested by DHHS to address Public Law 97-414, Section 7 (a), which directs DHHS to (1) conduct scientific research and prepare analyses necessary to develop valid and credible assessments of the risks of thyroid cancer that are associated with thyroid doses of Iodine 131; (2)...develop...methods to estimate the thyroid doses of Iodine 131 that are received by individuals from nuclear bomb fallout; (and) (3)...develop...assessments of the exposure to Iodine 131 that the American people received from the Nevada atmospheric nuclear bomb tests. In addition, the University of Utah, under contract with the NCI, is carrying out a study to determine if the incidence of thyroid disease and leukemia among identified populations in Utah may be related to exposure from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site

  2. Place of death of pediatric cancer patients in a single institute during 7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Tomoko; Hirase, Satoshi; Matsunoshita, Natsuki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ninchoji, Takeshi; Kubokawa, Ikuko; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-06-27

    Place of death is an important issue at the end-of-life. It is poorly understood in pediatric cancer patients in Japan. This study aimed to clarify place of death of children with cancer as well as variables associated with place of death. Study population was pediatric cancer patients who died in the Department of Pediatrics at Kobe University Hospital during the last 7 years. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed regardless of cause of death to derive data relating to patients' characteristics and disease. 18 patients were included. Median age at death was 12.2 years old. 6 patients including 5 children in complete remission had hematological disease and 12 patients suffered from solid tumors. 4 patients (22.2%) died at home, whereas 14 patients (77.8%) died in the hospital including 6 ICU deaths. No one died in hospices. Preference of patients was unavailable due to the lack of inquiry. Factors influencing place of death (home, ICU, non-ICU) were disease (hematological disease vs. solid tumor, p=0.010, brain tumor vs. non-brain tumor, p=0.023), disease status (complete remission vs. non-complete remission, p=0.0014) and preference of families (p=0.029). Among 6 families who expressed preference, no disparity was observed between actual and preferred place of death. This is the first English publication of place of death of pediatric cancer patients in Japan. The low percentage of home death, factors influencing place of death and the lack of disparity between actual and preferred place of death were indicated. Further studies are required to better understand place of death.

  3. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    size, diagnostic Gleason (3+3 or 3+4), BMI ( obese , overweight or normal), race (Caucasian, African American or other), ethnicity (Hispanic versus...results were presented at the 2016 Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) and have been published in European Urology (v72, pp448-454.) A...prostate cancer in men in the Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study (PASS).” Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association; 2016 May 6-10, San

  4. Platinum-Based Therapy in Adenosquamous Pancreatic Cancer: Experience at Two Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Luiz De Souza; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare type of pancreatic cancer. Although its molecular biology profile hasbeen shown to be similar to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumors, it has different prognostic features. There is noconsensus or guidelines to treat this tumor differently from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but therapies based on gemcitabineand platinum chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin and oxaliplatin have been used based on results of a few case reports. Wediscuss the Abst...

  5. The natural stratosphere of 1974. CIAP monograph 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    The Climatic Impact Assessment Program (CIAP) of the U.S. Department of Transportation is charged with the 'assessment' of the impact of future aircraft fleets and other vehicles operating in, or transiting through, the stratosphere. CIAP monograph 1 gives a survey, largely from an experimental standpoint, of what is known in 1974 about the unperturbed stratosphere with respect to an application to stratospheric flight. It reviews the overall structure of the stratosphere, its origin in terms of ozone photochemistry, solar irradiance and overall radiative energy balance, other chemically reactive minor species, and atmospheric motions on a variety of scales of time and distance. The limitations of our understanding are emphasized in the presentation. Also, the monograph examines briefly what is known about the effect of massive injections of nitrogen oxides (from atmospheric nuclear explosions) and sulfur oxides (from major volcanic eruptions)

  6. ‘The Returned’: on the future of monographic books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Bunz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the current state of academic book publishing based on the findings of the Hybrid Publishing Lab's business model research. With students relying more and more on Google and Wikipedia, the role of books within today's university studies is a difficult one. From the perspective of publishers, open access (OA embracing the digital is seen as one potential way to bridge this gap between online search engines and traditional monographs. To illustrate this further, the article delivers an overview of its findings, which highlight changes in academic publishing: publishers have switched their emphasis from delivering a product to creating a service, whereby the author rather than the reader becomes their most focused-on customer. Research frameworks, funding and conventions about academic careers, however, often still need to adjust to this new development. If these frameworks acknowledge and foster OA publishing, and new experiments with collaborative book productions flourish, the monograph will have a future.

  7. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  8. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.villeneuve@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe; Fortin, Bernard; Filion, Edith; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis; Ayad, Tarek; Christopoulos, Apostolos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and rate of complications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2005 and November 2008, 25 patients with an unknown primary cancer underwent IMRT, with a median radiation dose of 70 Gy. The bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa were included in the target volume. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma, except for 1 patient who had adenosquamous differentiation. They were all treated with curative intent. Of the 25 included patients, 20 were men and 5 were women, with a median age of 54 years. Of these patients, 3 had Stage III, 18 had Stage IVa, and 4 had Stage IVb. Of the 25 patients, 18 (72%) received platinum-based chemotherapy in a combined-modality setting. Neck dissection was reserved for residual disease after definitive IMRT. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were all 100% at 3 years. No occurrence of primary cancer was observed during the follow-up period. The reported rates of xerostomia reduced with the interval from the completion of treatment. Nine patients (36%) reported Grade 2 or greater xerostomia at 6 months, and only 2 (8%) of them reported the same grade of salivary function toxicity after 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: In our institution, IMRT for unknown primary cancer has provided good overall and disease-free survival in all the patients with an acceptable rate of complications. IMRT allowed us to address the bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa with minimal late salivary function toxicity. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT for more advanced disease led to good clinical results with reasonable toxicities.

  9. Challenges Facing Early Phase Trials Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute: An Analysis of Corrective Action Plans to Improve Accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massett, Holly A; Mishkin, Grace; Rubinstein, Larry; Ivy, S Percy; Denicoff, Andrea; Godwin, Elizabeth; DiPiazza, Kate; Bolognese, Jennifer; Zwiebel, James A; Abrams, Jeffrey S

    2016-11-15

    Accruing patients in a timely manner represents a significant challenge to early phase cancer clinical trials. The NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program analyzed 19 months of corrective action plans (CAP) received for slow-accruing phase I and II trials to identify slow accrual reasons, evaluate whether proposed corrective actions matched these reasons, and assess the CAP impact on trial accrual, duration, and likelihood of meeting primary scientific objectives. Of the 135 CAPs analyzed, 69 were for phase I trials and 66 for phase II trials. Primary reasons cited for slow accrual were safety/toxicity (phase I: 48%), design/protocol concerns (phase I: 42%, phase II: 33%), and eligibility criteria (phase I: 41%, phase II: 35%). The most commonly proposed corrective actions were adding institutions (phase I: 43%, phase II: 85%) and amending the trial to change eligibility or design (phase I: 55%, phase II: 44%). Only 40% of CAPs provided proposed corrective actions that matched the reasons given for slow accrual. Seventy percent of trials were closed to accrual at time of analysis (phase I = 48; phase II = 46). Of these, 67% of phase I and 70% of phase II trials met their primary objectives, but they were active three times longer than projected. Among closed trials, 24% had an accrual rate increase associated with a greater likelihood of meeting their primary scientific objectives. Ultimately, trials receiving CAPs saw improved accrual rates. Future trials may benefit from implementing CAPs early in trial life cycles, but it may be more beneficial to invest in earlier accrual planning. Clin Cancer Res; 22(22); 5408-16. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Mileham and Kim, p. 5397. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. HDR and LDR Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Lip Cancer: the Experience of the Catalan Institute of Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerra, Arrate Querejeta; Mena, Estefanía Palacios; Fabregas, Joan Pera; Miguelez, Cristina Gutiérrez; Guedea, Ferran

    2010-03-01

    Lip cancer can be treated by surgery, external radiotherapy, and/or brachytherapy (BT). In recent years, BT has become increasingly favored for this type of cancer. The aim of the present study was to analyze local control and survival of patients treated at our institution between July 1989 and June 2008. We performed a retrospective study of 121 patients (109 males and 12 females) who underwent lip cancer brachytherapy from July 1989 to June 2008. Median age was 67 years and median follow-up was 31.8 months (range 20-188 months). Out of 121 patients, 100 (82.6%) were treated with low dose rate (LDR) BT while the remaining 21 patients (17.4%) received high dose rate (HDR) BT. The most common cell type was squamous cell carcinoma (115 cases; 95%) and most tumors were located on the lower lip (107 patients; 88.4%). Most cases were either stage T1 (62 patients; 51.2%), or T2 (44 cases; 36.4%). After 15 years of follow-up, overall survival was 89.5%, cause-specific survival 97.8%, and disease-free survival 86.6%. Local, regional, and distant control at 15 years were 90%, 92%, and 98.8%, respectively. Grade 3 mucosal toxicity was observed in 23% of patients treated with LDR compared to 33% of HDR patients, and grade 4 mucosal toxicity in 9% versus 0% in the HDR group. Our findings confirm that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for lip cancer. The results from our series are in line with those published elsewhere. Based on our limited data, HDR appears to be equally as good as LDR, although this needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  11. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status of breast cancer patients of eastern India: A multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Koushik; Bhaumik, Gautam; Chattopadhyay, Bhargab

    2018-01-01

    There is a paucity of any significant data on the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of breast cancer patients from the eastern part of India. This study aims to document the ER and PR status of breast cancer patients in the eastern Indian population, as catered by two premier tertiary care hospitals in Kolkata. All breast cancer patients registered between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015, in the Departments of Oncology, of IPGMER and SSKM Hospitals and R. G. Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, who had at least undergone a core biopsy or surgery, were analyzed retrospectively for documentation of their ER and PR status, using the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) interpretation guidelines. Over a period of 3 years, a total of 927 patients were included for the study. A total of 825 (89%) patients had their ER and PR data available for evaluation. ER and PR positive was seen in 312 (37.82%) patients, ER and PR negative in 399 (48.36%) patients, ER positive and PR negative in 71 (8.6%) patients, and ER negative and PR positive results was found in 43 (5.21%) patients. This is the first multi-institutional documentation of ER and PR status from eastern India, having a modest number of patients and one of the earliest documentations using the latest ASCO/CAP interpretation guidelines. These findings resemble the data from the south and also reiterate the fact that majority of the Indian breast cancer patients are still ER and PR negative in spite of the changes in the interpretation guidelines.

  12. Monograph of Keçiören Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş Zafer Şahin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, urban administration can be defined from a judicial perspective as the bundle of powers vested in municipalities. It is known that throughout republican history, municipalities, using these powers, have differentiated themselves via their own internal dynamics in parallel to the evolution of public policy and changes in legislation. Yet, it is obvious that there are important gaps in understanding this differentiation taking into consideration the structural conditions of individual municipalities. In particular, in order to thoroughly understand municipalities, it is important to consider periodical pictures of how each municipality has been affected by waves of decentralization and centralization experienced over the last thirty years. In this respect, this monograph, using the same monographic approach developed for the Çankaya Municipality, provides a picture of the existing situation of Ankara’s Keçiören Municipality and presents related problems and potential. This monograph, based on qualitative and quantitative research, presents a holistic evaluation of Keçiören Municipality in terms of its external environment, provision of services, decision-making processes, use of technology and communications.

  13. Experience of a monographic tuberculosis unit: the first 500 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Moreno, Juan; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Cifuentes Luna, Carmen; Mir Villadrich, Isabel; Pareja Bezares, Antonio; Navarro Fernández, Verónica; Serrano Bujalance, Araceli; Pérez Seco, M Cruz; Payeras Cifre, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a highly prevalent and potentially severe disease. However, since 2002 the annual incidence has been decreasing both worldwide and in Spain, where the incidence varies widely between regions. The main objective of this study is to describe the experience of a monographic TB unit in a second level hospital. A descriptive study was carried out which included all cases of TB diagnosed in a monographic unit of a secondary hospital between 2003 and 2011. Demographic, clinical, epidemiological and microbiological data were recorded. We analyzed 500 TB cases and found an increasing annual incidence in all subgroups, including native and immigrant populations. Most cases (63.8%) were male, with a median age of 36 years (range 8 months-90 years). In total, 39.8% of patients were foreign born. Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus was found in 11% of cases. The pulmonary form was most frequently diagnosed (63.8%). Overall mortality was 5.8% with no significant differences between groups (including foreign born and human immunodeficiency virus positive patients). Although TB incidence is globally decreasing, in our study we found an increasing number of cases in recent years in all subgroups, which can be explained by this being a monographic unit with an intensive contact tracing program. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemo-radiotherapy plus hyperthermia in locally advanced cervical cancer: preliminary results of an institutional phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbani, M.; Marciai, N.; Maluta, S.; Griso, C.; Merlin, F.; Cassandrini, P.; Giudici, S.; Franchi, M.; Zanini, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiotherapy given concurrently with a cisplatin-based regimen has shown a benefit in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer so becoming the new standard treatment according to EBM criteria. Addition of hyperthermia to radiotherapy has also been proved to yield an advantage in survival and local control in pts affected by recurrent and local advanced cervical cancer in the Dutch Phase III trial so that the Consensus Forum of Kadota (Osaha June 2004) included cervical cancer among tumors treatable with hyperthermia. In our institutional multidisciplinary team a pilot study has been designed in order to evaluate feasibility, outcome and toxicity of tri-modality treatment in pts with locally advanced cervical cancer in our daily practice. Since January 2003 to now eight patients affected by cervical cancer with stage IB2 through IVA N0-N+ pelvic or paraaortic were entered the study. Six patients were treated at initial diagnosis and two patients after chemotherapy which had achieved stable disease. Treatment regimen consisted in 5 courses of weekly chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/mq) with concurrent external radiotherapy to a total dose of 64-66 Gy on CTV1 and 45 Gy on para-aortic nodes plus boost in pts with enlarged nodes identified by imaging. Five weekly sessions of hyperthermia were performed by using BSD 2000 system and sigma 60 applicator. No significant toxicity occurred and all of the patients completed tri-modality treatment in accordance with the study protocol. Seven pts experienced a complete clinical remission and one patient a partial remission as defined by clinical and imaging examinations. After four months from the end of the treatment a patient with Stage IIB bulky tumor plus one pelvic positive node who was in complete remission (Clinical examination, MRI and TAC-PET three months from the end of the treatment were negative for evidence of disease) developed a bleeding recto-vaginal fistula plus central pelvic necrosis for which an

  15. Local recurrence after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer: a recursive partitioning analysis of multi-institutional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Chris R; Higgins, Kristin A; Peterson, Bercedis L; Chino, Junzo P; Marks, Lawrence B; D'Amico, Thomas A; Varlotto, John M

    2013-10-01

    To define subgroups at high risk of local recurrence (LR) after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer using a recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). This Institutional Review Board-approved study included patients who underwent upfront surgery for I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer at Duke Cancer Institute (primary set) or at other participating institutions (validation set). The 2 data sets were analyzed separately and identically. Disease recurrence at the surgical margin, ipsilateral hilum, and/or mediastinum was considered an LR. Recursive partitioning was used to build regression trees for the prediction of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) from standard clinical and pathological factors. LRFS distributions were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. The 1411 patients in the primary set had a 5-year LRFS rate of 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-0.81), and the 889 patients in the validation set had a 5-year LRFS rate of 76% (95% CI, 0.72-0.80). The RPA of the primary data set identified 3 terminal nodes based on stage and histology. These nodes and their 5-year LRFS rates were as follows: (1) stage I/adenocarcinoma, 87% (95% CI, 0.83-0.90); (2) stage I/squamous or large cell, 72% (95% CI, 0.65-0.79); and (3) stage II-IIIA, 62% (95% CI, 0.55-0.69). The validation RPA identified 3 terminal nodes based on lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and stage: (1) no LVI/stage IA, 82% (95% CI, 0.76-0.88); (2) no LVI/stage IB-IIIA, 73% (95% CI, 0.69-0.80); and (3) LVI, 58% (95% CI, 0.47-0.69). The risk of LR was similar in the primary and validation patient data sets. There was discordance between the 2 data sets regarding the clinical factors that best segregate patients into risk groups. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; O'Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-07-18

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  17. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Sean; O’Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  18. Differences in CT features of peritoneal carcinomatosis, sarcomatosis, and lymphomatosis: Retrospective analysis of 122 cases at a tertiary cancer institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, A.C.; Shinagare, A.B.; Rosenthal, M.H.; Tirumani, S.H.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To study the differences in the imaging features of spread from the three cancer cell lines, namely epithelial, sarcomatoid, and lymphoid, resulting in peritoneal carcinomatosis, peritoneal sarcomatosis, and peritoneal lymphomatosis, respectively. Materials and methods: In this institutional review board-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study, an electronic radiology database was searched to identify patients with peritoneal tumour spread who underwent CT imaging at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a tertiary cancer institution, between January 2011 and December 2012. Out of 1214 patients with possible peritoneal tumour spread on the radiology reports, 122 patients were included with histopathologically confirmed peritoneal disease (50 randomly selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis and sarcomatosis each, and all 22 patients with lymphomatosis). Two blinded, fellowship-trained radiologists in consensus reviewed the CT images in random order and recorded the imaging findings of peritoneal tumour spread. The statistical analysis was performed in two steps: the first comparing incidence of various features in each group and the second step was a pairwise analysis between each cohort. Results: Peritoneal carcinomatosis more frequently had ascites, peritoneal thickening, and omental cake (all p ≤ 0.001). Measurable nodules were less common in peritoneal carcinomatosis (p < 0.001), and when present, were ill-defined and had an irregular outline (p ≤ 0.002). Peritoneal sarcomatosis more often had discrete nodules that were well defined and had a smooth outline and less frequently had ascites, peritoneal thickening, omental caking, serosal implants, and lymphadenopathy (all p ≤ 0.005). Peritoneal lymphomatosis frequently involved the omentum and mesentery, and often had associated lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly (all p ≤ 0.002). Conclusion: Peritoneal carcinomatosis, sarcomatosis

  19. Dose escalation by hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer - a large single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Klein, E.; Kupelian, P.

    2003-01-01

    To report the outcomes of high dose radiation therapy using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) with hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. A total of 278 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT between 1998 and 2001. All cases had available pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and biopsy Gleason scores (bGS), no nodal metastasis, a minimum 2 year follow-up, and >5 follow-up PSA levels. The frequency by T-stage was: T1-T2A in 86%, T2B-T2C in 9%, and T3 in 5%. The median iPSA was 8.35. The frequency by bGS was: =7 in 45%. The age range for the patients was from 48 to 85 years (median 68 years). The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 24-49 months). The median doses delivered were 83Gy (delivered at 2.5Gy per fraction to 70 Gy; this being equivalent to 83 Gy at standard fractionation of 1.8 Gy using an alpha/beta of 2). The ASTRO definition for biochemical failure was used. Toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. The 3-year biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) for the entire cohort at three years was 91%. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute genito-urinary (GU) side effects were seen in 79% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GU toxicity was seen in 18% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects were seen in 65% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GI toxicity was seen in 11% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GU side effects were seen in 3% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity was seen in 1.5% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GI side effects were seen in 13% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GI toxicity was seen in 5% of patients. Higher doses of radiation delivered by IMRT resulted in excellent bRFS outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy. IMRT can be effectively used to safely increase dose delivery without compromising on quality of life

  20. A Pragmatic Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Physician Data Query (PDQ)®-Based Brief Counseling on Cancer-Related Fatigue among Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Joshua; Xie, Sharon X; Penn, Courtney; Desai, Krupali; Dong, Kimberly W; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Vapiwala, Neha; Mao, Jun James

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) negatively affects quality of life among cancer patients. This study seeks to evaluate the outcome and patient receptiveness of a brief counseling program based on National Cancer Institute (NCI) PDQ® information to manage CRF when integrated into Radiation Therapy (RT). Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among patients undergoing non-palliative RT. Patients with stage I–III tumors and with Karnofsky score 60 or better were given a ten-minute behavioral counseling session during the first two weeks of RT. The Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) was administered at baseline/end of RT. Results Of 93 patients enrolled, 89% found the counseling useful and practical. By the end of RT, 59% reported increased exercise, 41.6% sought nutrition counseling, 72.7% prioritized daily activities, 74.4% took daytime naps, and 70.5% talked with other cancer patients. Regarding counseling, patients who had received chemotherapy prior to RT had no change in fatigue (−0.2), those who received RT alone had mild increase in fatigue (0.7, p=0.02), and those who received concurrent chemotherapy experienced a substantial increase in fatigue (3.0 to 5.2, p=0.05). Higher baseline fatigue and receipt of chemotherapy were predictive of worsened fatigue in a multivariate model (both p<0.01). Conclusion Our data suggests that brief behavioral counseling based on NCI guidelines is well accepted by patients showing an uptake in many activities to cope with CRF. Those who receive concurrent chemotherapy and with higher baseline fatigue are at risk for worsening fatigue despite of guideline-based therapy. PMID:29479490

  1. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  2. Biomedical information @ the speed of light: implementing desktop access to publishers' resources at the Paterson Institute for Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, S W

    2001-06-01

    Shortly after midnight every Thursday morning, a list server in Massachusetts delivers an electronic table of contents message to the Kostoris Medical Library at the Paterson Institute for Cancer Research in Manchester, UK. The messageins details of the latest edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, complete with hyperlinks to the full text of the content online. Publishers' electronic current awareness services have been integrated into the dissemination process of the Library service to enhance the speed of communication and access to full text content. As a means of promoting electronic journal use, a system of e-mail delivery coupled with fast Internet access has allowed a migration from paper-based current awareness alerting to a seamless online product.

  3. Present state of studies on FFAG accelerator for radiotherapy of cancer in National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misu, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    From 2001, developmental contract studies with Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for a compact accelerator for heavy ion radiotherapy of cancer started in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with use of fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator, which had been developed in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). This paper describes the present state of those studies. Described are FFAG accelerator design for repeated acceleration for 200 Hz or more toward the carbon ion at 400 MeV/u with the range of 25 cm in water, FFAG optical systems for these purposes by linear analyses, and the present situation of the design. Technological problems yielded and future study plan are also commented. (N.I.)

  4. The Generalizing Work on History and Culture of the Cossacks (Book Review: Essays on the History and Culture of the Cossacks of Southern Russia: Collective Monograph [Text] / ed. by G. G. Matishov, I. O. Tyumentsev ; Southern Scientic Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences; Volgograd Branch of Federal State Budgetary Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education “Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration”. – Volgograd : Izd-vo Volgogradskogo Filiala FGBOU VPO RANKhiGS, 2014. – 624 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugay Nikolay F.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article represents a review of the collective monograph “Essays on the history and culture of the Cossacks of Southern Russia”, published in 2014 under the auspices of the Southern Scientific Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Volgograd branch of Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration. The review provides a critical analysis of the material in the collective monograph on the problems of studying the history and culture of the Cossacks. The author notes that the revival of Cossacks that began in the 1990s, not only drew attention to the Cossack problem in modern Russia, but also stimulated scientific and public interest in the history and culture of the Cossacks. Russian Cossacks have rich past and its culture is colorful and specific, its role in the history of Russia is significant. Issues of origin and development of the Cossacks, their place among the peoples of Russia, the specificity of cultural practices are constantly causing great interest for researchers. All this has led scientistsspecialists in the history and culture of the Cossacks to the idea of the creation of this scientific work, which has become a generalization of accumulated research experience on the most important issues of the Cossacks’ historical existence. The authors of the monograph limited their research by Southern Russia because of the complexity of creating general work on all Cossack troops which have historically existed in the Russian state and had sometimes very great cultural differences and special historical destiny. The authors made a very successful attempt to highlight the main problematic aspects of the history and culture of the Cossacks. The genre of essay chosen for creating a collective monograph, has allowed not only to identify the most relevant topics of the Cossack history and culture, but also to consider them in relation and development. Each essay contains material that allows to

  5. Evolution of accesses to information on breast cancer and screening on the Brazilian National Cancer Institute website: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Sormunen, Taina; Craftman, Åsa Gransjön

    2018-04-01

    Delays in diagnosis due to low Breast Cancer awareness are widespread in Brazil maybe owing to ineffective strategies to raise attention on early diagnosis. As a proxy of collective interest in BC screanning (BCS) we studied the monthly accesses to BC and BCS webpages in INCA's website along 48 months. A log analyzer built a time serie (2006-2009) of BC and BCS monthly means, which oscilations were studied by analysis of variance (ANOVA). We found significant increasing accesses to BC and transient "attention peaks". Enlargement in BC/BCS differences along all period were caused by increasing accesses to BC and decreasing/minor/stable oscillations to SBC pages. These results are consistent with previous reports on increasing interest to BC contrasting with indifference on BCS. In the context of an exploratory study, we discussed some aspects: weakness of a "prevention culture"; lack of confidence in health system and screening programs; "celebrity effect" in the context of media framing; collective perception of risks heightened by perception of social vulnerability. Findings suggest that culture-tailored communication strategies would be necessary to inform Brazilian people about BCS. Future research is needed to study social perceptions and constructions on BC topics.

  6. Evolution of accesses to information on breast cancer and screening on the Brazilian National Cancer Institute website: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Vasconcellos-Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Delays in diagnosis due to low Breast Cancer awareness are widespread in Brazil maybe owing to ineffective strategies to raise attention on early diagnosis. As a proxy of collective interest in BC screanning (BCS we studied the monthly accesses to BC and BCS webpages in INCA's website along 48 months. A log analyzer built a time serie (2006-2009 of BC and BCS monthly means, which oscilations were studied by analysis of variance (ANOVA. We found significant increasing accesses to BC and transient “attention peaks”. Enlargement in BC/BCS differences along all period were caused by increasing accesses to BC and decreasing/minor/stable oscillations to SBC pages. These results are consistent with previous reports on increasing interest to BC contrasting with indifference on BCS. In the context of an exploratory study, we discussed some aspects: weakness of a “prevention culture”; lack of confidence in health system and screening programs; “celebrity effect” in the context of media framing; collective perception of risks heightened by perception of social vulnerability. Findings suggest that culture-tailored communication strategies would be necessary to inform Brazilian people about BCS. Future research is needed to study social perceptions and constructions on BC topics.

  7. [Evaluation of breast cancer treatment at a tertiary-level institution with Popular Health Insurance in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Salinas, Claudia; Lara-Medina, Fernando Ulises; Alvarado-Miranda, Alberto; Castañeda-Soto, Noel; Bargalló-Rocha, Enrique; Ramírez-Ugalde, María Teresa; Pérez-Sánchez, Víctor; Rivera, Lesbia; Gambo-Vignole, Carlos; Santamaría-Galicia, Julieta; Nieves-Casas, Rosa Isela; Morán-Muñoz, Héctor; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    In our country breast cancer represents a major health problem. Only 45% of all population has access to health services, the consequence is delay in diagnosis and treatment. In Mexico, 66% of all new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in locally advanced stages. From May 2007 the Health System Protection Against Catastrophic Expenses, called Seguro Popular (SP), breast cancer was included in covering the treatment of this neoplasm in any patient without access to social security. To evaluate the results and impact of SP in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment of a group of patients diagnosed with breast cancer at an institution of national reference. We analyzed a group of 259 patients in stages (I-IIIC). The clinical stages I and II (55 patients) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy FAC -T (fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, adriamycin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC) followed by 12 weeks of paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 +/- trastuzumab loading dose of 4 mg/kg followed by 2 mg/kg); 204 patients in locally advanced stages (IIB-IIIC) received FAC-T +/- trastuzumab followed by surgery. Adjuvant treatment consisted of endocrine therapy for hormone-sensitive patients and radiotherapy 50 cGy according to international standards. The age at diagnosis was 47 years (range 23-68). 80% of them were locally advanced stages (IIB-IIIC) and were treated in a neoadjuvant setting, 20% was in early stages, treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy The disease-free survival and overall survival at 30 months was 85.7 and 90% respectively. Overall pathologic complete response was obtained in 15% of cases. In the subgroup analysis showed that 41% of patients HER2 (+), 29% of triple-negative patients and 9% of hormone-sensitive tumors achieved complete pathological response (p = 0.0001). This is the first analysis of efficacy of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in breast cancer since the introduction of popular secure non-entitled population. It is clear that treatment efficacy

  8. Intraoperative radiation therapy in gynecologic cancer: update of the experience at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, Graciela R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Webb, Maurice J.; Wilson, Timothy O.; Cha, Stephen S.; Podratz, Karl C.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Mayo Clinic experience with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1983 and June 1991, 39 patients with recurrent or locally advanced gynecologic malignancies received intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. The anatomical area treated was pelvis (side walls or presacrum) or periaortic nodes or a combination of both. In addition to intraoperative radiation therapy, 28 patients received external beam irradiation (median dose, 45 Gy; range, 0.9 to 65.7 Gy), and 13 received chemotherapy preoperatively. At the time of intraoperative radiation therapy and after maximum debulking operation, 23 patients had microscopic residual disease and 16 had gross residual disease up to 5 cm in thickness. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 43.4 months (range, 27.1 to 125.4 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial local control with or without central control was 67.4%, and the control within the IORT field (central control) was 81%. The risk of distant metastases at 5 years was 52% (82% in patients with gross residual disease and 33% in patients with only microscopic disease postoperatively). Actuarial 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 31.5 and 40.5%, respectively. Patients with microscopic disease had 5-year disease-free and overall survival of 55 and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicity was directly associated with IORT in six patients (15%). Conclusion: Patients with local, regionally recurrent gynecologic cancer may benefit from maximal surgical debulking and IORT with or without external beam irradiation, especially those with microscopic residual disease

  9. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Consuelo Rubio-Poo21Universidad Autónoma Metropolitano–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Departments: Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS; 2Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies-Zaragoza (FES-ZaragozaAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94 were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS.Keywords: breast cancer, Mexican women, direct and indirect costs

  10. An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 93 Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer: Treatment Outcomes, Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Antoni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prognostic factors and indexes of a series of 93 patients with breast cancer and brain metastases (BM in a single institution. Treatment outcomes were evaluated according to the major prognostic indexes (RPA, BSBM, GPA scores and breast cancer subtypes. Independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS were identified. The median OS values according to GPA 0–1, 1.5–2, 2.5–3 and 3.5–4, were 4.5, 9.5, 14.2 and 19.1 months, respectively (p < 0.0001 and according to genetic subtypes, they were 5, 14.2, 16.5 and 17.1 months for basal-like, luminal A and B and HER, respectively (p = 0.04. Using multivariate analysis, we established a new grading system using the six factors that were identified as indicators of longer survival: age under 60 (p = 0.001, high KPS (p = 0.007, primary tumor control (p = 0.05, low number of extracranial metastases and BM (p = 0.01 and 0.0002, respectively and triple negative subtype (p = 0.002. Three groups with significantly different median survival times were identified: 4.1, 9.5 and 26.3 months, respectively (p < 0.0001. Our new grading system shows that prognostic indexes could be improved by using more levels of classification and confirms the strength of biological prognostic factors.

  11. Imaging yield from 133 consecutive patients with prostate cancer and low trigger PSA from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinagare, A.B.; Keraliya, A.; Somarouthu, B.; Tirumani, S.H.; Ramaiya, N.H.; Kantoff, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the yield of imaging in patients with relapsed prostate cancer (PC) with a low trigger prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Materials and methods: This institutional review board (IRB)-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study included all 133 patients (mean age 68 years; range 45–88; median 69 months since original diagnosis; interquartile range [IQR]: 32–139) with hormone-sensitive PC (HSPC, n=28) or castration-resistant PC (CRPC, n=105) and trigger PSA 0.05 for all). Fifty-seven of the 133 (43%) patients had findings seen only at CT, of which 37 had new extra-osseous findings. Only 2/133 (2%) had findings at bone scintigraphy not seen at CT, both in areas not covered on CT. Conclusion: Imaging frequently demonstrated new metastatic and non-metastatic findings in patients with a low trigger PSA. CT is valuable in these patients because extra-osseous findings not visible at bone scintigraphy are frequently seen. - Highlights: • New and existing metastases common in prostate cancer with low trigger PSA. • Previous reports of threshold PSA levels may not apply in follow-up setting. • No difference in metastatic pattern between hormone sensitive and resistant disease. • CT showed extra-osseous findings not seen on bone scan in 44% patients. • Bone scan rarely showed findings not visible on concurrent CT.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  13. Skin Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction (SSMIR for early breast cancer: Eight years single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin Jean

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin Sparing Mastectomy (SSM and immediate breast reconstruction has become increasingly popular as an effective treatment for patients with breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of skin sparing mastectomy in early breast cancer at a single population-based institution. Methods Records of ninety-five consecutive patients with operable breast cancer who had skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstructions between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed. Patient and tumor characteristic, type of reconstruction, postoperative complications, aesthetic results and incidence of recurrence were analyzed. Results Mean age of the patients was 51.6(range 33–72 years. The AJCC pathologic stages were 0 (n = 51, 53.7%, I (n = 20, 21.1%, and II (n = 2, 2.1%. Twenty of the patients had recurrent disease (21.1%. The immediate breast reconstructions were performed with autologus tissue including latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in 63 (66.3% patients and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap in 4 (4.2% patients. Implants were used in 28 (29.4% patients. The average hospital stay was 7.7 days. Flap complication occurred in seven (10.4% patients resulting in four (6% re-operations and there were no delay in accomplishing postoperative adjuvant therapy. At a median follow-up of 69 months (range 48 to 144, local recurrence was seen in one patient (1.1% and systemic recurrence was seen in two patients (2.1%. Conclusion Skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for early breast cancer is associated with low morbidity and low rate of local recurrence.

  14. MUC1 Expression by Immunohistochemistry Is Associated with Adverse Pathologic Features in Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Study.

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    Okyaz Eminaga

    Full Text Available The uncertainties inherent in clinical measures of prostate cancer (CaP aggressiveness endorse the investigation of clinically validated tissue biomarkers. MUC1 expression has been previously reported to independently predict aggressive localized prostate cancer. We used a large cohort to validate whether MUC1 protein levels measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC predict aggressive cancer, recurrence and survival outcomes after radical prostatectomy independent of clinical and pathological parameters.MUC1 IHC was performed on a multi-institutional tissue microarray (TMA resource including 1,326 men with a median follow-up of 5 years. Associations with clinical and pathological parameters were tested by the Chi-square test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Relationships with outcome were assessed with univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and the Log-rank test.The presence of MUC1 expression was significantly associated with extracapsular extension and higher Gleason score, but not with seminal vesicle invasion, age, positive surgical margins or pre-operative serum PSA levels. In univariable analyses, positive MUC1 staining was significantly associated with a worse recurrence free survival (RFS (HR: 1.24, CI 1.03-1.49, P = 0.02, although not with disease specific survival (DSS, P>0.5. On multivariable analyses, the presence of positive surgical margins, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, as well as higher pre-operative PSA and increasing Gleason score were independently associated with RFS, while MUC1 expression was not. Positive MUC1 expression was not independently associated with disease specific survival (DSS, but was weakly associated with overall survival (OS.In our large, rigorously designed validation cohort, MUC1 protein expression was associated with adverse pathological features, although it was not an independent predictor of outcome after radical prostatectomy.

  15. What is the radiotherapy quality control program (PQRT) of the National Cancer Institute - Rio de Janeiro/Brazil?

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    Campos de Araujo, A.M.; Viegas, C.C.B.; Salomon de Souza, R. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer, Praca Cruz Vermelha No. 23, Centro 20230-130, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)]. e-mail: amcampos@inca.gov.br; tld@inca.gov.br; salomon@inca.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute (INCA) Quality Program in Radiotherapy (PQRT) started in 1999 as a 3 years pilot program with only 33 participant institutions. Due to its positive results, it has been integrated to the permanent INCA programs and its activities extended to all the radiotherapy services where patients from the National Health System (SUS) are treated. They are about 150 services (90% of all the available Brazilian radiotherapy services). The PQRT activities objective is to allow that radiotherapeutic treatments can be carried out just like planned, according to international quality and safety standards. The PQRT main activities are: on-site quality control audits, postal TLD audits in reference and non-reference conditions, training and development of research projects. The on-site quality control audits have already evaluated 75 teletherapy units (37 Co-60 and 38 linear accelerators), performing dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. The Postal TLD audits used, till 2002, for the 33 participants, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) system for reference conditions. Five audits have been performed with this simple system. Since 2003, the PQRT postal TLD audit program is using its own system, developed for reference and non-reference conditions. This new system has been already applied to 58 beams (18 Co-60 and 40 linacs). In total, in reference conditions, PQRT has performed 400 audits in reference conditions (190 Co-60 and 210 linacs). Eighteen courses attended to the participants, covering their main practical problems. In parallel, some research studies have been carried out.

  16. What is the radiotherapy quality control program (PQRT) of the National Cancer Institute - Rio de Janeiro/Brazil?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Araujo, A.M.; Viegas, C.C.B.; Salomon de Souza, R.

    2004-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (INCA) Quality Program in Radiotherapy (PQRT) started in 1999 as a 3 years pilot program with only 33 participant institutions. Due to its positive results, it has been integrated to the permanent INCA programs and its activities extended to all the radiotherapy services where patients from the National Health System (SUS) are treated. They are about 150 services (90% of all the available Brazilian radiotherapy services). The PQRT activities objective is to allow that radiotherapeutic treatments can be carried out just like planned, according to international quality and safety standards. The PQRT main activities are: on-site quality control audits, postal TLD audits in reference and non-reference conditions, training and development of research projects. The on-site quality control audits have already evaluated 75 teletherapy units (37 Co-60 and 38 linear accelerators), performing dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. The Postal TLD audits used, till 2002, for the 33 participants, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) system for reference conditions. Five audits have been performed with this simple system. Since 2003, the PQRT postal TLD audit program is using its own system, developed for reference and non-reference conditions. This new system has been already applied to 58 beams (18 Co-60 and 40 linacs). In total, in reference conditions, PQRT has performed 400 audits in reference conditions (190 Co-60 and 210 linacs). Eighteen courses attended to the participants, covering their main practical problems. In parallel, some research studies have been carried out

  17. Multi-institutional Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Planning Strategies and Planning Results for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Ho; Park, Suk Won; Oh, Do Hoon; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Jeung Kee; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Won; Suh, Hyun Sook; Lee, Rena; Bae, Hoonsik

    2009-01-01

    The intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategies for nasopharyngeal cancer among Korean radiation oncology facilities were investigated. Five institutions with IMRT planning capacity using the same planning system were invited to participate in this study. The institutions were requested to produce the best plan possible for 2 cases that would deliver 70 Gy to the planning target volume of gross tumor (PTV1), 59.4 Gy to the PTV2, and 51.5 Gy to the PTV3 in which elective irradiation was required. The advised fractionation number was 33. The planning parameters, resultant dose distributions, and biological indices were compared. We found 2-3-fold variations in the volume of treatment targets. Similar degree of variation was found in the delineation of normal tissue. The physician-related factors in IMRT planning had more influence on the plan quality. The inhomogeneity index of PTV dose ranged from 4 to 49% in Case 1, and from 5 to 46% in Case 2. Variation in tumor control probabilities for the primary lesion and involved LNs was less marked. Normal tissue complication probabilities for parotid glands and skin showed marked variation. Results from this study suggest that greater efforts in providing training and continuing education in terms of IMRT planning parameters usually set by physician are necessary for the successful implementation of IMRT. PMID:19399266

  18. How one institution overcame the challenges to start an MRI-based brachytherapy program for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Harkenrider

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Adaptive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based brachytherapy results in improved local control and decreased high-grade toxicities compared to historical controls. Incorporating MRI into the workflow of a department can be a major challenge when initiating an MRI-based brachytherapy program. This project aims to describe the goals, challenges, and solutions when initiating an MRI-based cervical cancer brachytherapy program at our institution. Material and methods : We describe the 6-month multi-disciplinary planning phase to initiate an MRI-based brachytherapy program. We describe the specific challenges that were encountered prior to treating our first patient. Results : We describe the solutions that were realized and executed to solve the challenges that we faced to establish our MRI-based brachytherapy program. We emphasize detailed coordination of care, planning, and communication to make the workflow feasible. We detail the imaging and radiation physics solutions to safely deliver MRI-based brachytherapy. The focus of these efforts is always on the delivery of optimal, state of the art patient care and treatment delivery within the context of our available institutional resources. Conclusions : Previous publications have supported a transition to MRI-based brachytherapy, and this can be safely and efficiently accomplished as described in this manuscript.

  19. Leiomyosarcoma of the head and neck: A 17-year single institution experience and review of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Alan D; Farquhar, Douglas R; Brody, Robert M; Parasher, Arjun K; Carey, Ryan M; Purkey, Michael T; Nagda, Danish A; Brooks, John S; Hartner, Lee P; Brant, Jason A; Newman, Jason G

    2018-04-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a rare neoplasm of the head and neck. The purpose of this study was to present our single-institution case series of head and neck leiomyosarcoma and a review of cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Patients with head and neck leiomyosarcoma at the University of Pennsylvania and in the NCDB were identified. Demographic characteristics, tumor factors, treatment paradigms, and outcomes were evaluated for prognostic significance. Nine patients with head and neck leiomyosarcoma from the institution were identified; a majority had high-grade disease and cutaneous leiomyosarcoma, with a 5-year survival rate of 50%. Two hundred fifty-nine patients with leiomyosarcoma were found in the NCDB; macroscopic positive margins and high-grade disease were associated with poor prognosis (P < .01), and positive surgical margins were related to adjuvant radiation (P < .001). Head and neck leiomyosarcoma presents at a high grade and is preferentially treated with surgery. Several demographic and tumor-specific factors are associated with outcomes and prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 86. National Cancer Institute. PDQ testicular cancer treatment. Updated February 17, 2016. www.cancer. ...

  1. Estimation of the excess lifetime cancer risk from radon exposure in some buildings of Kufa Technical Institute, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abid Abojassim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of international health organizations consider the exposure to residential radon as the second main cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. It was found that there is no database on radon concentrations for the Kufa Technical Institute buildings in the literature. This therefore triggers a special need for radon measurement in some Kufa Technical Institute buildings. This study aims to investigate the indoor radon levels inside the Kufa Technical Institute buildings for the first time using different radon measurement methods such as active (RAD-7 and passive (LR-115 Type II methods. Seventy eight of Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs LR-115 Type II were distributed at four buildings within the study area. The LR-115 Type II detectors were exposed in the study area for three months period. In parallel to the latter, seventy two active measurements were conducted using RAD-7 in the same buildings for correlation investigation purposes between the two kinds of measurements (i.e. passive and active.The results demonstrate that the radon concentrations were generally low, ranging from 38.4 to 77.2 Bq/m3, with a mean value of 50 Bq/m3. The mean of the equilibrium equivalent radon concentration and annual effective dose were assessed to be 19.9 Bq/m3 and 1.2 mS/y, respectively; the excess lifetime lung cancer risk was approximately 11.6 per million personal. A high correlation was found between the methods of measurements (i.e. LR-115 Type II and RAD-7, R2 = 0.99 which is significant at P < 0.001. The results of this work revealed that the Radon concentration was below the action level set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency of 148 Bq/m3. This therefore indicates that no radiological health hazard exists. However, the relatively high concentrations in some classrooms can be addressed by the natural ventilation or the classrooms being supplied with suction fans.

  2. Morbidity analysis in minimally invasive esophagectomy for oesophageal cancer versus conventional over the last 10 years, a single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misbah Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been an increasing inclination towards minimally invasive esophagectomies (MIEs at our institute recently for resectable oesophageal cancer. Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to report peri-operative and long-term procedure specific outcomes of the two groups and analyse their changing pattern at our institute. Methods: All adult patients with a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer managed at our institute from 2005 to 2015 were included in this retrospective study. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded through our hospital information system. The cohort of esophagectomies was allocated into two groups, conventional open esophagectomy (OE or total laparoscopic MIE; hybrid esophagectomies were taken as a separate group. The short-term outcome measures are an operative time in minutes, length of hospital and Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay in days, post-operative complications and 30 days in-hospital mortality. Complications are graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Long-term outcomes are long-term procedure related complications over a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Trends were analysed by visually inspecting the graphic plots for mean number of events in each group each year. Results: Our results showed no difference in mortality, length of hospital and ICU stays and incidence of major complications between three groups on uni- and multi-variate analysis (P > 0.05. The operative time was significantly longer in MIE group (odds ratio [OR]: 1.66, confidence interval [CI]: 2.4–11.5. The incidence of long-term complication was low for MIE (OR: 1.0, CI: 133–1.017. However, all post-operative surgical outcomes trended to improve in both groups over the course of this study and stayed better for MIE group except for the operative time. Conclusion: MIE has overall comparable surgical outcomes to its conventional counterpart. Furthermore, the peri-operative outcomes tend to

  3. Pazopanib in metastatic renal cancer: a “real-world” experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Chiara Cecere

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a real-world study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS and the overall survival (OS were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included Objective Response Rate (ORR, Disease Control Rate (DCR, and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.5 months. The median OS (mOS was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6-39.9 months; the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3% and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (3, gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR=0.05 [95% CI, 0.05-055], p=0.01; HR=0.10 [95% CI, 0.02-0.43], p=0.002 respectively. A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p= 0.2 and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites 6 (p= 0.08. Worst OS was observed in patients age >70 years old (HR=6.91 [95% CI, 1.49-31.91], p=0.01. The treatment was well tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR=0.22 [95% CI, 0.05-0.8], p=0.03 and thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR=0.12 [95% CI, 0.02-0.78], p=0.02. Our results are consistent with those reported in prospective phase III trials and the published retrospective

  4. Soviet books and publications on hydrology (continental) and hydrogeology: titles and some notes on obtaining Soviet monographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Frank T.

    1966-01-01

    A common method of publication for Soviet scientists, which partly supplants periodicals, is the publication of a collection of articles on a general area of research, frequently by members of a given institution. An extensive sampling of world geologic literature for 1961 (Hawkes, 1966) showed that 33 percent of Soviet titles appeared in periodicals whereas 55 percent of North American and 70 percent of Western European literature appeared in this form. The Soviet predilection for symposia and collections of papers makes searching for information on a given subject more difficult for Westerners because the monographs in question are often not included in exchange agreements (except informal personal ones) with Western libraries and institutions, because they may be primed in small editions, and because such publications frequently escape the notice of Western abstract journals. Unless one is fortunate enough to have many personal contacts in the Soviet Union, there seems to be little alternative to at least a rudimentary knowledge of Russian in order to stay abreast of work published as monographs and in collections.

  5. Efficacy of doxorubicin after progression on carboplatin and paclitaxel in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer: a retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Emeline; Paulino, Eduardo; Ingles Garces, Álvaro Henrique; Fontes Dias, Mariane S; Saramago, Marcos; de Moraes Lino da Silva, Flora; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; de Melo, Andréia Cristina

    2018-01-31

    The treatment of endometrial cancer (EC) is challenging. There is no standard of care for patients who progressed after carboplatin and paclitaxel (CT) and all available drugs show a small response and poor long-term survival in this scenario. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity profile of palliative doxorubicin after progression to CT therapy in advanced or recurrent EC. A retrospective review of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute database between 2009 and 2013 was performed, and all patients with recurrent and advanced EC treated with palliative doxorubicin after progression on CT were included. Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), objective response rates as well as toxicity were evaluated. A total of 33 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 65.7 years. Objective responses were documented in 12.1% (3.0% of complete responses and 9.1% of partial responses). The median PFS was 4.4 months, and the median OS was 8.1 months for patients exposed to doxorubicin. The most common adverse event was anemia observed in 60.6% of patients. This retrospective study suggests that doxorubicin has a modest activity in patients with advanced or recurrent EC after treatment with CT.

  6. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in small cell lung cancer: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, J; Kehoe, M; Sasiadek, W; Hacking, D; Calvert, P

    2014-03-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is used to prevent the development of brain metastases in small cell lung carcinoma. PCI confers an overall survival (OS) benefit in both limited and extensive stage disease. We analyze the incidence of symptomatic brain metastases, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS in a cohort of patients who received PCI, in a 5-year period. A retrospective review of all patients who had received PCI between 2006 and 2011 at the Whitfield Clinic was completed. Patient- and disease-related characteristics, the number of patients who developed brain metastases, PFS and OS data were collected. 24 patients were identified. 14 (58.3 %) patients were male, 10 (41.7 %) were female, with a mean age of 62.5 years (range 31-78). All patients were smokers. 12 (50 %) patients had limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), 12 (50 %) had extensive stage disease. 2 (8.2 %) patients developed brain metastases post PCI (p = 0.478.) The median PFS for limited stage SCLC was 13 months (range 3-20) and 10 months (range 5-18) for extensive stage SCLC. Median OS was 15 months (range 4-29) in limited stage SCLC, and 11 months (range 5-29) in extensive stage SCLC. Our study demonstrated a low incidence of symptomatic brain metastases and favourable median PFS and OS in the patients that received PCI, when compared to published phase III data.

  7. A Proposed Architecture for Implementing a Knowledge Management System in the Brazilian National Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Pereira Barbosa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Because their services are based decisively on the collection, analysis and exchange of clinical information or knowledge, within and across organizational boundaries, knowledge management has exceptional application and importance to health care organizations. This article proposes a conceptual framework for a knowledge management system, which is expected to support both hospitals and the oncology network in Brazil. Under this holistic single-case study, triangulation of multiple sources of data collection was used by means of archival records, documents and participant observation, as two of the authors were serving as INCA staff members, thus gaining access to the event and its documentation and being able to perceive reality from an insider point of view. The benefits derived from the present status of the ongoing implementation, so far, are: (i speediness of cancer diagnosis and enhanced quality of both diagnosis and data used in epidemiological studies; (ii reduction in treatment costs; (iii relief of INCA’S labor shortage; (iii improved management performance; (iv better use of installed capacity; (v easiness of massive (explicit knowledge transference among the members of the network; and (vi increase in organizational capacity of knowledge retention (institutionalization of procedures.

  8. Security and privacy requirements for a multi-institutional cancer research data grid: an interview-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, Frank J; Robbins, Robert J; Weems, William A; Crowley, Rebecca S

    2009-06-15

    Data protection is important for all information systems that deal with human-subjects data. Grid-based systems--such as the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG)--seek to develop new mechanisms to facilitate real-time federation of cancer-relevant data sources, including sources protected under a variety of regulatory laws, such as HIPAA and 21CFR11. These systems embody new models for data sharing, and hence pose new challenges to the regulatory community, and to those who would develop or adopt them. These challenges must be understood by both systems developers and system adopters. In this paper, we describe our work collecting policy statements, expectations, and requirements from regulatory decision makers at academic cancer centers in the United States. We use these statements to examine fundamental assumptions regarding data sharing using data federations and grid computing. An interview-based study of key stakeholders from a sample of US cancer centers. Interviews were structured, and used an instrument that was developed for the purpose of this study. The instrument included a set of problem scenarios--difficult policy situations that were derived during a full-day discussion of potentially problematic issues by a set of project participants with diverse expertise. Each problem scenario included a set of open-ended questions that were designed to elucidate stakeholder opinions and concerns. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. For quantitative analysis, data was aggregated at the individual or institutional unit of analysis, depending on the specific interview question. Thirty-one (31) individuals at six cancer centers were contacted to participate. Twenty-four out of thirty-one (24/31) individuals responded to our request- yielding a total response rate of 77%. Respondents included IRB directors and policy-makers, privacy and security officers, directors of offices of research, information

  9. Security and privacy requirements for a multi-institutional cancer research data grid: an interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weems William A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data protection is important for all information systems that deal with human-subjects data. Grid-based systems – such as the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG – seek to develop new mechanisms to facilitate real-time federation of cancer-relevant data sources, including sources protected under a variety of regulatory laws, such as HIPAA and 21CFR11. These systems embody new models for data sharing, and hence pose new challenges to the regulatory community, and to those who would develop or adopt them. These challenges must be understood by both systems developers and system adopters. In this paper, we describe our work collecting policy statements, expectations, and requirements from regulatory decision makers at academic cancer centers in the United States. We use these statements to examine fundamental assumptions regarding data sharing using data federations and grid computing. Methods An interview-based study of key stakeholders from a sample of US cancer centers. Interviews were structured, and used an instrument that was developed for the purpose of this study. The instrument included a set of problem scenarios – difficult policy situations that were derived during a full-day discussion of potentially problematic issues by a set of project participants with diverse expertise. Each problem scenario included a set of open-ended questions that were designed to elucidate stakeholder opinions and concerns. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. For quantitative analysis, data was aggregated at the individual or institutional unit of analysis, depending on the specific interview question. Results Thirty-one (31 individuals at six cancer centers were contacted to participate. Twenty-four out of thirty-one (24/31 individuals responded to our request- yielding a total response rate of 77%. Respondents included IRB directors and policy-makers, privacy and

  10. Security and privacy requirements for a multi-institutional cancer research data grid: an interview-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Data protection is important for all information systems that deal with human-subjects data. Grid-based systems – such as the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) – seek to develop new mechanisms to facilitate real-time federation of cancer-relevant data sources, including sources protected under a variety of regulatory laws, such as HIPAA and 21CFR11. These systems embody new models for data sharing, and hence pose new challenges to the regulatory community, and to those who would develop or adopt them. These challenges must be understood by both systems developers and system adopters. In this paper, we describe our work collecting policy statements, expectations, and requirements from regulatory decision makers at academic cancer centers in the United States. We use these statements to examine fundamental assumptions regarding data sharing using data federations and grid computing. Methods An interview-based study of key stakeholders from a sample of US cancer centers. Interviews were structured, and used an instrument that was developed for the purpose of this study. The instrument included a set of problem scenarios – difficult policy situations that were derived during a full-day discussion of potentially problematic issues by a set of project participants with diverse expertise. Each problem scenario included a set of open-ended questions that were designed to elucidate stakeholder opinions and concerns. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. For quantitative analysis, data was aggregated at the individual or institutional unit of analysis, depending on the specific interview question. Results Thirty-one (31) individuals at six cancer centers were contacted to participate. Twenty-four out of thirty-one (24/31) individuals responded to our request- yielding a total response rate of 77%. Respondents included IRB directors and policy-makers, privacy and security officers, directors of

  11. Temporal and Other Exposure Aspects of Residential Magnetic Fields Measurement in Relation to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in Children: The National Cancer Institute Children's Cancer Group Study (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baris, D.; Linet, M.; Auvinen, A.; Kaune, W.T.; Wacholder, S.; Kleinerman, R.; Hatch, E.; Robison, L.; Niwa, S.; Haines, C.; Tarone, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Case-control studies have used a variety of measurements to evaluate the relationship of children's exposure to magnetic fields (50 or 60 Hz) with childhood leukaemia and other childhood cancers. In the absence of knowledge about which exposure metrics may be biologically meaningful, studies during the past 10 years have often used time-weighted average (TWA) summaries of home measurements. Recently, other exposure metrics have been suggested, usually based on theoretical considerations or limited laboratory data. In this paper, the rationale and associated preliminary studies undertaken are described as well as feasibility and validity issues governing the choice of the primary magnetic field exposure assessment methods and summary metric used to estimate children's exposure in the National Cancer Institute/Children's Cancer Group (NCI/CCG) case-control study. Also provided are definitions and discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the various exposure metrics used in exploratory analyses of the NCI/CCG measurement data. Exposure metrics evaluated include measures of central tendency (mean, median, 30th to 70th percentiles), peak exposures (90th and higher percentiles, peak values of the 24 h measurements), and measurements of short-term temporal variability (rate of change). This report describes correlations of the various metrics with the time-weighted average for the 24 h period (TWA-24-h). Most of the metrics were found to be positively and highly correlated with TWA-24-h, but lower correlations of TWA-24-h with peak exposure and with rate of change were observed. To examine further the relation between TWA and alternative metrics, similar exploratory analysis should be considered for existing data sets and for forthcoming measurement investigations of residential magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia. (author)

  12. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  13. Capacity for Cancer Care Delivery Research in National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Community Practices: Availability of Radiology and Primary Care Research Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Ruth C; Sicks, JoRean D; Chang, George J; Lyss, Alan P; Stewart, Teresa L; Sung, Lillian; Weaver, Kathryn E

    2017-12-01

    Cancer care spans the spectrum from screening and diagnosis through therapy and into survivorship. Delivering appropriate care requires patient transitions across multiple specialties, such as primary care, radiology, and oncology. From the program's inception, the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites were tasked with conducting cancer care delivery research (CCDR) that evaluates structural, organizational, and social factors, including care transitions that determine patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the capacity of the NCORP to conduct multidisciplinary CCDR that includes radiology and primary care practices. The NCORP includes 34 community and 12 minority and underserved community sites. The Landscape Capacity Assessment was conducted in 2015 across these 46 sites, composed of the 401 components and subcomponents designated to conduct CCDR. Each respondent had the opportunity to designate an operational practice group, defined as a group of components and subcomponents with common care practices and resources. The primary outcomes were the proportion of adult oncology practice groups with affiliated radiology and primary care practices. The secondary outcomes were the proportion of those affiliated radiology and primary care groups that participate in research. Eighty-seven percent of components and subcomponents responded to at least some portion of the assessment, representing 230 practice groups. Analyzing the 201 adult oncology practice groups, 85% had affiliated radiologists, 69% of whom participate in research. Seventy-nine percent had affiliated primary care practitioners, 31% of whom participate in research. Institutional size, multidisciplinary group practice, and ownership by large regional or multistate health systems was associated with research participation by affiliated radiology and primary care groups. Research participation by these affiliated specialists was not significantly

  14. Radiation therapy outcomes in muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer: A single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwana, M S; Ni, L H; Saini, S; Verma, S K; Doddamani, D; Jain, N; Biswas, M; Gupta, Meenu; Gupta, Madhur; Saini, M; Chauhan, N

    2016-01-01

    To audit the survival outcomes and loco-regional control in muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT). From November 2008 through December 2011, 50 consecutively diagnosed muscle invasive urinary bladder carcinoma (T2-4a N0-2, M0) patients were included in this retrospective study. All these patients received external beam RT to a median dose of 60 Gy (range 30-66 Gy), and were not suitable for radical surgery due to patients' preference or medical comorbidities. A stepwise procedure using proportional hazard regression was used to identify prognostic factors with respect to survival. Completion trans-urethral resection of bladder tumor was done in 38 (76%) patients of the cohort and 47 (94%) had transitional cell carcinoma on histopathology. Clinical stage T2 was diagnosed in 40 (80%) patients. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 14 ± 8.9 months (range 1-36 months). In conclusion, 24 patients (48%) were free of disease, 5 patients (10%) had residual disease, and 13 patients (26%) had died of disease. Two-year and 3 year overall survival of intact bladder for the entire cohort was 58% and 43.6%, respectively. Cox regression modeling strongly suggested clinical stage (P = 0.01) and RT dose (P = 0.001) as being predictors for overall survival. RT shows reliable outcomes and excellent compliance in this advanced disease. Prescribing a higher RT dose could potentially correlate to better intact bladder control rates while maintaining good quality of life in selected patients.

  15. Expanding public-private collaborations to enhance cancer drug development: a report of the Institute of Medicine's workshop series, "Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Monica M; Canetta, Renzo; Nass, Sharyl J

    2014-11-01

    Since their inception in the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded cancer cooperative groups have been important contributors to cancer clinical and translational research. In 2010, a committee appointed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences completed a consensus review on the status of the U.S. publicly funded cancer clinical trials system. This report identified a need to reinvigorate the cooperative groups and provided recommendations for improving their effectiveness. Follow-up workshops to monitor progress were conducted by the IOM's National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2011 and 2013. One of the key recommendations of the IOM report was a call for greater collaboration among stakeholders in cancer research. In particular, more active engagement and better alignment of incentives among the cooperative groups, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the biopharmaceutical industry were identified as essential to achieving the promise of oncology drug development. This review, based on presentations and discussion during the IOM-ASCO workshops, outlines the progress and remaining challenges of these collaborations. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Expanding Public-Private Collaborations to Enhance Cancer Drug Development: A Report of the Institute of Medicine’s Workshop Series, “Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Renzo; Nass, Sharyl J.

    2014-01-01

    Since their inception in the 1950s, the National Cancer Institute-funded cancer cooperative groups have been important contributors to cancer clinical and translational research. In 2010, a committee appointed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences completed a consensus review on the status of the U.S. publicly funded cancer clinical trials system. This report identified a need to reinvigorate the cooperative groups and provided recommendations for improving their effectiveness. Follow-up workshops to monitor progress were conducted by the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2011 and 2013. One of the key recommendations of the IOM report was a call for greater collaboration among stakeholders in cancer research. In particular, more active engagement and better alignment of incentives among the cooperative groups, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the biopharmaceutical industry were identified as essential to achieving the promise of oncology drug development. This review, based on presentations and discussion during the IOM-ASCO workshops, outlines the progress and remaining challenges of these collaborations. PMID:25326161

  17. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph Evaluations (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 11...

  18. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers.

  19. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A.; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-01-01

    ExCEL in Social Work : Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program’s curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers - the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers. PMID:25146345

  20. Clinical results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I small-cell lung cancer. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Asai, Kaori; Terashima, Koutarou; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). From April 2003 to September 2009, a total of eight patients with Stage I SCLC were treated with SBRT in our institution. In all patients, the lung tumors were proven as SCLC pathologically. The patients' ages were 58-84 years (median: 74). The T-stage of the primary tumor was T1a in two, T1b in two and T2a in four patients. Six of the patients were inoperable because of poor cardiac and/or pulmonary function, and two patients refused surgery. SBRT was given using 7-8 non-coplanar beams with 48 Gy in four fractions. Six of the eight patients received 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) + etoposide (VP-16) or cisplatin (CDDP) + irinotecan (CPT-11). The follow-up period for all patients was 6-60 months (median: 32). Six patients were still alive without any recurrence. One patient died from this disease and one died from another disease. The overall and disease-specific survival rate at three years was 72% and 86%, respectively. There were no patients with local progression of the lesion targeted by SBRT. Only one patient had nodal recurrence in the mediastinum at 12 months after treatment. The progression-free survival rate was 71%. No Grade 2 or higher SBRT-related toxicities were observed. SBRT plus chemotherapy could be an alternative to surgery with chemotherapy for inoperable patients with Stage I small-cell lung cancer. However, further investigation is needed using a large series of patients. (author)

  1. Proton Beam Reirradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer: Multi-institutional Report on Feasibility and Early Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romesser, Paul B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); Cahlon, Oren [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Scher, Eli D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen B.; Sine, Kevin [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); DeSelm, Carl [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); Fox, Jana L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Bronx, New York (United States); Mah, Dennis [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Garg, Madhur K. [Montefiore Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Bronx, New York (United States); Han-Chih Chang, John [Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation therapy (re-RT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for patients with locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Given the significant morbidity with head and neck re-RT, interest in proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) has increased. We report the first multi-institutional clinical experience using curative-intent PBRT for re-RT in recurrent HNC. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of ongoing prospective data registries from 2 hybrid community practice and academic proton centers was conducted. Patients with recurrent HNC who underwent at least 1 prior course of definitive-intent external beam radiation therapy (RT) were included. Acute and late toxicities were assessed with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring system, respectively. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure was calculated with death as a competing risk. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Ninety-two consecutive patients were treated with curative-intent re-RT with PBRT between 2011 and 2014. Median follow-up among surviving patients was 13.3 months and among all patients was 10.4 months. The median time between last RT and PBRT was 34.4 months. There were 76 patients with 1 prior RT course and 16 with 2 or more courses. The median PBRT dose was 60.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, [RBE]). Eighty-five percent of patients underwent prior HNC RT for an oropharynx primary, and 39% underwent salvage surgery before re-RT. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure at 12 months, with death as a competing risk, was 25.1%. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were 84.0% and 65.2%, respectively. Acute toxicities of grade 3 or greater included mucositis (9

  2. Proton Beam Reirradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer: Multi-institutional Report on Feasibility and Early Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romesser, Paul B.; Cahlon, Oren; Scher, Eli D.; Hug, Eugen B.; Sine, Kevin; DeSelm, Carl; Fox, Jana L.; Mah, Dennis; Garg, Madhur K.; Han-Chih Chang, John; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation therapy (re-RT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for patients with locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Given the significant morbidity with head and neck re-RT, interest in proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) has increased. We report the first multi-institutional clinical experience using curative-intent PBRT for re-RT in recurrent HNC. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of ongoing prospective data registries from 2 hybrid community practice and academic proton centers was conducted. Patients with recurrent HNC who underwent at least 1 prior course of definitive-intent external beam radiation therapy (RT) were included. Acute and late toxicities were assessed with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring system, respectively. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure was calculated with death as a competing risk. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Ninety-two consecutive patients were treated with curative-intent re-RT with PBRT between 2011 and 2014. Median follow-up among surviving patients was 13.3 months and among all patients was 10.4 months. The median time between last RT and PBRT was 34.4 months. There were 76 patients with 1 prior RT course and 16 with 2 or more courses. The median PBRT dose was 60.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, [RBE]). Eighty-five percent of patients underwent prior HNC RT for an oropharynx primary, and 39% underwent salvage surgery before re-RT. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure at 12 months, with death as a competing risk, was 25.1%. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were 84.0% and 65.2%, respectively. Acute toxicities of grade 3 or greater included mucositis (9

  3. 78 FR 51733 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-Products of Its Synthesis; Availability of... the Draft Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By..., approximately 11:30 a.m. Document Availability: Draft monographs will be available by August 28, 2013, at http...

  4. 78 FR 67371 - Draft Report on Carcinogens Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol and By-products of Its Synthesis; Availability of... peer review the Draft Report on Carcinogens (RoC) Monographs for ortho-Toluidine and Pentachlorophenol... monographs are available at http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/38853 . Public Comments Submissions: Deadline is...

  5. High-dose therapy and autologous transplantation for lymphoma: the Peter MacCallum Cancer institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, A.J.; Prince, H.M.; Wolf, M.; Januszewicz, H.; Seymour, J.F.; Gates, P.; Wirth, A.; Juneja, S.; Smith, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    High-dose therapy (HDT) with autologous bone marrow or blood cell transplantation for the treatment of lymphoma commenced at Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute in 1986. To examine the patient characteristics and outcomes of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD) treated with HDT and autologous transplantation at our Institute in the first 10 years of the service (1986-95). A retrospective analysis was performed examining patient characteristics, prior chemotherapy regimens, pretransplant disease status, HDT regimen, source of stem cells, time for haematopoietic recovery, complications of transplantation, response rates, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Sixty-seven patients with NHL were treated with an estimated 5-year OS rate of 44% (95% confidence interval (CI) 32-56%) and PFS rate of 34% (95% CI 21-44%). Factors independently predictive of an unfavourable PFS on multivariate analyses were presence of constitutional symptoms at transplant (P < 0.002) and chemotherapy-resistant disease at transplant (P= 0.02). Twenty-three patients with HD were treated with a 5-year predicted OS rate of 74% (95% CI 56-92%) and PFS rate of 57% (95% CI 36-77%).There was no difference in PFS for HD patients who relapsed either within 12 months of completion of front-line therapy or after this time (P =0.5). The transplant-related mortality for the entire cohort was 17%, with a progressive decrease over time. HDT with autologous transplantation achieves durable PFS and OS in patients with lymphoma. Improved patient selection, therapy modifications according to prognostic factors and ongoing improvements in supportive care should improve outcomes further

  6. Biological risks of medical irradiations: Medical physics monograph 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton, G.D.; Kopp, D.T.; Waggener, R.G.; Webster, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    This book is the fifth in a series of monographs by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and is a compendium of papers presented at an AAPM regional symposium conducted in San Antonio in July 1980. The book is divided into three sections: (1) biological fundamentals of ionizing radiation, (2) risk evaluation and reduction in three principle radiologic subspecialties (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy), and (3) medical-legal implications. The first section includes a historical review of radiation biology, including a discussion of somatic and genetic effects and statistical approaches to risk estimates. The section on risk evaluation and reduction includes a good review of the units of exposure and activity including the international (SI) system employing the gray, becquerel, and seivert that respectively replace the rad, Curie, and rem. The unavoidable problem of legal responsibility and liability is the subject of the third, and last, section of the monograph. A chapter summarizing the legal history of medical irradiation also includes a glossary of pertinent legal terms. Recent court decisions that impact upon the clinical use of radiation are presented and discussed as well as proposed changes in federal guidelines that could have a large impact on the practice of medicine in general and radiology in particular

  7. [The HMPC monograph on Hypericum: Background, development, contents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Länger, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    The adoption of the EU community monograph on Hypericum constitutes a milestone in the process of harmonisation of herbal medicinal products within the European Community. The assessment of the published clinical data revealed that for two types of extracts the evidence of the efficacy in mild to moderate depressive episodes compared to placebo or standard medication was found to be acceptable. Additionally, a sufficient efficacy in relapse prophylaxis could be demonstrated for these two herbal preparations. For some other dry extracts, the efficacy in the short-term treatment of symptoms in mild depressive disorders was found to be substantiated. Short-term treatment with preparations containing low amounts of hyperforin did not increase cytochrome P450 enzyme activity. Therefore the oral administration of traditional herbal preparations is restricted to two weeks. In the case that an applicant demonstrates that the daily intake of hyperforin is below 1 mg the warnings on interactions may be omitted in traditional herbal medicinal products. Additionally the cutaneous administration of traditional liquid herbal preparations for the traditional use in symptomatic treatment of minor inflammations of the skin and as an aid in healing minor wounds was included in the monograph.

  8. One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification in Breast Cancer Sentinel Lymph Node: A Single Institutional Experience and a Short Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Tatiana; Fiamengo, Barbara; Tinterri, Corrado; Testori, Alberto; Grassi, Massimo Maria; Sciarra, Amedeo; Abbate, Tommaso; Gatzemeier, Wolfgang; Roncalli, Massimo; Di Tommaso, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) examination is a standard in breast cancer patients, with several methods employed along its 20 years history, the last one represented by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA). The latter is a intra-operative molecular assay searching for CK19 mRNA as a surrogate of metastatic cells. Our 3 years experience with OSNA (1122 patients) showed results overlapping those recorded in the same institution with a morphological evaluation (930 patients) of SLN. In detail, the data of OSNA were almost identical to those observed with standard post-operative procedure in terms of patients with positive SLN (30%) and micrometastatic/macrometastatic involvement of SLN (respectively, 38-45 and 62-55%). By contrast, when OSNA was compared to the standard intraoperatory procedure, it was superior in terms of accuracy, prompting the use of this molecular assay as a very valid, and reproducible for intra-operative evaluation of SLN. Further possibilities prompting the use of OSNA range from adhesion to quality control programs, saving of medical time, ability to predict, during surgery, additional nodal metastasis, and molecular bio-banking.

  9. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer who develop brain metastasis: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountzilas, Christos; Chang, Katherine; Hernandez, Brian; Michalek, Joel; Crownover, Richard; Floyd, John; Mahalingam, Devalingam

    2017-02-01

    The development of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is a rare and late event. We sought to investigate the clinical characteristics, disease course and safety using biologic agents in our patients with CRC who develop brain metastases. A retrospective review of patients with CRC with brain metastases treated at our institution from 01/2005-01/2015 was performed. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Forty patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 55.5 years, 67.5% were males, and 28% had a KRAS mutation. Twenty-four percent were treatment-naive at the time of BM diagnosis. Patients had a median of two brain lesions. Sixty-five percent of the patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 22.5% had both surgical resection and brain radiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.2 months after development of BM. Overall survival was longer in patients who received combined modality local therapy compared to patients treated with surgical resection or radiotherapy alone. Patients who received systemic treatment incorporating biologics following development of BM had a median overall survival of 18.6 months. Overall, the administration of biologic agents was safe and well tolerated. In summary, BM is an uncommon and late event in the natural history of metastatic CRC. The ability to deliver combined-modality local brain therapy as well as availability of more systemic therapy options appear to lead to improved outcomes.

  10. Monitoring of people and workers exposure to the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in an Italian national cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomba Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields (emf measurements carried out in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute (NCI. Several devices, used in diagnostics and in medical cures, can represent sources of emf for the workers and for the public subjected to the treatments. The aim is to evaluate their exposition, in order to assess the compliance with the law. Methods The investigations have been carried out in the departments of: intensive care, physiotherapy, MR presstherapy and in the surgical rooms. The measurements have been performed using broad band probes in the frequency ranges 5 Hz÷30 kHz and 100 kHz-3 GHz. Results The variability of the magnetic induction (B(μT levels is between 0,05 μT and 80 μT. The statistical distribution shows that most of the measurements are in the range 0,05 Conclusion The measurement of the emf levels in the NCI is recommended because of the presence of the oncological patients; their long stay near the equipments and their day-long exposure represent additional risk factors for which a prudent avoidance strategy have to de adopted.

  11. ONE STEP NUCLEIC ACID AMPLIFICATION IN BREAST CANCER SENTINEL LYMPH NODE.A SINGLE INSTITUTIONAL EXPERIENCE AND A SHORT REVIEW.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana eBrambilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sentinel lymph node (SLN examination is a standard in breast cancer patients, with several methods employed along its 20-years history, the last one represented by OSNA. The latter is a intra-operative molecular assay searching for CK19 mRNA as a surrogate of metastatic cells. Our 3-years experience with OSNA (1122 patients showed results overlapping those recorded in the same Institution with a morphological evaluation (930 patients of SLN. In detail the data of OSNA were almost identical to those observed with standard post-operative procedure in terms of patients with positive SLN (30% and micrometastatic/macrometastatic involvement of SLN (respectively 38-45% and 62-55%. By contrast when OSNA was compared to the standard intra-operatory procedure it was superior in terms of accuracy, prompting the use of this molecular assay as a very valid and reproducible for intra-operative evaluation of SLN.Further possibilities prompting the use of OSNA range from adhesion to quality control programs, saving of medical time, ability to predict, during surgery, additional nodal metatastis and molecular bio-banking.

  12. Increasing the output of pipelines in petroleum recovery. [Monograph in Russian]. Povyshenie proizvoditel'inosti truda v dobyche nefti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainetdinov, E A; Tishchenko, V E

    1976-01-01

    The monograph deals with one of the most important problems confronting economics and practical industrial construction in the petroleum industry. An analysis is made of problems in productivity with consideration given to the peculiarities of a sector where the nature of the manufacturing process, labor organization and production management, and the level and dynamics of productivity are basically determined by the natural geological conditions under which oil fields are developed. An examination is made of methods for the measurement and planning production, factors of labor productivity and their classification. A mathematical statistical analysis is made of the level and dynamics of labor productivity. Basic trends of labor productivity dynamics are established and methods for forecasting those dynamics are also established. The basic areas for improving productivity are indicated on the basis of perfecting labor organization and production management. The monograph is intended for workers at petroleum recovery enterprises, scientific-research organizations as well as for students at institutions of higher learning. 80 tables, 5 illustrations, 65 references.

  13. Uterine Cancer: Cancer of the Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe To receive Publications email updates Submit Uterine cancer Cancer of the uterus (uterine cancer) is cancer ... Institute . Expand all | Collapse all What is uterine cancer? Cancer is a disease in which certain body ...

  14. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts mastectomy, reconstructive and symmetry procedures were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. In 100 patients of the sample study cohort, 151 reconstructions were performed. Increasing age was associated with one or more comorbidities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, P = 0.005], whereas younger age was associated with metastatic disease (OR = 0.88, P = 0.006), chemotherapy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.01), and radiation (OR = 0.94, P = 0.006); split cohorts demonstrated similar trends (P Mastectomy and reconstructive characteristics associated with younger age included bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.004), tissue expander (versus autologous flap) (OR = 0.94, P = 0.009), extra high implant type (OR = 0.94, P = 0.049), whereas increasing use of autologous flaps and contralateral mastopexy symmetry procedures (OR = 1.09, P = 0.02) were associated with an aging cohort. Increasing age was not associated with an increasing likelihood of complications (P = 0.75). Age-related factors play a role in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. Younger women typically present with more aggressive features requiring oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation. Mastectomy and reconstructive choices also demonstrate age-dependent characteristics. Women in younger age groups are more

  15. Value of a gene signature assay in patients with early breast cancer and intermediate risk: a single institution retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneterre, Jacques; Prat, Aleix; Galván, Patricia; Morel, Pascale; Giard, Sylvia

    2016-05-01

    Purpose In daily clinical practice, the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) is relatively easy to make in patients with early hormone-receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer with either very poor or very good clinicopathological prognostic variables. However, this decision is much more difficult in patients with intermediate clinicopathological prognostic variables. Here, we evaluate the value of a gene-expression profile identified by the Prosigna gene signature assay in guiding treatment decision-making in patients with these intermediate features. Methods A consecutive cohort of 577 HR + breast cancer patients surgically treated in a single institution between January 2012 and December 2012 was evaluated. From this population, pre- and post-menopausal patients with intermediate prognosis clinicopathological variables were identified and indication of adjuvant CT in these patients was recorded. The gene signature assay was performed retrospectively in this intermediate risk group. Descriptive statistics are presented. Results Among 96 intermediate-risk patients, 64 postmenopausal patients underwent gene signature testing. Subtype distribution was as follows: Luminal A (N = 33; 51.6%), Luminal B (N = 31; 48.4%). Risk of recurrence (ROR) distribution was as follows: ROR-low (n = 16; 25%); ROR-intermediate (N = 26; 40.6%); and ROR-high (N = 22; 34.4%). CT was subsequently administered in 18.7%, 53.8% and 59.0% of the ROR-low, ROR-intermediate and ROR-high groups, respectively. With the use of the gene signature assay, 59.4% of the intermediate cases were re-classified to either ROR-low or ROR-high risk categories. In the ROR-intermediate group, 11/26 patients (42.3%) had Luminal A and 15/26 (57.7%) had Luminal B. Due to follow-up time constraints, no patient outcome results were evaluated. Conclusion The gene signature assay provides clinically useful information and improved treatment decision-making in patients with intermediate risk based on

  16. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  17. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about ovarian and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  18. Revisiting an open access monograph experiment: measuring citations and tweets 5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Ronald

    An experiment run in 2009 could not assess whether making monographs available in open access enhanced scholarly impact. This paper revisits the experiment, drawing on additional citation data and tweets. It attempts to answer the following research question: does open access have a positive influence on the number of citations and tweets a monograph receives, taking into account the influence of scholarly field and language? The correlation between monograph citations and tweets is also investigated. The number of citations and tweets measured in 2014 reveal a slight open access advantage, but the influence of language or subject should also be taken into account. However, Twitter usage and citation behaviour hardly overlap.

  19. The NASA Monographs on Shell Stability Design Recommendations: A Review and Suggested Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the existing NASA design criteria monographs for the design of buckling-resistant thin-shell structures is presented. Subsequent improvements in the analysis for nonlinear shell response are reviewed, and current issues in shell stability analysis are discussed. Examples of nonlinear shell responses that are not included in the existing shell design monographs are presented, and an approach for including reliability-based analysis procedures in the shell design process is discussed. Suggestions for conducting future shell experiments are presented, and proposed improvements to the NASA shell design criteria monographs are discussed.

  20. I. Sleep and development: introduction to the monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Sadeh, Avi

    2015-03-01

    Literature on sleep and child development is growing rapidly in exciting new directions across several disciplines and with this comes a need for guiding conceptual principles and methodological tools. In this introductory chapter, the importance of sleep for child development across multiple domains is highlighted. The aims of this monograph are presented and pertain to the need to consider and integrate theory and research across multiple disciplines and use state-of-the-art methodologies. A developmental ecological systems perspective adapted to sleep illustrates the multiple levels of influence and their importance in the study of child sleep and development. A focal aim is to provide examples of longitudinal studies linking sleep with child development, which are presented in seven chapters of this volume. © 2015 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  1. Relativistic many-body bound systems. Monograph report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danos, M.; Gillet, V.

    1975-04-01

    The principles and the mathematical details of a fully relativistic nuclear theory are given. Since the concept of nuclear forces is a strictly non-relativistic construct, it must be abandoned, and the forces must be replaced explicitly by their physical origin, i.e., by the interaction between nucleons and mesons. Thus, in this monograph the description of a nucleus has been formulated as a problem of relativistic quantum field theory which is solved by nuclear physics methods; to wit: the physics is described by specifying a Lagrangian which is a functional of the constituent fields (= of the parton fields); the solutions for the physical systems then are obtained in a time-independent treatment as expansions in the parton fields: both particles and nuclei are composite systems, made up of parton configurations, which define a representation of the Hamiltonian (associated with the specified Lagrangian)

  2. New Analytical Monographs on TCM Herbal Drugs for Quality Proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Melchart, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Regardless of specific national drug regulations there is an international consensus that all TCM drugs must meet stipulated high quality standards focusing on authentication, identification and chemical composition. In addition, safety of all TCM drugs prescribed by physicians has to be guaranteed. During the 25 years history of the TCM hospital Bad Kötzting, 171 TCM drugs underwent an analytical quality proof including thin layer as well as high pressure liquid chromatography. As from now mass spectroscopy will also be available as analytical tool. The findings are compiled and already published in three volumes of analytical monographs. One more volume will be published shortly, and a fifth volume is in preparation. The main issues of the analytical procedure in TCM drugs like authenticity, botanical nomenclature, variability of plant species and parts as well as processing are pointed out and possible ways to overcome them are sketched. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  3. Automatic identification and normalization of dosage forms in drug monographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Each day, millions of health consumers seek drug-related information on the Web. Despite some efforts in linking related resources, drug information is largely scattered in a wide variety of websites of different quality and credibility. Methods As a step toward providing users with integrated access to multiple trustworthy drug resources, we aim to develop a method capable of identifying drug's dosage form information in addition to drug name recognition. We developed rules and patterns for identifying dosage forms from different sections of full-text drug monographs, and subsequently normalized them to standardized RxNorm dosage forms. Results Our method represents a significant improvement compared with a baseline lookup approach, achieving overall macro-averaged Precision of 80%, Recall of 98%, and F-Measure of 85%. Conclusions We successfully developed an automatic approach for drug dosage form identification, which is critical for building links between different drug-related resources. PMID:22336431

  4. Brachytherapy for T1-T2 floor-of-the-mouth cancers: the Gustave-Roussy Institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsiglia, Hugo; Haie-Meder, Christine; Sasso, Giuseppe; Mamelle, Gerard; Gerbaulet, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the Gustave-Roussy Institute's experience of locoregional control, survival, and complications of low-dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the floor of the mouth. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 1985, 160 patients with previously untreated carcinoma of the floor of the mouth received interstitial brachytherapy as definitive treatment. Of the 160 patients, 79 (49%) had T1 and 81 (51%) had T2 lesions, and 127 (79%) had N0 and 33 (21%) had N1; 84% of tumors arose from the anterior floor of the mouth. Brachytherapy was performed with 192 Ir wires, according to the Paris system rules, followed by neck dissection (T2 or N1) or follow-up (T1N0). Results: With a follow-up period of 9-19 years, the observed survival rates were 89% at 2 years and 76% at 5 years, and the local control rates were 93% in T1 and 88% in T2 tumors. A low rate of distant metastases was noticed (5%); 31% of patients developed a second primary cancer. Severe mucosal necrosis was observed in <10% of patients. Any grade of bone necrosis was seen in 18% of cases (only 2.5% had G3 necrosis). This complication occurred more frequently in patients with poor dental status and in those treated without dental protection during implantation (p <0.001). Conclusion: Radical brachytherapy offers excellent local control (89%) and an acceptable rate of complications (<10% severe necrosis) that may be significantly decreased with dental care and the use of protective devices. The high incidence of second malignancies remains a major concern in these patients

  5. Using health care audit to improve quality of clinical records: the preliminary experience of an Italian Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, Chiara; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Cacciatore, Pasquale; Marchini, Raffaele; Ricciardi, Walter; Cavuto, Costanza

    2017-01-01

    Audit and feedback are recognized as part of a strategy for improving performance and supporting quality and safety in European health care systems. These considerations led the Clinical Management Staff of the "Regina Elena" Italian Cancer Institute to start a project of self-assessment of the quality of clinical records and organizational appropriateness through a retrospective review. The evaluation about appropriateness and congruity concerned both clinical records of 2013 and of 2015. At the end of the assessment of clinical records of each Care Unit, results were shared with medical staff in scheduled audit meetings. One hundred and thirteen clinical records (19%) did not meet congruity criteria, while 74 (12.6%) resulted as inappropriate. Considering the economic esteem calculated from the difference between Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) primarily identified as main diagnosis and main surgical intervention or procedure and those modified during the Local Health Unit (LHU) assessment, 2 surgical Care Units produced a high negative difference in terms of economic value with a consequent drop of hospital discharge form (named in Italian "scheda di dimissione ospedaliera", SDO) remuneration, 7 Care Units produced about the same medium difference with almost no change as SDO remuneration, and 2 Care Units had a positive difference with a profit in terms of SDO remuneration. Concerning the quality assessment of clinical records of 2015, the most critical areas were related to medical documents and hospital discharge form compilation. Our experience showed the effectiveness of clinical audit in assessing the quality of filling in medical records and the appropriateness of hospital admissions and the acceptability of this tool by clinicians.

  6. The current status of treatment for oropharyngeal cancer in Japan. A multi-institutional retrospective observation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Akihiro; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of the treatment for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) in Japan to assist the planning of clinical trials in the future. The data for 523 patients with previously untreated OPC were obtained from 12 institutions from April 2005 to N/larch 2007. Of the 523 patients, 471 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and with curative intent were included in an analysis of the treatment and its results. Of the 471 patients with OPC treated with curative intent, 186 patients (39.5%) were treated with surgery, 118 (25.1%) with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 167 (355%) with CRT. Surgery was indicated for 60.4% of the patients with stage I, 47.8% in stage II, 29.4% in stage III, and 36.44% in stage IV. CRT was indicated for 8.3% in stage II, but the percentage increased with higher stage. The percentage of RT was around 30% among stage I-III, but in stage IV, 21.3% of the patients were indicated for RT. The median follow-up period was 4 years and 5 months. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates for the 471 patients were 85% and 69.9%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients treated initially with surgery, RT and CRT were 73%, 69.1% and 65.6%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients with stage I, II, III, IVA, and IVB were 78.9%. 87.3%, 69.7%, 66.6%, and 47.7%, respectively. Although this study was retrospective, we could understand the tendency of treatment choice according to various factors and treatment results. The information will be useful for planning clinical trials in the future. (author)

  7. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of the breast: 23 years of experience at the Colombian national cancer institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Myriam; Grajales, Marco; Londono, Sonia; Ortiz, Natascha

    2004-01-01

    Primary non- Hodgkin's lymphomas of the breast (PNHLB) are an infrequent malignancy. In a review of the literature, in which six Latin American journals are included, approximately 450 cases have been reported during the past two decades. in this paper we present the experience of the national cancer institute of Colombia during the last 23 years. Objective: to carry out a retrospective analysis of the characteristics, natural history, prognostic factors, and outcome of patients with PNHLB at the NCI of Colombia. Methods: the medical histories of patients diagnosed with PNHLB between 1980 and 2003 were reviewed; likewise, the clinical characteristics, treatment protocols, and final outcomes were analyzed. Results: 25 patients were identified as PNHLB. The average follow-up was 57 months. The medium age was 58, ranging from 26 to 83. 84% had diffused large cell lymphoma. The Karnofsky index was over 80 in 92% of the patients. 72% received chop chemotherapy. Two patients received a combination without doxorubicin. 68% received combined chemo- and radiation therapy. Two patients refused therapy. Two patients died before receiving any type of treatment. CNS compromise was observed in 20% of patients during the evolution of their disease. The youngest patient, whose case deserves special comment, obtained a second complete remission with simple mastectomy, after having relapsed after conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and autologous bone marrow transplant. No significant prognostic variables were found using the univariate analysis. Conclusions: a high rate of complete remission can be achieved by using combined treatment in patients with PNHLB. The medium overall survival was not reached after 71 months of follow-up. The most frequent relapse site was the CNS

  8. Management Head and Neck Ewing's Sarcoma Family of tumors: Experience of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.; El-Baradie, T.; Bahaa, Sh.; Shalan, M.; El-Baradie, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma accounts for 4-6% of primary malignant bone tumors and it affects the head and neck in only 1-4% of cases. The purpose of this study was to review the NCI experience with Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck in children. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of patient files with head and neck Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt, during the period from 1997 to 2008 was done. Files were reviewed and data for patients, tumor and treatment profile were extracted. Results: Twenty patients out of 280 with Ewing's sarcoma were identified during an 11 -year period. Patients had a median age of 11.5 years (range 5 months - 22 years) with a male to female ratio of 1:1. The most common tumor site was in the mandible (9/20, 45%) followed by a neck mass (4/20, 20%) and a clavicular mass (3/20, 15%). Six patients (30%) were metastatic at presentation. Most of the patients (19/20, 95%) received chemotherapy. Local therapy was in the form of radical radiotherapy for 8 patients (40%), 2 patients (10%) had surgery alone, while five patients (25%) had surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival ranged from 1 to 128 months, with a median of 36 months. At the end of the study, 9 patients (45%) were alive in CR, 6 (30%) were lost to FU in disease progression, while 5 patients died from disease progression. Conclusion: Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck is a disease of a rare incidence with debate about the optimum local therapy. Small non-metastatic tumors with good response to chemotherapy have abetter outcome.

  9. Cost and Outcome of Treatment of Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the National Cancer Institute-Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, H.M.; Zeeneldin, A.A.; Samra, M.A.; El-Gammal, M.M.; Mattar, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite important advances in the therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients die of their disease, unless bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is done. Infection and hemorrhage are still the major causes of mortality in AML patients. Progress in therapy and supportive care has led to gradual improvement in the overall results, but further improvements are still needed. Patients and Methods: The aim of this study is to identify the outcome and costs of adult AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy (CCT) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University during the time period from April 1999 to January 2002. Clinical, laboratory characteristics were all recorded. Data regarding different types of therapies given for these patients including response, outcome and costs were also collected. Results: The median age of 82 identified AML patients was 34 years. The complete remission (CR) rate after induction with CCT was 52% (42/82 patients) with a median CR duration of 9 months. Twenty-eight percent of patients who achieved CR subsequently relapsed. By January 2003, fifty-eight patients were dead (70.7%). Infections were the major mortality cause, followed by disease progression then bleeding (65%, 28% and 7% respectively). The median treatment cost per patient was 33158 Egyptian Pounds (LE). It was higher for patients who achieved CR compared to those who relapsed and/or died. Drugs contributed by 78 % to the total treatment cost, while hospitalization, investigations and blood-component therapy contributed by 6%, 7% and 8% respectively. Conclusions: Outcome of patients with AML treated at NCI- Cairo University can be enhanced by improvement of supportive therapy; mainly infection control and expanding BMT programs to accommodate all eligible patients

  10. Prostate cancer (PCa) risk variants and risk of fatal PCa in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Irene M; Lindström, Sara; Kibel, Adam S; Berndt, Sonja I; Campa, Daniele; Gerke, Travis; Penney, Kathryn L; Albanes, Demetrius; Berg, Christine; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Chanock, Stephen; Crawford, E David; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert; Johansson, Mattias; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Severi, Gianluca; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vineis, Paolo; Mucci, Lorelei A; Yeager, Meredith; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Screening and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) is hampered by an inability to predict who has the potential to develop fatal disease and who has indolent cancer. Studies have identified multiple genetic risk loci for PCa incidence, but it is unknown whether they could be used as biomarkers for PCa-specific mortality (PCSM). To examine the association of 47 established PCa risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with PCSM. We included 10 487 men who had PCa and 11 024 controls, with a median follow-up of 8.3 yr, during which 1053 PCa deaths occurred. The main outcome was PCSM. The risk allele was defined as the allele associated with an increased risk for PCa in the literature. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios of each SNP with time to progression to PCSM after diagnosis. We also used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios for each risk SNP, comparing fatal PCa cases to controls. Among the cases, we found that 8 of the 47 SNPs were significantly associated (pPCa, but most did not differentiate between fatal and nonfatal PCa. Rs11672691 and rs10993994 were associated with both fatal and nonfatal PCa, while rs6465657, rs7127900, rs2735839, and rs13385191 were associated with nonfatal PCa only. Eight established risk loci were associated with progression to PCSM after diagnosis. Twenty-two SNPs were associated with fatal PCa incidence, but most did not differentiate between fatal and nonfatal PCa. The relatively small magnitudes of the associations do not translate well into risk prediction, but these findings merit further follow-up, because they may yield important clues about the complex biology of fatal PCa. In this report, we assessed whether established PCa risk variants could predict PCSM. We found eight risk variants associated with PCSM: One predicted an increased risk of PCSM, while seven were associated with decreased risk. Larger studies that focus on fatal PCa are needed to identify more markers that

  11. Radiomic features for prostate cancer detection on MRI differ between the transition and peripheral zones: Preliminary findings from a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Shoshana B; Algohary, Ahmad; Pahwa, Shivani; Gulani, Vikas; Ponsky, Lee; Aronen, Hannu J; Boström, Peter J; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Brenner, Phillip; Delprado, Warick; Thompson, James; Pulbrock, Marley; Taimen, Pekka; Villani, Robert; Stricker, Phillip; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Jambor, Ivan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate in a multi-institutional study whether radiomic features useful for prostate cancer (PCa) detection from 3 Tesla (T) multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) in the transition zone (TZ) differ from those in the peripheral zone (PZ). 3T mpMRI, including T2-weighted (T2w), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), were retrospectively obtained from 80 patients at three institutions. This study was approved by the institutional review board of each participating institution. First-order statistical, co-occurrence, and wavelet features were extracted from T2w MRI and ADC maps, and contrast kinetic features were extracted from DCE-MRI. Feature selection was performed to identify 10 features for PCa detection in the TZ and PZ, respectively. Two logistic regression classifiers used these features to detect PCa and were evaluated by area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Classifier performance was compared with a zone-ignorant classifier. Radiomic features that were identified as useful for PCa detection differed between TZ and PZ. When classification was performed on a per-voxel basis, a PZ-specific classifier detected PZ tumors on an independent test set with significantly higher accuracy (AUC = 0.61-0.71) than a zone-ignorant classifier trained to detect cancer throughout the entire prostate (P  0.14) were obtained for all institutions. A zone-aware classifier significantly improves the accuracy of cancer detection in the PZ. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:184-193. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. DEVELOPING FINAL COURSE MONOGRAPHS USING A TEAM-BASED LEARNING METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Mari Hartz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an experience with the Team-Based Learning (TBL methodology in courses designed to support the planning and execution of final course monographs. It contains both professors’ and students’ perceptions, through observation and assessment. A qualitative approach using observation techniques and desk research was used in conjunction with a quantitative approach based on a questionnaire. The sample consisted of 49 students from a higher education institution, 27 of them in a Communication Course and the remaining 22 in a Business Administration course. Qualitative data analysis was performed through simple categorization with back-defined categories, while the quantitative data analysis employed descriptive statistics and cluster analysis using Minitab 17.1 software. The main findings include the identification of: three student profiles (designated as traditional, collaborative and practical; a preference for guidance and feedback from the professor rather than other students; and a need for a professor-led closing discussion when applying the TBL method. As regards the main benefits to students, they recognized that discussion in groups allowed them to realize how much they really know about the subject studied. Finally, most students seemed to like the TBL approach.

  13. Outcome of Breast Cancer in Moroccan Young Women Correlated to Clinic-Pathological Features, Risk Factors and Treatment: A Comparative Study of 716 Cases in a Single Institution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Slaoui

    Full Text Available Breast cancer in young women is quite uncommon and shows more aggressive characteristics with major disparities between worldwide populations. Prognosis and outcome of breast cancer in young patients are widely studied, but still no consensus is available.We retrospectively included 716 cases of breast cancer women diagnosed in 2009 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. Patients were divided into two groups according to their age: women aged ≤40 years (Group 1 and women aged >40 years (Group 2. Data were recorded from patients' medical files and analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software (IBM.Young patients represent 24.9% of all patients with breast cancer. The comparison between the two groups displayed significant differences regarding nulliparity (p = 0.001 and progesterone receptor negativity (p = 0.01. Moreover, more progression (Metastases/Relapse was registered in young women as compared to older women with breast cancer (p = 0.03. The estimated median follow-up period was 31 months. The 5-years Event-Free Survival (EFS of patients with local disease was 64.6% in young women and 71.5% in older women with breast cancer (p = 0.04. Multivariate analysis in young women showed that nulliparity (HR: 7.2; 95%CI: 1.16-44.54; p = 0.03, T3 tumors (HR: 17.39; 95%CI: 1.74-173.34; p = 0.01 and negative PgR status (HR: 19.85; 95%CI: 1.07-366.54; p = 0.04 can be considered as risk factors for poorer event free survival while hormone therapy was associated with better EFS (HR: 0.11; 95%CI: 0.00-0.75; p = 0.03. In Group 2, multivariate analysis showed that patients with inflammatory breast cancer, N+ status, absence of radiotherapy, absence of chemotherapy, and absence of hormone therapy are at increased risk of recurrence.In Morocco, breast cancer is more frequent in young women as compared to western countries. Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive and is diagnosed late, leading to an intensive treatment. Moreover, the main factors

  14. Danish Translation and Linguistic Validation of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæksted, Christina; Nissen, Aase; Pappot, Helle

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the basis for standardized clinician-based grading and reporting of adverse events in cancer clinical trials. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has developed the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE) to i......CONTEXT: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the basis for standardized clinician-based grading and reporting of adverse events in cancer clinical trials. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has developed the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO...

  15. HCV-related liver cancer in people with haemophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.; Haagsma, E. B.

    . The topic of this monograph is liver cancer associated with chronic HCV infection. We start with some background information on chronic HCV infection and its long-term sequelae, one of which is liver cancer. The rest of the article is concerned with liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  16. Conditions for monograph projectsʼ by preservice teachers: lessons from the long and winding route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melba Libia Cárdenas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the analysis of the nature of monograph projects undertaken by pre-service teachers at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. It will examine the main factors that, according to the participants of a case-study, favour or limit the development of those projects. On the basis of our findings, we highlight the conditions associated with the successful fulfilment of what students are required to do in monograph projects.

  17. Knowledge, attitude and practice of screening for cervical cancer among female students of a tertiary institution in South Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akujobi, C N; Ikechebelu, J I; Onunkwo, I; Onyiaorah, I V

    2008-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the second commonest cancer of females worldwide and the commonest cancer of the female genital tract in our environment. It can be prevented through early detection by cervical screening (Pap smear). The objective of this study is to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of cervical cancer screening among female undergraduates. A pre tested questionnaire was administered to third and fourth year female students of the Faculty of Natural Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria. Out of the 220 students involved in the study, 134 (60.9) had knowledge of cervical cancer and 118 (53.6%) were sexually active with the average age at sexual debut being 21.2 years. The mean age of the students was 23.8 years and the age range was 17 to 39 years with 175 (80%) in the age range of 20-29 years. About 2/3 of the students did not know about Pap smear and worse still, none of them had undergone a Pap screening test before. This low participation in screening for cervical cancer was attributed to several reasons including ignorance of the existence of such a test, lack of awareness of centers where such services are obtainable, ignorance of the importance of screening and the risk factors to the development of cervical cancer. There is good level of awareness of cervical cancer among the female undergraduates but poor knowledge and participation in cervical cancer screening. The development of a comprehensive cervical cancer screening strategy is being recommended to improve participation with a view to prevent cervical cancer by early detection and treatment of the pre-malignant stages.

  18. The Pharmacokinetics of Second-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics: Limitations of Monograph Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lik Hang N; Choi, Charles; Collier, Abby C; Barr, Alasdair M; Honer, William G; Procyshyn, Ric M

    2015-12-01

    Product monographs (also known by terms such as Summary of Product Characteristics and Highlights of Prescribing Information, depending on the jurisdiction) provide essential information to ensure the safe and effective use of a drug. Medical practitioners often rely on these monographs for guidance on matters related to pharmacokinetics as well as indications, contraindications, clinical pharmacology, and adverse reactions. The clinical and scientific information found within these documents, forming the basis for decision making, are presumed to be derived from well-designed studies. The objective of this review is to examine the source and validity of the pharmacokinetic data used in establishing the half-lives and times to steady-state reported in the product monographs of second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotics. Thus, we have critically evaluated the clinical trials from which the pharmacokinetic parameters listed in the product monographs were determined. In many cases, the pharmacokinetic information presented in product monographs is of limited use to clinicians wishing to optimize the effectiveness and tolerability of second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotics. Under such circumstances, off-label prescribing practices may actually produce better clinical outcomes than if decisions were made based on the product monographs alone.

  19. A Comprehensive List of Items to be Included on a Pediatric Drug Monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lauren E; Ito, Shinya; Woods, David; Nunn, Anthony J; Taketomo, Carol; de Hoog, Matthijs; Offringa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Children require special considerations for drug prescribing. Drug information summarized in a formulary containing drug monographs is essential for safe and effective prescribing. Currently, little is known about the information needs of those who prescribe and administer medicines to children. Our primary objective was to identify a list of important and relevant items to be included in a pediatric drug monograph. Following the establishment of an expert steering committee and an environmental scan of adult and pediatric formulary monograph items, 46 participants from 25 countries were invited to complete a 2-round Delphi survey. Questions regarding source of prescribing information and importance of items were recorded. An international consensus meeting to vote on and finalize the items list with the steering committee followed. Pediatric formularies are most commonly the first resource consulted for information on medication used in children by 31 Delphi participants. After the Delphi rounds, 116 items were identified to be included in a comprehensive pediatric drug monograph, including general information, adverse drug reactions, dosages, precautions, drug-drug interactions, formulation, and drug properties. Health care providers identified 116 monograph items as important for prescribing medicines for children by an international consensus-based process. This information will assist in setting standards for the creation of new pediatric drug monographs for international application and for those involved in pediatric formulary development.

  20. Elaborating European Pharmacopoeia monographs for biotherapeutic proteins using substances from a single source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, M; Wicks, S; Charton, E

    2016-01-01

    For more than twenty years, the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) monographs for biotherapeutic proteins have been elaborated using the multisource approach (Procedure 1), which has led to robust quality standards for many of the first-generation biotherapeutics. In 2008, the Ph. Eur. opened up the way towards an alternative mechanism for the elaboration of monographs (Procedure 4-BIO pilot phase), which is applied to substances still under patent protection, based on a close collaboration with the Innovator company, to ensure a harmonised global standard and strengthen the quality of the upcoming products. This article describes the lessons learned during the P4-BIO pilot phase and addresses the current thinking on monograph elaboration in the field of biotherapeutics. Case studies are described to illustrate the standardisation challenges associated with the complexity of biotherapeutics and of analytical procedures, as well as the approaches that help ensure expectations are met when setting monograph specifications and allow for compatibility with the development of biosimilars. Emphasis is put on monograph flexibility, notably by including tests that measure process-dependent microheterogeneity (e.g. glycosylation) in the Production section of the monograph. The European Pharmacopoeia successfully concluded the pilot phase of the P4-BIO during its 156 th session on 22-23 November 2016.

  1. NTP-CERHR monograph on Soy Infant Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Soy infant formula contains soy protein isolates and is fed to infants as a supplement to or replacement for human milk or cow milk. Soy protein isolates contains estrogenic isoflavones ("phytoestrogens") that occur naturally in some legumes, especially soybeans. Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal, estrogenic compounds. In plants, nearly all phytoestrogens are bound to sugar molecules and these phytoestrogen-sugar complexes are not generally considered hormonally active. Phytoestrogens are found in many food products in addition to soy infant formula, especially soy-based foods such as tofu, soy milk, and in some over-the-counter dietary supplements. Soy infant formula was selected for evaluation by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) because of the: (1)availability of large number of developmental toxicity studies in laboratory animals exposed to the isoflavones found in soy infant formula (namely, genistein) or other soy products, as well as a number of studies on human infants fed soy infant formula, (2)the availability of information on exposures in infants fed soy infant formula, and (3)public concern for effects on infant or child development. The NTP evaluation was conducted through its Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) and completed in September 2010. The results of this soy infant formula evaluation are published in an NTP Monograph. This document contains the NTP Brief on Soy Infant Formula, which presents NTP's opinion on the potential for exposure to soy infant formula to cause adverse developmental effects in humans. The NTP Monograph also contains an expert panel report prepared to assist the NTP in reaching conclusions on soy infant formula. The NTP concluded there is minimal concern for adverse effects on development in infants who consume soy infant formula. This level of concern represents a "2" on the five-level scale of concern used by the NTP that ranges from negligible concern ("1") to serious concern ("5"). This

  2. Analysis of Streptococcus bovis infections at a monographic oncological centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano TG

    2014-02-01

    interpretation of the results by the standards of the CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, M100- S18. The results were: 14 strains (100% were sensitive to ampicillin (≤0.25 mcg / mL, amoxicillin-clavulanate (≤4/2 mg / mL, penicillin G (≤0.12 mcg / mL, cefotaxime (≤1 µg / mL, teicoplanin (≤8 mcg / mL, vancomycin (≤1 µg / mL and nitrofurantoin (≤32 mg / mL, 5 strains (35.71% were resistant to clindamycin (≥1 µg / mL, 6 (42.85% erythromycin (≥8 g / mL, 4 (28.57%, gentamicin (≥16 mg / mL, 3 (21.42%, tobramycin (≥16 mg / mL , 6 (42.85% to levofloxacin (≥8 mcg / mL, 8 (57.14% to ciprofloxacin (≥4 mg / mL, 9 (64.28% to tetracycline (≥8 mcg / mL and 6 (42.58% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (≥8/152 ug / mL.Regarding to the pathogenicity, there are reports on the degree of colonization of S. bovis (S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus and colon cancer [1] ref code. It postulates several mechanisms involved in its pathogeny [2] ref code and it known the adhesion potential and invasion of endothelial cells or the ability to form biofilms [3] ref code, but if it is true, the relationship between colonization and oncogenesis is not entirely well defined.After analysing the isolated tumour epidemiology of our findings, no one of them was obtained from faecal samples or has been part of some study or active search for this microorganism.

  3. Breast cancer screening in an era of personalized regimens: a conceptual model and National Cancer Institute initiative for risk-based and preference-based approaches at a population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Sprague, Brian L; Barlow, William E; Haas, Jennifer S; Tosteson, Anna N A; D Schnall, Mitchell; Armstrong, Katrina; Schapira, Marilyn M; Geller, Berta; Weaver, Donald L; Conant, Emily F

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer screening holds a prominent place in public health, health care delivery, policy, and women's health care decisions. Several factors are driving shifts in how population-based breast cancer screening is approached, including advanced imaging technologies, health system performance measures, health care reform, concern for "overdiagnosis," and improved understanding of risk. Maximizing benefits while minimizing the harms of screening requires moving from a "1-size-fits-all" guideline paradigm to more personalized strategies. A refined conceptual model for breast cancer screening is needed to align women's risks and preferences with screening regimens. A conceptual model of personalized breast cancer screening is presented herein that emphasizes key domains and transitions throughout the screening process, as well as multilevel perspectives. The key domains of screening awareness, detection, diagnosis, and treatment and survivorship are conceptualized to function at the level of the patient, provider, facility, health care system, and population/policy arena. Personalized breast cancer screening can be assessed across these domains with both process and outcome measures. Identifying, evaluating, and monitoring process measures in screening is a focus of a National Cancer Institute initiative entitled PROSPR (Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens), which will provide generalizable evidence for a risk-based model of breast cancer screening, The model presented builds on prior breast cancer screening models and may serve to identify new measures to optimize benefits-to-harms tradeoffs in population-based screening, which is a timely goal in the era of health care reform. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Large institutional variations in use of androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiotherapy in a population-based cohort of men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Foroudi, Farshad; Evans, Sue; Millar, Jeremy

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the pattern of use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with definitive radiotherapy (RT) in men with prostate cancer (PCa) in a population-based study in Australia. This is a prospective cohort of men with intermediate- and high-risk PCa, captured in the population-based Prostate Cancer Outcome Registry Victoria, who were treated with definitive prostate RT between January 2010 and December 2015. The primary outcome of interest was ADT utilization. Chi-squared test for trend was used to evaluate the temporal trend in the use of ADT over the study period. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to evaluate the effects of patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors, and treatment institutions (public/ private and metropolitan/ regional) on the likelihood of ADT utilization. A total of 1806 men were included in the study, 199 of whom (11%) had favourable National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) intermediate-risk disease (i.e. only one intermediate-risk feature, primary Gleason grade 3, and variation in the use of ADT between public vs private and metropolitan vs regional institutions. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Peer Mentoring at the Uganda Cancer Institute: A Novel Model for Career Development of Clinician-Scientists in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Phipps

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer centers are beginning to emerge in low- and middle-income countries despite having relatively few oncologists and specialists in related fields. Uganda, like many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, has a cadre of highly motivated clinician-scientists-in-training who are committed to developing the capacity for cancer care and research. However, potential local mentors for these trainees are burdened with uniquely high demands on their time for clinical care, teaching, institutional development, advocacy, and research. Facilitated peer mentoring helps to fill skills and confidence gaps and teaches mentoring skills so that trainees can learn to support one another and regularly access a more senior facilitator/role model. With an added consultant component, programs can engage limited senior faculty time to address specific training needs and to introduce junior investigators to advisors and even potential dyadic mentors. Two years after its inception, our facilitated peer mentoring career development program at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala is successfully developing a new generation of researchers who, in turn, are now providing role models and mentors from within their group. This program provides a practical model for building the next generation of clinical scientists in developing countries.

  6. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  7. Impact of tertiary Gleason pattern 5 on prostate cancer aggressiveness: Lessons from a contemporary single institution radical prostatectomy series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Koloff

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results emphasize the importance of TP5 and suggest that criteria for tertiary pattern reporting in prostate cancer should be standardized. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of tertiary patterns in prognostic models.

  8. Concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) guidelines for cancer prevention and obesity-related cancer risk in the Framingham Offspring cohort (1991-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Nour; Lin, Yong; Bandera, Elisa V; Jacques, Paul F; Parekh, Niyati

    2015-02-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates associations between healthful behaviors consistent with WCRF/AICR cancer prevention guidelines and obesity-related cancer risk, as a third of cancers are estimated to be preventable. The study sample consisted of adults from the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 2,983). From 1991 to 2008, 480 incident doctor-diagnosed obesity-related cancers were identified. Data on diet, measured by a food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity, collected in 1991 was used to construct a 7-component score based on recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, foods that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcohol, and food preservation, processing, and preparation. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate associations between the computed score, its components, and subcomponents in relation to obesity-related cancer risk. The overall score was not associated with obesity-related cancer risk after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, energy, and preexisting conditions (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.86-1.02). When score components were evaluated separately, for every unit increment in the alcohol score, there was 29 % lower risk of obesity-related cancers (HR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.51-0.99) and 49-71 % reduced risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Every unit increment in the subcomponent score for non-starchy plant foods (fruits, vegetables, and legumes) among participants who consume starchy vegetables was associated with 66 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR 0.44, 95 % CI 0.22-0.88). Lower alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet consistent with the cancer prevention guidelines were associated with reduced risk of obesity-related cancers in this population.

  9. Higher complication risk of totally implantable venous access port systems in patients with advanced cancer - a single institution retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Fang; Lo, An-Chi; Tsai, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Pei-Yi; Sun, Shen; Chang, Te-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Yuan-Shin; Chen, Jen-Ruei

    2013-02-01

    Totally implantable port systems are generally recommended for prolonged central venous access in diverse settings, but their risk of complications remains unclear for patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of port system failure in patients with advanced cancer. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a comprehensive cancer centre. A detailed chart review was conducted among 566 patients with 573 ports inserted during January-June, 2009 (average 345.3 catheter-days). Cox regression analysis was applied to evaluate factors during insertion and early maintenance that could lead to premature removal of the port systems due to infection or occlusion. Port system-related infection was significantly associated with receiving palliative care immediately after implantation (hazard ratio, HR = 7.3, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 1.2-46.0), after adjusting for probable confounders. Primary cancer site also impacted the occurrence of device-related infection. Receiving oncologic/palliative care (HR = 3.0, P = 0.064), advanced cancer stage (HR = 6.5, P = 0.077) and body surface area above 1.71 m(2) (HR = 3.4, P = 0.029) increased the risk of port system occlusion. Our study indicates that totally implantable port systems yield a higher risk of complications in terminally ill patients. Further investigation should be carefully conducted to compare outcomes of various central venous access devices in patients with advanced cancer and to develop preventive strategies against catheter failure.

  10. [The survival prediction model of advanced gallbladder cancer based on Bayesian network: a multi-institutional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z H; Geng, Z M; Chen, C; Si, S B; Cai, Z Q; Song, T Q; Gong, P; Jiang, L; Qiu, Y H; He, Y; Zhai, W L; Li, S P; Zhang, Y C; Yang, Y

    2018-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of Bayesian network in predicting survival of patients with advanced gallbladder cancer(GBC)who underwent curative intent surgery. Methods: The clinical data of patients with advanced GBC who underwent curative intent surgery in 9 institutions from January 2010 to December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively.A median survival time model based on a tree augmented naïve Bayes algorithm was established by Bayesia Lab software.The survival time, number of metastatic lymph nodes(NMLN), T stage, pathological grade, margin, jaundice, liver invasion, age, sex and tumor morphology were included in this model.Confusion matrix, the receiver operating characteristic curve and area under the curve were used to evaluate the accuracy of the model.A priori statistical analysis of these 10 variables and a posterior analysis(survival time as the target variable, the remaining factors as the attribute variables)was performed.The importance rankings of each variable was calculated with the polymorphic Birnbaum importance calculation based on the posterior analysis results.The survival probability forecast table was constructed based on the top 4 prognosis factors. The survival curve was drawn by the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences in survival curves were compared using the Log-rank test. Results: A total of 316 patients were enrolled, including 109 males and 207 females.The ratio of male to female was 1.0∶1.9, the age was (62.0±10.8)years.There was 298 cases(94.3%) R0 resection and 18 cases(5.7%) R1 resection.T staging: 287 cases(90.8%) T3 and 29 cases(9.2%) T4.The median survival time(MST) was 23.77 months, and the 1, 3, 5-year survival rates were 67.4%, 40.8%, 32.0%, respectively.For the Bayesian model, the number of correctly predicted cases was 121(≤23.77 months) and 115(>23.77 months) respectively, leading to a 74.86% accuracy of this model.The prior probability of survival time was 0.503 2(≤23.77 months) and 0.496 8

  11. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) of the Stomach: Retrospective Experience with Surgical Resection at the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGUIB, Sh.F.; ZAGHLOUL, A.S.; El MARAKBY, H.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Gist's account for more than half of all gastrointestinal stromal tumors and represent less than 5% of all gastric tumors. The peak age for harboring Gist of the stomach is around 60 years and a slight male preponderance is reported. These tumors are identified by expression of CD117 or CD34 antigen. Symptoms at presentation usually include bleeding, ab¬dominal pain or abdominal mass. Endoscopically, they typically appear as a submucosal mass with or without ulceration and on CT scans an extra gastric mass is usually seen. Complete surgical resection provides the only chance for cure, with only l-2 cm free margins needed. However, local recurrence and/or metastases supervene in almost half the patients treated with surgery alone, even when no gross residual is left. Thereby imatinib mesylate was advocated as an adjuvant to surgery, which appears to have improved disease-free and overall survival. Aim of the Work: The aim of this work was to assess clinico-pathological features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the stomach and to appraise the results of treatment by surgery in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of Cairo between January 2002 and December 2007. Patients and Methods: Nineteen patients with histologically and immuno-histochemically proven GIST of the stomach were treated by surgery at the NCI during the 6-year study period. Preoperative assessment included detailed history, clinical examination, full laboratory tests, endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound and CT. General medical assessment included chest X-ray, ECG and echocardiography. Results: The patients' age ranged from 26 to 77 years with a median of 51 years. Obvious male/female preponderance was noticed (68.4% to 31.6%). Tumors were located at the upper 1/3 in 42.1%, at the middle 1/3 in 31.6% and at the lower 1/3 in 26.3%. The most common clinical presentation was related to bleeding (hematemesis, melena or anaemia) and was seen in 63.2%. No tumors were

  12. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for early detection of ovarian cancer: the pivotal role of the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Duffy, Michael J; Walker, Graeme

    2011-07-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently reviewed optimal means of early recognition and initial management of ovarian cancer, the leading cause of gynaecological death in the UK. The NICE guidelines state that general practitioners should measure serum CA125 in women presenting with persistent and continuous symptoms suggestive of ovarian cancer (e.g. abdominal distension, early satiety and loss of appetite or pelvic pain). If CA125 is ≥35 kU/L, the general practitioner should arrange an ultrasound scan of the abdomen and pelvis to enable calculation of the risk of malignancy score (RMI). Women with an RMI score of ≥250 should then be referred to a specialist multidisciplinary team. Successful implementation of these guidelines requires close liaison between primary care and laboratory medicine to ensure that CA125 is requested as a diagnostic aid only for women meeting the criteria stated in the guidelines. Preanalytical criteria must also be met and it is essential that both requestors and patients be aware of other possible causes of increases in CA125, as well as the fact that it is not raised in all patients with ovarian cancer. Guidance is being prepared to enable appropriate interpretation and implementation of the NICE guidelines. Continuous audit of the outcomes will also be essential to determine the effectiveness of this approach to early detection of ovarian cancer.

  13. GH replacement therapy and second neoplasms in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a retrospective study from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignardello, E; Felicetti, F; Castiglione, A; Fortunati, N; Matarazzo, P; Biasin, E; Sacerdote, C; Ricardi, U; Fagioli, F; Corrias, A; Arvat, E

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is the most common endocrine late effect observed in childhood cancer survivors (CCS) previously submitted to cranial irradiation. Radiation therapy can also increase the risk of second neoplasms (SNs). Since in previous studies GH replacement therapy was associated with increased incidence of neoplasia, we explored the association between SNs and GH replacement therapy in a cohort of CCS with GHD. Within the clinical cohort of CCS referred to the Transition Unit for Childhood Cancer Survivors of Turin between November 2001 and December 2012, we considered all patients who developed GHD as a consequence of cancer therapies. GHD was always diagnosed in childhood. To evaluate the quality of data, our cohort was linked to the Childhood Cancer Registry of Piedmont. GHD was diagnosed in 49 out of 310 CCS included in our clinical cohort. At least one SN was diagnosed in 14 patients, meningioma and basal cell carcinoma being the most common SNs. The cumulative incidence of SNs was similar in GH-treated and -untreated patients (8 SNs out of 26 GH-treated and 6 out of 23 GH-untreated patients; p = 0.331). Age, sex and paediatric cancer type had no impact on SNs development. In our CCS, GH replacement therapy does not seem to increase the risk of SNs. Anyway, independently from replacement therapy, in these patients we observed an elevated risk of SNs, possibly related to previous radiation therapy, which suggests the need of a close long-term follow-up.

  14. National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference Statement: Symptom management in cancer: pain, depression, and fatigue, July 15-17, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Daniel L; Ferketich, Sandra L; Frame, Paul S; Harris, Jesse J; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Levin, Bernard; Link, Michael P; Lustig, Craig; McLaughlin, Joseph; Reid, L Douglas; Turrisi, Andrew T; Unützer, Jürgen; Vernon, Sally W

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in early detection and effective treatment, cancer remains one of the most feared diseases. Among the most common side effects of cancer and treatments for cancer are pain, depression, and fatigue. Although research is producing increasingly hopeful insights into the causes and cures for cancer, efforts to manage the side effects of the disease and its treatments have not kept pace. The challenge that faces us is how to increase awareness of the importance of recognizing and actively addressing cancer-related distress. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a State-of-the-Science Conference on Symptom Management in Cancer: Pain, Depression, and Fatigue to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the management of pain, depression, and fatigue in individuals with cancer and to identify directions for future research. Specifically, the conference examined how to identify individuals who are at risk for cancer-related pain, depression, and/or fatigue; what treatments work best to address these symptoms when they occur; and what is the best way to deliver interventions across the continuum of care. STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE PROCESS: A non-advocate, non-Federal, 14-member panel of experts representing the fields of oncology, radiology, psychology, nursing, public health, social work, and epidemiology prepared the statement. In addition, 24 experts in medical oncology, geriatrics, pharmacology, psychology, and neurology presented data to the panel and to the conference audience during the first 1.5 days of the conference. The panel then prepared its statement, addressing the five predetermined questions and drawing on submitted literature, the speakers' presentations, and discussions held at the conference. The statement was presented to the conference audience, followed by a press conference to allow the panel to respond to questions from the media. After its release at the conference, the draft statement was made available on the Internet

  15. Survival in women with ovarian cancer before and after the introduction of adjuvant paclitaxel; a 25-year, single institution review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shireen, R

    2012-02-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy regime for ovarian cancer patients remains to be a contentious issue. The aim of this study was to compare the overall and progression-free survival of women with ovarian cancer before and after introduction of paclitaxel in our unit in 1992. A sample of 112 women who received adjuvant therapy following surgery for ovarian cancer was collected, 68 (61%) received platinum+alkylating agent before 1992 and later 44 (39%) received platinum+paclitaxel. Five-year survival was same in both treatment groups when there was no macroscopic disease after surgery (78% versus 70%) and when residual disease was <2 cm (50% versus 40%). Survival was greater in women with residual disease >2 cm in the platinum+paclitaxel group (50% versus 24%), (p = 0.04). However, progression-free survival was similar in both groups irrespective of stage or residual volume of disease. Therefore consideration to selective use of paclitaxel could reduce patient morbidity and costs significantly.

  16. Monographs for medicines on WHO’s Model List of Essential Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Melissa; Jain, Tanvi; Bempong, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To raise awareness about the importance of public pharmaceutical standards, identify if and, if so, where current pharmacopeias are falling short in the development of new and complete monographs and foster collaboration among the various pharmacopeias, to prioritize, develop and make available standards for those key medicines for which no complete monographs exist. Methods In August 2017, we mined eight pharmacopeias to identify which of the 669 medicines in the 20th edition of the World Health Organization’s Model List of Essential Medicines were covered by complete or incomplete monographs. The pharmacopeias we included were the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia, the British Pharmacopoeia, the Indian Pharmacopeia Commission, the International Pharmacopoeia, the Japanese Pharmacopoeia, the Mexican Pharmacopoeia, the Pharmacopeia of the People’s Republic of China and the United States Pharmacopeia. Findings For 99 (15%) of the medicines on the Model List, no monographs were available in any of the eight pharmacopeias investigated. Only 3% (1/30) of the cardiovascular medicines listed, but 28% (9/32) of the antiretroviral medicines and 23% (6/26) of the antimalarial medicines lacked monographs. Conclusion There appear to be no public standards for many so-called essential medicines. To address this shortfall, a greater collaboration in the global health community is needed.

  17. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  18. Progression-free Survival Following Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment-naive Recurrence: A Multi-institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Piet; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; As, Nicholas Van; Zilli, Thomas; Muacevic, Alexander; Olivier, Kenneth; Henderson, Daniel; Casamassima, Franco; Orecchia, Roberto; Surgo, Alessia; Brown, Lindsay; Tree, Alison; Miralbell, Raymond; De Meerleer, Gert

    2016-01-01

    The literature on metastasis-directed therapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence consists of small heterogeneous studies. This study aimed to reduce the heterogeneity by pooling individual patient data from different institutions treating oligometastatic PCa recurrence with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We focussed on patients who were treatment naive, with the aim of determining if SBRT could delay disease progression. We included patients with three or fewer metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate distant progression-free survival (DPFS) and local progression-free survival (LPFS). Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. In total, 163 metastases were treated in 119 patients. The median DPFS was 21 mo (95% confidence interval, 15-26 mo). A lower radiotherapy dose predicted a higher local recurrence rate with a 3-yr LPFS of 79% for patients treated with a biologically effective dose ≤100Gy versus 99% for patients treated with >100Gy (p=0.01). Seventeen patients (14%) developed toxicity classified as grade 1, and three patients (3%) developed grade 2 toxicity. No grade ≥3 toxicity occurred. These results should serve as a benchmark for future prospective trials. This multi-institutional study pools all of the available data on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for limited prostate cancer metastases. We concluded that this approach is safe and associated with a prolonged treatment progression-free survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A System for Planning and Achieving Comprehensive Health Care in Residential Institutions for the Mentally Retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Harold A.

    Based on a view of health care intertwining medicine intimately with other components of institutional care, the monograph presents a system of concepts and operating techniques for providing comprehensive health care to institutionalized retardates. Background of the system is explained in terms of its research basis (two studies by the author of…

  20. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mehta, Minesh P.; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [de

  1. A monograph assignment as an integrative application of evidence-based medicine and pharmacoeconomic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Anandi V; Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Bounthavong, Mark

    2011-02-10

    To describe the development and assessment of monographs as an assignment to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) and pharmacoeconomic principles into a third-year pharmacoeconomic course. Eight newly FDA-approved drugs were assigned to 16 teams of students, where each drug was assigned to 2 teams. Teams had to research their drug, write a professional monograph, deliver an oral presentation, and answer questions posed by faculty judges. One team was asked to present evidence for inclusion of the drug into a formulary, while another team presented evidence against inclusion. The teams' average score on the written report was 99.1%; on the oral presentation, 92.5%, and on the online quiz given at the end of the presentations, 77%. Monographs are a successful method of incorporating and integrating learning across different concepts, as well as increasing relevance of pharmacoeconomics in the PharmD curriculum.

  2. Validity and Reliability of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueck, Amylou C.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Castro, Kathleen M.; Rogak, Lauren J.; Atkinson, Thomas M.; Bennett, Antonia V.; Denicoff, Andrea M.; O'Mara, Ann M.; Li, Yuelin; Clauser, Steven B.; Bryant, Donna M.; Bearden, James D.; Gillis, Theresa A.; Harness, Jay K.; Siegel, Robert D.; Paul, Diane B.; Cleeland, Charles S.; Schrag, Deborah; Sloan, Jeff A.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Bruner, Deborah W.; Minasian, Lori M.; Basch, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    Importance Symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in cancer trials are currently reported by clinicians using the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). To integrate the patient perspective, the NCI developed a patient-reported outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE) to capture symptomatic AEs directly from patients. Objective To assess the construct validity, test-retest reliability, and responsiveness of PRO-CTCAE items. Design Participants completed PRO-CTCAE items on tablet computers in clinic waiting rooms at two visits 1-6 weeks apart. A subset completed PRO-CTCAE items during an additional visit one business day after the first visit. Setting Nine U.S. cancer centers and community oncology practices. Participants 975 adult cancer patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy and/or radiation enrolled between January 2011 and February 2012. Eligibility required participants to read English and be without clinically significant cognitive impairment. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Primary comparators were clinician-reported Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). Results 940/975 (96%) and 852/940 (91%) participants completed PRO-CTCAE items at each visit. 938/940 (99.8%) participants (53% female, median age 59, 32% high school education or less, 17% ECOG PS 2-4) reported having at least one symptom. All PRO-CTCAE items had at least one correlation in the expected direction with a QLQ-C30 scale (111/124 P<.05). Stronger correlations were seen between PRO-CTCAE items and conceptually-related QLQ-C30 domains. Scores for 94/124 PRO-CTCAE items were higher in the ECOG PS 2-4 versus 0-1 group (58/124 P<.05). Overall, 119/124 items met at least one construct validity criterion. Test-retest reliability was acceptable for 36/49 pre-specified items (median intra-class correlation coefficient

  3. Writing about Class and Race Differences and Similarities in Early Childhood Mathematics: The Case of One Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Amy Noelle

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a literature review of 49 articles that cited a single monograph East Lansing written in 1981 about early learning in mathematics to make claims of similarity or difference across lines of race and class in early mathematics. The review found that while about two-thirds of the articles cited the monograph to make claims of…

  4. Access to Basic Education in Ghana: Politics, Policies and Progress. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Angela W.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph examines the history and politics of educational reform in Ghana. Using data from interviews conducted with senior policy-makers, implementers and researchers, as well as documentary sources, to explore the drivers and inhibitors of change at the political, bureaucratic and grass-roots levels. The monograph explores the nature of…

  5. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  6. Measuring patient-centered communication in cancer care: a literature review and the development of a systematic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Lauren A; Treiman, Katherine; Rupert, Douglas; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Nadler, Eric; Arora, Neeraj K; Lawrence, William; Street, Richard L

    2011-04-01

    Patient-centered communication (PCC) is a critical element of patient-centered care, which the Institute of Medicine (Committee on Quality of Health Care in America, 2001) promulgates as essential to improving healthcare delivery. Consequently, the US National Cancer Institute's Strategic Plan for Leading the Nation (2006) calls for assessing the delivery of PCC in cancer care. However, no comprehensive measure of PCC exists, and stakeholders continue to embrace different conceptualizations and assumptions about how to measure it. Our approach was grounded in the PCC conceptual framework presented in a recent US National Cancer Institute monograph (Epstein & Street, 2007). In this study, we developed a comprehensive inventory of domains and subdomains for PCC by reviewing relevant literature and theories, interviewing a limited number of cancer patients, and consulting experts. The resulting measurement domains are organized under the six core functions specified in the PCC conceptual framework: exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, recognizing and responding to emotions, managing uncertainty, making decisions, and enabling patient self-management. These domains represent a promising platform for operationalizing the complicated PCC construct. Although this study focused specifically on cancer care, the PCC measurements are relevant to other clinical contexts and illnesses, given that patient-centered care is a goal across all healthcare. Finally, we discuss considerations for developing PCC measures for research, quality assessment, and surveillance purposes. United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute (2006). The NCI Strategic Plan for Leading the Nation: To Eliminate the Suffering and Death Due to Cancer. NIH Publication No. 06-5773. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer: Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and Head and Neck Group (111 institutions) to evaluate the widespread use of cetuximab and radiotherapy in HNC and to estimate the frequency of grades III and IV skin reactions in the radiation portals associated with this protocol. Co-morbidities, RT schedules and co-medications were also recorded. Results: We received responses from 28 institutions in 11 countries. A total of 125 HNC patients from 15 institutions were treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. Information about the skin reactions was available from 71 patients. Of these 36 had no grade III/IV adverse effects in the RT field, 15 had a grade III and 20 had grade IV radiation dermatitis. No detectable relation of grades III and IV radiation dermatitis with co-morbidities such as liver insufficiency or renal dysfunction was found. Conclusion: According to the results of the questionnaire, grade III/IV radiation dermatitis is observed in 49% of HNC patients treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. A systematic clinical monitoring of cutaneous side effects during RT plus cetuximab is advised to ensure the safety of this protocol

  8. NTP-CERHR monograph on the potential human reproductive and developmental effects of hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) conducted an evaluation of the potential for hydroxyurea to cause adverse effects on reproduction and development in humans. Hydroxyurea is a drug used to treat cancer, sickle cell disease, and thalassemia. It is the only treatment for sickle cell disease in children, aside from blood transfusion and, in severe cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hydroxyurea is FDA-approved for use in adults with sickle cell anemia to reduce the frequency of painful crises and the need for blood transfusions. Hydroxyurea may be given to children and adults with sickle cell disease for an extended period of time or for repeated cycles of therapy. Treatment with hydroxyurea is associated with known side effects such as cytotoxicity and myelosuppression, and hydroxyurea is genotoxic (can damage DNA). CERHR selected hydroxyurea for evaluation because of: its increasing use for treatment of sickle cell disease in children and adults, knowledge that it inhibits DNA synthesis and is cytotoxic, and published evidence of reproductive and developmental toxicity in rodents. The results of this evaluation are published in the NTP-CERHR Monograph on Hydroxyurea, which includes the NTP Brief and Expert Panel Report on the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Hydroxyurea. Additional information related to the evaluation process, including public comments received on the draft NTP Brief and the final expert panel report, are available on the CERHR website (http:// cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/). See hydroxyurea under "CERHR Chemicals" on the homepage or go directly to http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/chemicals/hydroxyurea/hydroxyurea-eval.html). The NTP reached the following conclusions on the possible effects of exposure to hydroxyurea on human reproduction or development. The possible levels of concern, from lowest to highest, are negligible concern, minimal concern, some concern, concern

  9. Harmonization of monographic standards is needed to ensure the quality of Chinese medicinal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Sandy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article provides an overview on the regulations of Chinese medicinal materials (CMMs in various countries and regions. Harmonization of CMM monographs would provide standards for the quality control of CMM products and play an important role in the modernization and globalization of Chinese medicine. A harmonized regulatory system would improve the quality of CMMs thereby ensuring the safety of the products and assisting Chinese medicine practitioners in their practice. The fast growing demand worldwide for traditional medicines calls for harmonized monographic standards to safeguard the safety and quality of CMM products.

  10. Bladder preservation in non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC): a single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Marianna A; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Zerini, Dario; Surgo, Alessia; Dicuonzo, Samantha; Spoto, Ruggero; Fodor, Cristiana; Verri, Elena; Rocca, Maria Cossu; Nolè, Franco; Muto, Matteo; Ferro, Matteo; Musi, Gennaro; Bottero, Danilo; Matei, Deliu V; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to access the feasibility, toxicity profile, and tumour outcome of an organ preservation curative approach in non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients affected by M0 bladder cancer, who refused cystectomy and were treated with a curative approach. The standard bladder preservation scheme included maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) and combination of radiotherapy and platin-based chemotherapy, followed by endoscopic evaluation, urine cytology, and instrumental evaluation. Thirteen patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. TNM stage was cT2cN0M0 and cT2cNxM0, in 12 and one patients, respectively. All patients had transitional cell cancer. Twelve patients completed the whole therapeutic programme (a bimodal treatment without chemotherapy for one patient). Median follow-up is 36 months. None of the patients developed severe urinary or intestinal acute toxicity. In 10 patients with a follow-up > 6 months, no cases of severe late toxicity were observed. Response evaluated in 12 patients included complete response and stable disease in 11 patients (92%), and one patient (8%), respectively. At the time of data analysis (March 2016), 10 patients (77%) are alive with no evidence of disease, two patients (15%) died for other reasons, and one patient has suspicious persistent local disease. The trimodality approach, including maximal TURBT, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, is well-tolerated and might be considered a valid and feasible option in fit patients who refuse radical cystectomy.

  11. Application of the Western-based adjuvant online model to Korean colon cancer patients; a single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Minkyu; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Geon Woo; Jung, Inkyung; Ahn, Joong Bae; Roh, Jae Kyung; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Tae Il

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant Online (AOL) is web-accessible risk-assessment model that predicts the mortality and the benefits of adjuvant therapy. AOL has never been validated for Asian colon cancer patients. Using the Yonsei Tumor Registry database, patients who were treated within the Yonsei University Health System between 1990 and 2005 for T1-4, N0-2, and M0 colon cancer were included in the calculations for survival. Observed and predicted 5-year overall survival was compared for each patient. The median age of the study population of 1431 patients was 60 years (range, 15–87 years), and the median follow-up duration was 7.9 years (range, 0.06–19.8 years). The predicted 5-year overall survival rate (77.7%) and observed survival (79.5%) was not statistically different (95% Confidential interval, 76.3–81.5) in all patients. Predicted outcomes were within 95% confidential interval of observed survival in both stage II and III disease, including most demographic and pathologic subgroups. Moreover, AOL more accurately predicted OS for patients with stage II than stage III. AOL tended to offer reliable prediction for 5-year overall survival and could be used as a decision making tool for adjuvant treatment in Korean colon cancer patients whose prognosis is similar to other Asian patients

  12. A multi-institutional analysis of 429 patients undergoing major hepatectomy for colorectal cancer liver metastases: The impact of concomitant bile duct resection on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlewait, Lauren M; Squires, Malcolm H; Kooby, David A; Weber, Sharon M; Scoggins, Charles R; Cardona, Kenneth; Cho, Clifford S; Martin, Robert C G; Winslow, Emily R; Maithel, Shishir K

    2015-10-01

    Data are lacking on long-term outcomes of patients undergoing major hepatectomy requiring bile duct resection (BDR) for the treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases. Patients who underwent major hepatectomy (≥3 segments) for metastatic colorectal cancer from 2000-2010 at three US academic institutions were included. The primary outcome was disease-specific survival (DSS). Of 429 patients, nine (2.1%) underwent BDR, which was associated with pre-operative portal vein embolization (25.0% vs. 4.3%; P = 0.049). There were no significant differences in age, ASA class, margin status, number of lesions, tumor size, cirrhosis, perineural invasion, or lymphovascular invasion. BDR was independently associated with increased postoperative major complications (OR: 6.22; 95%CI:1.44-26.97; P = 0.015). There were no differences in length of stay, reoperation, readmission, or 30-day mortality. Patients who underwent BDR had markedly decreased DSS (9.3 vs. 39.9 mo; P = 0.002). When accounting for differences between the two groups, the need for BDR was independently associated with reduced DSS (HR: 3.06; 95%CI:1.12-8.34; P = 0.029). Major hepatectomy with concomitant bile duct resection is seldom performed in patients undergoing resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases and is associated with higher major morbidity and reduced disease-specific survival compared to major hepatectomy alone. Stringent selection criteria should be applied when patients may need bile duct resection during hepatectomy for colorectal cancer liver metastases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Long term mortality from cardiac disease and lung cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a prospective cohort study of 7 711 women treated and followed-up at Institute Gustave Roussy (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukheris, H.; Rubino, C.; Le, M.; Giardini, M.; Brindel, P.; Doyon, F.; Paoletti, C.; Labbe, M.; Haouari, Z.; Vathaire, F. de [Institut Gustave Roussy, Unite 605 INSERM, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Women who are treated for early breast cancer with adjuvant radiation have a decreased risk of local recurrence but an increased risk of mortality from heart disease and lung cancer. Patients with left -sided breast tumors receive a higher dose of radiation to the heart than patients with right-sided tumors. In a previous study of about 300000 women treated for breast cancer during 1973-2001 and followed-up prospectively for cause-specific mortality until January 1, 2002, Sarah Darby showed that for women diagnosed during 1973-1982 and irradiated, the cardiac mortality ratio (left versus right tumor laterality) was 1.20 [1.04-1.38] less then 10 years afterwards, and 1.58 [1.29 - 1.95] after 15 years or more. Because radiation techniques have improved over time, such risks are expected to be reduced. A cohort was performed at Institute Gustave Roussy to investigate long term effects of breast cancer treatments. This cohort comprise 7711 women treated for beast cancer between 1954 and 1984. Mean age at the first treatment was 55 years [21 - 91], 61% were diagnosed before 1977 vs 39% after, 50.4% were left -sided breast cancer, 4832 (73.2 %) were recorded as having received external-beam radiotherapy as part of the initial treatment and 516 (8%) radiotherapy in association with chemotherapy. The aim of the present study is to investigate long term mortality and effects of radiotherapy on mortality from cardiac disease and second cancers. The originality of our study comparing to similar others is the homogeneity of the population studied and the longer follow-up. Vital status and causes of death of women of the cohort were obtained as well as mortality rates in the general French population. The cut off date was January 1, 2001. External and internal analysis were performed. Persons years at risk have been calculated for the entire follow-up period, less then 10 years, 10-19 years, 20-29 years, and 30 or more years afterwards. To

  14. Long term mortality from cardiac disease and lung cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a prospective cohort study of 7 711 women treated and followed-up at Institute Gustave Roussy (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukheris, H.; Rubino, C.; Le, M.; Giardini, M.; Brindel, P.; Doyon, F.; Paoletti, C.; Labbe, M.; Haouari, Z.; Vathaire, F. de

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Women who are treated for early breast cancer with adjuvant radiation have a decreased risk of local recurrence but an increased risk of mortality from heart disease and lung cancer. Patients with left -sided breast tumors receive a higher dose of radiation to the heart than patients with right-sided tumors. In a previous study of about 300000 women treated for breast cancer during 1973-2001 and followed-up prospectively for cause-specific mortality until January 1, 2002, Sarah Darby showed that for women diagnosed during 1973-1982 and irradiated, the cardiac mortality ratio (left versus right tumor laterality) was 1.20 [1.04-1.38] less then 10 years afterwards, and 1.58 [1.29 - 1.95] after 15 years or more. Because radiation techniques have improved over time, such risks are expected to be reduced. A cohort was performed at Institute Gustave Roussy to investigate long term effects of breast cancer treatments. This cohort comprise 7711 women treated for beast cancer between 1954 and 1984. Mean age at the first treatment was 55 years [21 - 91], 61% were diagnosed before 1977 vs 39% after, 50.4% were left -sided breast cancer, 4832 (73.2 %) were recorded as having received external-beam radiotherapy as part of the initial treatment and 516 (8%) radiotherapy in association with chemotherapy. The aim of the present study is to investigate long term mortality and effects of radiotherapy on mortality from cardiac disease and second cancers. The originality of our study comparing to similar others is the homogeneity of the population studied and the longer follow-up. Vital status and causes of death of women of the cohort were obtained as well as mortality rates in the general French population. The cut off date was January 1, 2001. External and internal analysis were performed. Persons years at risk have been calculated for the entire follow-up period, less then 10 years, 10-19 years, 20-29 years, and 30 or more years afterwards. To

  15. Italian cancer figures, report 2012: Cancer in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study describes up-to-date cancer incidence and survival in Italian paediatric and adolescent patients, based on data collected by the network of Italian cancer registries (AIRTUM). It updates the monograph published on the same topic in 2008. The main objective of this monograph is to present the statistics according to standard rigorous epidemiological methods and disseminate them to a wide range of readers, including the lay public. Given the deep impact of the 2008 monograph on the general public, in this update we complement descriptive statistics with additional data and commentaries on issues of importance for public health, in order to provide unambiguous criteria on how to interpret the statistics. The study is the result of the collaboration between AIRTUM and AIEOP (Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology) with contributions from interested parties, including representatives of parent associations. The monograph is divided into three parts. The first part presents incidence rates, survival probabilities, and time trends, by sex, age, geographical area, and cancer site or type, by means of tables and graphs as in the previous monograph, to facilitate direct comparisons. Four articles summarize and comment the results. The second part uses data from AIRTUM and AIEOP to outline patient management and health care issues; it includes estimates of the number of new cases in the next decade and of young adults living after a paediatric cancer diagnosis. Health organizational aspects of treatment services for paediatric patients, based on the AIEOP database, are also discussed, along with long-term complications in cured patients. The third section describes the changes in mortality trends due to improving therapies and healthcare services, and discusses risk factors and prevention of childhood cancer, late adverse events in cured patients, and other related issues. Data herein presented were provided by AIRTUM population-based cancer

  16. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer patients with isolated lymph nodes involvement: a two-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Gianluca; Trippa, Fabio; Maranzano, Ernesto; Carosi, Alessandra; Ponti, Elisabetta; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Draghini, Lorena; Di Murro, Luana; Lancia, Andrea; Santoni, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is emerging as a treatment option in oligometastatic cancer patients. This retrospective study aimed to analyze local control, biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS), and toxicity in patients affected by isolated prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Finally, we evaluated androgen deprivation therapy-free survival (ADT-FS). Forty patients with 47 isolated lymph nodes of recurrent prostate cancer were treated with SBRT. Mostly, two different fractionation schemes were used: 5 × 7 Gy in 23 (48.9 %) lesions and 5 × 8 Gy in 13 (27.7 %) lesions. Response to treatment was assessed with periodical PSA evaluation. Toxicity was registered according to RTOG/EORTC criteria. With a mean follow-up of 30.18 months, local control was achieved in 98 % of the cases, with a median b-PFS of 24 months. We obtained a 2-year b-PFS of 44 % with 40 % of the patients ADT-free at last follow-up (mean value 26.18 months; range 3.96-59.46), whereas 12.5 % had a mean ADT-FS of 13.58 months (range 2.06-37.13). Late toxicity was observed in one (2.5 %) patient who manifested a grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity 11.76 months after the end of SBRT. Our study demonstrates that SBRT is safe, effective, and minimally invasive in the eradication of limited nodal metastases, yielding an important delay in prescribing ADT.

  17. Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, Sebastien; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Khaouam, Nader; Charpentier, Danielle; Belair, Manon; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  18. Efficacy of icotinib in lung squamous-cell cancer: A real-world experience from single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is a less common type of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which associates with a poor clinical prognosis and lacks specific therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has proven to be effective in EGFR-mutated NSCLC, in patients with lung squamous-cell cancer. Retrospective analysis was conducted in patients who had advanced lung squamous-cell cancer confirmed by cytology or histology. Patients were treated orally with icotinib (125 mg, three times daily) until event of unacceptable toxicity, disease progression or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall response rate and disease control rate. Between January 2014 and May 2016, 20 patients were enrolled and evaluated for the efficacy and safety of icotinib. Overall, the median overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.93 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.46-16.40) and 3.0 months (95% CI: 0.00-8.35), respectively. The overall response rate and disease control rate were 20% and 70%, respectively. For treatment-naive patients (n = 11), the overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.93 months (95% CI: 0.00-23.49) and 6.27 months (95% CI: 0.00-12.61); the response rate and disease control rate were 27.3% and 54.5%, respectively. The overall survival and progression-free survival of patients treated with second- or multiple-line icotinib treatment (n = 9) were 6.5 months (95% CI: 0.80-12.20) and 1.2 months (95% CI: 1.10-1.30). A total of 11 patients experienced at least one treatment-related adverse event, most of which were mild to moderate. The most common manifestations were rash (n = 6, 30%) followed by diarrhea (n = 2, 10%). Icotinib has demonstrated a favorable efficacy and safety profile in patients with advanced lung squamous-cell cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation and integrated boost in the head and neck cancers: experience of the Curie Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, I.; Serre, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C.; Racadot, S.; Calais, G.; Alfonsi, M.; Giraud, P.; Graff, P.; Serre, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C.; Racadot, S.; Calais, G.; Alfonsi, M.; Giraud, P.

    2009-01-01

    The modulated intensity radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) is used in the treatment of cancers in superior aero digestive tracts to reduce the irradiation of parotids and to reduce the delayed xerostomia. This retrospective study presents the results got on the fourteen first patients according an original technique of I.M.R.T. with integrated boost. It appears that this technique is feasible and allows to reduce the xerostomia rate without modifying the local control rate. To limit the average dose to the parotids under 30 Gy seems reduce the incidence of severe xerostomia. (N.C.)

  20. Morbidity associated to the transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia in the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino Valderrama, Martha; Suarez Mattos, Amaranto; Hernandez Kunzel, Jorge Alberto; Restrepo, Alexandra

    2002-01-01

    Acute leukemia represents the most common cancer in pediatrics. The current treatments made necessary a hematological support which increases the risks of complications, like fever, immunologic reaction, infections and, graft versus host disease. The objective of the present study was to determine the morbidity associated with transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia. In the pediatric population with diagnosis of acute leukemia in the INC during one and half year, the morbidity associated with transfusions was low and couldn't be related to the treatment given to the transfused products

  1. Socio-Demographic, Reproductive and Clinical Profile of Women Diagnosed with Advanced Cervical Cancer in a Tertiary Care Institute of Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Neha; Bachani, Damodar; Acharya, Anita S; Sharma, D N; Gupta, Subhash; Haresh, K P

    2017-02-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading cancers among Indian women with estimated 123,000 new cases and 67,477 deaths in 2012. Cervical cancer is a multi-etiological disease. Factors such as low socioeconomic status, tobacco use, sexual and reproductive factors, HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases and long-term oral contraceptive use have been suggested as determinants. Assessment of socio-demographic profile and reproductive history gives a better picture of the determinants of cervical carcinoma in low-resource settings. This hospital-based cross-sectional study was undertaken at a tertiary healthcare institute at New Delhi, India. Sixty-seven newly diagnosed women with advanced cervical cancer (stage 2B-4B), who were undertaking radio- and/or chemotherapy, were included to assess their socio-demographic, reproductive and clinical profile. The mean age of women at the time of detection of cervical cancer was 52.28 ± 11.29 years (range 30-75 years). More than 60 % of patients were illiterate and belonged to middle socioeconomic status. Thirty-nine percentage of the study subjects had their first sexual experience before 15 years of age. Nearly 54 % women had 5 or more pregnancies. Nearly 73 % of women had all deliveries at home. Majority (69 %) of women had symptoms suggestive of reproductive tract infection. Among them, unusual discharge from vagina (73.13 %) followed by bleeding after menopause (55.10 %) and pain in abdomen (44.77 %) were the most common presenting complaints. Pallor was present in nearly two-third (63.93 %) study subjects. More than half (56.72 %) study subjects had moderate anemia, and 7.46 % had severe anemia before treatment. Mean hemoglobin level of the study subjects was 10.35 ± 1.72 gm% before treatment and 9.69 ± 1.29 gm% after treatment. This difference was statistically significant. Around 97 % of the study subjects had squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Majority (53.73 %) of the study subjects were in

  2. Andrzej Soltan 1897-1959. Bio-bibliographic monograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plucinska, H.

    1991-01-01

    Report contains the biography of professor Andrzej Soltan the first director of the Institute of Nuclear Research at Swierk, the description of his scientific and organizational activity as well as the bibliography of his papers. 73 refs

  3. Results of definitive radiotherapy in T1 and T2 glottic carcinoma: Institute of Rotary Cancer Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanti, B.K.; Rath, G.K.; Tanwar, R.K.; Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Tandon, D.A.; Bahadur, S.

    1996-01-01

    Early glottic carcinomas (T1 and T2) constitute only 2% of all laryngeal cancers in our data. Seventy patients were seen between 1985 and 1992. All patients were treated by cobalt-60 small field radiotherapy using a beam directed shell. The total dose delivered was 60-65Gy in 31 patients and 66-70Gy in 39 patients. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 126 months, with a mean follow up of 37 months overall and 55 months in the surgical salvage group. Radiation therapy controlled disease in 71% (50 of 70) of patients overall; 75% with T1 and 67% with T2 lesions. Total laryngectomy as salvage surgery was performed in 70% (14 of 20) of patients whose disease recurred. Ultimate control including surgical salvage occurred in 64 (91 %) of 70 patients in the present study. The actuarial 5 year survival was 83 and 80% in T1 and T2 tumours, respectively (statistically insignificant). This report supports the policy of definitive irradiation, reserving surgical salvage for radiation failures in early laryngeal cancers. 17 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Badellino, Serena [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ceccarelli, Manuela [Cancer Epidemiology and CPO Piemonte, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Guarneri, Alessia [Radiation Oncology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Franco, Pierfrancesco [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Monagheddu, Chiara [Cancer Epidemiology and CPO Piemonte, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Spadi, Rosella [Medical Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Racca, Patrizia [Medical Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  5. Electronic Health Record Phenotypes for Precision Medicine: Perspectives and Caveats From Treatment of Breast Cancer at a Single Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfang; Maxwell, Kara N.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Zhang, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Precision medicine is at the forefront of biomedical research. Cancer registries provide rich perspectives and electronic health records (EHRs) are commonly utilized to gather additional clinical data elements needed for translational research. However, manual annotation is resource‐intense and not readily scalable. Informatics‐based phenotyping presents an ideal solution, but perspectives obtained can be impacted by both data source and algorithm selection. We derived breast cancer (BC) receptor status phenotypes from structured and unstructured EHR data using rule‐based algorithms, including natural language processing (NLP). Overall, the use of NLP increased BC receptor status coverage by 39.2% from 69.1% with structured medication information alone. Using all available EHR data, estrogen receptor‐positive BC cases were ascertained with high precision (P = 0.976) and recall (R = 0.987) compared with gold standard chart‐reviewed patients. However, status negation (R = 0.591) decreased 40.2% when relying on structured medications alone. Using multiple EHR data types (and thorough understanding of the perspectives offered) are necessary to derive robust EHR‐based precision medicine phenotypes. PMID:29084368

  6. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Badellino, Serena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Spadi, Rosella; Ragona, Riccardo; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials

  7. Summary and recommendations of a National Cancer Institute workshop on issues limiting the clinical use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms for megavoltage external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; Smathers, James; Deye, James

    2003-01-01

    Due to the significant interest in Monte Carlo dose calculations for external beam megavoltage radiation therapy from both the research and commercial communities, a workshop was held in October 2001 to assess the status of this computational method with regard to use for clinical treatment planning. The Radiation Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, in conjunction with the Nuclear Data and Analysis Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, gathered a group of experts in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning and Monte Carlo dose calculations, and examined issues involved in clinical implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods in clinical radiotherapy. The workshop examined the current status of Monte Carlo algorithms, the rationale for using Monte Carlo, algorithmic concerns, clinical issues, and verification methodologies. Based on these discussions, the workshop developed recommendations for future NCI-funded research and development efforts. This paper briefly summarizes the issues presented at the workshop and the recommendations developed by the group

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn ... Cancer Institute USA.gov NIH ... Turning Discovery Into Health ® TOP

  9. Nutritional Problems and Policy in Tanzania. Cornell International Nutrition Monograph Series, Number 7 (1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgaza, Olyvia

    This monograph discusses policies designed to deal with food and nutrition problems in Tanzania. Available information on food supplies and nutritional conditions in Tanzania clearly shows that the country faces nutritional problems; protein energy malnutrition is the most serious and requires priority action. Iron deficiency anemia, goiter, and…

  10. Urine Testing for Drugs of Abuse. NIDA Research Monograph Series 73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Richard L., Ed.; Chiang, C. Nora, Ed.

    In the past 5 years, a growing concern over the use of illicit drugs in the workplace has led to an interest in urinalysis as a way to detect and deter drug use. This monograph provides information that will assist those involved in the planning or implementation of drug testing programs in making informed choices. Articles include: (1)…

  11. Data Matching, Integration, and Interoperability for a Metric Assessment of Monographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Cornacchia, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper details a unique data experiment carried out at the University of Amsterdam, Center for Digital Humanities. Data pertaining to monographs were collected from three autonomous resources, the Scopus Journal Index, WorldCat.org and Goodreads, and linked according to unique identifiers...

  12. HPLC method validation for modernization of the tetracycline hydrochloride capsule USP monograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad M. Hussien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuation to our previous work aiming at development and validation of a reversed-phase HPLC for modernization of tetracycline-related USP monographs and the USP general chapter . Previous results showed that the method is accurate and precise for the assay of tetracycline hydrochloride and the limit of 4-epianhydrotetracycline impurity in the drug substance and oral suspension monographs. The aim of the current paper is to examine the feasibility of the method for modernization of USP tetracycline hydrochloride capsule monograph. Specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision were examined for tetracycline hydrochloride assay and 4-epianhydrotetracycline limit. The method was linear in the concentration range from 80% to 160% (r>0.9998 of the assay concentration (0.1 mg/mL for tetracycline hydrochloride and from 50% to 150% (r>0.997 of the acceptance criteria specified in tetracycline hydrochloride capsule monograph for 4-epianhydrotetracycline (NMT 3.0%. The recovery at three concentration levels for tetracycline hydrochloride assay was between 99% and 101% and the RSD from six preparations at the concentration 0.1 mg/mL is less than 0.6%. The recovery for 4-epianhydrotetracycline limit procedure over the concentration range from 50% to 150% is between 96% and 102% with RSD less than 5%. The results met the specified acceptance criteria.

  13. Affirmative Action Versus Seniority--Is Conflict Inevitable? Monograph of the California Public Employee Relations Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebulski, Bonnie G.

    In this monograph, the Federal equal employment opportunity law (the legislation and litigation on the seniority conflict) and the nature of seniority rights in the public sector are examined. The concept of affirmative action is discussed with reference to legislation and national policy and the interrelationship of affirmative action to layoffs…

  14. South Asian Nomads--A Literature Review. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This review of literature on South Asian nomads is part of a series of monographs on educational access published by the Consortium for Research on Educational Access Transitions and Equity (CREATE). In the context of India, most recent work has focused on access to the education system for the poor. CREATE research in India has focused on …

  15. Does It Make a Sound: Are Open Access Monographs Discoverable in Library Catalogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an exploratory study examining the common perception among library-based publishers that open access academic publications (especially monographs) are not readily discoverable in library catalogs. Using titles from the Michigan Publishing imprint, digital culture books, the study provides an empirical basis for evaluating…

  16. Compilation of monographs on α-, β-, γ- and X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debertin, K.

    1977-11-01

    The working group 'α-, β-, γ-Ray Spectrometry' of the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) compiled about 35 monographs on α-, β-, γ- and X-ray spectrometry which were published in the years 1970 to 1976. Support was obtained by the Zentralstelle fuer Atomkernenergie-Dokumentation (ZAED) in Karlsruhe. (orig.) [de

  17. Place as Text: Approaches to Active Learning. 2nd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braid, Bernice, Ed.; Long, Ada, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The decade since publication of "Place as Text: Approaches to Active Learning" has seen an explosion of interest and productivity in the field of experiential education. This monograph presents a story of an experiment and a blueprint of sorts for anyone interested in enriching an existing program or willing to experiment with pedagogy…

  18. Monograph on safety in high power and high energy advanced technologies and medical applications of lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is intended for creating awareness amongst the safety and health professionals of nuclear and radiation facilities on hazards involved in high power and high energy advanced technologies as well as on how development of advanced technologies can benefit the common people

  19. Honors Programs at Smaller Colleges. 3rd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This monograph focuses upon areas of special concern to those working with honors at smaller colleges and universities: mission, recruitment, facilities, administration, budget, and curriculum. In each area, the author makes some general suggestions about overall operating principles, note specific issues that can lead to difficulties, and suggest…

  20. Evaluation in School Districts; Organizational Perspectives. CSE Monograph Series in Evaluation, 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Adrianne, Ed.; Williams, Richard C., Ed.

    This monograph focuses on educational evaluation and how it occurs within a specific setting--school districts' central administrative offices--examining the relationships between evaluation activities and district organizational features that impinge upon such activities. The various chapter authors worked with the Center for the Study of…

  1. Unitas: Evaluating a Preventative Program for Hispanic and Black Youth. Monograph No. 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procidano, Mary E.; Glenwick, David S.

    This monograph is the third of a trilogy of studies on the Unitas Therapeutic Community, a program that attempts to strengthen the competencies of the Hispanic and Black youngsters living in the Longwood/Hunts Point section of the South Bronx, New York City. The program uses indigenous nonprofessionals as surrogate parents, uncles, and aunts for…

  2. Logo and Geometry. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Douglas H.; Battista, Michael T.

    This book, the 10th volume in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (JRME) Monograph Series, discusses the geometry curriculum and investigates how elementary school students learn geometric concepts and how Logo programming and its turtle graphics might affect this learning. This volume also provides details on the development,…

  3. Knowing How To Teach Well: Teachers Reflect on their Classroom Practice. ACER Research Monograph No. 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Margaret; And Others

    This monograph gives an account of three associated studies of the professional craft knowledge of teachers as articulated by 20 teachers in 4 secondary schools in Victoria, Queensland, and New South Wales, Australia. Participants were chosen on the basis of: (1) student identification of their best teachers and (2) equal representation from three…

  4. On the rise of Bayesian econometrics after Cowles Foundation Monographs 10, 14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baştürk, N.; Çakmak, C.; Pinar Ceyhan, S.; van Dijk, H.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper starts with a brief description of the introduction of the likelihood approach in econometrics as presented in Cowles Foundation Monographs 10 and 14. A sketch is given of the criticisms on this approach mainly from the first group of Bayesian econometricians. Publication and citation

  5. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report. UNO Aviation Monograph Series. UNOAI Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Box, Richard C.; Fink, Mary M.; Gogos, George; Lehrer, Henry R.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; O'Neil, Patrick D.; Tarry, Scott E.; Vlasek, Karisa D.

    This document contains four papers on aeronautics education, research, and partnerships that partly supported through the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL). The paper "2002 AERIAL Monograph" (Brent D. Bowen, Jocelyn S. Nickerson, Mary M. Fink, et al.) presents an overview of research and development in the…

  6. Work, Life and VET Participation amongst Lower-Paid Workers. NCVER Monograph Series 05/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Barbara; Skinner, Natalie; McMahon, Catherine; Pritchard, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This monograph is the culmination of a three-year research program undertaken by the University of South Australia's Centre for Work+Life. It considers the barriers, support and benefit of vocational education and training (VET) for workers in the low-paid occupations (that is, those earning around $17 per hour). The research considered a wide…

  7. News Piracy: Unfair Competition and the Misappropriation Doctrine. Journalism Monographs No. 56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Paul W.

    Unfair competition is a complex problem affecting all areas of American business, including the communications media. Piracy of material, an alarmingly widespread example of unfair competition, involves legal as well as ethical questions. This monograph uses the historical approach to trace the development of common-law precedent and trends and…

  8. Prevention, The Beginning of the Rehabilitation Process: A View from New Zealand. Monograph #46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian B.

    The monograph argues that prevention should be considered the first step in the rehabilitation process, and examines preventive efforts in the areas of occupational safety, road safety, home safety, and sporting and recreational safety. Following an introductory chapter, other chapters discuss: (1) the close relationship between compensation,…

  9. A Network for Integrated Science and Mathematics Teaching and Learning. NCSTL Monograph Series, #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Donna F.; White, Arthur L.

    This monograph presents a summary of the results of the Wingspread Conference in April, 1991 concerning the viability and future of the concept of integration of mathematics and science teaching and learning. The conference focused on three critical issues: (1) development of definitions of integration and a rationale for integrated teaching and…

  10. Setting the Table for Diversity. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Lisa L., Ed.; Kotinek, Jonathan D., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph provides a cross section of policy and practice through the voices and experiences of honors faculty, staff, and students from across the nation. While far from comprehensive, this volume does pick up different strands of thinking on diversity to present a rich and complicated understanding of what diversity is, why it is important,…

  11. Re-irradiation for oligo-recurrence from esophageal cancer with radiotherapy history: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingu, Keiichi; Niibe, Yuzuru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Katsui, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Nishina, Tomohiro; Terahara, Atsuro

    2017-09-05

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy following surgery has recently become a standard therapy. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effectiveness and toxicity of re-irradiation for oligo-recurrence in lymph nodes from esophageal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy or by surgery with additional radiotherapy. We reviewed retrospectively 248 patients treated with (chemo)radiotherapy for oligo-recurrence in lymph nodes from esophageal cancer in five Japanese high-volume centers between 2000 and 2015. Thirty-three patients in whom re-irradiation was performed were enrolled in this study, and the results for patients in whom re-irradiation was performed were compared with the results for other patients. Median maximum lymph node diameter was 22 mm. Median total radiation dose was 60 Gy. The median calculated biological effective dose using the LQ model with α/β = 10 Gy (BED10) in patients in whom re-irradiation was performed was significantly lower than the median BED10 in others. There was no different factor except for BED10, histology and irradiation field between patients with a past irradiation history and patients without a past irradiation history. The median observation period in surviving patients in whom re-irradiation was performed was 21.7 months. The 3-year overall survival rate in the 33 patients with a past irradiation history was 17.9%, with a median survival period of 16.0 months. Overall survival rate and local control rate in patients with a past irradiation history were significantly worse than those in patients without a past irradiation history (log-rank test, p = 0.016 and p = 0.0007, respectively). One patient in whom re-irradiation was performed died from treatment-related gastric hemorrhage. Results in the present study suggested that re-irradiation for oligo-recurrence in lymph nodes from esophageal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy or by surgery with additional radiotherapy might be acceptable but

  12. Synchronous Primary Cancers of the Endometrium and Ovary With the Same Histopathologic Type Versus Endometrial Cancer With Ovarian Metastasis: A Single Institution Review of 72 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bese, Tugan; Sal, Veysel; Kahramanoglu, Ilker; Tokgozoglu, Nedim; Demirkiran, Fuat; Turan, Hasan; Ilvan, Sennur; Arvas, Macit

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of women with simultaneous endometrial and ovarian carcinomas having the same histopathologic type. A review of medical records from 1997 to 2015 identified 72 patients with simultaneous carcinomas of the endometrium and ovary with the same histopathologic type. Patients with synchronous primary cancers of endometrium and ovary (SCEOs) were compared with patients with primary endometrial cancer with ovarian metastasis (ECOM). Clinical and pathological data were obtained from the patients' medical records. Clinicopathological variables including categorical data were analyzed by χ(2) or Fisher exact test and continuous data by a Student t test. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed and compared by using the log-rank test. A univariate and multivariate analysis of 72 patients with SCEO with the same histopathologic type revealed that SCEO is an independent prognostic factor of 10-year overall survival. There were 31 patients in the SCEO group and 41 patients in the ECOM group. With a mean follow-up time of 68.2 months, the 10-year overall survival rates were 61.3% and 36.6% in SCEO and ECOM groups, respectively (P = 0.029). Age, menopausal status, stage of ovarian cancer, performing lymphadenectomy, grade of endometrial tumor, omental metastasis, and residual tumor were found to be significant risk factors for recurrence in the synchronous group. The differentiation between SCEO and ECOM is of great clinical importance while our results showed a better prognosis for patients with SCEO compared with patients with ECOM. More aggressive therapeutic approaches may be considered for patients with SCEO who are older, postmenopausal, and/or have advanced grade of endometrial tumor, omental metastasis, and residual tumor. Lymphadenectomy should be performed in every patient with SCEO.

  13. Cross-cultural Adaptation of the EORTC QLQ CR-29 Questionnaire for Use in Colorectal Cancer Patients at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, Oscar; Oliveros, Ricardo; Sanchez, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To validate a cross-cultural version of the EORTC QLQ CR-29 questionnaire version 2.0 (neutral Spanish) for use in Colombian patients. Methods: The EORTC quality of life group algorithm was applied including translation, translation comparison, reverse translation, and pilot application of the questionnaire. Results: The terms used to define the answers across items were modified. In four items the instrument was also modified using different words. The pilot verified a better understanding after the changes. Conclusions: An adapted version of the EORTC QLQ CR-29 is available for Colombia. Thus, validation of psychometric properties through its application in colorectal cancer patients is currently suitable.

  14. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ 2  = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  15. The long tail of molecular alterations in non-small cell lung cancer: a single-institution experience of next-generation sequencing in clinical molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Caterina; Vacirca, Davide; Rappa, Alessandra; Passaro, Antonio; Guarize, Juliana; Rafaniello Raviele, Paola; de Marinis, Filippo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Casadio, Chiara; Viale, Giuseppe; Barberis, Massimo; Guerini-Rocco, Elena

    2018-03-13

    Molecular profiling of advanced non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) is essential to identify patients who may benefit from targeted treatments. In the last years, the number of potentially actionable molecular alterations has rapidly increased. Next-generation sequencing allows for the analysis of multiple genes simultaneously. To evaluate the feasibility and the throughput of next-generation sequencing in clinical molecular diagnostics of advanced NSCLC. A single-institution cohort of 535 non-squamous NSCLC was profiled using a next-generation sequencing panel targeting 22 actionable and cancer-related genes. 441 non-squamous NSCLC (82.4%) harboured at least one gene alteration, including 340 cases (63.6%) with clinically relevant molecular aberrations. Mutations have been detected in all but one gene ( FGFR1 ) of the panel. Recurrent alterations were observed in KRAS , TP53 , EGFR , STK11 and MET genes, whereas the remaining genes were mutated in <5% of the cases. Concurrent mutations were detected in 183 tumours (34.2%), mostly impairing KRAS or EGFR in association with TP53 alterations. The study highlights the feasibility of targeted next-generation sequencing in clinical setting. The majority of NSCLC harboured mutations in clinically relevant genes, thus identifying patients who might benefit from different targeted therapies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

  17. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  18. The challenge to bring personalized cancer medicine from clinical trials into routine clinical practice: the case of the Institut Gustave Roussy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnedos, Monica; André, Fabrice; Farace, Françoise; Lacroix, Ludovic; Besse, Benjamin; Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2012-04-01

    Research with high throughput technologies has propitiated the segmentation of different types of tumors into very small subgroups characterized by the presence of very rare molecular alterations. The identification of these subgroups and the apparition of new agents targeting these infrequent alterations are already affecting the way in which clinical trials are being conducted with an increased need to identify those patients harboring specific molecular alterations. In this review we describe some of the currently ongoing and future studies at the Institut Gustave Roussy that aim for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for cancer patients with the incorporation of high throughput technologies into daily practice including aCGH, next generation sequencing and the creation of a software that allows for target identification specific for each tumor. The initial intention is to enrich clinical trials with cancer patients carrying certain molecular alterations in order to increase the possibility of demonstrating benefit from a targeted agent. Mid and long term aims are to facilitate and speed up the process of drug development as well as to implement the concept of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photobiomodulation therapy for the management of radiation-induced dermatitis. A single-institution experience of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouthos, Iosif; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Tselis, Nikolaos; Bon, Dimitra; Karagiannis, Efstratios; Zoga, Eleni; Ferentinos, Konstantinos; Maximenko, Julia; Nikolettou-Fischer, Vassiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) comprises a key component in the treatment of breast cancer. Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the major adverse event experienced by patients; however, radiodermatitis (RD) prevention and management remains trivial. It is proven that photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy using light-emitting diode (LED) increases wound healing and depicts an anti-inflammatory effect. This single-institute study evaluates the beneficial role of PBM-LED in preventing/reducing RD during breast cancer RT. Of 70 consecutively treated patients, 25 patients were treated with PBM-LED twice a week prior to adjuvant 3D conformal RT after breast-conserving surgery. RD was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 and pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS). For comparison, a control group (n = 45) received RT without PBM-LED. In addition, a ''matched'' group (n = 25) was generated from the control group based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. In the PBM group, 22 patients (88%) presented grade 1 and 3 (12%) grade 2 RD. In the control group, 25 patients (55.6%) developed grade 1 reactions, 18 patients (40%) grade 2, and 2 (4.4%) patients grade 3 RD. Concerning pain intensity, 15 patients (60%) of the PBM treatment arm reported no pain, 5 patients (20%) VAS 2, and 5 (20%) VAS 3. In the control group, 13 patients (28.9%) reported no pain, 2 (4.4%) VAS 1, 7 (15.6%) VAS 2, 9 patients (20%) reported VAS 3, 12 (26.7%) patients VAS 4, and 2 (4.4%) patients VAS 5. PBM-LED therapy applied prior to RT might be effective in decreasing the incidence and sequelae of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  20. Concordance Between FISH Analysis of Her-2/Neu Gene in Breast Duct Carcinoma and Corresponding Axillary Nodal Metastases: Egyptian National Cancer Institute Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Omnia M; Hassan, Hannan; ELBakey, Heba A; Mosaad, Maha

    2018-05-10

    Breast cancer is a major health problem in Egypt. Her-2/Neu gene is routinely assessed for all breast cancer patients primarily by immunohistochemistry. At National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, Flourescence In Situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of Her-2/Neu gene is carried out for Her-2/Neu score 2 and for some cases of score 3 (particularly those assessed outside NCI). The test is performed essentially on the primary tumor. However, some situations require testing on corresponding lymph node metastases. There is a debate about the concordance between Her-2/Neu status in the primary tumor and synchronous lymph node metastases in various studies. The aim of this study was to test for the concordance between Her-2/Neu status in the primary breast tumor and corresponding axillary nodal metastases. This is a retrospective study in which FISH analysis of Her-2/Neu was carried out simultaneously on archived material of 50 cases previously diagnosed as invasive duct carcinoma and the corresponding nodal metastases from the Pathology Department, NCI. There was complete concordance between Her-2 status in the primary tumor and the corresponding axillary lymph node metastatic deposits in which Her-2 was amplified in 44% of the studied cohort of Egyptian patients. Her-2/Neu gene assessed by FISH analysis on synchronous lymph node metastases is strongly correlated with the primary tumor. Hence, it is justified to carry out the Her-2/Neu test on synchronous lymph nodes to decide on whether to carry out anti-Her-2/Neu target therapy. Further studies on other metastatic sites is recommended.

  1. [Undifferentiated (embryonal) liver sarcoma: reviaew of 6 cases in National Cancer Institute, Lima, Peru. Review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Daniela; Huanca, Lourdes; Cordero, Mónica; Webb, Patricia; Ruiz, Eloy

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated (embryonal) liver sarcoma is a rare tumor about 2% of all malignant liver tumors with a poor prognosis and usually occurs in children, this review aims to assess cases of primary embryonal sarcoma of the liver presented at our institution the past 8 years and improve recognition of its variants and evaluate immunohistochemical characteristics that help differentiated it from other tumors. Six cases of undifferentiated liver sarcoma were histologically evaluated and investigated by immunohistochemistry with a panel of antibodies using the equipment “Autostainer Link 48”. Usually masses were on average more than 20 cm, with solid, cystic, mucinous areas. The microscopic features include cells of spindle cell appearance, oval, starry, epithelioid and multinucleated cells densely arranged in a myxoid matrix. Trapped bile ducts and hepatic cords often present in the periphery of tumors. Intracellular and extracellular PAS positive hyaline globules. Immunohistochemistry showed very divergent differentiation.

  2. Standard of Care Versus Metastases-directed Therapy for PET-detected Nodal Oligorecurrent Prostate Cancer Following Multimodality Treatment: A Multi-institutional Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuber, T; Jilg, C; Tennstedt, P; De Bruycker, A; Tilki, D; Decaestecker, K; Zilli, T; Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Wetterauer, U; Grosu, A L; Schultze-Seemann, W; Heinzer, H; Graefen, M; Morlacco, A; Karnes, R J; Ost, P

    2018-03-10

    Most prostate cancer (PCa) patients with a biochemical failure following primary multimodality treatment (surgery and postoperative radiotherapy) relapse in the nodes. To perform a matched-case analysis in men with lymph node recurrent PCa comparing standard of care (SOC) with metastasis-directed therapy (MDT). PCa patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression following multimodality treatment were included in this retrospective multi-institutional analysis. The SOC cohort (n=1816) received immediate or delayed androgen deprivation therapy administered at PSA progression. The MDT cohort (n=263) received either salvage lymph node dissection (n=166) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (n=97) at PSA progression to a positron emission tomography-detected nodal recurrence. The primary endpoint, cancer-specific survival (CSS), was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards models, and propensity score-matched analyses. At a median follow-up of 70 (interquartile range: 48-98) mo, MDT was associated with an improved CSS on univariate (p=0.029) and multivariate analysis (hazard ratio: 0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17-0.64) adjusted for the year of radical prostatectomy (RP), age at RP, PSA at RP, time from RP to PSA progression, Gleason score, surgical margin status, pT- and pN-stage. In total, 659 men were matched (3:1 ratio). The 5-yr CSS was 98.6% (95% CI: 94.3-99.6) and 95.7% (95% CI: 93.2-97.3) for MDT and SOC, respectively (p=0.005, log-rank). The main limitations of our study are its retrospective design and lack of standardization of systemic treatment in the SOC cohort. MDT for nodal oligorecurrent PCa improves CSS as compared with SOC. These retrospective data from a multi-institutional pooled analysis should be considered as hypothesis-generating and inform future randomized trials in this setting. Prostate cancer patients experiencing a lymph node recurrence might benefit from local treatments directed at

  3. Engineering Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Projects Past Projects Publications NSEC » Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Multidisciplinary engineering research that integrates advanced modeling and simulations, novel sensing systems and new home of Engineering Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI

  4. Outcome in Advanced Ovarian Cancer following an Appropriate and Comprehensive Effort at Upfront Cytoreduction: A Twenty-Year Experience in a Single Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marszalek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this retrospective evaluation of advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients was to compare outcome with published findings from other centers and to discuss future options for the management of advanced ovarian carcinoma patients. Methods. A retrospective series of 340 patients with a mean age of 58 years (range: 17–88 treated for FIGO stage III and IV ovarian cancer between January 1985 and January 2005 was reviewed. All patients had primary cytoreductive surgery, without extensive bowel, peritoneal, or systematic lymph node resection, thereby allowing initiation of chemotherapy without delay. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in combination with alkylating agents before 2000, whereas carboplatin and paclitaxel regimes were generally used after 1999-2000. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Results. With a mean followup of 101 months (range: 5 to 203, 280 events (recurrence or death were observed and 245 patients (72% had died. The mortality and morbidity related to surgery were low. The main prognostic factor for overall survival was postoperative residual disease (P<.0002, while the main prognostic factor for disease-free survival was histological tumor type (P<.0007. Multivariate analysis identified three significant risk factors: optimal surgery (RR=2.2 for suboptimal surgery, menopausal status (RR=1.47 for postmenopausal women, and presence of a taxane in the chemotherapy combination (RR=0.72. Conclusion. These results confirm that optimal surgery defined by an appropriate and comprehensive effort at upfront cytoreduction limits morbidity related to the surgical procedure and allows initiation of chemotherapy without any negative impact on survival. The impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to improve resectability while lowering the morbidity of the surgical procedure is discussed.

  5. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [de

  6. Computers, Laptops and Tools. ACER Research Monograph No. 56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, Mary; Bourke, Valerie; Chatfield, Robert; Hillman, Kylie; Watkins, Ian

    In 1997, Balwyn High School (Australia) instituted a class of 28 Year 7 students to use laptop computers across the curriculum. This report details findings from an action research project that monitored important aspects of what happened when this program was introduced. A range of measures was developed to assess the influence of the use of…

  7. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumors in Germany: first results of a multi-institutional cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörsch, Dieter; Ezziddin, Samer; Haug, Alexander; Gratz, Klaus Friedrich; Dunkelmann, Simone; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Schümichen, Carl; Bengel, Frank M; Knapp, Wolfram H; Bartenstein, Peter; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Plöckinger, Ursula; Schwartz-Fuchs, Sabine; Baum, R P

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is an effective treatment option for patients with well-differentiated somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors. However, published data result mainly from retrospective monocentric studies. We initiated a multi-institutional, prospective, board-reviewed registry for patients treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in Germany in 2009. In five centers, 297 patients were registered. Primary tumors were mainly derived from pancreas (117/297) and small intestine (80/297), whereas 56 were of unknown primary. Most tumors were well differentiated with median Ki67 proliferation rate of 5% (range 0.9-70%). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy was performed using mainly yttrium-90 and/or lutetium-177 as radionuclides in 1-8 cycles. Mean overall survival was estimated at 213 months with follow-up between 1 and 230 months after initial diagnosis, and 87 months with follow-up between 1 and 92 months after start of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Median overall survival was not yet reached. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that best results were obtained in neuroendocrine tumors with proliferation rate below 20%. Our results indicate that peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is an effective treatment for well- and moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors irrespective of previous therapies and should be regarded as one of the primary treatment options for patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors.

  8. Salvage Radiation Therapy Dose Response for Biochemical Failure of Prostate Cancer After Prostatectomy—A Multi-Institutional Observational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisansky, Thomas M., E-mail: pisansky.thomas@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Agrawal, Shree [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koontz, Bridget F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Moghanaki, Drew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Den, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists for salvage radiation therapy (RT) of biochemical failure after prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Individual data from 1108 patients who underwent salvage RT at 10 academic centers were pooled. The cohort was enriched for selection criteria more likely associated with tumor recurrence in the prostate bed (margin positive and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of ≤2.0 ng/mL) and without the confounding of planned androgen suppression. The cumulative incidence of biochemical failure and distant metastasis over time was computed, and competing risks hazard regression models were used to investigate the association between potential predictors and these outcomes. The association of radiation dose with outcomes was the primary focus. Results: With a 65.2-month follow-up duration, the 5- and 10-year estimates of freedom from post-RT biochemical failure (PSA level >0.2 ng/mL and rising) was 63.5% and 49.8%, respectively, and the cumulative incidence of distant metastasis was 12.4% by 10 years. A Gleason score of ≥7, higher pre-RT PSA level, extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle invasion were associated with worse biochemical failure and distant metastasis outcomes. A salvage radiation dose of ≥66.0 Gy was associated with a reduced cumulative incidence of biochemical failure, but not of distant metastasis. Conclusions: The use of salvage radiation doses of ≥66.0 Gy are supported by evidence presented in the present multicenter pooled analysis of individual patient data. The observational reporting method, limited sample size, few distant metastasis events, modest follow-up duration, and elective use of salvage therapy might have diminished the opportunity to identify an association between the radiation dose and this endpoint.

  9. Salvage Radiation Therapy Dose Response for Biochemical Failure of Prostate Cancer After Prostatectomy—A Multi-Institutional Observational Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Agrawal, Shree; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Koontz, Bridget F.; Liauw, Stanley L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Pollack, Alan; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Moghanaki, Drew; Den, Robert B.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Lee, W. Robert; Kattan, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists for salvage radiation therapy (RT) of biochemical failure after prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Individual data from 1108 patients who underwent salvage RT at 10 academic centers were pooled. The cohort was enriched for selection criteria more likely associated with tumor recurrence in the prostate bed (margin positive and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of ≤2.0 ng/mL) and without the confounding of planned androgen suppression. The cumulative incidence of biochemical failure and distant metastasis over time was computed, and competing risks hazard regression models were used to investigate the association between potential predictors and these outcomes. The association of radiation dose with outcomes was the primary focus. Results: With a 65.2-month follow-up duration, the 5- and 10-year estimates of freedom from post-RT biochemical failure (PSA level >0.2 ng/mL and rising) was 63.5% and 49.8%, respectively, and the cumulative incidence of distant metastasis was 12.4% by 10 years. A Gleason score of ≥7, higher pre-RT PSA level, extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle invasion were associated with worse biochemical failure and distant metastasis outcomes. A salvage radiation dose of ≥66.0 Gy was associated with a reduced cumulative incidence of biochemical failure, but not of distant metastasis. Conclusions: The use of salvage radiation doses of ≥66.0 Gy are supported by evidence presented in the present multicenter pooled analysis of individual patient data. The observational reporting method, limited sample size, few distant metastasis events, modest follow-up duration, and elective use of salvage therapy might have diminished the opportunity to identify an association between the radiation dose and this endpoint.

  10. NTP-CERHR Monograph on the Potential Human Reproductive and Developmental Effects of Di-n-Butyl Phthalate (DBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    concludes that there is some concern for DBP causing adverse effects to human development, particularly development of the male reproductive system. NTP-CERHR monographs are transmitted to federal and state agencies, interested parties, and the public and are available electronically in PDF format on the CERHR web site (http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov) and in printed text or CD-ROM from the CERHR (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD EC-32, Research Triangle Park, NC; fax: 919-316-4511).

  11. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  12. Prognostic factors of endometrial cancer: analysis of a series of 206 patients treated at the Institut Curie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.; De La Rochefordiere, A.; Mouret-Fourme, E.; Durand, J.C.; Clough, K.; Asselain, B.; Labib, A.; Fenton, J.

    1995-01-01

    From january 1, 1983 to December 31, 1990 two hundred and six patients with an invasive, non metastatic endometrial carcinoma were first treated at Institut Curie. Initial tumoral staging (TNM) was as follows: stage Ia: 48%, stage Ib: 31%, stage II: 15% and stage III-IV: 6 %. Total hysterectomy or colpohysterectomy was performed in 186 cases, with a bilateral oophorectomy in 180 cases. Bilateral limited pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed in 116 cases. Brachytherapy was performed in the pre-operative setting in 25 cases, in the post-operative setting in 134 cases. Only five patients had brachytherapy alone, because of poor medical condition. External irradiation was exclusive in 15 cases and added to surgery for 68 patients. Median follow-up is 61 months (8-122 months). Five-year survival rate is 77% (71-83%); 5-year specific survival rate is 81% (75-87%).Independent prognostic factors for survival in multivariate analysis (Cox regression model) are tumoral stage (p<0.0001), ovarian involvement (p<0.0001), histologic node involvement (p=3D0.005) and grade (p=3D0.01). For local relapse, independent risk factors in the same analysis are ovarian involvement (p=3D0.0004), tumoral stage (p=3D0.01), age (p=3D0.02) and histologic involvement of cervix (p=3D0.04). For distant failure, independent risk factors are histologic node involvement (p=3D0.0001), tumoral stage (p=3D0.002) and grade (p=3D0.003). (authors). 30 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  13. Radiation therapy with or without primary limited surgery for operable breast cancer: A 20-year experience at the Marseilles Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amalric, R.; Santamaria, F.; Robert, F.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1960 more than 3000 consecutive patients with operable infiltrating breast carcinoma were treated by radiation therapy with or without primary limited surgery, which usually consisted of local excision. For tumors smaller than or equal to 5 cm the ten-year crude survival rate is 77% for patients without palpable axillary nodes (T/sub 1-2/N 0 ) and 63% for patients having axillary adenopathy (T/sub 1-2/N 1 ). For operable tumors exceeding 5 cm in diameter (T 3 N/sub 0-1/) the ten-year crude survival is 34%. Thirty-five percent of the patients alive free of disease at ten years required a secondary operation for presumed local or regional tumor persistence or recurrence, although no residual disease was found in 24% of the operative specimens. Local-regional recurrence had no adverse effect on ten-year survival. This conservative approach offers most women with operable breast cancer an excellent chance at breast preservation with the same chance for ten-year survival as with radical mastectomy

  14. Possible ambiguities when testing viscosity in compendial monographs - characterisation of grades of cellulose ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelker, E

    2010-10-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) monographs for the water-soluble cellulose ethers require viscosity determination, either in the "Tests" section or in the non-mandatory "Functionality-related characteristics" section. Although the derivatives are chemically closely related and used for similar applications, the viscosity tests strongly differ. Some monographs generically speak of the rotating viscometer method (2.2.10) and a fixed shear rate (e.g. 10 s-1), which would necessitate an absolute measuring system, while others recommend the capillary viscometer method for product grades of less than 600 mPa∙s and the rotating viscometer method and given operating conditions for grades of higher nominal viscosity. Viscometer methods also differ between the United States Pharmacopeia/National Formulary (USP/NF) and the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) monographs. In addition, for some cellulose ethers the tests sometimes diverge from one pharmacopoeia to the other, although the three compendiums are in a harmonisation process. But the main issue is that the viscometer methods originally employed by the product manufacturers are often not those described in the corresponding monographs and generally vary from one manufacturer to the other. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether such a situation could invalidate the present pharmacopoeial requirements. 2 per cent solutions of several viscosity grades of hydroxyethylcellulose, hypromellose and methylcellulose were prepared and their (apparent) viscosity determined using both relative and absolute viscometer methods. The viscometer method used not only affects the measured viscosity but experimental values generally do not correspond to the product nominal viscosities. It emerges that, in contrast to Newtonian solutions (i.e. those of grades of up to ca. 50 mPa∙s nominal viscosity), some of the viscometer methods currently specified in the monographs are not able unambiguously to characterise the

  15. Multi institutional phase II study of concomitant stereotactic reirradiation and cetuximab for recurrent head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, Eric F.; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Thariat, Juliette; Graff, Pierre; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Benezery, Karen; Schiappacasse, Luis; Degardin, Marian; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Peiffert, Didier; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lacornerie, Thomas; Kramar, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recurrent head and neck cancer is associated to a poor survival prognosis. A high toxicity rate is demonstrated when surgery and/or radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy are combined. Furthermore, the duration of treatment is often not ethically compatible with the expected survival (median survival < 1 year). Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. After completion of a feasibility study, results of a multicentric study (Lille, Nancy and Nice) using SBRT with cetuximab are reported. The aim of the study was to deliver non toxic short course SBRT (2 weeks) in order to get the same local control as the one demonstrated with longer protocols. Methods and materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor in a previously irradiated area, were included (WHO < 3). Reirradiation (RT) dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the PTV with 5 injections of concomitant cetuximab (CT). All patients had previous radiotherapy, 85% had previous surgery and 48% previous chemotherapy. Results: Between 11/2007 and 08/2010, 60 were included (46 men and 14 women), 56 received CT + RT, 3 were not treated and 1 received only CT. Median age was 60 (42–87)) and all 56 patients had squamous carcinoma and received concomitant cetuximab. Mean time between previous radiotherapy and the start of SBRT was 38 months. Cutaneous toxicity was observed for 41 patients. There was one toxic death from hemorrhage and denutrition. Median follow-up was 11.4 months. At 3 months, response rate was 58.4% (95% CI: 43.2–72.4%) and disease control rate was 91.7% (95% CI: 80.0–97.7%). The one-year OS rate was 47.5% (95% CI: 30.8–62.4). Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC

  16. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. 20-year experience from a single institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K.; Sauer, T.; Klemm, S.; Bayer, C.; Haller, B.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To report the efficacy and toxicity of radio(chemo)therapy (RCT) in the management of squamous cell anal carcinoma (SQ-AC) and to evaluate the prognostic factors influencing the outcomes. Patients and methods: A consecutive cohort of 138 patients with cT1-4, cN0-3, cM0 SQ-AC were treated with RCT between 1988 and 2011 at our department. Median follow-up time for surviving patients from the start of RCT was 98 months (range, 1-236 months). Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 56 Gy (range, 4-61 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 119 patients (86%). Results: The survival rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 88 {+-} 3, 82 {+-} 4, and 59 {+-} 6%, respectively, with a median overall survival (OS) of 167 months. The cumulative incidence for local recurrence at 2 and 5 years was 8 {+-} 2 and 11 {+-} 3%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) times were 132 and 135 months, respectively. In 19 patients (14%), a distant metastasis was diagnosed after a median time of 19 months. In the multivariate analysis, UICC (International Union Against Cancer) stage I-II, female gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1, and good/moderate histologic differentiation (G1-2) were significantly associated with a better OS, DFS, and CFS. Conformal radiotherapy planning techniques were significantly associated with a lower cumulative incidence of local recurrence (11 {+-} 3% vs. 38 {+-} 19% at 5 years, p = 0.006). A higher radiation dose beyond 54 Gy was not associated with an improvement in outcome, neither for smaller - (T1/T2) nor for larger tumors (T3/T4). Conclusion: RCT leads to excellent outcomes - especially in patients with stage I/II and G1/G2 tumors - with acceptable toxicity. The probable advantages of high-dose radiotherapy should be considered carefully against the risk of a higher rate of toxicity. Future studies are needed to investigate the role of a more

  17. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die mit ungeplanten Behandlungsunterbrechungen bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie des Mammakarzinoms assoziiert sind. Es wurden Patienten untersucht, die eine adjuvante Strahlentherapie der Mamma oder Brustwand zwischen Maerz 2014 und August 2016 erhielten. Zur Anwendung kamen als Fraktionierungsprotokoll und strahlentherapeutische Technik eine konventionell fraktionierte (CF; 28 Fraktionen mit

  18. Postoperative chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer - is the Macdonald Regimen Tolerable? a retrospective multi-institutional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundel, Yulia; Fenig, Eyal; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch; Purim, Ofer; Idelevich, Efraim; Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Man, Sofia; Kovel, Svetlana; Karminsky, Natalia; Pfeffer, Raphael M; Nisenbaum, Bella

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative chemoradiation as per Intergroup-0116 trial ('Macdonald regimen') is considered standard for completely resected high risk gastric cancer. However, many concerns remain with regards to the toxicity of this regimen. To evaluate the safety and tolerability of this regimen in a routine clinical practice setting, we analyzed our experience with its use. As we did not expect a different toxic profile in patients (pts) with positive margins (R1 resection), these were studied together with pts after complete resection (R0). Postoperative chemoradiation therapy was given according to the original Intergroup-0116 regimen. Overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of OS and DFS between R0 and R1 pts was done using the log-rank test. Between 6/2000 and 12/2007, 166 pts after R0 (129 pts) or R1 (37 pts) resection of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma received postoperative chemoradiation; 61% were male and the median age was 63 years (range, 23-86); 78% had T ≥ 3 tumors and 81% had N+ disease; 87% of the pts completed radiotherapy and 54% completed the entire chemoradiation plan; 46.4% had grade ≥ 3 toxicity and 32% were hospitalized at least once for toxicity. Three pts (1.8%) died of toxicity: diarrhea (1), neutropenic sepsis (1) and neutropenic sepsis complicated by small bowel gangrene (1). The most common hematological toxicity was neutropenia, grade ≥ 3 in 30% of pts and complicated by fever in 15%. The most common non-hematological toxicities were nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. With a median follow-up of 51 months (range, 2-100), 62% of the R0 patients remain alive and 61% are free of disease. Median DFS and OS for R0 were not reached. R0 pts had a significantly higher 3-year DFS (60% vs. 29%, p = 0.001) and OS (61% vs. 33%, p = 0.01) compared with R1 pts. In our experience, postoperative chemoradiation as per Intergroup-0116 seems to be substantially toxic

  19. Cancer - renal pelvis or ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer Images Kidney anatomy References National Cancer Institute website. Transitional cell cancer (kidney/ureter) treatment (PDQ) - health professional version. www.cancer. ...

  20. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Ruysscher, Dirk de [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aurora, CO (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [German] Fuer fruehe und lokal fortgeschrittene Stadien des nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (NSCLC) wurden Behandlungsleitlinien publiziert

  1. Is there any association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Ceylan, Cavit; Kilinc, Fatih; Gazel, Eymen; Resorlu, Berkan; Odabas, Oner

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer. The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure), history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient's age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded. In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2%) patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7%) patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5-20.0) ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6-20.0) ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67). The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9%) patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6%) patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32). Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa.

  2. Dose-Painted Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Report of Acute Toxicity and Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Tsai, Henry K.; Coen, John J.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Hartshorn, Kevan; Kwak, Eunice L.; Willins, John D.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiation for anal cancer yields effective tumor control, but is associated with significant acute toxicity. We report our multi-institutional experience using dose-painted IMRT (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: Between August 2005 and May 2009, 43 patients were treated with DP-IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for biopsy-proven, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at two academic medical centers. DP-IMRT was prescribed as follows: T2N0: 42 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fraction (fx) to elective nodal planning target volume (PTV) and 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to anal tumor PTV; T3-4N0-3: 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fx to elective nodal PTV, and 54 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to the anal tumor and metastatic nodal PTV >3 cm with 50.4 Gy, 1.68 Gy/fx to nodal PTVs ≤3 cm in size. Acute and late toxicity was reported by the treating physician. Actuarial analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 58 years; 67% female; 16% Stage I, 37% II; 42% III; 5% IV. Fourteen patients were immunocompromised: 21% HIV-positive and 12% on chronic immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 0.6–43.5 months). Sixty percent completed chemoradiation without treatment interruption; median duration of treatment interruption was 2 days (range, 2–24 days). Acute Grade 3+ toxicity included: hematologic 51%, dermatologic 10%, gastrointestinal 7%, and genitourinary 7%. Two-year local control, overall survival, colostomy-free survival, and metastasis-free survival were 95%, 94%, 90%, and 92%, respectively. Conclusions: Dose-painted IMRT appears effective and well-tolerated as part of a chemoradiation therapy regimen for the treatment of anal canal cancer.

  3. Introducing nerve-sparing approach during minimally invasive radical hysterectomy for locally-advanced cervical cancer: A multi-institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspagliesi, Francesco; Bogani, Giorgio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Ditto, Antonino; Bogliolo, Stefano; Casarin, Jvan; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Gardella, Barbara; Chiappa, Valentina; Scaffa, Cono; Ferrero, Simone; Cromi, Antonella; Lorusso, Domenica; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of nerve-sparing (NS) approach on outcomes of patients undergoing minimally invasive radical hysterectomy (MRH) for locally advanced stage cervical cancer (LACC). Data of consecutive patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for LACC were retrospectively retrieved in a multi-institutional setting from 2009 to 2016. All patients included had minimally invasive class III radical hysterectomy (MRH or NS-MRH). Propensity matching algorithm was used to decrease possible allocation bias when comparing outcomes between groups. Overall, 83 patients were included. The prevalence of patients undergoing NS approach increased aver the study period (from 7% in the year 2009-2010 to 97% in the year 2015-2016; p-for-trend < 0.001). NS-MRH and MRH were performed in 47 (57%) and 36 (43%) patients, respectively. After the application the propensity-matching algorithm, we compared 35 patients' pair (total 70 patients). Postoperative complications rate was similar between groups. Patients undergoing NS-LRH experienced shorter hospital stay than patients undergoing LRH (3.6 vs. 5.0 days). 60-day pelvic floor dysfunction rates, including voiding, fecal and sexual alterations, were lower in the NS group in comparison to control group (p = 0.02). Five-year disease-free (p = 0.77) and overall (p = 0.36) survivals were similar comparing NS-MRH with MRH. The implementation of NS approach in the setting of LACC improves patients' outcomes, minimizing pelvic dysfunction rates. NS approach has not detrimental effects on survival outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  4. Dose-Painted Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Report of Acute Toxicity and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachnic, Lisa A., E-mail: lisa.kachnic@bmc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tsai, Henry K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Coen, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hartshorn, Kevan [Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Kwak, Eunice L. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willins, John D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiation for anal cancer yields effective tumor control, but is associated with significant acute toxicity. We report our multi-institutional experience using dose-painted IMRT (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: Between August 2005 and May 2009, 43 patients were treated with DP-IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for biopsy-proven, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at two academic medical centers. DP-IMRT was prescribed as follows: T2N0: 42 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fraction (fx) to elective nodal planning target volume (PTV) and 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to anal tumor PTV; T3-4N0-3: 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fx to elective nodal PTV, and 54 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to the anal tumor and metastatic nodal PTV >3 cm with 50.4 Gy, 1.68 Gy/fx to nodal PTVs {<=}3 cm in size. Acute and late toxicity was reported by the treating physician. Actuarial analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 58 years; 67% female; 16% Stage I, 37% II; 42% III; 5% IV. Fourteen patients were immunocompromised: 21% HIV-positive and 12% on chronic immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 0.6-43.5 months). Sixty percent completed chemoradiation without treatment interruption; median duration of treatment interruption was 2 days (range, 2-24 days). Acute Grade 3+ toxicity included: hematologic 51%, dermatologic 10%, gastrointestinal 7%, and genitourinary 7%. Two-year local control, overall survival, colostomy-free survival, and metastasis-free survival were 95%, 94%, 90%, and 92%, respectively. Conclusions: Dose-painted IMRT appears effective and well-tolerated as part of a chemoradiation therapy regimen for the treatment of anal canal cancer.

  5. Comorbidity and Karnofksy performance score are independent prognostic factors in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: an institutional analysis of patients treated on four RTOG studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic role of comorbidity in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated definitively with radiotherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 112 patients with clinical Stage III NSCLC (American Joint Commission on Cancer 1997) enrolled in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group studies (83-11, 84-03, 84-07, and 88-08 nonchemotherapy arms) at a single institution were analyzed retrospectively for overall survival (OS) and comorbidity. Of the 112 patients, 105 (94%) completed their assigned radiotherapy. The median assigned dose was 50.4 Gy to the lymphatics (range 45-50.4 Gy) and 70.2 Gy to the primary tumor (range 60-79.2 Gy). Comorbidity was rated retrospectively using the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G) and Charlson scales. Karnofsky performance scores (KPSs) and weight loss were prospectively recorded. Because only 8 patients had a KPS of 70). Results: The median survival was 10.39 months (range 7.87-12.91). The 2-, 3-, and 5-year OS rate was 20.5%, 12.5%, and 7.1%, respectively. On univariate analysis, clinical stage (IIIA vs. IIIB) was found to be a statistically significant factor influencing OS (p=0.026), and the histologic features, grade, tumor size as measured on CT scans, age, tobacco use, weight loss ≥5%, and total dose delivered to the primary tumor were not. A KPS of ≤70 (p=0.001), the presence of a CIRS-G score of 4 (extremely severe; p=0.0002), and a severity index of >2 (p 2 were independently associated with inferior OS; clinical tumor stage was not found to be an independent prognostic factor. Conclusion: KPS and comorbidity are important independent prognostic factors in Stage III NSCLC. Comorbidity should be included in protocols studying advanced stage NSCLC and used for stratification

  6. Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Timing of Relapse and Overall Survival for Children Treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocols (2000-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Kira; Blonquist, Traci M; Neuberg, Donna S; Silverman, Lewis B; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Population-based evidence suggests that lower socioeconomic status (SES) negatively impacts the overall survival (OS) of children with leukemia; however, the relationships between SES and treatment-related mortality, relapse, and timing of relapse remain unclear. We examined OS, event-free survival (EFS) and cumulative incidence (CI) and timing of relapse by community-level poverty for 575 children aged 1-18 years with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated on consecutive phase III multicenter Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocols between 2000 and 2010. Children were categorized into high- and low-poverty areas for the analysis using aggregate U.S. Census data linked to zip code. Children living in high-poverty areas experienced a 5-year OS of 85% as compared with 92% for those in low-poverty areas (P = 0.02); poverty remained marginally significant (P = 0.07) after adjustment for immunophenotype, age, and white blood cell count. There were no differences detected in EFS or CI relapse by poverty area. However, 92% of the relapses observed in children from high-poverty areas occurred <36 months from complete remission, compared to 48% of those in children from low-poverty areas (P = 0.008). U.S. children with ALL living in high-poverty areas have a higher risk of early relapse when compared with those living in low-poverty areas despite uniform treatment. This may in part explain decreased OS observed in these children. This finding highlights disparities in childhood cancer outcomes by SES despite uniform treatment. Further investigations of the mechanistic pathways underlying this finding are needed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mathematical methods for cancer evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to describe recent developments in mathematical modeling and mathematical analysis of certain problems arising from cell biology. Cancer cells and their growth via several stages are of particular interest. To describe these events, multi-scale models are applied, involving continuously distributed environment variables and several components related to particles. Hybrid simulations are also carried out, using discretization of environment variables and the Monte Carlo method for the principal particle variables. Rigorous mathematical foundations are the bases of these tools. The monograph is composed of four chapters. The first three chapters are concerned with modeling, while the last one is devoted to mathematical analysis. The first chapter deals with molecular dynamics occurring at the early stage of cancer invasion. A pathway network model based on a biological scenario is constructed, and then its mathematical structures are determined. In the second chapter mathematica...

  8. Transperineal gold marker implantation for image-guided external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. A single institution, prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgo, Kliton; Agoston, Peter; Major, Tibor; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-06-15

    To present the feasibility and complications of transperineal fiducial marker implantation in prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Between November 2011 and April 2016, three radiopaque, gold-plated markers were transperineally implanted into the prostate of 300 patients under transrectal ultrasound guidance and with local anaesthesia. A week after the procedure patients filled in a questionnaire regarding pain, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, rectal bleeding, hematuria, hematospermia or fever symptoms caused by the implantation. Pain was scored on a 1-10 scale, where score 1 meant very weak and score 10 meant unbearable pain. The implanted gold markers were used for daily verification and online correction of patients' setup during IGRT. Based on the questionnaires no patient experienced fever, infection, dysuria or rectal bleeding after implantation. Among the 300 patients, 12 (4%) had hematospermia, 43 (14%) hematuria, which lasted for an average of 3.4 and 1.8 days, respectively. The average pain score was 4.6 (range 0-9). Of 300 patients 87 (29%) felt any pain after the intervention, which took an average of 1.5 days. None of the patients needed analgesics after implantation. Overall, 105 patients (35%) reported less, 80 patients (27%) more, and 94 patients (31%) equal amount of pain during marker implantation compared to biopsy. The 21 patients who had a biopsy performed under general anesthesia did not answer this question. Transperineal gold marker implantation under local anesthesia was well tolerated. Complications were limited; rate and frequency of perioperative pain was comparable to the pain caused by biopsy. The method can be performed safely in clinical practice. (orig.) [German] Darstellung von Machbarkeit und Komplikationen der transperinealen Implantation von Goldmarkern bei mit perkutaner Strahlentherapie (IGRT) behandelten Prostatakarzinompatienten. Zwischen November 2011 und April 2016 bekamen 300

  9. Routine port-site excision in incidentally discovered gallbladder cancer is not associated with improved survival: A multi-institution analysis from the US Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethun, Cecilia G; Postlewait, Lauren M; Le, Nina; Pawlik, Timothy M; Poultsides, George; Tran, Thuy; Idrees, Kamran; Isom, Chelsea A; Fields, Ryan C; Krasnick, Bradley A; Weber, Sharon M; Salem, Ahmed; Martin, Robert C G; Scoggins, Charles R; Shen, Perry; Mogal, Harveshp D; Schmidt, Carl; Beal, Eliza; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Cardona, Kenneth; Maithel, Shishir K

    2017-06-01

    Current data on the utility of port-site excision (PSE) during re-resection for incidentally discovered gallbladder cancer (IGBC) in the US are conflicting and limited to single-institution series. All patients with IGBC who underwent curative re-resection at 10 institutions from 2000 to 2015 were included. Patients with and without PSE were compared. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Of 449 pts with GBC, 266 were incidentally discovered, of which 193(73%) underwent curative re-resection and had port-site data; 47 pts(24%) underwent PSE, 146(76%) did not. The PSE rate remained similar over time (2000-2004: 33%; 2005-2009: 22%; 2010-2015:22%; P = 0.36). Both groups had similar demographics, operative procedures, and post-operative complications. There was no difference in T-stage (T1: 9 vs. 11%; T2: 52 vs. 52%; T3: 39 vs. 38%; P = 0.96) or LN involvement (36 vs. 41%; P = 0.7) between groups. A 3-year OS was similar between PSE and no PSE groups (65 vs. 43%; P = 0.07). On univariable analysis, residual disease at re-resection (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.3; P = 0.001), high tumor grade, and advanced T-stage were associated with decreased OS. Only grade and T-stage, but not PSE, persisted on multivariable analysis. Distant disease recurrence-rate was identical between PSE and no PSE groups (80 vs. 81%; P = 1.0). Port-site excision during re-resection for IGBC is not associated with improved overall survival and has the same distant disease recurrence compared to no port-site excision. Routine port-site excision is not recommended. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  11. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  12. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  13. Information for physicians and pharmacists about drugs that might cause dry mouth: a study of monographs and published literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Caroline T; MacEntee, Michael I; Mintzes, Barbara; Perry, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    Over three-quarters of the older population take medications that can potentially cause dry mouth. Physicians or pharmacists rarely inform patients about this adverse effect and its potentially severe damage to the teeth, mouth and general health. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify warnings in the literature about dry mouth associated with the most frequently prescribed pharmaceutical products in Canada; and (2) consider how this information might be obtained by physicians, pharmacists and patients. Monographs on the 72 most frequently prescribed medications during 2010 were retrieved from the Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS, a standard drug information reference for physicians and pharmacists), the National Library of Medicine's 'DailyMed' database, directly from the manufacturers, and from a systematic search of biomedical journals. The CPS provided monographs for 43% of the medications, and requests to manufacturers produced the remaining monographs. Mentions of dry mouth were identified in 61% of the products (43% amongst CPS monographs; an additional 43% amongst manufacturers' monographs; 7% in the DailyMed database and 7% from biomedical journals); five medications had contradictory reports in different monographs. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of the most commonly prescribed medications can cause dry mouth, yet warnings about this adverse effect and its potentially serious consequences are not readily available to physicians, pharmacists, dentists or patients.

  14. The UNO Aviation Monograph Series: Aviation Security: An Annotated Bibliography of Responses to the Gore Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, John S.; Schaaf, Michaela M.

    1998-01-01

    This monograph is a companion to UNOAI Monograph 96-2, "The Image of Airport Security: An Annotated Bibliography," compiled in June 1996. The White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, headed by Vice President Al Gore, was formed as a result of the TWA Flight 800 crash in August 1996. The Commission's final report included 31 recommendations addressed toward aviation security. The recommendations were cause for security issues to be revisited in the media and by the aviation industry. These developments necessitated the need for an updated bibliography to review the resulting literature. Many of the articles were written in response to the recommendations made by the Gore Commission. "Aviation Security: An Annotated Bibliography of Responses to the Gore Commission" is the result of this need.

  15. Non-European traditional herbal medicines in Europe: a community herbal monograph perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liping; Zou, Wenjun; Zhou, Zhenxiang; Zhang, Tingmo; Greef, JanVander; Wang, Mei

    2014-10-28

    The European Directive 2004/24/EC introducing a simplified registration procedure for traditional herbal medicinal products, plays an important role in harmonising the current legislation framework for all herbal medicinal products in the European Union (EU). Although substantial achievements have been made under the new scheme, only a limited number of herbal medicinal products from non-European traditions commonly used in Europe have been registered. Therefore, identification of the obstacles, and determination of appropriate means to overcome the major challenges in the registration of non-European traditional herbal medicinal products are of critical importance for the EU herbal medicinal product market. The primary aims of this study were to understand the key issues and obstacles to registration of non-European traditional herbal medicinal products within the EU. The findings may identify the need for more attention on the Community herbal monographs elaborated by the Herbal Medicinal Products Committee (HMPC), as well as further evidence based scientific research on non-European herbal substances/preparations by the scientific community. A systematic evaluation of the herbal substances and preparations included in Community herbal monographs and public statements has been carried out. The focus was herbal substances and preparations derived from non-European traditions. Of the 109 adopted Community herbal monographs, 10 are herbal substances used in Chinese traditional medicine. Where the HMPC issued a public statement because it was unable to elaborate a monograph more than half-involved herbal substances/preparations from non-European traditions. The main reasons herbal substances/preparations from non-European traditions were not accepted for inclusion in the Community herbal monographs have been identified as due to unfulfilled requirements of Directive 2004/24/EC. The most common reasons were the lack of evidence to demonstrate a 15-year minimum

  16. Arrangement and processing of monographic publications in youth sections of public libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Ločniškar-Fidler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic and transparent layout of library material on book shelves of public libraries is one of the essential conditions for successful viewing and searching of materials. The research tried to determine the contemporary classification system of library material for the youth. The data needed for the research was gathered and analyzed by a questionnaire completed by five randomly selected central public libraries. Special collections, arrangement and classification of certain fiction and specialized monographic publications for infants, teenagers and adolescents were analyzed. It was of our interest to observe whether the libraries assign the elements of a call number - which are evident on the library material and in online catalogs – according to standards and current instructions. The article also focuses on the unity and differences of the technical processing, and on color and/or image of labels which additionally explain the classification and the contents of the monographic publications for the youth.

  17. A randomized phase III trial comparing concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in advanced head and neck cancers - mature results: Yoodhvir Singh Nagar, Lucknow Cancer Institute, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Kumar, S.; Datta, N.R.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate contribution of concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) over and above radiotherapy alone (RT) in previously untreated stage III/IV, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCH and N). Patients with cancers of oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), supraglottis (SG) and hypopharynx (HP) were randomized into RT arm or CTRT arm. Radiotherapy was identical in both arms (70Gy/35 fractions/7 weeks). In CTRT arm concomitant cisplatin (35mg/m 2 ) was given weekly for seven cycles. Surgery was reserved for salvage purposes when required. From May 1996 to December 1998, 155 patients (RT=78, CTRT=77) were enrolled and 139 patients (RT1,CTRT=68) were assessable. Over 90% patients in both arms completed planned treatment. The complete response rate was 51% in RT arm and 71% in CTRT arm (p=0.017). The median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in RT arm and CTRT arm were 3 months vs. 11 months (p=0.0009) and 9 months vs. 26 months (p=0.01) respectively. The 5-year DFS and OS in the two arms were 10% vs. 27% (p=0.000) and 16% vs. 29% (p=0.01) respectively. Acute grade III toxicity was comparable in both the arms (12% vs. 16%, p=0.74). Late grade I/II toxicity was higher in CTRT arm (70% vs. 51%, p=0.09). Serious late toxicities were not seen in both arms. On univariate analysis the favorable factors for immediate response were protocol (CTRT better), primary site (SG and OP better than OC and HP), T-stage (T1-T2 better), Nodes (N0 better than N+), Stage (III > IV), KPS (>80) and lesser overall treatment time (OTT). Multivariate analysis retained protocol, T stage, N stage and OTT as factors independently affecting the immediate response. Addition of concomitant weekly cisplatin (35mg/m 2 ) to radiotherapy improves the likelihood of local control, DFS and OS with acceptable acute and late toxicities and can be recommended as a standard form of treatment in advanced SCCH and N

  18. Institutional entrepreneurship:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretzinger, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Institutional entrepreneurship pays specific attention to the process and outcomes of agents who are willing and capable of changing institutions. It has some common ground with the political entrepreneur, a concept that proposes change in norms and institutions because of commitment and activities...... of agents or organisations in the policy arena. The present chapter understands institutional entrepreneurship as the process of changing institutionalised practices. Based on a literature review, it describes the triggers, activities and potential effects of institutional entrepreneurs. The chapter...... concludes by tentatively arguing that political entrepreneurs can be institutional entrepreneurs, but institutional entrepreneurship can be considered as the broader concept that incorporates strategies and visions as well as interpretative-discursive power into the conceptual framework....

  19. Review of the monograph “Corruption: nature, revelation, interaction” / editor-in-chief Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences T. Ya. Khabrieva. Мoscow: “Yurisprudentsiya” Publishers, 2014, 688 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F. Milyukov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the authorsrsquo opinion of the monograph ldquoCorruption nature revelation interactionrdquo editorinchief Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences T. Ya. Khabrieva. Selected chapters and paragraphs are reviewed and analyzed. The authors note both positive and negative sides of the monograph. The concept of corruption as a social phenomenon is discussed as well as the need to implement international norms in national legislation the legal framework for combating corruption in Russia the activities of the various institutions to fight against corruption combating corruption in state and municipal service ways of overcoming the corruption potential of legal acts impact of corruption on business and methods of combating corruption abroad. The team of authors including a large number of wellknown scientists and politicians S. B. Ivanov S. B. Naryshkin S. V. Stepashin Yu. A. Tikhomirov A. V. Fedorov T. Ya. Khabrieva etc. view corruption as a social phenomenon highlight the issues of international cooperation on corruption issues give a detailed review of legislation including international on combating corruption and name individual institutions to counteract this dangerous phenomenon. Special chapters are devoted to corruption in the system of state and municipal service and corruption in the business sector. Detailed attention in a separate chapter is given to the institution of anticorruption expertise. nbsp

  20. Temporal and Other Exposure Aspects of Residential Magnetic Fields Measurement in Relation to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in Children: The National Cancer Institute Children's Cancer Group Study (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baris, D.; Linet, M.; Auvinen, A.; Kaune, W.T.; Wacholder, S.; Kleinerman, R.; Hatch, E.; Robison, L.; Niwa, S.; Haines, C.; Tarone, R.E

    1999-07-01

    Case-control studies have used a variety of measurements to evaluate the relationship of children's exposure to magnetic fields (50 or 60 Hz) with childhood leukaemia and other childhood cancers. In the absence of knowledge about which exposure metrics may be biologically meaningful, studies during the past 10 years have often used time-weighted average (TWA) summaries of home measurements. Recently, other exposure metrics have been suggested, usually based on theoretical considerations or limited laboratory data. In this paper, the rationale and associated preliminary studies undertaken are described as well as feasibility andvalidity issues governing the choice of the primary magnetic field exposure assessment methods and summary metric used to estimate children's exposure in the National Cancer Institute/Children's Cancer Group (NCI/CCG) case-control study. Also provided are definitions and discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the various exposure metrics used in exploratory analyses of the NCI/CCG measurement data. Exposure metrics evaluated include measures of central tendency (mean, median, 30th to 70th percentiles), peak exposures (90th and higher percentiles, peak values of the 24 h measurements), and measurements of short-term temporal variability (rate of change). This report describes correlations of the various metrics with the time-weighted average for the 24 h period (TWA-24-h). Most of the metrics were found to be positively and highly correlated with TWA-24-h, but lower correlations of TWA-24-h with peak exposure and with rate of change were observed. To examine further the relation between TWA and alternative metrics, similar exploratory analysis should be considered for existing data sets and for forthcoming measurement investigations of residential magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia. (author)