WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer institute hospital

  1. [Breast-conserving surgery without radiotherapy in the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumi, Fujio; Takahashi, Kaoru; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Tada, Keiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Tada, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Masataka; Akiyama, Futoshi; Akiyama, Goi

    2002-11-01

    We began performing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in 1986 to achieve complete resection of breast cancer and omit postoperative radiotherapy (RT) if serial and detailed pathologic examination of the resected specimen within a 5-mm width showed that the of margin was cancer free. At of the end of 1998, 1,233 sides of the breast had been conserved, of which 827 sides were shown to have cancer-free margins. As of the end of 2001, with a mean observation period of 79 months, ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was recognized on 46 sides (19 recurrences, 27 multiple cancers), for a recurrence rate 5.6% and an annual recurrence rate of 0.85%. This rate is slightly better than those reported by eminent institutions in the USA and Europe which all perform RT, confirming the accuracy and safety of our BCS.

  2. Postoperative Survival Estimation of Gastric Cancer Patients in Cancer Institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital and Its Relative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kazemnejad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Gastric Cancer (GC is one of the most common causes of death in the world. The most important cause of high death rate related to GC is late diagnosis of the disease. The main treatment of gastric cancer in its primary stage of is surgery, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are supplementary treatments. There are some factors that affect survival after surgery. This study aimed to assess the survival of patients with GC under surgery and to determine the risk factors of this cancer. Materials & Methods: A total of 262 patients with GC under surgery were followed and included in the study from 21st of March 2003 to 21st of March 2007 in the cancer institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital, . The staging of the disease before the surgery was based on CT-Scan and endosonography and after the surgery was based on the pathologic reports. The survival of the patients was determined by their periodical referrals and our telephone contacts with their relatives. The survival times were considered as the time from the diagnosis up to the death or the end of the study. The effect of the various risk factors including gender, age at diagnosis, tumor site, pathologic stage of the disease, type of treatment, metastases and relapse were evaluated. Kaplan-Miere approach was used to estimate survival and Log-rank test and proportional Cox model to evaluate the related factors. Data were analyzed using Spss16 statistical software. Results: 75.2% of patients were men and 34.4% cases of patients experienced death. The mean follow-up time was 19.317.4. The mean age at diagnosis was 5811.5 and survival mean and median were 49 and 27 months respectively. The one, three and five year survival of the patients were 0.85, 0.41 and 0.3 respectively. Gender, pathologic stage, age at diagnosis and weight-loss were significantly related to the survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The diagnosis of the cancer in primary stages causes

  3. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  4. 2D AND 3D dose verification at The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital using EPIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Tielenburg, Rene; Van Herk, Marcel; Vijlbrief, Ron; Stroom, Joep

    2010-11-01

    A review is given of the clinical use of EPID dosimetry in the Department of Radiation Oncology of The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital. All curative plans (almost all IMRT or VMAT) are verified with EPID dosimetry, mostly in vivo. The 2D approach for IMRT verification and the 3D method for VMAT verification are elucidated and their clinical implementation described. It has been shown that EPID dosimetry plays an important role in the total chain of verification procedures that are implemented in our department. It provides a safety net for advanced treatments such as IMRT and VMAT, as well as a full account of the dose delivered.

  5. [Dialogical leadership in hospitals institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Waterkemper, Roberta; Heidman, Ivonete Teresinha Schülter; Boehs, Astrid Egged; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is make a theorical-reflection about the importance of using dialogical leadership in hospital institutions through Freirean referencial. The dialogical leadership pattern differs from the coercive and autocratic methods, for being reasoned on the establishment of an efficient communicational process, able to stimulate autonomy, co-responsibility and appreciation of each member from nurse team. The dialogical leadership, unlike the directive one, is a management instrument, that pursuits to minimize the conflicts and stimulate the formation of healthy interpersonal relationships, which can contribute to the improvement of organizational atmosphere and quality care provided to health services users.

  6. Evaluation of institutional cancer registries in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, L G; Roca, S; Rodríguez, M N; Stein, J; Izquierdo, J; Trujillo, A; Mora, M

    1999-09-01

    The four primary objectives of this descriptive study were to: 1) design a quality-measurement instrument for institutional cancer registries (ICRs), 2) evaluate the existing ICRs in Colombia with the designed instrument, 3) categorize the different registries according to their quality and prioritize efforts that will efficiently promote better registries with the limited resources available, and 4) determine the institution with the greatest likelihood of successfully establishing Colombia's second population-based cancer registry. In 1990 the National Cancer Institute of Colombia developed 13 institution-based cancer registries in different Colombian cities in order to promote the collection of data from a large group of cancer diagnostic and treatment centers. During the first half of 1997, this evaluation reviewed 12 registries; one of the original 13 no longer existed. All of the Colombian institutions (hospitals) that maintain institution-based cancer registries were included in the study. At each institution, a brief survey was administered to the hospital director, the registry coordinator, and the registrar (data manager). Researchers investigated the institutions by looking at six domains that are in standard use internationally. Within each domain, questions were developed and selected through the Delphi method. Each domain and each question were assigned weights through a consensus process. In most cases, two interviewers went to each site to collect the information. The university hospitals in Cali, Pereira, and Medellín had substantially higher scores, reflecting a good level of performance. Four of the 12 institutions had almost no cancer registry work going on. Five of the 12 hospital directors considered that the information provided by the cancer registries influenced their administrative decisions. Three of the registries had patient survival data. Four of the institutions allocated specific resources to operate their cancer registries; in the

  7. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  8. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life among African-American cancer survivors. Study finds premature death rates diverge in the United States by race and ethnicity January 25, 2017 Premature death rates declined among Hispanics, blacks, and Asian/Pacific ...

  9. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics.

  10. Disease specific productivity of american cancer hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A Goldstein

    Full Text Available Research-oriented cancer hospitals in the United States treat and study patients with a range of diseases. Measures of disease specific research productivity, and comparison to overall productivity, are currently lacking.Different institutions are specialized in research of particular diseases.To report disease specific productivity of American cancer hospitals, and propose a summary measure.We conducted a retrospective observational survey of the 50 highest ranked cancer hospitals in the 2013 US News and World Report rankings. We performed an automated search of PubMed and Clinicaltrials.gov for published reports and registrations of clinical trials (respectively addressing specific cancers between 2008 and 2013. We calculated the summed impact factor for the publications. We generated a summary measure of productivity based on the number of Phase II clinical trials registered and the impact factor of Phase II clinical trials published for each institution and disease pair. We generated rankings based on this summary measure.We identified 6076 registered trials and 6516 published trials with a combined impact factor of 44280.4, involving 32 different diseases over the 50 institutions. Using a summary measure based on registered and published clinical trails, we ranked institutions in specific diseases. As expected, different institutions were highly ranked in disease-specific productivity for different diseases. 43 institutions appeared in the top 10 ranks for at least 1 disease (vs 10 in the overall list, while 6 different institutions were ranked number 1 in at least 1 disease (vs 1 in the overall list.Research productivity varies considerably among the sample. Overall cancer productivity conceals great variation between diseases. Disease specific rankings identify sites of high academic productivity, which may be of interest to physicians, patients and researchers.

  11. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ...

  12. 78 FR 19275 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel Tumor Immunology. Date: June 26-27, 2013. Time... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116...

  13. [Cervix cancer and pregnancy. Experience of 5 years at the Gynecology-Obstetrics Hospital No. 3, C. M. La Raza from the Mexican Institute of Social Security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa Vargas, A; Padilla Cortez, M E; Bacelis Castaño, C

    1999-12-01

    Of the 300 clinical files of pregnant women, 22 were associated with cancer plus pregnancy in 5 years. Of them 7 were excluded in the work. 15 patients with CaCu and pregnancy were studied in the Gineco-Obstetric Hospital No. 3 C.M. La Raza of the IMSS México City in a period since 1st of January 1988 to 31st December of 1992. Early menarchia and sexual life, take an important roll in the mexican women as predisponent factors, multideliver and tobacco too. The colposcopy with manage cervix biopsy is the election method of diagnosis, with 99.5% of confiability. In the 15 patients, the estirpe was epidermoid cancer in all of them. The diagnosis of pregnancy age made in the first and third trimester of gestation. Only in 3 patients (20%) were founded visible lesion, this rename the necessity of make detection of CaCu during the pregnancy, because we will can found the cases in preinvader stages or early invader, that cure highly, like the cases seen in this work. Stages preinvader and early invaders during the pregnancy are highly curatives. We concluded that they have worst prognosis of survival, aggressivity and early relapse in patients with pregnancy stage by stage. The last because in the Historical Literature review about this topic, there was statistical relevance about pregnancy in the women with CaCu, using our work for reference. CaCu does change his prognosis associated with the pregnancy.

  14. Hospital management contracts: institutional and community perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, J. R.; Zuckerman, H S

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that external management by contract can improve the performance of managed hospitals. This article presents a conceptual framework which develops specific hypotheses concerning improved hospital operating efficiency, increased ability to meet hospital objectives, and increased ability to meet community objectives. Next, changes in the process and structure of management under contractual arrangements, based on observations from two not-for-profit hospital systems,...

  15. Medical hospitalizations in prostate cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanaraj, Jerome; Balakrishnan, Shobana; Umar, Zarish; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Pavlovich, Christian P; Wright, Scott M; Khaliq, Waseem

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to explore the context and reasons for medical hospitalizations among prostate cancer survivors and to study their relationship with obesity and the type of prostate cancer treatment. A retrospective review of medical records was performed at an academic institution for male patients aged 40 years and older who were diagnosed and/or treated for prostate cancer 2 years prior to the study's observation period from January 2008 to December 2010. Unpaired t test, ANOVA, and Chi-square tests were used to compare patients' characteristics, admission types, and medical comorbidities by body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer treatment. Mean age for the study population was 76 years (SD = 9.2). Two hundred and forty-five prostate cancer survivors were stratified into two groups: non-obese (BMI obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). The study population's characteristics analyzed by BMI were similar including Gleason score, presence of metastatic disease and genitourinary-related side effects. Only 13 % of admissions were for complaints related to their genitourinary system. Neither the specific treatment that the patients had received for their prostate cancer, nor obesity was associated with the reasons for their medical admission. Survivorship after having a diagnosis of prostate cancer is often lengthy, and these men are at risk of being hospitalized, as they get older. From this inquiry, it has become clear that neither body mass index nor prior therapy is associated with specific admission characteristics, and only a minority of such admissions was directly related to prostate cancer or the genitourinary tract.

  16. 78 FR 8155 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Immunology. ] Date: March 15, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Omnibus Cancer Biology...

  17. Analysis of the factors influencing lung cancer hospitalization expenses using data mining

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tianzhi; He, Zhen; Zhou, QingHua; Ma, Jun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospitalization expenses for the therapy of lung cancer are not only a direct economic burden on patients, but also the focus of medical insurance departments. Therefore, the method for classifying and analyzing lung cancer hospitalization expenses so as to predict reasonable medical cost has become an issue of common interest for both hospitals and insurance institutions. Methods A C5.0 algorithm is adopted to analyze factors influencing hospitalization expenses of 731 lung cancer...

  18. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ...@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Breast Cancer... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  19. 76 FR 16431 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Lymphoma, Breast, Ovarian.... 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  20. 76 FR 50487 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI SPORE in Childhood ALL, Skin, Brain, Lung....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed...

  1. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  2. Tourism and Hospitality Training: Hallmark of the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Williams

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the evolution of tourism and hospitality training in The Bahamas over the last 40 years, focusing on stakeholders, pioneers, partnerships, organizational structures, programs, and other key factors that have contributed to the establishment and operation of the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute at the College of The Bahamas

  3. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Breast, Prostate and... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  4. 77 FR 49450 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI REVIEW of P50 and R01 applications in Lung, Skin, Ovarian... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  5. 78 FR 41939 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Omnibus Review, Cancer Etiology/Genetics... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and...

  6. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Methods for the Detection of Cancer Recurrence in Post-Therapy Breast Cancer Patients. Date: June 4, 2013... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  7. 75 FR 3239 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Basal-like Breast Cancer Assay. Date: March 10, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  8. 78 FR 28235 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Diagnostic Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: June 13, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  9. 75 FR 16153 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network. Date: June...., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National...

  10. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  11. Study On The Prevalence Of Various Forms Of Cancer In Diabetic Patients Hospitalized In The National Institute Of Diabetes, Nutrition And Metabolic Diseases “Prof. N.C. Paulescu”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu-Vâlceanu Horaţiu-Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Epidemiological evidence suggests that people with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of developing various cancers. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of various cancers in diabetic patients admitted in the National Institute of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases “Prof. N.C. Paulescu” between 01.01.2011 and 01.09.2014.

  12. 75 FR 21002 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Panel, SPORE in Lymphoma and Breast Cancer. Date: June 15-16, 2010. Time: 5 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  13. 77 FR 26772 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify...

  14. 75 FR 16488 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes...

  15. 77 FR 15782 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes...

  16. 78 FR 26379 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... Methodological Research for Cancer Epidemiology Cohorts. Date: June 25, 2013. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Small Grants Program for Cancer Epidemiology. Date: July...

  17. Gastrointestinal Tumor Board: An Evolving Experience in Tehran Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2013-04-01

    electronic database was kept from the beginning. The number of patients presented in the tumor board increased from 4 in January 2010 to 16 in December 2011. Most patients were presented by radiation oncology department (38% and then surgical (36% and medical oncology (20% departments. Physicians’ participation also grew from an average of 8 each session to 12 in the same months, with a number of cancer specialists taking part from other university hospitals in Tehran. A total number of 225 patients were presented with a treatment decision made in this 2-year period. The majority of cases were colorectal (32%, stomach (23%, and esophageal (17% cancers. The number of pancreatic (7% and hepatobiliary (6% cancers were much smaller. Most decisions were for a primary treatment (surgery or radiochemotherapy and then a neoadjuvant approach. Tehran Cancer Institute's GI tumor board is one of the first multi-disciplinary organ-based tumor boards in Iran, and as such has made a successful start, establishing itself as a recognized body for clinical decisions and consultations in GI oncology. This experience is growing and evolving, with newer presentation and discussion formats and adapted guidelines for treatment of GI cancers in Iran sought.

  18. 75 FR 60132 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September...

  19. 75 FR 71712 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November...

  20. 77 FR 43098 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93....398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated:...

  1. 77 FR 58852 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; R13 Review Teleconference. Date: October 24..., Panel; Immunology. Date: December 6, 2012. Time: 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  2. 76 FR 64090 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ..., Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116....) Contact Person: Timothy C. Meeker, MD, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  3. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Mesothelioma, Lung, Breast and Ovarian Cancers. Date: February 2-3, 2011. Time: 8... Special Emphasis Panel; Development of Blood-based Methods for the Detection of Cancer Recurrence in Post... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  4. 78 FR 78982 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the Contact...

  5. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent.

  6. Systemic treatment with capecitabine as maintenance therapy in patients with recurring or metastatic breast cancer: experience in the Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center Siglo XXI, Mexican Social Security Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-González, Manuel; Quintana-Quintana, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic breast cancer as initial onset represents between 20 and 30 % of cases and is considered an incurable disease. The goal of its treatment is palliative, looking for increasing the survival while reducing the symptoms. Maintenance chemotherapy studies for metastatic breast cancer have demonstrated to prolong the progression-free survival, with unclear results in terms of overall survival. The main objectives of our study were the progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with recurring or metastatic breast cancer treated with capecitabine in the maintenance chemotherapy setting compared with patients not receiving maintenance chemotherapy. As secondary objectives, the frequency of dose-limiting toxicities and response rate were determined. A non-probabilistic sampling was used, through expert selection of patients from the recurring/metastatic breast cancer survey cared within the period from January 1, 2007, to December 21, 2012. A total of 77 patients were included. Clinical data of advanced/recurrent breast cancer patients that were treated with capecitabine were recorded. The study achieved its primary objective, since the progression-free survival was prolonged for the maintenance therapy group: 6.6 versus 18.1 months, p Siglo XXI Oncology Hospital extends the overall survival and progression-free survival with a good toxicity profile.

  7. 76 FR 41273 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ...: Gail J Bryant, MD, Medical Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  8. 77 FR 33476 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Emerging Technologies in... Emphasis Panel; Biopsy Instruments and Devices That Preserve Molecular Profiles and Alternative Biospecimen...

  9. 76 FR 26309 - National Cancer Institute; Notice Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ...: Washington DC North Hilton Hotel, 620 Perry Parkway, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Contact Person: Lalita D... Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 7141, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  10. 76 FR 80375 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive M, 1750 Rockville Pike... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116...

  11. 78 FR 15023 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... applications and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as... Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NHH,...

  12. 76 FR 37358 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... for Cancer Epidemiology Cohorts, Date: July 12, 2011, Time: 8 a,m, to 5 p,m Agenda: To review and... Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grants Program for Cancer Epidemiology. Date: July 21-22, 2011. Time...

  13. 77 FR 12600 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ...: Bethesda Marriott Suites, 6711 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20817. Contact Person: Ellen K Schwartz.... Place: Bethesda Marriott Suites, 6711 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20817. Contact Person: Savvas C...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Research Infrastructure Support for HMOs....

  14. 78 FR 41072 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: July 2, 2013. David Clary, Program...

  15. 78 FR 66370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: October 30, 2013. Melanie J. Gray,...

  16. 77 FR 12318 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... outcome of the evaluation will provide information for consideration by an internal NCI committee that... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93....398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  17. 77 FR 70170 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 16, 2012. Melanie J. Gray,...

  18. Inadequate Nutritional Status of Hospitalized Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In oncology practice, nutrition and also metabolic activity are essential to support the nutritional status and prevent malignant cachexia. It is important to evaluate the patients and plan the maneuvers at the start of the therapy. The primary objective of the study is to define the nutritional status of hospitalized patients and the factors affecting it in order to define the most susceptible patients and maneuvers for better nutritional support. Methods: Patients hospitalized in oncology clinic for therapy were evaluated for food intake and nutritional status through structured interviews. The clinical properties, medical therapies, elements of nutritional support were noted and predictors of inadequate nutritional status (INS were analyzed. Results: Four hundred twenty three patients, between 16-82 years old (median: 52 were evaluated. Nearly half of the patients (185, 43% reported a better appetite at home than in hospital and declared that hospitalization is an important cause of loss of appetite (140/185, 75.6%. Presence of nausea/vomiting (N/V, depression, age less than 65 and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were associated with increased risk of INS in hospitalized cancer patients. On the contrary, steroid medication showed a positive impact on nutritional status of cancer patients. Conclusion: N/V, younger age, presence of depression and NSAIDs medication were associated with INS in hospitalized cancer patients. Clinicians should pay more attention to this group of patients. In addition, unnecessary hospitalizations and medications that may disturb oral intake must be avoided. Corticosteroids are important tools for managing anorexia and INS.

  19. 76 FR 31619 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ..., 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Hotel..., makridessc@mail.nih.gov , Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Development of... Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive...

  20. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Portable e-Technology Diet and Physical Activity Tools for Consumers. Date: April... Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd.,...

  1. 78 FR 45217 - Medicaid Program; Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental Diseases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental Diseases Disproportionate Share Hospital Limits... for mental diseases (IMDs) and other mental health facilities. This notice also includes background... diseases (IMDs) and other mental health facilities is limited to state- specific aggregate...

  2. Feeding newborns after hospital discharge from a Baby-Friendly Health Care Institution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vivancos, Raquel Bosquim Zavanella; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Furtado, Maria Cândida de Carvalho; Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira de; Haas, Vanderlei José; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize how babies are fed during their hospital stay and after hospital discharge from a Baby-Friendly Health Care Institution, using indicators proposed by the World Health Organization. METHODS...

  3. [Hospital and organizational dynamics of the National Institutes of Health. Relationship with high-specialty hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabilondo Navarro, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In order to primarily encourage medical care, teaching and research activities in high specialty regional hospitals (HSRH), a number of strategies are explored to increase the number of patients cared for, improve the quality and timeliness of care and successfully integrate the function of these hospitals within the care and patient flow model expected by the Federal Government. These strategies include the use of information technology systems as platforms for telemedicine, including tele-imaging, tele-education and telepathology, thus fostering the quality and timeliness of medical care and narrow the relationship between these HSRH with the National Health Institutes. Other strategies such as extra-mural surgery, specific theme workshops, resident rotations, the use of simulators and "Science Weeks" are also explored so as to promote teaching and research. Finally, the reference and counter-reference system and the introduction of pension programs are evaluated as possible strategies supporting resource management.

  4. Tissue banking in a regional hospital: a promising future concept? First report on fresh frozen tissue banking in a hospital without an integrated institute of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Strauss und Torney, Marco; Güller, Ulrich; Rezaeian, Farid; Brosi, Philippe; Terracciano, Luigi; Zuber, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Vital tissue provided by fresh frozen tissue banking is often required for genetic tumor profiling and tailored therapies. However, the potential patient benefits of fresh frozen tissue banking are currently limited to university hospitals. The objective of the present pilot study--the first one in the literature--was to evaluate whether fresh frozen tissue banking is feasible in a regional hospital without an integrated institute of pathology. Patients with resectable breast and colon cancer were included in this prospective study. Both malignant and healthy tissue were sampled using isopentan-based snap-freezing 1 h after tumor resection and stored at -80 °C before transfer to the main tissue bank of a University institute of pathology. The initial costs to set up tissue banking were 35,662 US$. Furthermore, the running costs are 1,250 US$ yearly. During the first 13 months, 43 samples (nine samples of breast cancer and 34 samples of colon cancer) were collected from 41 patients. Based on the pathology reports, there was no interference with standard histopathologic analyses due to the sample collection. This is the first report in the literature providing evidence that tissue banking in a regional hospital without an integrated institute of pathology is feasible. The interesting findings of the present pilot study must be confirmed by larger investigations.

  5. 78 FR 15021 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396... Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 4, 2013. Melanie J. Gray, Program...

  6. 77 FR 43301 - Medicaid Program; Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental Diseases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental Diseases Disproportionate Share Hospital Limits... institutions for mental diseases (IMD) and other mental health facilities. In addition, this notice includes... mental diseases (IMDs) and other mental health facilities that are in excess of State-specific...

  7. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets Across Cancer Types | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dana Farber Cancer Institute CTD2 Center focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  8. 75 FR 54161 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda (Formerly Holiday Inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin..., Research Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116... applications. Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact...

  9. 78 FR 3901 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ...: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person... Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, ] 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8135, Bethesda, MD...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville...

  10. 78 FR 16272 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852..., Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8131, Bethesda.... Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120...

  11. 77 FR 30297 - National Cancer Institute; Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Repair and Damage Signaling Networks. Date: June 6, 2012. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd...

  12. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; The Early Detection Research Network: Clinical...: Lalita D. Palekar, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of...

  13. 75 FR 11896 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute...: Adriana Stoica, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review & Logistics Branch, Division of...

  14. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY... Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for...

  15. 77 FR 19024 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel Career Development (K08). Date: May 15, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda... Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural, Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive... applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852...

  16. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ...: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities... Person: Timothy C. Meeker, MD, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  17. Choosing a doctor and hospital for your cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm Choosing a doctor and hospital for your cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. When you seek cancer treatment, you want to find the best care possible. ...

  18. Unified Modeling Language (UML) for hospital-based cancer registration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiki, Naomi; Ohno, Yuko; Fujii, Ayumi; Murata, Taizo; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    standardized system because the hospital-based cancer registration system was constructed with the pre-existing computer system in Osaka University Hospital. Difficulty of utilization of useful information for cancer registration processes was shown to increase the task workload. By using UML, we were able to clarify functions and extract the typical processes for a hospital-based cancer registry. Modeling can provide a basis of process analysis for establishment of efficient hospital-based cancer registration processes in each institute.

  19. 77 FR 56215 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Target Discovery and Development Network.... Contact Person: Adriana Stoica, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review & Logistics Branch... Person: Thomas A. Winters, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review & Logistics Branch, Division...

  20. Implementing hospital innovation in Taiwan: the perspectives of institutional theory and social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop an innovation model for hospital organisations. For this purpose, this study explores and examines the determinants, capabilities and performance in the hospital sector. First, this discusses three categories of determinants that affect hospitals' innovative capability studies: (1) knowledge stock; (2) social ties; and (3) institutional pressures. Then, this study examines the idea of innovative hospital capabilities, defined as the ability of the hospital organisation to innovate their knowledge. Finally, the hospital evaluation rating, which identifies performance in the hospital sector, was examined. This study empirically tested the theoretical model at the organisation level. The findings suggest that a hospital's innovative capabilities are influenced by its knowledge stock, social ties, institutional pressures and the impact of hospital performance. However, in attempts to keep hospitals aligned with their highly institutionalised environments, it may prove necessary for hospital administrators to pay more attention to both existing knowledge stock and the process of innovation if the institutions are to survive. Finally, implications for theory and practitioners complete this study. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  2. [Male breast cancer: prognostic factors, diagnosis and treatment: a multi-institutional survey of 95 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, A-S; Boukerrou, M; Cutuli, B; Campion, L; Rousseau, E; Bussières, E; Raro, P; Classe, J-M

    2015-04-01

    The optimal treatment for male breast cancer is not known because male breast cancer is a rare disease. It represents as little as 0.6% of all breast cancers and less than 1% of human cancers. The aim was to analyze the clinical, histological and therapeutic characteristics of 95 men cared for breast cancer between 2000 and 2010 in four hospitals, and determine predictors of poor prognosis to improve care of male breast cancer. This study is a multi-institutional survey, retrospective, involving four French institutions: Cancer Institute of the West (ICO), Reunion Island South hospital group, the hospital group of Dax, and the Bergonié Institute. All carcinomas in situ or invasive breast occurred in male patients were included. An analysis of clinical, histological and therapeutic features was performed. Statistical analysis of our study focused on the overall survival of patients and specific method of Kaplan-Meier, enabling search for predictors of poor prognosis. The mean age was 65 years. Thirty-seven percent of patients were overweight or obese. It was in 88% of cases of palpable tumor whose average size was 26.29mm. Ninety patients, none had a lesion palpable T0, 44% T1 tumors, 38% T2 tumors, 3% had a T3 tumors, and finally 10% T4 tumors. The histological type was the most common invasive ductal carcinoma (87%). He found a similar proportion of patients with or without lymph node involvement. N+ patients, capsular rupture was observed in 29% of cases. Receptor positivity was found, estrogen in 95% of cases and progesterone in 83% of cases. Additional irradiation was performed in 75% of patients and chemotherapy in 37% of patients. Overall survival was 79.2% at five years and 70.8% at ten years. Age, tumor size and histological capsular rupture are factors that significantly influence the overall survival and specific. Male breast cancer is a different pathology of breast cancer in women. The majority of recommendations suggest treating men who are diagnosed

  3. Costs and benefits of nursing clinical education for hospital institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivério Ribeiro

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: The inferences show that the presence of students in Clinical Teachings in the hospitals leads to a positive balance of 21.57 € per day and service, with a positive reinforcement associated to the resulting citizens satisfaction facing student rendered cares.

  4. Breast cancer in pregnancy: an institutional experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquisett, Abraham Hernández; Vicent, Carmen Herrero; Gregori, Joaquín Gavilá; Zotano, Ángel Guerrero; Porta, Vicente Guillem; Simón, Amparo Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 12 months of delivery. Nowadays PABC can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy with good outcomes for both the mother and the fetus. Recent studies suggest that prognosis of women diagnosed during postpartum seems to be worse. In order to gain a better understanding of the PABC, we reviewed our centre’s experience. Patients and methods We assessed the clinicopathological parameters, evolution, and outcome of patients treated in the Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología of Valencia, Spain, from October 1990 to October 2013, and compared the results of patients diagnosed during pregnancy (group ‘A’) and patients diagnosed within one year of delivery (group ‘B’). Of 12,000 cases of breast cancer registered in our database, 35 cases of PABC were identified. We included 11 patients in group ‘A’ and 24 in group ‘B’. Results In our group the median age was 35 years (range 29–42), of which ten (28%) patients had family history (first grade) of breast cancer, four patients were BRCA 1 mutation carriers. Axillary node compromise was found in 19 patients (53.5%), 24 patients were stage II or III at diagnosis (68.5%), 22 (62.8%) were ER positive, and nine (25.7%) were HER-2 positive. In group A (n = 11), five patients diagnosed before 18th week decided that a therapeutic abortion be performed before treatment, two patients were treated during pregnancy, one with chemotherapy without treatment associated complications during delivery. Four women diagnosed after 28th week decided to delay the treatment until delivery. After a follow up of 172 months, the relapse free survival (RFS) was 69% at five years and 45% at ten years. Overall survival (OS) at five years was 90.8% and 74.2% at ten years for all patients. For group ‘A’ OS was higher

  5. Highlights from the 2013 national cancer research institute conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Cancer research is a multifaceted endeavour that incorporates not only a myriad of techniques and specialties but also encompasses a huge range of disease types. The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK partnership comprising 21 charity and government funders of cancer research along with the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry. Each year, the NCRI hosts the largest cancer meeting in the UK; bringing together members of the UK cancer research community, research leaders from around the world, health professionals, service users, research funders, and industry to discuss the latest findings in cancer research from a wide range of disciplines. The 2013 NCRI Conference attracted over 1700 delegates and 150 speakers from 15 different countries. The conference programme covered a large range of topic areas including prevention, screening, model systems, the provision of information, survivorship, and end-of-life care. This conference report gives an overview of the plenary sessions at the conference as well as highlights from the parallel sessions.

  6. [AIDS and the hospital institution: why to think/rethink about this relationship?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M A

    1999-07-01

    Through the report of a situation occurred within the hospital institution, the article tries to focus on the way how the AIDS question has been thought in this enviroment. Furthermore, it broaches the possibility of compromising the hospital as a space for reflection and discussion. Through the analysis, it articulates the subjects implicated in the situation with gender, sex, sexuality, race and ethic questions. It also relates AIDS to risk groups, as a meaning to promote the occlusion, and to power relations within the hospital institution. As a conclusion, the article proposes more questions for us to think over our practice as professionals inserted in this context.

  7. Cloud-based hospital information system as a service for grassroots healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qin; Han, Xiong; Ma, Xi-Kun; Xue, Yi-Feng; Chen, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing-Song

    2014-09-01

    Grassroots healthcare institutions (GHIs) are the smallest administrative levels of medical institutions, where most patients access health services. The latest report from the National Bureau of Statistics of China showed that 96.04 % of 950,297 medical institutions in China were at the grassroots level in 2012, including county-level hospitals, township central hospitals, community health service centers, and rural clinics. In developing countries, these institutions are facing challenges involving a shortage of funds and talent, inconsistent medical standards, inefficient information sharing, and difficulties in management during the adoption of health information technologies (HIT). Because of the necessity and gravity for GHIs, our aim is to provide hospital information services for GHIs using Cloud computing technologies and service modes. In this medical scenario, the computing resources are pooled by means of a Cloud-based Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) to serve multiple GHIs, with different hospital information systems dynamically assigned and reassigned according to demand. This paper is concerned with establishing a Cloud-based Hospital Information Service Center to provide hospital information software as a service (HI-SaaS) with the aim of providing GHIs with an attractive and high-performance medical information service. Compared with individually establishing all hospital information systems, this approach is more cost-effective and affordable for GHIs and does not compromise HIT performance.

  8. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  9. 75 FR 79010 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Special Emphasis Panel. SPORE in Glioma, Head and Neck, Lymphoma, Myeloid Leukemia, and Myeloma. Date... Tumor Cells. Date: March 17-18, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract.... peguesj@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Small Grants...

  10. 78 FR 69858 - National Cancer Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... following agenda topics will be discussed: Proposed organizational change: DEA, Biomedical Cloud Technology, Optimizing Big Data to Advance Research, and Advocate and Organizational Engagement. Dated: November 15, 2013... is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Cancer Institute Director's Consumer...

  11. 78 FR 64222 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Career and Training Development. Date: December...). Contact Person: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural.... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, (Formerly Holiday...

  12. 75 FR 10295 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington, DC/Rockville Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike.... Place: Legacy Hotel and Meeting Center, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Gerald... Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd., Room 8101, Bethesda, MD...

  13. 76 FR 42718 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    .... Time: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington/DC Rockville, Hotel and Executive Meeting Center, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20582. Contact Person... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8113, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  14. 77 FR 14026 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Zhiqiang Zou... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Room 8050A, MSC 8329, Bethesda, MD...

  15. 76 FR 5597 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact...D, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities..., Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room...

  16. 77 FR 4052 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive....m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville, 1750... Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116...

  17. 75 FR 3242 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    .... Place: Washington DC North Hilton Hotel, 620 Perry Parkway, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Contact Person... Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 7147, Bethesda, MD 20892-8329, 301-496.... Time: 7:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton...

  18. 75 FR 57473 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ....m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Alexandria Old Town..., Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH... evaluate contract proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli...

  19. 78 FR 38355 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ...: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Peter J... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 9606 Medical Center Drive, 7W514, MSC 9750, Bethesda, MD 20892... evaluate grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD...

  20. New Hires at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty-one people joined the facility in November and December 2013. The National Cancer Institute welcomes… Emily Boward Emad Darvishi Shuo Gu Sanath Kumar Janaka Robert Kortum Yasmin Lachir Jinbian Liu Yang Liu Eric Ramirez Salazar Brett Shelley Li Xia Jaeho Yoon

  1. Analysis of the factors influencing lung cancer hospitalization expenses using data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianzhi; He, Zhen; Zhou, Qinghua; Ma, Jun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalization expenses for the therapy of lung cancer are not only a direct economic burden on patients, but also the focus of medical insurance departments. Therefore, the method for classifying and analyzing lung cancer hospitalization expenses so as to predict reasonable medical cost has become an issue of common interest for both hospitals and insurance institutions. A C5.0 algorithm is adopted to analyze factors influencing hospitalization expenses of 731 lung cancer patients. A C5.0 algorithm is a data mining method used to classify calculation. Increasing the number of input variables leads to variation in the importance of different variables, but length of stay (LOS), major therapy, and medicine cost are the three variables of greater importance. They are important factors that affect the hospitalization cost of lung cancer patients. In all three calculations, the classification accuracy rate of training and testing partition sets reached 84% and above. The classification accuracy rate reached over 95% after addition of the cost variables. The classification rules are proven to be in accordance with actual clinical practice. The model established by the research can also be applied to other diseases in the screening and analysis of disease hospitalization costs according to selected feature variables.

  2. Hospital physician payment mechanisms in Austria: do they provide gateways to institutional corruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommersguter-Reichmann, Margit; Stepan, Adolf

    2017-12-01

    Institutional corruption in the health care sector has gained considerable attention during recent years, as it acknowledges the fact that service providers who are acting in accordance with the institutional and environmental settings can nevertheless undermine a health care system's purposes as a result of the (financial) conflicts of interest to which the service providers are exposed. The present analysis aims to contribute to the examination of institutional corruption in the health sector by analyzing whether the current payment mechanism of separately remunerating salaried hospital physicians for treating supplementary insured patients in public hospitals, in combination with the public hospital physician's possibility of taking up dual practice as a self-employed physician with a private practice and/or as an attending physician in private hospitals, has the potential to undermine the primary purposes of the Austrian public health care system. Based on the analysis of the institutional design of the Austrian public hospital sector, legal provisions and directives have been identified, which have the potential to promote conduct on the part of the public hospital physician that systematically undermines the achievement of the Austrian public health system's primary purposes.

  3. Environmental market factors associated with electronic health record adoption among cancer hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Will L; Menachemi, Nir

    2017-02-22

    cancer hospitals will help stakeholders in these institutions make informed strategic decisions about information technology investments guided by their facilities' respective environmental factors. The results of this study may also be useful to hospital chief information officers and chief executive officers seeking to either improve their quality of care or achieve and maintain accreditation in providing cancer care.

  4. Psychosocial staffing at National Comprehensive Cancer Network member institutions: data from leading cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshields, Teresa; Kracen, Amanda; Nanna, Shannon; Kimbro, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is comprised of 25 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers and arguably could thus set the standard for optimal psychosocial staffing for cancer centers; therefore, information was sought from NCCN Member Institutions about their current staffing for psychosocial services. These findings are put into perspective given the limited existing literature and consensus reports. The NCCN Best Practices Committee surveyed member institutions about their staffing for psychosocial services. The survey was administered electronically in the winter of 2012. The survey was completed by 20 cancer centers. Across institutions, case managers and mental health therapists, typically social workers, were utilized most frequently to provide psychosocial services (67% of full-time-equivalents (FTEs)), with other psychosocial professionals also represented but less consistently. Most psychosocial services are institutionally funded (ranging from 64 to 100%), although additional sources of support include fee for service and grant funding. Training of psychosocial providers is unevenly distributed across responding sites, ranging from 92% of institutions having training programs for psychiatrists to 36% having training programs for mental health therapists. There was variability among the institutions in terms of patient volume, psychosocial services provided, and psychosocial staff employed. As accreditation standards are implemented that provide impetus for psychosocial services in oncology, it is hoped that greater clarity will develop concerning staffing for psychosocial services and uptake of these services by patients with cancer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Cancer Treatment Measures – PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses three cancer specific measures. The resulting PPS-Exempt...

  6. The Invention of a Medical Institution? A Discussion of Hospitals Around 1800

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dross, Fritz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the position of the hospital in the discussion on health care between self-help and formal poor relief. This is done for the late 18th and early 19th centuries when besides the famous hospital foundations e.g. in Vienna and Würzburg, a lot of hospital foundations failed. Although hospitals had been considered to be quite useful for the state by influential publicists, in the German territories neither public opinion nor doctors favoured central hospital care for the poor around 1800. A policinical model with an essential portion of curing the sick in their homes had been the modernist model of medical help in terms of late 18th / early 19th century discourse. The process of inventing the hospital as a new medical institution was based on the acceptance of family and kinship networks as requisite parts of medical help.

  7. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  8. Coping with cancer and adversity. Hospital ethnography in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulemi, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many people associate hospital treatment with 'getting better', the restoration to health and normal life. The onset of a life-threatening disease such as cancer, however, can transform the hospital into a place of constant struggle and suffering. Hospitalisation in this sense coincides with the

  9. Understanding and reducing obstacles in a collaboration between a minority institution and a cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Beti; O'Connell, Mary; Löest, Helena; Anderson, Jennifer; Westcott, Rick

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the cancer incidence and mortality rates of underserved populations will require multidisciplinary efforts involving diverse teams of investigators. We describe a collaborative program between a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center and a minority-serving institution. The organizations worked together to discover institutional and cultural barriers and facilitators to productive collaboration.

  10. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  11. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. Methods We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93. For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83 and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74 for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61 and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47 for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94 and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82 for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63 and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79 for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. Conclusions The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  12. Scholarly Activities in Hospitality and Tourism Higher Education among Private Higher Institutions in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of scholarship and develop research and scholarship strategies among Private Higher Institutions delivering Tourism and Hospitality degree programs in Australia. In doing so, this paper confronts the traditional view of research publications as the only form of scholarship by traditional…

  13. Koch Institute Symposium on Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Adam; Joshi, Nikhil S; Szeto, Gregory L; Zhu, Eric; Eisen, Herman N; Irvine, Darrell J

    2013-10-01

    The 12(th) annual summer symposium of The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT was held in Cambridge, MA, on June 14(th), 1023. The symposium entitled "Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy" focused on recent advances in preclinical research in basic immunology and biomedical engineering, and their clinical application in cancer therapies. The day-long gathering also provided a forum for discussion and potential collaborations between engineers and clinical investigators. The major topics presented include: (i) enhancement of adoptive cell therapy by engineering to improve the ability and functionality of T-cells against tumor cells; (ii) current therapies using protein and antibody therapeutics to modulate endogenous anti-tumor immunity; and (iii) new technologies to identify molecular targets and assess therapeutic efficacy, and devices to control and target drug delivery more effectively and efficiently.

  14. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  15. TESTICULAR CANCER AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-02-02

    Feb 2, 2000 ... detection of relapse in germ cell cancers(15). Other less ... enlarged supraclavicular and cervical lymph nodes, one patient (2.56%) had orbital .... from supraclavicular adenopathy, haemoptysis from lung metastasis, back pain.

  16. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysi...... sensory impressions and the opportunity for recreation through environmental facilities strengthen the patient's positive thoughts and feelings....... process was guided by the hermeneutical–phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital...... environment had a significant impact on their mood, generating positive thoughts and feelings. A view to nature also helped them to forget their negative thoughts for a while. The possibility of having a view helped some cancer patients to connect with good memories and personal life stories that enabled them...

  17. Institutional traps in the hospitality industry financing (by the example of Krasnodar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Yu. Baranova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine and classify the institutional traps in financing the hospitality industry in Russia. Methods abstractlogical generalization and observation. Results basing on the analysis of statistics and regional program of tourism development in Krasnodar region the challenges and obstacles were identified to the development and improvement of tourist services quality. The research result is the identification and systematization of institutional traps in the financing of tourism expressed in the increased public support of the sector. In particular a significant proportion of touristrecreational sector funding is still taken from the budget though the specific weight of profitable health resort organizations amounted to 60 over the past three years. In the process of research the author formulated a general concept of the institutional structure of the hospitality industry in Russia and the model of the sector financing through a system of incentives and benefits for vacationers forming the tourist clusters and forming a mechanism of dialogue between the authorities and representatives of tourist business. Scientific novelty the institutional traps are defined and systematized which are formed in the system of tourism financing measures to overcome them are proposed. Practical significance the proposed recommendations can be used by the entities of the hospitality industry to enhance business activities and by authorities to implement tasks outlined in the state programs.

  18. Cancer Pain Management and Pain Interference with Daily Functioning among Cancer Patients in Gondar University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Henok Getachew Tegegn; Eyob Alemayehu Gebreyohannes

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is an increasing public health burden for Ethiopia. Pain is among the most common symptoms in patients with cancer. Hence, we aimed to assess cancer pain prevalence, cancer pain interference, and adequacy of cancer pain treatment in the oncology ward of an Ethiopian teaching hospital. Of 83 patients, total of 76 (91.6%) cancer patients experienced pain with varying degree of severity, and 7 (8.4%) patients experienced severe pain. Of the 76 cancer patients with pain, 68 (89.2%) experie...

  19. Improving Breast Cancer Screening Adherence Among Hospitalized Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Waseem; Landis, Regina; Wright, Scott M

    2017-02-03

    More than a third of hospitalized women are both overdue for breast cancer screening and at high risk for developing breast cancer. The purpose of the study was to evaluate if inpatient breast cancer screening education, scheduling an outpatient mammography appointment before hospital discharge at patients' convenience, phone call reminders, and a small monetary incentive ($10) would result in improved adherence with breast cancer screening for these patients. A prospective intervention pilot study was conducted among 30 nonadherent women aged 50-75 years hospitalized to a general medicine service. Sociodemographic, reproductive history, family history for breast cancer, and medical comorbidity data were collected for all patients. Chi-square and unpaired t-tests were utilized to compare characteristics among women who did and did not get a screening mammogram at their prearranged appointments. Of the 30 women enrolled who were nonadherent to breast cancer screening, the mean age for the study population was 57.8 years (SD = 6), mean 5-year Gail risk score was 1.68 (SD = 0.67), and 57% of women were African American. Only one-third of the enrolled women (n = 10) went to their prearranged appointments for screening mammography. Not feeling well enough after the hospitalization and not having insurance were reported as main reasons for missing the appointments. Convenience of having an appointment scheduled was reported to be a facilitator of completing the screening test. This intervention was partially successful in enhancing breast cancer screening among hospitalized women who were overdue and at high risk. Future studies may need to evaluate the feasibility of inpatient screening mammography to improve adherence and overcome the significant barriers to compliance with screening.

  20. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  1. Hospital acquisitions, parenting styles and management accounting change: An institutional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossi, Andrea; Lecci, Francesca; Longo, Francesco; Morelli, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Many healthcare scholars have applied institutional theories to the study of management accounting systems (MAS) change. However, little attention has been devoted to MAS change within groups. Kostova et al. highlight the limitations of traditional institutional frameworks in studying groups since they are characterised not only by the existence of external institutional environments but also by intra-organisational (meso-level) ones. Given this background, the research question is: how does the meso-level institutional environment affect MAS change in healthcare groups? We use a longitudinal multiple-case study design to understand the role of headquarters in shaping local MAS change. We would expect companies to adopt similar MAS. However, we argue that the relationship between external institutions and MAS change cannot be wholly understood without taking into consideration the role of headquarters. Our analysis shows how hospitals facing the same external institutional environment implement different MAS as a consequence of different parenting styles. From a scientific perspective, our article contributes to broaden traditional institutional theoretical frameworks.

  2. The First Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt International Scientific Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2009-10-01

    A wide gathering of scientists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses specialized in pediatric oncology practice met to celebrate the second anniversary of Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). The celebration was in the form of high-brow teaching lectures and reports presented by international experts in the fields of pediatric CNS tumors, solid tumors (neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, soft tissue and bone tumors, lymphoma, leukemia and pediatric oncology nursing. The conference extends its activities to hospital management, clinical pharmacy and telemedicine. Furthermore, CCHE experts presented the efforts performed to establish a state-of-the-art pediatric oncology hospital equipped with all needed facilities to raise the standard of care to the highest levels.

  3. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    . Our study highlights the importance of providing hospital-based home care with consideration for the family members' need for the sense of security achieved by home care by experienced paediatric oncology nurses and regular contact with the doctor. In future studies, interviews with children......The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment...

  4. Epidemiological and clinical profile of triple negative breast cancer at a cancer hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a recent concept and the burning topic of research today. Various studies have been reported in western literature on TNBCs or the similar group of basal like cancers, all highlighting the poor prognostic features of this molecular subtype in comparison to the other types of breast cancers. However extensive data from India is lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical profile of TNBcs at our institute. Materials and Methods: Data on 171 patients of TNBCs registered at this hospital between 2005 and 2008 and followed up until December 2010 was collected and reviewed for epidemiological and clinical features. Results: The median age at presentation was 49 years (22-75 years. Sixty eight patients (40% had lump in the breast of less than 1 month duration. Fourteen (8% were nulliparous and 10 (7% patients had crossed the age of 30 years at first full-term pregnancy, 89 (52% were pre or peri-menopausal at presentation. Only 8 (5% patients had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. One hundred and six (62% patients were stage II, 26 (15% stage III, 21 (12% stage I and 18 (10% stage IV at presentation. One hundred and twenty eight patients (75% had early breast cancer eligible for surgery at presentation, 25 (15% were locally advanced and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT and 18 (10% were found to be metastatic. Modified radical mastectomy was the preferred surgical option by most patients (76% who underwent upfront surgery in our study. The pathological overall response rates (complete and partial response after NACT was 75% with complete response rate of 25% and there were no relapses in the complete responders. The median follow-up was 30 months (9-70 months. One hundred and twenty two patients (71% were alive at last follow-up, 34 (22% had relapsed, 18 (11% had died due to progressive disease. Thirty one patients (18% were lost to follow-up. Most of

  5. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... furnished by a hospital with a swing-bed approval. ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, other than services in...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.10 Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution...

  6. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  7. Awareness of cervical cancer and Pap smear among nursing staff at a rural tertiary care hospital in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer cervix is the leading cause of cancer deaths in females in developing countries and one in five women suffering from cervical cancer lives in India. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the awareness about cervical cancer and Pap smear among nurses working in a tertiary care institute. Study Setting and Design: Cross-sectional survey in a tertiary care institute. Materials and Methods: Nurses working at our institute excluding those who have worked or working in the Obstetrics and Gynecology department were provided with a pre-designed questionnaire testing their knowledge about cervical cancer. Results: Approximately, 86% were aware about cancer cervix and 69% were aware of a pre-cancerous stage. 42.3% were not aware of any risk factor and 27.6% were not aware of any symptom of cancer cervix. 86.2% were aware about Pap smear, but only 58.6% were aware that facilities of Pap smear were available at our hospital. Conclusions: Knowledge about cervical cancer and awareness of Pap smear as screening test was inadequate in nursing staff. Awareness programs about cervical cancer and screening are needed to increase awareness for this preventable condition. Recommendation: There is a need to arrange reorientation programs to sensitize nurses and establish cytology clinics to offer facilities for easily accessible and affordable screening.

  8. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Novel Oncogenes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread recurrent copy number alterations are observed across the majority of human cancers, yet the specific targets of such amplified or deleted regions remain undefined. Here, the CTD2 Center at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute took a systematic approach using cDNA overexpression screening to identify and validate oncogenes residing in such amplified regions. In representative examples, these experiments have identified the adaptor proteins CRKL, GAB2, FRS2 and the TLOC and SKIL proteins as novel amplified oncogenes.

  9. The preliminary experience in the emergency department of a newly opened penitentiary institution hospital in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Koc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency cases become a widespread problem in prisons across Turkey. The opening of a new prison hospital in January 2012 within the catchment of Silivri Penitentiary Institution gave a unique opportunity to treat the inmates quickly. Aims: The study was to conduct an extensive review for documentation of prisoners′ healthcare problems leading to emergency admission following the first year after the opening of Penitentiary Institution Hospital and point to decrease redundant hospital transfers of this individual cohort. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out where 12,325 visits to the Silivri Penitentiary Institution Hospital for emergency visits from the period of 1 st January 2012 to the 31 st December 2012 were identified from electronic medical records. After obtaining consent from the local IRB, data including details of the type, cause and nature of the complaints of the illnesses were processed. Results: In the 12-month period, there were 12,325 visits to the emergency department, of which 4328 for surgical conditions (35.1%, 2684 for medical disorders (21.8%, 1867 for sports injuries (15.2%, 1327 for Ear Nose Throat (ENT problems (10.8%, 827 for psychiatric disorders (6.70%, 396 for violence injury (3.2%, 169 for self harm (1.4%, and 727 for miscellaneous (5.8%. The most common cause of emergency visits was sports injuries, followed by non-specific abdominal pain and ENT problems. Eighteen prisoners re-attended 243 times, ranging from 8 visits to a maximum of 56 visits. Conclusion: Inmates in prison have a wide range of complaints, and sometimes these complaints do not suggest an illness. Prison population exhibited substantially higher prevalence rates of diseases than the civilian population. We conclude that this new healthcare system in prisons will prevent redundant hospital transfers and guarantee detainees have access to the same health care that is offered to non-detained population.

  10. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  11. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets in KRAS Driven Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  12. [Hospital biomedical research through the satisfaction of a Health Research Institute professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, C; Plá, R; Bellón, J M; Bardinet, T; Buño, I; Bañares, R

    2015-01-01

    A Health Research Institute is a powerful strategic commitment to promote biomedical research in hospitals. To assess user satisfaction is an essential quality requirement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional satisfaction in a Health Research Institute, a hospital biomedical research centre par excellence. Observational study was conducted using a satisfaction questionnaire on Health Research Institute researchers. The explored dimensions were derived from the services offered by the Institute to researchers, and are structured around 4 axes of a five-year Strategic Plan. A descriptive and analytical study was performed depending on adjustment variables. Internal consistency was also calculated. The questionnaire was completed by 108 researchers (15% response). The most valued strategic aspect was the structuring Areas and Research Groups and political communication and dissemination. The overall rating was 7.25 out of 10. Suggestions for improvement refer to the need for help in recruitment, and research infrastructures. High internal consistency was found in the questionnaire (Cronbach alpha of 0.9). So far research policies in health and biomedical environment have not been sufficiently evaluated by professionals in our field. Systematic evaluations of satisfaction and expectations of key stakeholders is an essential tool for analysis, participation in continuous improvement and advancing excellence in health research. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of local recurrence of colorectal cancer at the Iranian Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omranipour, Ramesh; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Safavi, Farinaz

    2014-01-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made in the management of colorectal cancer in terms of neoadjuvant modalities, surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies, the recurrence of tumors remains an enigmatic complication in patients. A better understanding of colorectal cancer and of factors that lead to recurrence of disease can provide helpful information for designing more effective screening and surveillance methods. To investigate the factors that may lead to local recurrence of colorectal cancers. The current retrospective case study evaluated 617 patients admitted to the Iranian Cancer Institute (the largest referral cancer center in the country) from 1995 to 2009 with confirmed colorectal cancer. Patients with distant metastasis, or with pathology other than adenocarcinoma and no follow-up, were excluded (175 patients). The remainder (442) included 294 (66.5%) with rectal cancer and 148 (33.5%) with colon cancer. The median duration of follow-up was 26 months. The total rate of recurrence was 17.4%, comprising 19.6% and 16.3% recurrence rates in colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Recurrence of colorectal cancer was significantly correlated to tumor grade (p<0.008).

  14. Magnitude and Leading Sites of Cancer in A Tertiary Cancer Care Hospital of Western Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil H Agrawal, S.S. Rajderkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It is observed that cancers are increasingly seen in both genders and all the age groups due to a complex interaction of various risk factors. To implement the Public health intervention measures it is essential to have the baseline data regarding frequency, distribution of cancers in the population. Aims: To study the magnitude of cancers by obtaining a baseline data regarding the frequency, distribution, leading cancer sites among the patients in a tertiary cancer care hospital of Western Maharashtra. Study settings: Shri Siddhivinayak Ganapati Cancer Hospital, Miraj Study Design: Hospital based, Cross sectional study involving retrospective information of patients from 1st March 2005 to 28th February 2006. Methods and Material: Retrospective, questionnaire study of patients from 1st March 2005 to 28th February 2006. Out of the total 2168 new patients registered, 1891 patients were detected to be malignant and included in the study. Results: 63.5 % Males and 67% Females in the age group 35-64 years had cancer. The sex ratio percent was 1.01%. Top five Cancer in males in our study were Oral Cavity, Oesophagus, Lung, Larynx and NHL. Top five Cancer in females in our study were Cervix, Breast, Ovary, Oral Cavity and Oesophagus. 27% were TRCs (Tobacco Related Cancers in males while 9.6% were TRCs in females. 34% cancers were in easily accessible parts of body. Conclusions: The Tobacco Related Cancers represent the most preventable form of cancer in our society. It was 27% in males and 9.6% in females in our study. Additionally 34% cancers were in easily accessible parts of body. It highlights the possibility of easy and early detection of cancers in the population thus decreasing the cancer burden in the community.

  15. 75 FR 11894 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    .... Agenda: Welcome, Overview of the Cancer Genome Atlas, Expert Panel on the Cancer Genome Atlas. Place..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology...

  16. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety, an...... and the psychosocial burden on the family does not increase. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety......, and cost. A controlled trial was conducted to assess children's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using the parent-reported and self-reported PedsQL Generic Core Scale and PedsQL Cancer Module, and the psychosocial impact on the family by PedsQL Family Impact Module comprising a subsample of 28...

  17. Cancer Pain Management and Pain Interference with Daily Functioning among Cancer Patients in Gondar University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henok Getachew Tegegn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is an increasing public health burden for Ethiopia. Pain is among the most common symptoms in patients with cancer. Hence, we aimed to assess cancer pain prevalence, cancer pain interference, and adequacy of cancer pain treatment in the oncology ward of an Ethiopian teaching hospital. Of 83 patients, total of 76 (91.6% cancer patients experienced pain with varying degree of severity, and 7 (8.4% patients experienced severe pain. Of the 76 cancer patients with pain, 68 (89.2% experienced pain interference with their daily activities. Fifty-four (65% patients were receiving inadequate cancer pain treatment with negative Pain Management Index. Therefore, it is vital to anticipate and assess pain of the cancer patients as routine clinical practice, to optimize analgesic therapy, and to identify and overcome barriers to adequate pain management.

  18. Hospital financial performance in the recent recession and implications for institutions that remain financially weak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Fareed, Naleef; Waters, Teresa M

    2014-05-01

    The recent recession had a profound effect on all sectors of the US economy, including health care. We examined how private hospitals fared through the recession and considered how changes in their financial health may affect their ability to respond to future industry challenges. We categorized 2,971 private short-term general medical or surgical hospitals (both nonprofit and for-profit) according to their pre-recession financial health and safety-net status, and we examined their operational status changes and operating and total financial margins during 2006-11. We found that hospitals that were financially weak before the recession remained so during and after the recession. The total margins of nonprofit hospitals (both safety-net and other institutions) declined in 2008 but returned to their pre-recession levels by 2011. The recession did not create additional fiscal pressure on hospitals that were previously financially weak or in safety-net roles. However, both groups continue to have notable financial deficiencies that could limit their abilities to meet the growing demands on the industry.

  19. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  20. Pain and its treatment in hospitalized patients with metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascinu, Stefano; Giordani, Paolo; Agostinelli, Romina; Gasparini, Giampietro; Barni, Sandro; Beretta, Giordano D; Pulita, Franca; Iacorossi, Laura; Gattuso, Domenico; Mare, Marzia; Munaò, Stefania; Labianca, Roberto; Todeschini, Renata; Camisa, Roberta; Cellerino, Riccardo; Catalano, Giuseppina

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the quality of pain management hospitalized cancer patients. In a quantitative and qualitative evaluation from six oncology centers in Italy, all consecutive cancer patients complaining of pain and hospitalized during the same 2 weeks were requested to fill in a McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), a present pain intensity scale (PPI), and a hospital anxiety and depression acale (HADS), and to answer a questionnaire focused (QF) on the quality of medical and nursing care. The healthcare provider's antalgic prescriptions were assessed by an index of pain management (IPM). Of 120 patients with pain admitted to oncology divisions (65 men and 52 women; mean age 57 years, range 21-79 years), 117 completed the questionnaires. The quantitative evaluation (PPI) showed a significant pain reduction between admission and discharge pain levels-from 2.65 to 1.50 ( p<0.001). While a significant reduction of anxiety (HADS) was also found-from 10.24 to 9.11 ( p<0.001)-depression did not improve (9.83 and 9.72). The most relevant information from qualitative evaluation (QF) was: in 37.6% of patients, pain level was higher overnight; 47% waited for spontaneous decrease of pain intensity before asking for nurse or physician intervention; 69% asked for nurse help when pain level was really high. The health care response to patients' pain was not completely satisfactory, since analgesic prescription was adequate in 56.52% but inadequate in 43.47%. Pain control in hospitalized cancer patients is not completely satisfactory. The physician's attitude is to underestimate and undertreat pain, while nurses are not adequately trained for timely intervention despite published guidelines for pain management. The findings of this study support the concern of inadequate knowledge and inappropriate attitudes regarding pain management, even in cancer patients hospitalized in medical oncology divisions.

  1. Biological aging and social characteristics: gerontology, the Baltimore city hospitals, and the National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2013-01-01

    The intramural gerontological research program in the National Institutes of Health underwent a substantial growth after its creation within the precincts of the Baltimore City Hospitals in 1940. This paper analyzes its development and the associated problems of its early years. Gerontologists aimed at improving the social and economic life of the elderly through scientific research. With this aim in mind, they conducted various investigations using the indigent aged patients of the Baltimore City Hospitals. Yet the scientists of aging, who hoped to eliminate negative social factors that might bias their research and heighten the confusion between pathology and aging per se, eventually stopped using these patients in the hospital as human subjects. Instead they sought educated affluent subjects in order to eliminate the impact of poverty. By doing so, however, they introduced a new source of social bias to their work, especially within the novel project begun in 1958, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. This article thus examines the context of the development of gerontologists' research by analyzing their agenda, institutional environment, and research subjects in the 1940s and the 1950s.

  2. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. [Promotion plan for the promotion of cancer: coping measures at Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital in Ehime prefecture - the current state of affairs at the hospital's cancer treatment promotion office].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Motohiro

    2013-05-01

    Recent cancer control strategies in Japan have been aimed at lowering morbidity and mortality rates, based on the Thirdterm Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control initiated by the Japanese government. In April 2007, the Cancer Control Basic Law was promulgated to necessitate promotion of cancer control by national and local authorities. In June 2007, the Japanese Health Ministry released a plan for the promotion of measures to cope with cancer. The cancer control measures adopted by the Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital(MRCH)in Ehime Prefecture were as follows: ·Progress in the promotion of measures to cope with cancer in Ehime, including a review of 2012, problems with new treatment methods for childhood cancer, employment of cancer patients, and promotion of home care. ·Cancer treatment measures adopted by MRCH as a hub medical institution for the past 5 years. ·The distinctive efforts of the intensive professionals team at the Cancer Treatment Promotion Office for cancer treatment at MRCH, and its work on cancer care from the 4 perspectives of the balanced scorecard in accordance with the basic policy of MRCH.

  4. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS. Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7% patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient’s awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7% uneducated patients, 85 (59.4% were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients.

  5. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad; Fahim, Ammad; Innocent, Haran; Mansoor, Zainab; Rizvi, Shehrbano; Farrukh, Hizra

    2016-01-01

    Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS). Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7%) patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient's awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7%) uneducated patients, 85 (59.4%) were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients. PMID:27752508

  6. Breast cancer mammographic diagnosis performance in a public health institution: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Juliana M R B; Bittelbrunn, Fernando P; Rockenbach, Marcio A B C; May, Guilherme G; Vedolin, Leonardo M; Kruger, Marilia S; Soldatelli, Matheus D; Zwetsch, Guilherme; de Miranda, Gabriel T F; Teixeira, Saone I P; Arruda, Bruna S

    2017-10-04

    To evaluate the quality assurance of mammography results at a reference institution for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in southern Brazil, based on the BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) 5th edition recommendations for auditing purposes. Retrospective cohort and cross-sectional study with 4502 patients (9668 mammographies)) who underwent at least one or both breast mammographies throughout 2013 at a regional public hospital, linked to a federal public university. The results were followed until 31 December 2014, including true positives (TPs), true negatives (TNs), false positives (FPs), false negatives (FNs), positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity and specificity, with a confidence interval of 95%. The study showed high quality assurance, particularly regarding sensitivity (90.22%) and specificity (92.31%). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) was 65.35%, and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 98.32%. The abnormal interpretation rate (recall rate) was 12.26%. The results are appropriate when compared to the values proposed by the BIRADS 5th edition. Additionally, the study provided self-reflection considering our radiological practice, which is essential for improvements and collaboration regarding breast cancer detection. It may stimulate better radiological practice performance and continuing education, despite possible infrastructure and facility limitations. • Accurate quality performance rates are possible despite financial and governmental limitations. • Low-income institutions should develop standardised teamwork to improve radiological practice. • Regular mammography audits may help to increase the quality of public health systems.

  7. Individual and institutional determinants of caesarean section in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali: a cross-sectional epidemiological survey

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Two years after implementing the free-CS policy, we assessed the non-financial factors associated with caesarean section (CS) in women managed by referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey nested in a cluster trial (QUARITE trial) in 41 referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali (10/01/2007–10/01/2008). Data were collected regarding women’s characteristics and on available institutional resources. Individual and institutional factors ...

  8. The Affordable Care Act and hospital chaplaincy: re-visioning spiritual care, re-valuing institutional wholeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierdich, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the institutional dimensions of spiritual care within hospital settings in the context of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), applying policy information and systems theory to re-imagine the value and function of chaplaincy to hospital communities. This article argues that chaplaincy research and practice must look beyond only individual interventions and embrace chaplain competencies of presence, ritual, and communication as foundational tools for institutional spiritual care.

  9. [Children's department and child care institutions of the Central military, hospital of People's commissariat during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonenko, V B; Krainyukov, P E; Abashin, V G

    2016-01-01

    The article presents historical data about paediatric health care delivery and escort of children of the Command of the Red Army during their evacuation from Moscow in 1941. Data on foundation of kindergartens of People's commissariat in 1942-1943, their support and foundation of children's department in the hospital is given. Special subdivision governed by the head of child care institutions of the hospital was formed for managing child care institutions.

  10. [Standards, options and recommendations: Good clinical practice in the dietetic management of cancer patients: hospital catering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayot, F; Bataillard, A; Keré, C; Ducès, F; Bachmann, P; Blanc-Vincent, M P; Besnard, B; Bonneteau, C; Champetier, S; Claude, M; Combret, D; Cometto, F; Duguet, A; Duval, N; Finck, C; Freby-Lehner, A; Garabige, V; Lallemand, Y; Massoud, C; Meuric, J; Montane, C; Poirée, B; Puel, S; Rossignol, G; Roux-Bournay, P; Simon, M; Tran, M

    2001-10-01

    The "Standards, Options and Recommendations" (SOR) project, started in 1993, involves a collaboration between the Federation of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC), the 20 French Regional Cancer Centres, some French public university and general hospitals and private Clinics and medical scientific societies. Its main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and outcome for cancer patients. The methodology is based on a literature review followed by a critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts to produce the draft guidelines which are then validated by specialists in cancer care delivery. To develop clinical practice guidelines for hospital catering for cancer patient using the methodology developed by the Standards, Options and Recommendations project. Data were identified by a literature search of Medline and the reference lists of experts in the groups. After the guidelines were drafted, they were validated by independent reviewers. The main recommendations are: 1) While taking into consideration the specific needs of cancer patients, the dietician is responsible for the hygiene, the sanitary quality of alimentation, the equilibrium and nutritional quality of the hospital catering. 2) Ordering and distribution of meals, and clearing up afterwards contribute to the quality of hospital catering and the personnel who do this should have time and be willing to listen to the patients. 3) The ordering of meals should be adapted to individual patient's requirements and must take into account the patient's medication. 4) The method of transporting the food chosen by the institution (cold or warm method) should be respected. The personnel responsible should receive regular and specific training to use the method correctly. 5) The intake of patients with nutritional follow-up should be reliably and reproducibly evaluated by the personnel after every meal. 6) Patient satisfaction should be assessed

  11. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  12. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  13. [Anxiety and depression of cancer patients hospitalized and at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, Ercole; Sinapi, Nadia; Piria, Paola; Bernardi, Francesca M; Dario, Lucia; Brunetti, Annarita

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anxiety and depression of cancer patients hospitalized and at home. Using a descriptive, correlational and comparative design and the Roy Adaptation Model, a sample of 80 oncologic patients was studied. Several instruments were used to measure anxiety and depression (HADS), quality of life and symptoms (RSCL), sociodemographic factors, variables connected to the hospitalization, quality of the relationship with health practitioners, family members and friends and the degree of satisfaction for the received information and support. The examined variables were measured on the same patients at hospital and at home. About the 30% of the patients were anxious and depressed. Statistical analysis showed that while anxiety did not change from the hospital to home, depression increased soon after the discharge and decreased over time and after the increasing of the number of hospital access. Anxiety and depression were positively correlated to boredom during the hospitalization, physical symptoms, number of the patients children, and previous anxious and depressive problems. Anxiety and depression were negatively correlated to the ward comfort, the support of health practitioners, family members and friends and the satisfaction for the received information. Differences between this study and the international literature are discussed. Recommendations for the future research and nursing practice are given.

  14. Utilization of operating room time in a cancer hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appropriate usage of operating room (OR time can improve efficiency of utilization of resources and help to decrease surgical waiting lists. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of usage of OR time in a tertiary referral cancer hospital. Setting and Design: This was a prospective audit carried out over 2 months in 11 major ORs in a cancer hospital. Materials and Methods: OR anesthesiologists filled a standard form for all patients undergoing elective surgery and documented the following times: entry into OR, start of anesthesia, handover to surgeon, incision, start of reversal, end of anesthesia, and shifting out of patient. Statistical Analysis: Median time utilized for various OR processes was calculated. Results: An average of two surgeries were performed per OR session (828 surgeries in 407 OR sessions. Anesthesia and surgery-related processes contributed to 17% and 79%, respectively, of total OR time, with turnover time between cases accounting for the remaining 4%. Fifteen percent (60 out of 407 OR sessions started more than 10 min later than the planned start time, and 17% (70 of 407 of OR sessions ended more than 2 h after the scheduled finish time. An anesthesia procedure room was utilized in only 15% of cases where it could potentially have been used. Conclusion: This audit identified patterns of OR usage in a cancer hospital and helped to detect areas of inefficient utilization. Anesthesia-related processes contributed to 17% of the total OR time.

  15. Prognostic Factors and Recurrence in Breast Cancer: Experience at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Stankov, A.; J. E. Bargallo-Rocha; A. Ñamendys-Silva Silvio; Ramirez, M. T.; Stankova-Ninova, K.; Meneses-Garcia, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic and predictive factors that relate to locoregional or distant recurrences in breast cancer patients who have been treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico. Multivariate, time-dependent Cox regression analyses indicate that the pN status (positive versus negative lymph node; P = 0.003; HR (hazard ratio), 3.47; CI (confidence interval), 1.52–7.91) and the pathological complete response of the patient to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (...

  16. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Resistance Mechanisms | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to targeted therapy is emerging as a bottleneck to achieving durable drug responses in cancer. The goal of the CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute is to identify mechanisms of resistance for both existing therapeutics as well as for emerging targets even prior to the identification of lead compounds. They aim to use this information to inform combinatorial treatments. In representative examples they have found that YAP1 leads to resistance after KRAS targeting and that PRKACA mediates resistance to HER2 therapy.

  17. Hospital reimbursement price cap for cancer drugs: the French experience in controlling hospital drug expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrassat-Théas, A; Bensadon, M; Rieu, C; Angalakuditi, M; Le Pen, C; Paubel, P

    2012-07-01

    In 2005, the French Government implemented a new way of financing high-cost drugs for hospitals in order to promote innovation. Such drugs are gathered on a positive list, established by the Ministry of Health, with a reimbursement price cap. Hospitals still negotiate with pharmaceutical firms, who set their prices freely, and then charge the national health insurance according to their consumption, without budgetary constraints, but on the condition of good use of care. They are not allowed to charge a price higher than this ceiling price, which is called the 'responsibility tariff' (RT). This measure is included in another, larger reform, which concerns hospital financing through allotted amounts at a specific diagnosis-based level. The purpose of this add-on payment on top of the health funds is firstly to avoid heterogeneity in costs per diagnostic-related group and secondly to avoid an uncontrolled increase of prices due to a lack of interest in negotiation from hospitals, as supplementary funding could reduce hospital price sensitivity. The aim of this work was to assess the bargaining power of hospitals with the pharmaceutical firms in the monopoly market of innovative cancer drugs since the implementation of this reimbursement price cap. This study used data from the French Technical Agency of Information on Hospitals (ATIH; Agence Technique de l'Information sur l'Hospitalisation) and included 487 hospitals, which were public and non-profit private. The analysis was conducted on the cancer drugs of the regulated list. An index representing the ratio of the purchase prices to the RT was built from 2004 to 2007 in order to make a 'before-and-after' comparison. Results showed a transient price decrease in 2005 before an alignment of patented drugs with regulated prices in the context of a dynamic market with a 22.5% yearly growth rate in value between 2004 and 2007. Hospitals are able to impose the RT for single-brand drugs. However, they are no longer able to

  18. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers.

  19. Institutional Ethnography (IE, Nursing Work and Hospital Reform: IE's Cautionary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Rankin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals in Canada have been subject to intensive reorganization in the past few decades as the public health care system absorbs and adapts to a neoliberal government agenda that promotes more "efficient and effective" use of public funds and increased involvement on the part of the private sector. A massive infusion of public money for health information technology and health services research has created the capacity to generate objectified knowledge and to use it to reform the health care system—both its organization and, increasingly, its therapeutics—with the promise of making it all work better. The research reported here is on the engagement of professional nurses in their everyday/night work in restructured hospitals and on how nursing practice is being reshaped in consequence. Our research approach, institutional ethnography, focuses on the social organization of health knowledge from the standpoint of those involved in and subordinated to its managerial uses, in this case, the nurses. We argue that a new form of ruling is being deployed. Nurses play an active part in the subordination of their own professional judgment to the objectified knowledge and knowledge-based practices that externalize decision making and reposition authoritative knowing. The paper describes and discusses the conduct of an institutional ethnographic inquiry (RANKIN & CAMPBELL, 2006 and illustrates some of its distinctive features using examples from our research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090287

  20. Health-related behaviour among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health

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    Jerneja Farkas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Behavioural risk factors have a significant impact on health. We aimed to assess health-related behaviour, health status, and use of healthcare services among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which included management (directors, scientific directors, directors’ deputies of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health (63 respondents; 57% women; overall mean age: 51±7 years; response rate: 74%. Data were obtained using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Results: About 35% of respondents were directors. More than half of the respondents were overweight or obese (52%, the majority were not sufficiently physically active (59% and overloaded with stress (87%. Hypercholesterolemia (36%, spinal disease (17%, and arterial hypertension (16% were most common chronic diseases. Whilst only few participants visited their general practitioner due their health complaints, blood pressure (76%, cholesterol (51%, and glucose (54% were measured within last year in most of the respondents. Conclusion: Our findings point to a high prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as workplace-related stress among Slovenian public health managers. Therefore, effective preventive strategies should be focused on stress management along with promotion of healthy behavioural patterns.

  1. Pattern and Distribution of Colorectal Cancer in Tanzania: A Retrospective Chart Audit at Two National Hospitals

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    Leonard K. Katalambula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC is a growing public health concern with increasing rates in countries with previously known low incidence. This study determined pattern and distribution of CRC in Tanzania and identified hot spots in case distribution. Methods. A retrospective chart audit reviewed hospital registers and patient files from two national institutions. Descriptive statistics, Chi square (χ2 tests, and regression analyses were employed and augmented by data visualization to display risk variable differences. Results. CRC cases increased sixfold in the last decade in Tanzania. There was a 1.5% decrease in incidences levels of rectal cancer and 2% increase for colon cancer every year from 2005 to 2015. Nearly half of patients listed Dar es Salaam as their primary residence. CRC was equally distributed between males (50.06% and females (49.94%, although gender likelihood of diagnosis type (i.e., rectal or colon was significantly different (P=0.027. More than 60% of patients were between 40 and 69 years. Conclusions. Age (P=0.0183 and time (P=0.004 but not gender (P=0.0864 were significantly associated with rectal cancer in a retrospective study in Tanzania. Gender (P=0.0405, age (P=0.0015, and time (P=0.0075 were all significantly associated with colon cancer in this study. This retrospective study found that colon cancer is more prevalent among males at a relatively younger age than rectal cancer. Further, our study showed that although more patients were diagnosed with rectal cancer, the trend has shown that colon cancer is increasing at a faster rate.

  2. Participation of the family in hospital-based palliative cancer care: perspective of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    Full Text Available The objective was to understand the perspective of nurses about the participation of the family in palliative cancer care and to analyze the nursing care strategies to meet their needs. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the National Cancer Institute between January and March 2013, with 17 nurses. Elements of the Roy Adaptation Model were used for the interpretation of the data. Two categoriesemergedfrom the thematic analysis: perspective of nurses about the presence and valuation of family in the hospital; and appointing strategies to encourage family participation in care and meet their needs. This participation is essentialand represents a training opportunity for the purpose of homecare. Nurses create strategies to encourage it and seek to meet the needs. The results contribute to promote the family adaptation and integrity, in order to balance the dependent and independent behaviors, aimingfor quality of life and comfort. Further studies are neededdue to the challenges of the specialty.

  3. A theory of physician-hospital integration: contending institutional and market logics in the health care field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas G; Shortell, Stephen M; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes a theory of physician-hospital integration. The theory is developed by building on three streams of scholarship: "new" institutionalism, "old" institutionalism, and the theory of economic markets. The theory uses several key concepts from these theoretical frameworks, including the notions of environmental demands for legitimacy, market demands for efficiency, and agency. To enhance the predictive power of the theory, two new concepts are introduced: directionality of influence between institutional and market forces at the macro-societal level, and degree of separation of institutional and market domains at the local level--which add important predictive power to the theory. Using these concepts, a number of hypotheses are proposed regarding the ideal types of physician-hospital arrangements that are likely to emerge under different combinations of directionality of influence and institutional and market domain separation. Moreover, the theory generates hypotheses regarding organizational dynamics associated with physician-hospital integration, including the conditions associated with high and low prevalence of physician-hospital integration, the extent to which the integrated organization is physician-centric or hospital-centric, and whether physician-hospital integration is likely to be based on loose contractual arrangements or tight, ownership-based arrangements.

  4. Enrollment and Racial Disparities in National Cancer Institute Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Leah L.; Fortune-Britt, Alice G.; Rao, Shangbang; Tyree, Seth D.; Godley, Paul A.; Carpenter, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials provide access to innovative, quality cancer treatment. Simultaneously, broad access helps ensure trial inclusion of heterogeneous patient populations, which improves generalizability of findings and development of interventions that are effective for diverse populations. We provide updated data describing enrollment into cancer treatment trials in North Carolina. Methods For 1996 to 2009, person-level data regarding cancer clinical trial enrollment and cancer incidence were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Enrollment rates were estimated as the ratio of trial enrollment to cancer incidence for race, gender, and year for each county, Area Health Education Center (AHEC) region, and the state overall. Enrollment rates for common cancers are presented. Results From 1996 to 2009, North Carolina NCI treatment trial enrollment rate was 2.4% and 2.2% for whites and minorities, respectively. From 2007 to 2009, rates were 3.8% for white females, 3.5% for minority females, 1.3% for white men, and 1.0% for minority men, with greater enrollment among more urban populations (2.4%) than the most rural populations (1.5%). Limitations This study is limited to NCI-sponsored treatment trials in North Carolina. Policies governing collection of original data necessitate a delay in data availability. Conclusions Effort is needed to ensure trial access and enrollment among all North Carolina populations. Specifically, we identified racial and gender disparities, particularly for certain cancers (e.g., breast). Programs in North Carolina and across the nation can use the methods we employ to assess their success in broadening clinical trials enrollment for diverse populations. PMID:26763244

  5. Institutional and economic influences on the adoption and extensiveness of managerial innovation in hospitals: The case of reengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, S L; Kimberly, J R; Burns, L R

    2001-06-01

    In the recent past, a number of managerial innovations--including product line management, total quality management, and reengineering--have swept through the hospital industry. Given their pervasiveness and their cost, understanding the mix of factors that influences their adoption is of theoretical interest and practical relevance. The research reported here focuses on this general question by examining influences on the adoption and extensiveness of a particular managerial innovation, hospital reengineering. The results suggest that while economic and institutional factors have influenced the adoption and extensiveness of hospital reengineering, institutional forces play a more important role. The greater influence of institutional forces may be attributed to the high degree of uncertainty in health care, the causal ambiguity of the innovation, and the anticipatory actions of hospitals attempting to position themselves in a rapidly changing environment.

  6. Assessment of a Hospital Palliative Care Unit (HPCU) for Cancer Patients; A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Saghafinia, Masoud; Zandehdel, Kazem; Motlagh, Ali Ghanbari; Kazemian, Ali; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Tahmasebi, Mamak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The first hospital palliative care unit (HPCU) in Iran (FARS-HPCU) has been established in 2008 in the Cancer Institute, which is the largest referral cancer center in the country. We attempted to assess the performance of the HPCU based on a comprehensive conceptual framework. The main aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for assessment of the HPCU performances through designing a value chain in line with the goals and the main processes (core and support). Materials and Methods: We collected data from a variety of sources, including international guidelines, international best practices, and expert opinions in the country and compared them with national policies and priorities. We also took into consideration the trend of the HPCU development in the Cancer Institute of Iran. Through benchmarking the gap area with the performance standards, some recommendations for better outcome are proposed. Results: The framework for performance assessment consisted of 154 process indicators (PIs), based on which the main stakeholders of the HPCU (including staff, patients, and families) offered their scoring. The outcome revealed the state of the processes as well as the gaps Conclusion: Despite a significant improvement in many processes and indicators, more development in the comprehensive and integrative aspects of FARS-HPCU performance is required. Consideration of all supportive and palliative requirements of the patients through interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches is recommended. PMID:26600701

  7. Education and support needs in patients with head and neck cancer: A multi-institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Joe; Milross, Chris; Sundaresan, Puma; Ebrahimi, Ardalan; Shepherd, Heather L; Dhillon, Haryana M; Morgan, Gary; Ashford, Bruce; Abdul-Razak, Muzib; Wong, Eva; Veness, Michael; Palme, Carsten E; Froggatt, Cate; Cohen, Ruben; Ekmejian, Rafael; Tay, Jessica; Roshan, David; Clark, Jonathan R

    2017-06-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) encompasses a diverse group of tumors, and thus providing appropriate and tailored information to patients before, during, and after treatment is a challenge. The objective of the current study was to characterize the experience and unmet needs of patients with HNC with regard to information and support provision. A 28-question, cross-sectional survey was completed by patients treated for HNC at 1 of 4 institutions in New South Wales, Australia (Chris O'Brien Lifehouse and Liverpool, Westmead, and Wollongong hospitals). It consisted of the adapted Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and questions assessing information quality, quantity, and format. A total of 597 patients responded. The mean age of the patients was 58 years (range, 21-94 years) with 284 men and 313 women (1:1.1). The majority of patients reported information concerning the disease process (76%), prognosis (67%), and treatment (77%) was sufficient, and approximately 50% reporting having received little or no information regarding coping with stress and anxiety. A substantial percentage of patients reported receiving minimal information concerning psychosexual health (56%) or the availability of patient support groups (56%). The majority of patients preferred access to multiple modes of information delivery (72%), with the preferred modality being one-on-one meetings with a health educator (37%) followed by internet-based written information (19%). Patients with HNC are a diverse group, with complex educational and support needs. Patients appear to be given information regarding survivorship topics such as psychological well-being, patient support groups, and psychosexual health less frequently than information concerning disease and treatment. Verbal communication needs to be reinforced by accessible, well-constructed, written and multimedia resources appropriate to the patient's educational level. Cancer 2017;123:1949-1957. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017

  8. Consensus report of the national cancer institute clinical trials planning meeting on pancreas cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philip A; Mooney, Margaret; Jaffe, Deborah; Eckhardt, Gail; Moore, Malcolm; Meropol, Neal; Emens, Leisha; O'Reilly, Eileen; Korc, Murray; Ellis, Lee; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Rothenberg, Mace; Willett, Christopher; Tempero, Margaret; Lowy, Andrew; Abbruzzese, James; Simeone, Diane; Hingorani, Sunil; Berlin, Jordan; Tepper, Joel

    2009-11-20

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality, despite significant improvements in diagnostic imaging and operative mortality rates. The 5-year survival rate remains less than 5% because of microscopic or gross metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting in pancreatic cancer was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to discuss the integration of basic and clinical knowledge in the design of clinical trials in PDAC. Major emphasis was placed on the enhancement of research to identify and validate the relevant targets and molecular pathways in PDAC, cancer stem cells, and the microenvironment. Emphasis was also placed on developing rational combinations of targeted agents and the development of predictive biomarkers to assist selection of patient subsets. The development of preclinical tumor models that are better predictive of human PDAC must be supported with wider availability to the research community. Phase III clinical trials should be implemented only if there is a meaningful clinical signal of efficacy and safety in the phase II setting. The emphasis must therefore be on performing well-designed phase II studies with uniform sets of basic entry and evaluation criteria with survival as a primary endpoint. Patients with either metastatic or locally advanced PDAC must be studied separately.

  9. Postpartum remodeling, lactation, and breast cancer risk: summary of a National Cancer Institute-sponsored workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Arcaro, Kathleen F; Balkam, Jane J; Eliassen, A Heather; Hassiotou, Foteini; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Michels, Karin B; Palmer, Julie R; Schedin, Pepper; Stuebe, Alison M; Watson, Christine J; Sherman, Mark E

    2013-02-06

    The pregnancy-lactation cycle (PLC) is a period in which the breast is transformed from a less-developed, nonfunctional organ into a mature, milk-producing gland that has evolved to meet the nutritional, developmental, and immune protection needs of the newborn. Cessation of lactation initiates a process whereby the breast reverts to a resting state until the next pregnancy. Changes during this period permanently alter the morphology and molecular characteristics of the breast (molecular histology) and produce important, yet poorly understood, effects on breast cancer risk. To provide a state-of-the-science summary of this topic, the National Cancer Institute invited a multidisciplinary group of experts to participate in a workshop in Rockville, Maryland, on March 2, 2012. Topics discussed included: 1) the epidemiology of the PLC in relation to breast cancer risk, 2) breast milk as a biospecimen for molecular epidemiological and translational research, and 3) use of animal models to gain mechanistic insights into the effects of the PLC on breast carcinogenesis. This report summarizes conclusions of the workshop, proposes avenues for future research on the PLC and its relationship with breast cancer risk, and identifies opportunities to translate this knowledge to improve breast cancer outcomes.

  10. Multiple sclerosis in Mexico: hospital cases at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, T; Rodrigues, J L; Otero, E; Stopp, L

    1996-05-01

    The frequency and clinical features of multiple sclerosis (MS) at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City for the period spanning 1984-1993 is presented. Hospital records of patients with clinically diagnosed MS were selected, the frequency and cumulative frequency of this diagnosis were determined and demographic information and clinical features were recorded. It was found that 70% of the patients were women, 25% were professionals, and 95% were of mixed race. The clinical features of our patients and their neuroimages were consistent with those of MS patients in other populations. Importantly, we found that the frequency of MS has almost doubled over the last 10 years. The reason for this phenomenon is discussed as resulting from better health screening, the availability of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and the cultural, demographic and dietary changes that have occurred due to the rapid urbanization of our country.

  11. Travel Burden and Clinical Profile of Cancer Patients Admitted to the Cancer Institute of Iran in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ardestani, Atefeh; Hadji, Maryam; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Kazemian, Ali; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Aghili, Mahdi; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-03-01

    Burden of cancer is increasing in developing countries, where healthcare infrastructures and resources are limited. Evaluating the pattern of care would provide evidence for planning and improvement of the situation. We studied the pattern of residential place and clinical information of cancer patients who were admitted to the Cancer Institute of Iran from January 1, to May 31, 2012. We studied 1,705 consecutive cancer patients admitted to the Cancer Institute in the study period. The most common cancers were breast (29.2%), colorectal (9.0%), stomach (8.3%), head & neck (8.0%) and esophageal (3.8%) cancers. Radiotherapy was the main treatment (52.1%) followed by chemotherapy (43.8%) and surgery (29.1%). We found that 60% of the patients presented in the loco-regional or advanced stages. About 35% of patients travelled from other provinces mainly from Mazandaran (13.4%), Lorestan (10.6%), Zanjan (7.8%) and Ghazvin (6.6%). On average, the cancer patients travelled about 455 kilometers to receive care in the cancer institute. We found more than 38% patients who were referred from other provinces had an early stage tumor. Establishment of comprehensive cancer centers in different geographical regions and implementation of a proper referral system for advanced cancer patients is needed to improve the patient outcomes and mitigate the burden of travel of patients for cancer care.

  12. Quality Improvement in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program: The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert D.; Castro, Kathleen M.; Eisenstein, Jana; Stallings, Holley; Hegedus, Patricia D.; Bryant, Donna M.; Kadlubek, Pam J.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007; it is a network of community-based hospitals funded by the NCI. Quality of care is an NCCCP priority, with participation in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) playing a fundamental role in quality assessment and quality improvement (QI) projects. Using QOPI methodology, performance on quality measures was analyzed two times per year over a 3-year period to enhance our implementation of quality standards at NCCCP hospitals. Methods: A data-sharing agreement allowed individual-practice QOPI data to be electronically sent to the NCI. Aggregated data with the other NCCCP QOPI participants were presented to the network via Webinars. The NCCCP Quality of Care Subcommittee selected areas in which to focus subsequent QI efforts, and high-performing practices shared voluntarily their QI best practices with the network. Results: QOPI results were compiled semiannually between fall 2010 and fall 2013. The network concentrated on measures with a quality score of ≤ 0.75 and planned voluntary group-wide QI interventions. We identified 13 measures in which the NCCCP fell at or below the designated quality score in fall 2010. After implementing a variety of QI initiatives, the network registered improvements in all parameters except one (use of treatment summaries). Conclusion: Using the NCCCP as a paradigm, QOPI metrics provide a useful platform for group-wide measurement of quality performance. In addition, these measurements can be used to assess the effectiveness of QI initiatives. PMID:25538082

  13. Oral cancer in Myanmar: a preliminary survey based on hospital-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Htun Naing; Myint, Yi Yi; Maung, Chan Nyein; Oo, Phyu Sin; Cheng, Jun; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Yagi, Minoru; Sawair, Faleh A; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of oral cancer is not clearly known in Myanmar, where betel quid chewing habits are widely spread. Since betel quid chewing has been considered to be one of the important causative factors for oral cancer, the circumstantial situation for oral cancer should be investigated in this country. We surveyed oral cancer cases as well as whole body cancers from two cancer registries from Yangon and Mandalay cities, both of which have representative referral hospitals in Myanmar, and we showed that oral cancer stood at the 6th position in males and 10th in females, contributing to 3.5% of whole body cancers. There was a male predominance with a ratio of 2.1:1. Their most frequent site was the tongue, followed by the palate, which was different from that in other countries with betel quid chewing habits. About 90% of male and 44% of female patients had habitual backgrounds of chewing and smoking for more than 15 years. The results revealed for the first time reliable oral cancer frequencies in Myanmar, suggesting that longstanding chewing and smoking habits are etiological backgrounds for oral cancer patients. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Lung cancer diagnostic delay in a Havana hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de la Vega, Joan F; Pérez, Hayvin; Samper, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and in Cuba, where its incidence and mortality are on the rise. Diagnostic delay is a variable linked to survival and prognosis. Quantifying this delay and comparing it with data from other national and international sources may lead to planning actions to reduce its impact. Assess diagnostic delay of lung cancer in patients at the Joaquín Albarrán Clinical-Surgical Teaching Hospital, Havana, Cuba, from 2007 to 2010. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted based on administrative data from patients diagnosed with lung cancer. The length of overall diagnostic delay was determined, as well delay between symptom onset and the patient's first contact with the health system, and delay at the primary and secondary levels of the national health system. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the different time intervals. The study comprised a total of 54 patients; 74.1% were men; the largest age group was 51-60 years. Of the total, 61.1% sought care first at the primary level. Total diagnostic delay for these patients was 67.4 days: 24.3 days due to patient delay (SD 32.8), 16.2 days due to primary care delay (SD 5.2), and 26.9 days due to secondary care delay (SD 20.1). The total delay for patients first seen at the secondary care level was 79.1 days (SD 81.8): 47.8 days due to patient delay (SD 25.6), and 31.3 days due to secondary level delay (SD 14.4). Diagnostic delay in lung cancer is high. Patients who went directly to hospital did not benefit from shorter delay in diagnosis.

  15. [From the medieval hospitals hospices to modern National public Health Institutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Since the most ancient times, hospital constructions and progresses in the clinical practice advanced pari passu. We can find exampless of this statement in Greek regions as well as in Greek citie overseas. Thus, during the renaissance, great figures ot that time converged in Italy: The genius Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472), a humanist and innovator of architecture. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) and his contemporany artists performed anatomical dissection to perfect their art by studying the human body. Anatomical studies flourished at the University of Padua, driven by the Flemish Master. Based on the rigorous study of the anatomical substrate, the studies on the function of the already known organic structures excelled in the xvii century. That century started with the revelation of the major blood circulation by the British physician William Harvey, alumni of the University of Padua, and continued with the description of the minior or pulmonary circulation by ancient or contemporany authors and of the peripheral connections between the arterial and the venous system (Marcelo Malpighi, 1661). All these researchers, and others, were membres of the University of Padua, were the beneficial influence of the teachings of Galileo persisted. In the following centuries, together with the embryological and normal anatomy, the pathological anatomy, systematized by G.B. Morgani, became the cornerstone of the clinical practice. The model of the ancient hospitals evolved to ward the National Institutes of Health in Mexico fostered by Dr. Ignacio Chávez.

  16. [Institutional violence, medical authority, and power relations in maternity hospitals from the perspective of health workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Schraiber, Lilia Blima

    2013-11-01

    The current article discusses institutional violence in maternity hospitals from the health workers' perspective, based on data from a study in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Eighteen health workers from the public and private sectors were interviewed, including obstetricians, nurses, and nurse technicians. A semi-structured interview was used with questions on professional experience and the definition of violence. The analysis revealed that these health workers acknowledged the existence of discriminatory and disrespectful practices against women during prenatal care, childbirth, and the postpartum. Examples of such practices cited by interviewees included the use of pejorative slang as a form of "humor", threats, reprimands, and negligence in the management of pain. Such practices are not generally viewed by health workers as violent, but rather as the exercise of professional authority in what is considered a "difficult" context. The institutional violence is thus trivialized, disguised as purportedly good practice (i.e., "for the patient's own good"), and rendered invisible in the daily routine of care provided by maternity services.

  17. Chemoirradiation for glioblastoma multiforme: the national cancer institute experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ho

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM is surgery followed by radiation (RT and temozolomide (TMZ. While there is variability in survival based on several established prognostic factors, the prognostic utility of other factors such as tumor size and location are not well established. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The charts of ninety two patients with GBM treated with RT at the National Cancer Institute (NCI between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received RT with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Topographic locations were classified using preoperative imaging. Gross tumor volumes were contoured using treatment planning systems utilizing both pre-operative and post-operative MR imaging. RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, the median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS for all patients was 17.9 and 7.6 months. Patients with the smallest tumors had a median OS of 52.3 months compared to 16.3 months among patients with the largest tumors, P = 0.006. The patients who received bevacizumab after recurrence had a median OS of 23.3 months, compared to 16.3 months in patients who did not receive it, P = 0.0284. The median PFS and OS in patients with periventricular tumors was 5.7 and 17.5 months, versus 8.9 and 23.3 months in patients with non-periventricular tumors, P = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: Survival in our cohort was comparable to the outcome of the defining EORTC-NCIC trial establishing the use of RT+TMZ. This study also identifies several potential prognostic factors that may be useful in stratifying patients.

  18. 78 FR 50068 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... 21701 and their Web site is: http://ncifrederick.cancer.gov/About/Atrf/Default.aspx . Directions/Parking... Laboratory for Cancer Research Strategic Plan; Proposed Organizational Change: Division of Extramural...

  19. 75 FR 42453 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    .... Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: The Future of Cancer Research: Accelerating Scientific Innovation. Place... language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the Contact Person listed below... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research;...

  20. Survey of the Information-Seeking Behaviour of Hospital Professionals at a Public Cancer Hospital in Greece Proves the Value of Hospital Libraries. A Review of: Kostagiolas, P. A., Ziavrou, K., Alexias, G., & Niakas, D. (2012. Studying the information-seeking behavior of hospital professionals: The case of METAXA Cancer Hospital in Greece. Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 12(1, 33-45.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio DeRosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To study the information-seeking practices of hospital staff and weigh the impact of hospital libraries on effective information-seeking.Design – Survey questionnaire.Setting – Large public cancer hospital in Greece.Subjects – The authors surveyed 49 physicians, 43 nursing staff members, 25 administrative staff members, 23 paramedical staff members, and 5 technical staff members, totaling 145 health professionals.Methods – Participants were given a questionnaire comprised of five parts: general information (including gender, age, education, position, and professional experience; questions on computer and Internet accessibility; questions regarding individual information needs; questions on information-seeking obstacles; and a question regarding the satisfaction with the current degree of information availability in the hospital. The last question was ranked using a 5-point Likert scale. Each questionnaire was distributed with a cover letter explaining the anonymity and consent of the respondent. Hospital members were randomly selected using a number generator and respondents returned completed surveys to the hospital personnel office in a sealed envelope within a specified time frame. The sampled group was representative of the overall population of the hospital.Main Results – The authors discuss demographic data of respondents: 65.7% were women; 56.7% were over 40 years old; 29.0% were graduates of higher technological institutes; 28.3% were university graduates; 9.7% held a postgraduate degree; 8.3% had a PhD; and 1.4% had only secondary education. As for the remainder of the survey questions: 64% of respondents had access to the Internet both at home and at work, while only 8.2% had no access to the Internet at all; most respondents noted using the Internet for seeking scientific information (83.0% and e-mail communication (65.3%; the main obstacle respondents noted experiencing when seeking information was the lack of

  1. Proton treatment facility at National Cancer Center Hospital East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Teiji [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East

    2002-06-01

    In 1997, the proton- treatment facility that has the therapeutic Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator (C235) is constructed at National Cancer Center Hospital East. The facility has 3-irradiation ports (rooms) that are 2-rotationg gantry ports and 1-horizontal fixed port. The C235 can accelerate proton to 235 MeV with the beam intensity of 300 nA. The external diameter is a very compact with about 4 m. The radio frequency is 106 MHz, the accelerating voltage is about 60 kV, and the harmonic number is 4. A beam stability of the C235 has an important relation with the uniformity of an irradiation field and is a very difficulty. The measured result indicated that the incident beam position against the 2.5-% dose uniformity must be into the 0.5- and 6.6-mm{phi} circles with the double-scattering and wobbler methods, respectively. The proton beam therapy began at the end of November 1998. It has been curing 97 patients by the present. Also, the proton therapy system at our hospital got an approval as medical equipment from the Japanese government in April 2001. And the proton therapy at our hospital was approved as a high advanced medical technology from the Japanese government in July 2001. The treatment expenses are 2883,000 yen uniformly. (author)

  2. Inter-institutional development of a poster-based cancer biology learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Modzelewski, Ruth A; Steinman, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    There is a paucity of African-American Cancer researchers. To help address this, an educational collaboration was developed between a Comprehensive Cancer Center and a distant undergraduate biology department at a minority institution that sought to teach students introductory cancer biology while modeling research culture. A student-centered active learning curriculum was established that incorporated scientific poster presentations and simulated research exercises to foster learning of cancer biology. Students successfully mined primary literature for supportive data to test cancer-related hypotheses. Student feedback indicated that the poster project substantially enhanced depth of understanding of cancer biology and laid the groundwork for subsequent laboratory work. This inter-institutional collaboration modeled the research process while conveying facts and concepts about cancer.

  3. Complications in Neck Dissection 10 years ex-perience with 268 cases in the Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. OSKOUI

    1973-07-01

    Full Text Available Immediate and late post operative complications or radical Neck Dissection were discussed. Preventive measures and the treatment of each were mentioned briefly. Our 10 years experience with complications or neck dissection in the Cancer Institute was presented.

  4. Factors Associated with Waiting Time for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedey, Florence; Wu, Lily; Ayettey, Hannah; Sanuade, Olutobi A.; Akingbola, Titilola S.; Hewlett, Sandra A.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Cole, Helen V.; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Adanu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in Ghana. Data are limited on the predictors of poor outcomes in breast cancer patients in low-income countries; however, prolonged waiting time has been implicated. Among breast cancer patients who received treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, this study…

  5. 78 FR 57400 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ...: Biomedical Cloud Technology; Electronic Health Records; Advocate and Organizational Engagement; and Proposed Organizational Change: Division of Extramural Activities. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31,...

  6. Lung Cancer Survival Improvement through Surgical Intervention in PUMCH Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Feng; ZHANG Zhiyong; CUI Yushang; LI Shanqing; LI Li; XU Xiaohui; GE Feng; GUO Huiqin; LI Zejian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and evaluate improvement of lung cancer survival after surgical intervention in PUMC hospital during the last 15 years. Methods: From January 1989 to December 2003, 1574 lung cancer cases underwent surgical treatment and followed up. All cases in this series were divided into two groups according to time period: group A (1999-2003) and group B (1989-1998). The difference in the survival rate between groups A and B was compared. Results: The morbidity and mortality in group A was decreased significantly in comparison to group B (11.2% vs. 19.2%, 1.06% vs. 1.93%, respectively).However, the 3-year and 5-year survival rate was increased from 42.35% to 56.07%, and from 28.46% to38.99%, respectively. A significant improvement in survival was observed in patients with stage Ⅰ, Ⅱ and ⅢA, but not in those with stage ⅢB and Ⅳ. Also, patients with lobectomy had more satisfactory results than those receiving exploratory thoracotomy, limited resection, pneumonectomy and sleeve resection. Conclusion: Lobectomy plus systematic mediastinal lymph nodes dissection has become the standard mode for resectable lung cancer. Combination of complete resection along with lymph nodal dissection, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy based on platinum/3rd generation chemotherapy medicine, has preliminarily been justified, proving an important approach for effective improvement in long-term survival of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

  7. 78 FR 19496 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT Program Evaluation SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section... submitted ] to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the...

  8. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurieshi, Mariya A; Khan, S M Salim; Masoodi, Muneer A; Qurieshi, Uruj; Ain, Quratul; Jan, Yasmeen; Haq, Inaamul; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending from January 2006 to December 2012. Descriptive analysis has been done by using statistical software. A total of 1598 cancer patients were admitted during this period. Overall male to female ratio was 1.33 : 1. Stomach cancer was the most commonly reported cancer (25.2%), followed by colorectal cancer (16.4%) and lung cancer (13.2%) among males. For females, colorectal cancer (16.8%), breast cancer (16.1%), and stomach cancer (10.4%) were the most frequently reported cancers in order of frequency. Tobacco related cancers contributed to more than three-fourths of cancers among men and more than half of cancers for women. There is an urgent need to set up a population based cancer registration system to understand the profile of cancers specific to this geographic region.

  9. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The Philippine General Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Edward N. Lo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWell-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC is the most common form of thyroid malignancy. While it is typically associated with good prognosis, it may exhibit higher recurrence and mortality rates in selected groups, particularly Filipinos. This paper aims to describe the experience of a Philippine Hospital in managing patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.MethodsWe performed a retrospective cohort study of 723 patients with WDTC (649 papillary and 79 follicular, evaluating the clinicopathologic profiles, ultrasound features, management received, tumor recurrence, and eventual outcome over a mean follow-up period of 5 years.ResultsThe mean age at diagnosis was 44±13 years (range, 18 to 82, with a majority of cases occurring in the younger age group (<45 years. Most tumors were between 2 and 4 cm in size. The majority of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, 63.2% and follicular thyroid cancers (FTCs, 54.4% initially presented as stage 1, with a greater proportion of FTC cases (12.7% vs. 3.7% presenting with distant metastases. Nodal metastases at presentation were more frequent among patients with PTC (29.9% vs. 7.6%. A majority of cases were treated by complete thyroidectomy, followed by radioactive iodine therapy and thyroid stimulating hormone suppression, resulting in a disease-free state. Excluding patients with distant metastases at presentation, the recurrence rates for papillary and FTC were 30.1% and 18.8%, respectively.ConclusionOverall, PTC among Filipinos was associated with a more aggressive and recurrent behavior. FTC among Filipinos appeared to behave similarly with other racial groups.

  10. Between prevention and therapy: Gio Batta Gori and the National Cancer Institute's Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme, 1974-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, David

    2012-10-01

    This paper explores the origins of the Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme (DNCP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and its fate under its first director, Gio Batta Gori. The DNCP is used to explore the emergence of federal support for research on diet, nutrition and cancer following the 1971 Cancer Act, the complex relations between cancer prevention and therapeutics in the NCI during the 1970s, the broader politics around diet, nutrition and cancer during that decade, and their relations to Senator George McGovern's select committee on Nutrition and Human Needs. It also provides a window onto the debates and struggles over whether NCI research should be funded by contracts or grants, the nature of the patronage system within the federal cancer research agency, how a director, Gio Gori, lost patronage within that system and how a tightening of the budget for cancer research in the mid-to-late 1970s affected the DNCP.

  11. Towards Customer-Driven Management in Hospitality Education: A Case Study of the Higher Hotel Institute, Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnavas, Andreas P.; Soteriou, Andreas C.

    2002-01-01

    Presents and discusses the approach used by the Higher Hotel Institute in Cyprus to incorporate total quality management through establishment of a customer-driven management culture in its hospitality education program. Discusses how it collects and uses service-quality related data from future employers, staff, and students in pursuing this…

  12. Using institutional theory to analyse hospital responses to external demands for finance and quality in five European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Burnett (Susan); Mendel, P. (Peter); F. Nunes (Francisco); S. Wiig (Siri); van den Bovenkamp, H. (Hester); Karltun, A. (Anette); G. Robert (Glenn); J.E. Anderson (Janet); C. Vincent (Charles); N.J. Fulop (Naomi)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Given the impact of the global economic crisis, delivering better health care with limited finance grows more challenging. Through the lens of institutional theory, this paper explores pressures experienced by hospital leaders to improve quality and constrain spending, focusi

  13. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that oc

  14. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that oc

  15. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that

  16. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  17. 78 FR 4422 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Prevention and Etiology. Date: February 27, 2013. Time: 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and...

  18. 78 FR 59362 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Boulevard, Gaithersburg, MD 20878. Contact Person: Caron A. Lyman, Ph.D., Chief, Research Programs Review... B: Exploratory Grants. Date: November 18, 2013. Time: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research;...

  19. Auditing hospital bills: an analysis of the main reasons of glosses in a private institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinaldo Pereira dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Objective: costs auditing is considered fundamental for the survival of health institutions. Thus, this article aims to investigate the reasons for glosses which occurred in a hospital in São Paulo, capital. Methods: data survey included the glosses identified from its resources, along with a health care operator. Results and Discussion: nine hundred and twenty-one glossed items were found in the analyzed resources, whose total value was of R$173,603.36. Ninety-one percent of the resources concern administrative glosses and 9% concern technical glosses. As for the value appealed, around 22% are accepted. Final results reveal that 75% of the glosses can be avoided. Conclusion: most of the reasons for the glosses analyzed concern failures in the patient-care, administrative and paying resources areas. In order to obtain a successful result, it is necessary that the manager perform a critical analysis of the reasons for glosses, thus making people aware of the problems caused by glossing and developing action plans for solving them

  20. The national database of hospital-based cancer registries: a nationwide infrastructure to support evidence-based cancer care and cancer control policy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Takahiro; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Shibata, Akiko; Emori, Yoshiko; Nishimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the current status of cancer care is essential for effective cancer control and high-quality cancer care. To address the information needs of patients and physicians in Japan, hospital-based cancer registries are operated in 397 hospitals designated as cancer care hospitals by the national government. These hospitals collect information on all cancer cases encountered in each hospital according to precisely defined coding rules. The Center for Cancer Control and Information Services at the National Cancer Center supports the management of the hospital-based cancer registry by providing training for tumor registrars and by developing and maintaining the standard software and continuing communication, which includes mailing lists, a customizable web site and site visits. Data from the cancer care hospitals are submitted annually to the Center, compiled, and distributed as the National Cancer Statistics Report. The report reveals the national profiles of patient characteristics, route to discovery, stage distribution, and first-course treatments of the five major cancers in Japan. A system designed to follow up on patient survival will soon be established. Findings from the analyses will reveal characteristics of designated cancer care hospitals nationwide and will show how characteristics of patients with cancer in Japan differ from those of patients with cancer in other countries. The database will provide an infrastructure for future clinical and health services research and will support quality measurement and improvement of cancer care. Researchers and policy-makers in Japan are encouraged to take advantage of this powerful tool to enhance cancer control and their clinical practice.

  1. Adverse events in hospitalised cancer patients: a comparison to a general hospital population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haukland, Ellinor; von Plessen, Christian; Nieder, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ) compared to a general hospital population. Material and methods: A total of 6720 patient records were retrospectively reviewed comparing AEs in hospitalised cancer patients to a general hospital population in Norway, using the IHI Global Trigger Tool method. Results: 24.2 percent of admissions for cancer...... risk. The rate of AEs increases by 1.05 times for each day spent in hospital. For every year increase in age, the risk for AEs increases by 1.3%. Cancer patients more often have hospital-acquired infections, other surgical complications and AEs related to medications. Conclusions: Because of higher age...

  2. A pilot study to assess the level of depression and the coping strategies adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitumoni Konwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer, the second most common cause of death, has become a major health problem. Depression is the most common psychological problem encountered in patients with cancer. The coping skills adopted may affect the mental health of patients. Therefore, this research is undertaken to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by the patients diagnosed with cancer. Materials and methods: A descriptive study to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl was carried out from April to May 2014 with 30 convenient samples. Depression was assessed by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS developed by Zigmond and Snaith in 1983. Coping strategy adopted by patients were assessed by revised version of the Ways of Coping Checklist developed by Folkman and Lazarus in 1985. Results: Findings of the study showed that depression was universal to all the cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients (66.5% had moderate depression while 13.26% of the cancer patients had severe depression, and only 6.7% of them reported to have low depression. The most effective coping strategy adopted was reappraisal, followed by distancing. There is significant correlation between depression and reappraisal (r=-0.538, p<0.002, and also with depression and acceptance (r=-0.415, p<0.022 strategies. Conclusion: As depression is universal to all cancer patients, use of appropriate coping strategy is very essential to improve their quality of life. The recognition of coping strategies by health team may enable appropriate information and interventions to be provided at optimal times for each individual.

  3. A clinicoepidemiological study of esophageal cancer patients at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soumaya Ezzat; Hisham El Hossieny; Mohamed Abd Alla; Azza Nasr; Nagwan Anter; Ahmed Adel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) assess the clinicoepidemiological characteristics of esopha-geal cancer patients, (2) analyze the prognostic factors determining treatment failure and survival, and (3) evaluate the results of various treatment modalities for locoregional and disseminated disease and their ef ect on disease-free survival and overal survival (OS). Methods Clinicoepidemiological retrospective data from 81 esophageal cancer patients treated at the Na-tional Cancer Institute of Cairo between 2007 and 2011 were evaluated. Results The study showed that patients with esophageal cancer commonly present with local y advanced disease (87.7% had T-stage 3 and 12.3% had T-stage 4). There was a significant correlation between surgery and survival; patients who received radical surgery and postoperative radiation had a better median survival than patients who received radical radiotherapy (20 months vs. 16 months, respectively; P = 0.04). There was also a significant statistical correlation between radical concomitant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) and pal iative treatment. Patients who received radical NCRT had a better median survival than patients who received pal-liative radiotherapy (16 months vs. 10 months, respectively; P = 0.001). The median fol ow-up period for al patients was 7 months. The median OS of the whole group was 12 months. The OS after 1 and 2 years was 57.8% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion High-dose NCRT is an acceptable alternative for patients unfit for surgery or with inoperable disease. High-dose radiation is more ef ective than low-dose radiation in terms of local control, time to relapse, and OS. Further study using a larger series of patients and introducing new treatment protocols is necessary for a final evaluation.

  4. Using institutional theory to analyse hospital responses to external demands for finance and quality in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Susan; Mendel, Peter; Nunes, Francisco; Wiig, Siri; van den Bovenkamp, Hester; Karltun, Anette; Robert, Glenn; Anderson, Janet; Vincent, Charles; Fulop, Naomi

    2016-04-01

    Given the impact of the global economic crisis, delivering better health care with limited finance grows more challenging. Through the lens of institutional theory, this paper explores pressures experienced by hospital leaders to improve quality and constrain spending, focusing on how they respond to these often competing demands. An in-depth, multilevel analysis of health care quality policies and practices in five European countries including longitudinal case studies in a purposive sample of ten hospitals. How hospitals responded to the financial and quality challenges was dependent upon three factors: the coherence of demands from external institutions; managerial competence to align external demands with an overall quality improvement strategy, and managerial stability. Hospital leaders used diverse strategies and practices to manage conflicting external pressures. The development of hospital leaders' skills in translating external requirements into implementation plans with internal support is a complex, but crucial, task, if quality is to remain a priority during times of austerity. Increasing quality improvement skills within a hospital, developing a culture where quality improvement becomes embedded and linking cost reduction measures to improving care are all required. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Using institutional theory to analyse hospital responses to external demands for finance and quality in five European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Peter; Nunes, Francisco; Wiig, Siri; van den Bovenkamp, Hester; Karltun, Anette; Robert, Glenn; Anderson, Janet; Vincent, Charles; Fulop, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Given the impact of the global economic crisis, delivering better health care with limited finance grows more challenging. Through the lens of institutional theory, this paper explores pressures experienced by hospital leaders to improve quality and constrain spending, focusing on how they respond to these often competing demands. Methods An in-depth, multilevel analysis of health care quality policies and practices in five European countries including longitudinal case studies in a purposive sample of ten hospitals. Results How hospitals responded to the financial and quality challenges was dependent upon three factors: the coherence of demands from external institutions; managerial competence to align external demands with an overall quality improvement strategy, and managerial stability. Hospital leaders used diverse strategies and practices to manage conflicting external pressures. Conclusions The development of hospital leaders’ skills in translating external requirements into implementation plans with internal support is a complex, but crucial, task, if quality is to remain a priority during times of austerity. Increasing quality improvement skills within a hospital, developing a culture where quality improvement becomes embedded and linking cost reduction measures to improving care are all required. PMID:26683885

  6. Does hospital discharge policy influence sick-leave patterns in the case of female breast cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, Rikard; Stenbeck, Magnus; Diderichsen, Finn

    2005-01-01

    in 2000 were selected from the National Cancer Register and combined with data from the sick-leave database of the National Social Insurance Board and the National Hospital Discharge Register (N = 1834). A multi-factorial model was fitted to the data to investigate how differences in hospital care......The objective was to investigate how differences among hospitals in the shift from in-patient care to day surgery and a reduced hospital length of stay affect the sick-leave period for female patients surgically treated for breast cancer. All women aged 18-64 who were diagnosed with breast cancer....... The effect of the hospital median length of stay (LOS) was U-shaped, suggesting that hospitals with a median LOS that is either short or long are associated with longer sick-leave. In the intermediate range, women treated in hospitals with a median LOS of 2 days had 22 days longer sick-leave than those...

  7. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  8. Patient Survey (HCAHPS) - PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  9. Setting up a Prospective Thyroid Biobank for Translational Research: Practical Approach of a Single Institution (2004-2009, Pasteur Hospital, Nice, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Sandra; Hofman, Véronique; Ilie, Marius; Butori, Catherine; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Gaziello, Marie Clotilde; Selva, Eric; Gavric-Tanga, Virginie; Guevara, Nicolas; Castillo, Laurent; Santini, José; Chabannon, Christian; Hofman, Paul

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, conditions for setting up a human biobank in France have been upgraded by taking into account (1) the new laws and regulations that integrate the ethical and societal dimension of biobanking and delineate the risks for patients associated with the procurement of human cells and tissues, (2) the increasing request by scientists for human samples with proven biological quality and sophisticated sets of annotations, including information produced through the evergrowing use of molecular biology in pathology, and (3) establishment of procedures concerning the safety of the personnel working with biological products. For this purpose, health authorities and national research institutes in France have provided significant support for the set up of biobanks. The present work was conducted to describe how we set up a biobank targeting diseases of a specific organ (thyroid gland), with the aim of rapidly developing translational research projects. The prospective experience of a single institution (Pasteur Hospital, Nice, France) over a 6-year period (2004-2009) is presented from the practical point of view of a surgical pathology laboratory. We describe different procedures required to obtain high-quality thyroid biological resources and clinical annotations. The procedures were established for the management of biological products obtained from 1454 patients who underwent thyroid surgery. The preanalytical steps leading to the storage of frozen specimens were carried out in parallel with diagnostic procedures. As the number of international networks for research programs using biological products is steadily increasing, it is crucial to harmonize the procedures used by biobanks. In this regard, the described thyroid biobank has been set up using criteria established by the French National Cancer Institute (Institut National du Cancer) to guarantee the quality of different collections stored in biobanks.

  10. Microbial keratitis in los angeles: the doheny eye institute and the los angeles county hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Daniel; She, Rosemary; Shulman, Ira A; Chen, David S; Schur, Mathew; Hsu, Hugo Y

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the spectrum and antibiotic susceptibility panel of infectious keratitis at a major tertiary care referral eye center and a major county hospital in Southern California. Retrospective case series. All cultured infectious keratitis cases from July 1, 2008, through December 31, 2012, from the Doheny Eye Institute (DEI) and the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center (LAC+USC) were evaluated. Microbiology records were reviewed retrospectively. Microbial isolates as well as antibiotic susceptibility patterns were analyzed. One hundred eighty-four (63%) of 290 cases showed positive culture results at DEI and 152 (82%) of 186 cases showed positive culture results at LAC+USC. Gram-positive pathogens were found to be the most common at both DEI (70%) and LAC+USC (68%), with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus being the most common gram-positive organism (58% at DEI and 44% at LAC+USC). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common gram-negative organism (57% at DEI and 43% at LAC+USC). Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin susceptibility for all tested pathogens was 73% at DEI and 81% at LAC+USC (P = 0.16). Oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA) was found in 42% of cases at DEI and in 45% of cases at LAC+USC (P = 1.00). There is no significant difference in the spectrum of pathogens or antibiotic susceptibility of pathogens at DEI versus LAC+USC, and ORSA was found in approximately half of all S. aureus samples. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 75 FR 26968 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... grant applications. Place: Legacy Hotel and Meeting Center, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Technology Development. Date: June 23-24, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to... applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852...

  12. Where do the poorest go to seek outpatient care in Bangladesh: hospitals run by government or microfinance institutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hwei Tseng

    Full Text Available Health programs implemented by microfinance institutions (MFIs aim to benefit the poor, but whether these services reach the poorest remains uncertain. This study intended to investigate the socioeconomic distribution of patients in hospitals operated by microfinance institutions (i.e. MFI hospitals in Bangladesh and compare the differences with public hospitals to determine if the programs were consistent with their pro-poor mandate.In this cross-sectional study, we used the convenience sampling method to conduct an interviewer-assisted questionnaire survey among 347 female outpatients, with 170 in public hospitals and 177 in MFI hospitals. Independent variables were patient characteristics categorized into predisposing factors (age, education, marital status, family size, enabling factors (microcredit membership, household income and need factors (self-rated health, perceived needs for care. We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE to evaluate how these factors contributed to MFI hospital use.Use of MFI hospitals was associated with microcredit membership over 5 years (OR=2.9, p<.01, moderately poor household (OR=4.09, p<.001, non-poor household (OR=7.34, p<.01 and need for preventive care (OR=3.4, p<.01, compared with public hospitals. Combining membership and income, we found microcredit members had a higher tendency towards utilization but membership effect pertained to the non- and moderately-poor. Compared with the group who were non-members and the poorest, microcredit members who were non-poor had the highest likelihood (OR=7.46, p<.001 to visit MFI hospitals, followed by members with moderate income (OR=6.91, p<.001 and then non-members in non-poor households (OR=4.48, p<.01. Those who were members but the poorest had a negative association (OR=0.42, though not significant. Despite a higher utilization of preventive services in MFI hospitals, expenditure there was significantly higher.Inequity was more pronounced in MFI

  13. [A rare cancer: cancers of the small intestine. 25 cases diagnosed at the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar from 1992 to 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Dina, T J N; Ravalisoa, A

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective survey of cases of cancer of the small intestine observed in the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar (IPM), in the Centre Hospitalier de Soavinandriana (CenHoSoa) and in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo/Hôpital Joseph Ravoahangy Andrianavalona (CHUA/HJRA), has been undertaken with the goal to find out epidemiological and diagnostical particularities, as well as the therapeutic measures and their results. Only 25 cases have been found in 10 years (from 1992 to 2001). They represent 5.4% of the digestive cancers diagnosed by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar. They concern 14 women and 11 men with a mean age of 36 years old at the time of diagnosis. The motive of hospitalization was an acute abdomen (peritonitis, perforation, occlusive syndrome, König's syndrome) in 64.3%, and a chronic abdominal pain often associated with abdominal mass in 35.7%. The duodenum is the predilection seat of the small bowel cancers (50%), followed by the ileum (25%) and the jejunum (10%). A diffuse shape has been observed in 15% of the cases. The most frequent histological type is the lymphoma (40%) followed by the adenocarcinoma (32%).

  14. 76 FR 81952 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... 24-25, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton...., Scientific Review Officer, Research Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramual Activities, National Cancer... evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli...

  15. 76 FR 5595 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    .... Place: Lorien Hotel & Spa, 1600 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. Contact Person: Marvin L. Salin, PhD... Clinical Automated Multiplex Affinity Capture Technology for Detecting Low Abundance Cancer-Related... proposals. Place: Lorien Hotel & Spa, 1600 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. Contact Person: Marvin L...

  16. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Dornelles Prolla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice.METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9% agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed.RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173 or degree/specialization (p=0.815. Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed.CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice.

  17. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, Carmen Maria Dornelles; da Silva, Patrícia Santos; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Goldim, José Roberto; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9%) agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed. RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173) or degree/specialization (p=0.815). Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed. CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice. PMID:25806636

  18. Using institutional theory to analyse hospital responses to external demands for finance and quality in five European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Glenn Brian; Anderson, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Given the impact of the global economic crisis, delivering better health care with limited finance grows more challenging. Through the lens of institutional theory, this paper explores pressures experienced by hospital leaders to improve quality and constrain spending, focusing on how they respond to these often competing demands. Methods: An in-depth, multilevel analysis of health care quality policies and practices in five European countries including longitudinal case studies i...

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hospital-based Case Management in Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Christian N; Vedsted, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case management (CM) models based on experienced nurses are increasingly used to improve coordination and continuity of care for patients with complex health care needs. Anyway, little is known about the effects of hospital-based CM in cancer care.Aim.To analyse the effects of hospital......-based CM on (i) GPs' evaluation of information from the hospital and collaboration with the hospital staff and (ii) patients' contacts with GPs during daytime and out of hours. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial allocated 280 colorectal cancer patients 1:1 to either a control group or CM intervention...

  20. Morbidity analysis in minimally invasive esophagectomy for oesophageal cancer versus conventional over the last 10 years, a single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misbah Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been an increasing inclination towards minimally invasive esophagectomies (MIEs at our institute recently for resectable oesophageal cancer. Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to report peri-operative and long-term procedure specific outcomes of the two groups and analyse their changing pattern at our institute. Methods: All adult patients with a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer managed at our institute from 2005 to 2015 were included in this retrospective study. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded through our hospital information system. The cohort of esophagectomies was allocated into two groups, conventional open esophagectomy (OE or total laparoscopic MIE; hybrid esophagectomies were taken as a separate group. The short-term outcome measures are an operative time in minutes, length of hospital and Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay in days, post-operative complications and 30 days in-hospital mortality. Complications are graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Long-term outcomes are long-term procedure related complications over a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Trends were analysed by visually inspecting the graphic plots for mean number of events in each group each year. Results: Our results showed no difference in mortality, length of hospital and ICU stays and incidence of major complications between three groups on uni- and multi-variate analysis (P > 0.05. The operative time was significantly longer in MIE group (odds ratio [OR]: 1.66, confidence interval [CI]: 2.4–11.5. The incidence of long-term complication was low for MIE (OR: 1.0, CI: 133–1.017. However, all post-operative surgical outcomes trended to improve in both groups over the course of this study and stayed better for MIE group except for the operative time. Conclusion: MIE has overall comparable surgical outcomes to its conventional counterpart. Furthermore, the peri-operative outcomes tend to

  1. Colon cancer modulation by a diabetic environment: A single institutional experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nieves; Portal-Nuñez, Sergio; Zazo, Sandra; Corton, Marta; Minguez, Pablo; Gomez-Guerrero, Carmen; Arce, Jose Miguel; Sanz, Ana Belen; Mas, Sebastian; Aguilera, Oscar; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Esbrit, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto; Ayuso, Carmen; Egido, Jesus; Rojo, Federico; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Background Multiple observational studies suggest an increased risk of colon cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This can theoretically be the result of an influence of the diabetic environment on carcinogenesis or the tumor biologic behavior. Aim To gain insight into the influence of a diabetic environment on colon cancer characteristics and outcomes. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of clinical records in an academic tertiary care hospital with detailed analysis of 81 diabetic patients diagnosed of colon cancer matched with 79 non-diabetic colon cancer patients. The impact of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the growth of colon cancer xenografts was studied in mice. Results The incidence of DM in 1,137 patients with colorectal cancer was 16%. The diabetic colon cancer cases and non-diabetic colon cancer controls were well matched for demographic and clinical variables. The ECOG Scale Performance Status was higher (worse) in diabetics (ECOG ≥1, 29.1% of controls vs 46.9% of diabetics, p = 0.02), but no significant differences were observed in tumor grade, adjuvant therapy, tumor site, lymphovascular invasion, stage, recurrence, death or cancer-related death. Moreover, no differences in tumor variables were observed between patients treated or not with metformin. In the xenograft model, tumor growth and histopathological characteristics did not differ between diabetic and nondiabetic animals. Conclusion Our findings point towards a mild or negligible effect of the diabetes environment on colon cancer behavior, once cancer has already developed. PMID:28253286

  2. Cancer outcomes research in a rural area: a multi-institution partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael; Almon, Lyn; Bayakly, Rana; Butler, Susan; Crosby, Carol; DiIorio, Colleen; Ekwueme, Donatus; Fletcher, Diane; Fowler, John; Gillespie, Theresa; Glanz, Karen; Hall, Ingrid; Lee, Judith; Liff, Jonathan; Lipscomb, Joseph; Pollack, Lori A; Richardson, Lisa C; Roberts, Phillip; Steenland, Kyle; Ward, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    Whereas, most cancer research data come from high-profile academic centers, little is known about the outcomes of cancer care in rural communities. We summarize the experience of building a multi-institution partnership to develop a cancer outcomes research infrastructure in Southwest Georgia (SWGA), a primarily rural 33-county area with over 700,000 residents. The partnership includes eight institutions: the Emory University in Atlanta, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Georgia Comprehensive Center Registry (the Registry), the Southwest Georgia Cancer Coalition (the Coalition), and the four community cancer centers located within the SWGA region. The practical application of the partnership model, its organizational structure, and lessons learned are presented using two specific examples: a study evaluating treatment decisions and quality of life among prostate cancer patients, and a study of treatment discontinuation among prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancer patients. Our partnership model allowed us to (1) use the Coalition as a link between Atlanta-based researchers and local community; (2) collaborate with the area cancer centers on day-to-day study activities; (3) involve the Registry personnel and resources to identify eligible cancer cases and to perform data collection; and (4) raise community awareness and sense of study ownership through media announcements organized by the Coalition. All of the above activities were performed in consultation with the funding institution (CDC) and its project directors who oversee several other studies addressing similar research questions throughout the country. Our partnership model may provide a useful framework for cancer outcomes research projects in rural communities.

  3. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A Pooling Project of Studies Participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Wright, Lauren B; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N; McClain, Kathleen M; Jones, Michael E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Blot, William J; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A Heather; Giles, Graham G; Gram, Inger T; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Kirsh, Victoria A; Kitahara, Cari M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A; Milne, Roger L; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R; Peeters, Petra H; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This article describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1360-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Overcoming barriers to cancer pain management: an institutional change model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Virginia Chih-Yi; Borneman, Tami; Ferrell, Betty; Piper, Barbara; Koczywas, Marianna; Choi, Kyong

    2007-10-01

    The Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Pain Guidelines of 1994 recognized pain as a critical symptom that impacts quality of life (QOL). The barriers to optimum pain relief were classified into three categories: patient, professional, and system barriers. A prospective, longitudinal clinical trial is underway to test the effects of the "Passport to Comfort" innovative intervention on pain and fatigue management. This article reports on preintervention findings related to barriers to pain management. Cancer patients with a diagnosis of breast, lung, colon, or prostate cancer who reported a pain rating of >/=4 were accrued. Subjects completed questionnaires to assess subjective ratings of overall QOL, barriers to pain management, and pain knowledge at baseline and at one- and three-month evaluations. A chart audit was conducted at one month to document objective data related to pain management. The majority of subjects had moderate (4-6 on a 0-10 numeric rating scale) pain at the time of accrual. Patient barriers to pain management existed in attitudes and knowledge regarding addiction, tolerance, and not being able to control pain. Subjects who were currently receiving chemotherapy were reluctant to communicate their pain with health care professionals. Professional and system barriers were focused around screening, documentation, reassessment, and follow-up of pain. Lack of referrals to supportive care services for patients was also noted. Several well-described patient, professional, and system barriers continue to hinder efforts to provide optimal pain relief. Phase II of this initiative will attempt to eliminate these barriers using the "Passport" intervention to manage cancer pain.

  5. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  6. Breast cancer mortality among patients attending a cancer hospital, Vitoria, ES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Arthmar Mentz Albrecht

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the association between mortality of breast cancer women and the social-demographic and clinical characteristics. During the mortality study of 1,086 women diagnosed with breast cancer and treated from 2000 to 2005 at a cancer hospital in the city of Vitória, Espírito Santo, medical records and tumor registration cards were controlled. The Mortality Information System and the Reclink program were used to identify 280 deaths. Patients were classified under death and non-death, and variables percentages were calculated. For variables that showed statistical significance, considering the level of 0.10, the crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR were calculated by logistic regression model. There was a correlation between mortality and the following variables: women coming from the Unified Health System (p = 0.014; OR = 2.38, negative c-erb B-2 tumor marker (p = 0.027; OR = 2.03, advanced (III and IV staging (p = 0.001; OR = 6.89 and OR = 17.13, respectively, presence of metastasis (p = 0.001; OR = 18.23 and recurrence (p = 0.010; OR = 3.53. Mortality associated with staging underlines the necessity of warning the population about the benefits of early diagnosis of the disease of cancer.

  7. Institutional transfer from the European design practices to Ukraine and Moldova: the case of hospital design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugaru, Rodica

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the development of post-soviet hospital design through the analysis of recent modernisations in Moldova and Ukraine. It consists of two parts. First, an introduction of the definition of hospital design as well as its main characteristics during the Soviet period. Secondly, a presentation of two hospital modernisations in Ukraine and Moldova. In a comparative perspective, the paper presents the actors involved, the difficulties in modernising the hospital regarding the inherited rules as well as the solutions advanced in order to implement a change. An introduction to the hospital design in Moldova and Ukraine will allow an in-depth study of the involvement of international actors in the post-communist transformations.

  8. Oncology Care Measures – PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses five oncology care measures. The resulting PPS-Exempt...

  9. Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses one clinical effectiveness measure—External Beam...

  10. End-of-life hospital care for cancer patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudevich, Alexey; Chen, Allie; Gula, Cheryl; Fagbemi, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada, and the number of new cases is expected to increase as the population ages and grows. This study examined the use of hospital services in the last month of life by adult cancer patients who died in Canadian acute care hospitals in fiscal year 2012-2013. Almost 25,000 Canadian cancer patients - excluding those in Quebec - died in acute care hospitals, representing approximately 45% of the estimated cancer deaths in 2012-2013. The proportion of in-hospital deaths varied across jurisdictions. Twenty-three percent of these patients were admitted to acute care multiple times in their last 28 days of life, with a higher percentage for rural (29%) compared to urban (21%) patients. Relatively few patients used intensive care units or received inpatient chemotherapy in their last 14 days of life.

  11. The frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of nosocomial pathogens recovered from cancer patients and hospital environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Mudawe Nurain

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of nosocomial infection among cancer patients was high (48.1% with the increasing of antimicrobial resistance rates. Hospital environments are potential reservoirs for nosocomial infections, which calls for intervention program to reduce environmental transmission of pathogens.

  12. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women: e0145492

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waseem Khaliq; Ali Aamar; Scott M Wright

    2015-01-01

    .... Patients and Methods A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50-75 years...

  13. The learning curve for laparoscopic colectomy in colorectal cancer at a new regional hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Yen Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer in a new regional hospital is feasible and safe. It does not need additional time for learning. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy can be considered as the initial surgery for a trainee.

  14. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  15. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Corrêa Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%, with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71% patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2% patients. In 50 patients (86%, sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%, hypothyroidism (43%, mucositis (33% and diarrhea (29%. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%, hypertension (12%, thrombocytopenia (7%, neutropenia (5% and hand-foot syndrome (5%. Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS.

  16. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  17. [Management of breast cancers diagnosed at the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar from 1995 to 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Rabarijaona, L P; Rajemiarimoelisoa, C; Rasendramino, M; Migliani, R

    2002-01-01

    Breast cancer is a great problem of public health all over the world. In developed countries, breast cancer represents the most common cancer in females. Its incidence is also increasing in developing country. In Madagascar, no data is available to estimate the real incidence and prevalence rates of breast cancer. However, the data at the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar can confirm the extent of the problem even if it is not at a national scale. The authors report the results of a retrospective study from histological examination at the Laboratory of pathological anatomy of the IPM, during 7 years. Among 2,337 cases of cancer, 16% (373) were breast cancer. Most of them were a female breast cancer (356 cases). The average age is 48 years old. 30% of the tumors were more than 2 cm in size, corresponding at least to the T2 stade from the International Union Against Cancer anatomoclinical classification. The current histological type is the infiltrating ductal carcinoma (80%), about 2/3 belong to the grade 3 of the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson histopronostical classification. Early diagnosis of the cancer is difficult because of the insufficiency of the sanitary infrastructure, particularly for cervical and breast cancers. A national policy for screening must be set up in order to decrease the rate of these invasive carcinomas. In the meantime, informing women and training all the medical staff is a priority. Recording all the data in Madagascar would be desirable.

  18. An Analysis of Gap in TQM Indicators in Health Care Institutions (Case: Isfahan Khorshid Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadr-Bafghi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many organizations, especially, service organizations, relative to their goals and mission, have a special view towards quality phenomena and its management and are turning to approaches such as TQM to help manage their business. This study examined the TQM indicators gap in Isfahan Khorshid hospital. As fuzzy set theory is better than the logical theory for estimating the linguistic factors, this paper tries to apply fuzzy approach to quality management in hospitals and analyzes the gap between personnel expectations and perception. Methods: This paper analyzes medical total quality management in a case (Internal Section of Khorshid Hospital, based on gap analysis model and fuzzy logic. A questionnaire was therefore applied to measure expectations and perceptions of hospital personnel. Results: This study results show that on the whole, there is a significant difference between TQM expectations and perceptions among K`horshid hospital personnel. Conclusions: Spurred by impressive results in other industries, this compelling and logical approach has begun to penetrate the thinking of health care accrediting agencies, business coalitions, private foundations and leading health care organizations. However, before making a commitment to TQM, hospital decision makers should thoroughly understand what it is they are committing to, and solve the main barriers such as the conflict between hospital management philosophies and TQM philosophies.

  19. Institutional characteristics associated with receipt of emergency care for obstructive pyelonephritis at community hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borofsky, Michael S; Walter, Dawn; Li, Huilin; Shah, Ojas; Goldfarb, David S; Sosa, R Ernest; Makarov, Danil V

    2015-03-01

    Delivering the recommended care is an important quality measure that has been insufficiently studied in urology. Obstructive pyelonephritis is a suitable case study for this focus because many patients do not receive such care, although guidelines advocate decompression. We determined the influence of hospital factors, particularly familiarity with urolithiasis, on the likelihood of decompression in such patients. We used the NIS from 2002 to 2011 to retrospectively identify patients admitted to community hospitals with severe infection and ureteral calculi. Hospital familiarity with nephrolithiasis was estimated by calculating hospital stone volume (divided into quartiles) and hospital treatment intensity (the decompression rate in patients with ureteral calculi and no infection). After calculating national estimates we performed logistic regression to determine the association between the receipt of decompression and hospital stone volume, controlling for treatment intensity and other covariates thought to be associated with receiving recommended care. Of an estimated 107,848 patients with obstructive pyelonephritis 27.4% failed to undergo decompression. Discrepancies were greatest between hospitals with the highest and lowest stone volumes (76% vs 25%, OR 2.77, 95% CI 1.94-3.96, p <0.01) as well as high and low treatment intensity (78% vs 37%, p <0.01). High hospital stone volume and treatment intensity were associated with an increased likelihood of receiving decompression. Such findings might be useful to identify hospitals and regions where access to quality urological care should be augmented. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... (OMB) for review and approval. Written comments and/or suggestions from the public and affected... comments in writing, request more information on the proposed project, or to obtain a copy of the data... developed (and is managed) by the ] National Cancer Institute (NCI) Tobacco Control Research Branch...

  1. Restructuring the organizational culture of medical institutions: a study on a community hospital in the I-Lan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2008-09-01

    Launched in 1995, the National Health Insurance Program has imposed tremendous pressure on hospitals across Taiwan. As a result, most hospitals, especially those of small and medium scale, have gone to great lengths to restructure their organizations in order to continue operating under the new medical setting. Using a community hospital in I-Lan area as its focus, this study attempts to identify the process of organizational culture restructuring in medical institutions. This process includes the two phases of (1) analyzing difficulties faced, with particular emphasis on three problems associated with the existing organizational culture and (2) restructuring the organizational culture and evaluating the restructuring process, with emphasis on four strategies geared to modify the organizational culture and a pre-and-post quasi-experimental study to evaluate outcomes. This study uses a triangulated data collection approach comprising four qualitative data collection techniques that include semi-structured interviews, focus groups, reflective participant observation, and critical review of relevant organizational materials. The evaluation reveals a significant level of difference between employee perspectives on organizational culture before and after restructuring. In short, employees expressed that, after the restructuring, they feel more respected and recognized than before. Research results, based on an organization's cultural restructuring process, show the process by which a hospital successfully restructured its organizational culture. Empirical data derived from the restructuring process may serve as reference for other hospitals contemplating restructuring.

  2. Cancer incidence, hospital morbidity, and mortality in young adults in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sabrina da Silva; Melo, Leticia Rodrigues; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge; Koifman, Sergio

    2013-05-01

    There are still relatively few studies in the world on cancer incidence and mortality in young adults. The current study aimed to explore cancer distribution in young adults in Brazil. A descriptive study was conducted on cancer incidence (selected State capitals), hospital morbidity, and mortality (Brazil and selected capitals) in the 20-24-year age strata in 2000-2002, and trends in cancer mortality rates in Brazil in 1980-2008 in the same population. Testicular cancer was the principal anatomical site in young adult males; in young adult women, the main sites were thyroid, uterine cervix, and Hodgkin disease. Brain cancer was the principal cause of death from cancer in both sexes, and time trends in mortality showed an increase in mortality from brain cancer in men and from lymphocytic leukemia in both sexes. As a whole, the results show an epidemiological pattern of cancer in young adults with regional distribution characteristics.

  3. Failure-to-Rescue After Colorectal Cancer Surgery and the Association with Three Structural Hospital Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, D.; van Leersum, N. J.; ten Berge, M.; Snijders, H. S.; Fiocco, M.; Wiggers, T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between structural hospital characteristics and failure-to-rescue (FTR) after colorectal cancer surgery. A growing body of evidence suggests a large hospital variation concerning mortality rates in patients with a severe complication (FTR) in color

  4. Hospital volume and post-operative mortality after resection for gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, RAM; Meurs, CJC; Dijkhuis, CM; Stassen, LPS; Wiggers, T

    2002-01-01

    Aims: In low-volume hospitals, expertise in gastric surgery is difficult to maintain because of the decreasing incidence of gastric cancer and the fall of surgery for ulcer disease. We evaluated the prognostic impact of hospital volume on post-operative mortality (POM) in a consecutive series of 197

  5. Variation in case-mix between hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, N.E.; Marang van de Mheen, P.J.; Gooiker, G.A.; Eddes, E.H.; Kievit, J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Wouters, M.W.; Bemelman, W.A.; Busch, O.R.; Dam, R.M. van; Harst, E. van der; Jansen-Landheer, M.L.E.A; Karsten, T.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Kuijpers, W.G.T.; Lemmens, V.E.; Manusama, E.R.; Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; Rutten, H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Velde, C.J. van de

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine how expected mortality based on case-mix varies between colorectal cancer patients treated in non-teaching, teaching and university hospitals, or high, intermediate and low-volume hospitals in the Netherlands. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used the databas

  6. Hospital volume and post-operative mortality after resection for gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, RAM; Meurs, CJC; Dijkhuis, CM; Stassen, LPS; Wiggers, T

    Aims: In low-volume hospitals, expertise in gastric surgery is difficult to maintain because of the decreasing incidence of gastric cancer and the fall of surgery for ulcer disease. We evaluated the prognostic impact of hospital volume on post-operative mortality (POM) in a consecutive series of

  7. [Cervical cancers diagnosed at the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar from 1992 to 2002].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Rabarijaona, L P; Soares, J L; Rasendramino, M; Pécarrère, J L; Khun, H; Huerre, M

    2003-01-01

    In Madagascar, the epidemiological data actualized concerning the cancer of the collus of uterus are not available because of the absence of register of cancer. The objective of this study is to achieve a first assessment of the problem, to complete the epidemiological knowledge, to point out the tool of precoce detection of the precancerous lesions, to propose the measures aiming to improve the management of the patients and to contribute to the institution of a register of cancer. This is a retrospective survey on the frequency of the cancer of the cervix observed from 1992 to 2002 about 23,908 withdrawals addressed to the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar for anatomopathological exam and 12,605 cervical smears for cytological exam. In pathological anatomy, 2,621 (63.4%) of 4,136 cases of diagnosed cancer, have been observed in women. 687 cases (26.2%) of them were localized in the collus. The 3/4 of the cancers of the cervix is invasive and the mean age is 48.2 years old at the time of diagnosis. The cytology detects only 74 cases of invasive cancer of which most don't have an histological confirmation. 274 pre-lesions of cervix cancer were diagnosed for this period, the majority lesions are cytological diagnosis. In spite of a non representative recruitment of the general population, and by the number of withdrawals considered, these results may represent indicators of the epidemiological situation and justify the institution of program to detect the precancerous lesions in a national scale.

  8. Multi-institutional Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery: An Observational Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra eFreeman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Title: Multi-institutional Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery: An Observational Clinical TrialAuthors: Debra Freeman, MD*; Gregg Dickerson, MD; Mark Perman, MDObjective: To report on the design, methodology and early outcome results of a multi-institutional registry study of prostate cancer radiosurgery.Methods: The Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery (RPCR was established in 2010 to further evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of prostate radiosurgery (SBRT for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer. Men with prostate cancer were asked to voluntarily participate in the Registry. Demographic, baseline medical and treatment-related data were collected and stored electronically in a HIPAA-compliant database, maintained by Advertek, Inc. Enrolled men were asked to complete short, multiple choice questionnaires regarding their bowel, bladder and sexual function. Patient-reported outcome forms were collected at baseline and at regular intervals (every 3-6 months following treatment. Serial PSA measurements were obtained at each visit and included in the collected data.Results: From July 2010 to July 2013, nearly 2000 men from 45 participating sites were enrolled in the registry. The majority (86% received radiosurgery as monotherapy. At 2 years follow-up, biochemical disease free survival was 92%. No Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was reported. One patient developed Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (rectal bleeding. Erectile function was preserved in 80% of men <70 yeats old. Overall compliance with data entry was 64%.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative option to conventional radiotherapy for the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer. The Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery represents the collective experience of multiple institutions, including community-based cancer centers, with outcome results in keeping with published, prospective trials of prostate SBRT.

  9. Factors that influence minority use of high-volume hospitals for colorectal cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lyen C; Tran, Thuy B; Ma, Yifei; Ngo, Justine V; Rhoads, Kim F

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that minorities cluster in low-quality hospitals despite living close to better performing hospitals. This may contribute to persistent disparities in cancer outcomes. The purpose of this work was to examine how travel distance, insurance status, and neighborhood socioeconomic factors influenced minority underuse of high-volume hospitals for colorectal cancer. The study was a retrospective, cross-sectional, population-based study. All hospitals in California from 1996 to 2006 were included. Patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed and treated in California between 1996 and 2006 were identified using California Cancer Registry data. Multivariable logistic regression models predicting high-volume hospital use were adjusted for age, sex, race, stage, comorbidities, insurance status, and neighborhood socioeconomic factors. A total of 79,231 patients treated in 417 hospitals were included in the study. High-volume hospitals were independently associated with an 8% decrease in the hazard of death compared with other settings. A lower proportion of minorities used high-volume hospitals despite a higher proportion living nearby. Although insurance status and socioeconomic factors were independently associated with high-volume hospital use, only socioeconomic factors attenuated differences in high-volume hospital use of black and Hispanic patients compared with white patients. The use of cross-sectional data and racial and ethnic misclassifications were limitations in this study. Minority patients do not use high-volume hospitals despite improved outcomes and geographic access. Low socioeconomic status predicts low use of high-volume settings in select minority groups. Our results provide a roadmap for developing interventions to increase the use of and access to higher quality care and outcomes. Increasing minority use of high-volume hospitals may require community outreach programs and changes in physician referral practices.

  10. International benchmarking of specialty hospitals. A series of case studies on comprehensive cancer centres

    OpenAIRE

    van Lent Wineke AM; de Beer Relinde D; van Harten Wim H

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Benchmarking is one of the methods used in business that is applied to hospitals to improve the management of their operations. International comparison between hospitals can explain performance differences. As there is a trend towards specialization of hospitals, this study examines the benchmarking process and the success factors of benchmarking in international specialized cancer centres. Methods Three independent international benchmarking studies on operations managem...

  11. Impact of aortic aneurysm on hospitalizations in patients with marfan syndrome: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R Thomas; Phomakay, Venusa; Zarate, Yuri A; Tang, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder affecting 1 in 3,000 people. Cardiovascular involvement is a prominent feature of MFS, with aortic dissection and/or rupture being the leading cause of death. Advances in the medical and surgical care of patients with MFS have improved survival. Hospital resource utilization and outcomes have not been evaluated in a large population of patients with MFS. We sought to analyze pediatric hospital resource utilization and outcomes in patients with MFS. Nationally distributed data from 43 pediatric hospitals in the 2004-2011 Pediatric Health Information System database were used to identify patients admitted to the hospital with International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision codes for a diagnosis of MFS. Aortic aneurysm (AA) with or without dissection, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges were determined. During the study period, there were 1,978 admissions in 1,228 patients with MFS. AA was present in 217 (11%) admissions in 188 (15%) patients (63% male). Mean age of patients with AA was 13.8 ± 5.9 years. Aortic dissection or rupture was present in 15 (7% with AA) admissions in 15 (8% with AA) patients (mean age 15.7 ± 5.2 years). Other cardiac diagnoses occurred more commonly in the AA cohort (p < 0.0001), regardless of the reason for admission. Cardiothoracic surgical procedures were performed in 116 AA admissions (53%). Mean LOS, hospital charges per admission, and charges per day were significantly higher in AA cohort compared to those without AA. In-hospital mortality for AA was 2%. The presence of AA in patients with MFS increases hospital resource utilization. Cardiothoracic surgeries are commonly performed in this cohort. Other cardiovascular diagnoses are more prevalent in patients with AA suggesting a more severe phenotype.

  12. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods.

  13. Oesophageal squamous cell cancer in a South African tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 SEPTEMBER 2017 ... world is adenocarcinoma (AC) and this has a well described ... Key words: Oesophageal cancer, squamous cell cancer, HIV, dental hygiene, socioeconomic .... increased incidence of SCO amongst women may reflect.

  14. Cost of the Cervical Cancer Screening Program at the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Granados-García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the annual cost of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Materials and methods. This cost analysis examined regional coverage rates reported by IMSS. We estimated the number of cytology, colposcopy, biopsy and pathology evaluations, as well as the diagnostic test and treatment costs for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II and III (CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer. Diagnostic test costs were estimated using a micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results. The cost to perform 2.7 million cytology tests was nearly 38 million dollars, which represents 26.1% of the total program cost (145.4 million. False negatives account for nearly 43% of the program costs. Conclusion. The low sensitivity of the cytology test generates high rates of false negatives, which results in high institutional costs from the treatment of undetected cervical cancer cases.

  15. Cost of the Cervical Cancer Screening Program at the Mexican Social Security Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-García, Víctor; Flores, Yvonne N; Pérez, Ruth; Rudolph, Samantha E; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the annual cost of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP) of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). This cost analysis examined regional coverage rates reported by IMSS. We estimated the number of cytology, colposcopy, biopsy and pathology evaluations, as well as the diagnostic test and treatment costs for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II and III (CIN 2/3) and cervical cancer. Diagnostic test costs were estimated using a micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analyses were performed. The cost to perform 2.7 million cytology tests was nearly 38 million dollars, which represents 26.1% of the total program cost (145.4 million). False negatives account for nearly 43% of the program costs. The low sensitivity of the cytology test generates high rates of false negatives, which results in high institutional costs from the treatment of undetected cervical cancer cases.

  16. Epidemiology of epithelial ovarian cancer, a single institution-based study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Kumar Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of mortality among all cancers of female genital tract in countries where effective cervical cancer screening program exists. As the world's population ages, remarkable increase in the total number of ovarian cancer cases are expected. This is preliminary epidemiological study to decide priorities in ovarian cancer research. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with primary epithelial ovarian cancer cases registered in J. K. Cancer Institute, Kanpur (Uttar Pradesh, from 2007 to 2009. Patients' age at diagnosis, clinical feature, parity of patients, tumor histological type, Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, chemotherapy regimens, and overall survival data were collected and analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-three cases of primary ovarian epithelial cancer were analyzed. Patients' mean age at diagnosis was 55.98 ± 9.24 (median = 55. Serous adenocarcinoma (49.69% was the most prevalent type of histopathology followed by endometroid (19.1%, mucinous (10.42% and clear cell (4.29%. Combination of taxane and platin was most commonly used first line regimen in newly diagnosed as well as in relapsed patients post 1 year. Survival was not significantly different in various histopathology (log-rank P = 0.7406, but advancing stage demonstrated gradually poor survival (log-rank P < 0.05 when compared with early stage disease. Conclusion: Research efforts should be in the direction to find early diagnostic and effective screening tools as well as better therapeutic approaches for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  17. Improvement of best practice in early breast cancer : Actionable surgeon and hospital factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, Marjan; Broekhuis, Manda; Otter, Rene; Klazinga, Niek S.

    To identify actionable elements for improving best practice, this study examined the relative effects of patient, surgeon and hospital factors on surgical treatment variation of 2,929 early breast cancer patients, diagnosed from January 1998 to January 2002 in the region of the Comprehensive Cancer

  18. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, M.J.; Siesling, S.; Otter, R.; Harten, van W.H.

    2015-01-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews we

  19. Thyroid metastases from colorectal cancer: the Institut Gustave Roussy experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lièvre, Astrid; Leboulleux, Sophie; Boige, Valérie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Dromain, Clarisse; Elias, Dominique; Ducreux, Michel; Malka, David

    2006-08-01

    The prevalence of thyroid metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. We retrieved the records of all patients with CRC and pathologically proved thyroid metastasis for the period 1993-2004. Among 5,862 consecutive patients with CRC, 6 (0.1%) were diagnosed with thyroid metastases, a median of 61 months after the diagnosis of primary tumour, and a median of 19 months after the last surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation of other metastases (which were present in all cases). Signs and symptoms, when present (n=3), consisted of cervical pain, cervical adenopathy, goitre, dysphagia, and/or dysphonia. In other cases, the diagnosis was made by positron emission tomography scanning. Thyroidectomy was performed in the 5 patients with isolated thyroid metastases, with cervical lymph node dissection being required in all cases. The only patient treated conservatively because of concomitant liver and lung metastases developed life-threatening dyspnoea, which required emergent tracheal stenting. Median overall survival was 77 months, 58 months, and 12 months after the diagnosis of primary CRC, initial metastases, and thyroid metastasis, respectively. It is concluded that thyroid metastases are rare and occur late in the course of CRC. Thyroidectomy (with cervical lymph node dissection) may result in prevention or improvement of life-threatening symptoms and prolonged survival.

  20. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia Using the National Cancer Institute's Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiale, Thomas F; Yu, Menggang; Monahan, Patrick O; Stump, Timothy E; Tabbey, Rebeka; Glowinski, Elizabeth; Ransohoff, David F

    2017-01-01

    There is no validated, discriminating, and easy-to-apply tool for estimating risk of colorectal neoplasia. We studied whether the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Risk Assessment Tool, which estimates future CRC risk, could estimate current risk for advanced colorectal neoplasia among average-risk persons. This cross-sectional study involved individuals age 50 to 80 years undergoing first-time screening colonoscopy. We measured medical and family history, lifestyle information, and physical measures and calculated each person's future CRC risk using the NCI tool's logistic regression equation. We related quintiles of future CRC risk to the current risk of advanced neoplasia (sessile serrated polyp or tubular adenoma ≥ 1 cm, a polyp with villous histology or high-grade dysplasia, or CRC). All statistical tests were two-sided. For 4457 (98.5%) with complete data (mean age = 57.2 years, SD = 6.6 years, 51.7% women), advanced neoplasia prevalence was 8.26%. Based on quintiles of five-year estimated absolute CRC risk, current risks of advanced neoplasia were 2.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3% to 3.3%), 4.8% (95% CI = 3.5% to 6.4%), 6.4% (95% CI = 4.9% to 8.2%), 10.0% (95% CI = 8.1% to 12.1%), and 17.6% (95% CI = 15.5% to 20.6%; P < .001). For quintiles of estimated 10-year CRC risk, corresponding current risks for advanced neoplasia were 2.2% (95% CI = 1.4% to 3.5%), 4.8% (95% CI = 3.5% to 6.4%), 6.5% (95% CI = 5.0% to 8.3%), 9.3% (95% CI = 7.5% to 11.4%), and 18.4% (95% CI = 15.9% to 21.1%; P < .001). Among persons with an estimated five-year CRC risk above the median, current risk for advanced neoplasia was 12.8%, compared with 3.7% among those below the median (relative risk = 3.4, 95 CI = 2.7 to 4.4). The NCI's Risk Assessment Tool, which estimates future CRC risk, may be used to estimate current risk for advanced neoplasia, making it potentially useful for tailoring and improving CRC

  1. Epidemiological Trends of GI Cancers in Patients Visiting a Tertiary Care Hospital in Chandigarh, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Munesh K; Singh, Tarundeep; Pandey, Avdesh K; Kankaria, Ankita

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become an epidemic disease. Nearly ten million new cancer cases are diagnosed annually in the world and out of these about half are from the developing world. To appropriately plan for treatment, management and prevention of the disease, it becomes necessary to study the trends about morbidity caused by cancers. Data for patients diagnosed with any form of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers was extracted from records maintained in the outpatient department registers of the Oncology Department of Government Medical College and Hospital in Chandigarh from 1999 to 2012. Trends were analysed for different categories of GI cancers for the period of 12 years. In present study GI cancers accounted for 23 % of all registered cases (n-9603) of carcinomas. Males predominated for all GI cancers except in the gall bladder. Gastrointestinal cancers as a proportion of total cancers increased from 21% in 1999 to 25.9% in 2012 with a significant increasing trend in our series (χ2 for linear trend=9.36, pGI (χ2=19.6, pGI cancers form a significant proportion of all cancers reporting to our data. In depth studies to ascertain the reasons for the changing trends are required to design intervention programs. Further information is necessary from cancer registries and from the hospital records of oncology departments.

  2. Profile of Cancer Cases at a Tertiary Care Level Teaching Hospital in Rural Western Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant D Deshpande , Kailash K Singh , Deepak B Phalke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer is one of the major public health problems worldwide. Prevalence and pattern of cancer is known to vary from region to region. Epidemiological information on cancer including the pattern is an important basis for determining the priorities for cancer control in any population group. Objective: Present work is an attempt to study magnitude, profile and some epidemiological aspects in relation to cancer cases at a tertiary care level teaching hospital in rural area. Method: All records were studied and analyzed. A total of 1106 patients were treated during the period studied. A proforma was used to collect data such as age, sex, place of residence, type of cancers and treatment given. The data collected were entered into MS-Excel sheets and analysis was carried out. The information obtained was tabulated analyzed using the software GraphPad Instat demo version. Results: A total of 1106 cancer patients were treated during the January 2010 to December 2010. Among these, 626(56.60 were females and 480(43.39 were females. In males, the common cancers were oral cavity cancers, lung cancers and GIT cancers. The most common cancers among females were the cervical carcinomas, which constituted 32.10% of the total number of cancers cases followed by cancers of breast. Almost 2/3rd of cases occurred in the age group of 41 to 70 years. Maximum frequency was observed in 51–60 year age group in both sexes. Maximum numbers (74.59% of the cases were from rural area. The main methods of cancer treatment were surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, used alone or in combination. Conclusion: Tobacco and alcohol related cancers predominated in males. In females, cervical cancer predominated over breast cancer. Human behavior is a major determinant in the successful control of cancer. Understanding cancer magnitude, risk and trends will be of help in cancer control.

  3. [Cancer in Madagascar. Experience of the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar from September 1992 to June 1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C; Pécarrère, J L; Roux, J F

    1998-01-01

    The Unit of the anatomo-pathology in the "Institut Pasteur de Madagascar" (IPM) examined in the period from September 1992 to June 1996 tissue specimens from 10,275 patients. Tumorous pathology presented 40% of the tissues and half of which were of malign etiology. 64% of the cancer diagnosed were in females. Cervical cancer was most frequently observed (17%), followed by breast cancer (16%). Cancer in the gastro-intestinal tract (15%) was most often located in the colon without sex difference. Stomach cancer occurring predominantly in males presented 25% of the total cases of cancer in the gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer of liver is rarely diagnosed despite the high prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus. Skin cancer constituted 9% of the malign diagnosis and was mainly found in males. Children under 15 years old presented 7.4% of the total cases of malignancy with the haematopoietic tissues (30%) and the eyes (17%) as the most frequent topic locations. Due to a very low seroprevalence of the HIV in Madagascar, malign tumours associated to AIDS were only seen in a few rare cases. The review of cancer cases in the IPM may not be representative for the cancer epidemiology of Madagascar because of a general very low level of health care coverage, especially in the rural areas. Furthermore, a major part of the specimens originates from easily accessible organsystems, whereas other organs seem less investigated due to lack of appropriate available technique. Therefore, it is not feasible for the moment to establish a cancer register in Madagascar, although the Unit of Pathology in the IPM can offer a valid cancer diagnostical service.

  4. Individual and institutional determinants of caesarean section in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali: a cross-sectional epidemiological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briand Valérie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two years after implementing the free-CS policy, we assessed the non-financial factors associated with caesarean section (CS in women managed by referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey nested in a cluster trial (QUARITE trial in 41 referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali (10/01/2007–10/01/2008. Data were collected regarding women’s characteristics and on available institutional resources. Individual and institutional factors independently associated with emergency (before labour, intrapartum and elective CS were determined using a hierarchical logistic mixed model. Results Among 86 505 women, 14% delivered by intrapartum CS, 3% by emergency CS and 2% by elective CS. For intrapartum, emergency and elective CS, the main maternal risk factors were, respectively: previous CS, referral from another facility and suspected cephalopelvic-disproportion (adjusted Odds Ratios from 2.8 to 8.9; vaginal bleeding near full term, hypertensive disorders, previous CS and premature rupture of membranes (adjusted ORs from 3.9 to 10.2; previous CS (adjusted OR=19.2 [17.2-21.6]. Access to adult and neonatal intensive care, a 24-h/day anaesthetist and number of annual deliveries per hospital were independent factors that affected CS rates according to degree of urgency. The presence of obstetricians and/or medical-anaesthetists was associated with an increased risk of elective CS (adjusted ORs [95%CI] = 4.8 [2.6-8.8] to 9.4 [5.1-17.1]. Conclusions We confirm the significant effect of well-known maternal risk factors affecting the mode of delivery. Available resources at the institutional level and the degree of urgency of CS should be taken into account in analysing CS rates in this context.

  5. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  6. METACHRONOUS SECOND PRIMARY CANCERS: CLINICAL ANALYSES OF 506 CASES IN A SINGLE INSTITUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xiang-qian; HAO Chun-yi; GAO Fei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the clinical features and prognosis of multiple primary cancers, in order to make improvement of diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A total of 506 patients with two primary cancers admitted from 1973 to 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: These cases accounted for 0.9% of all the hospitalized cases in the same period among which 126 were males, with the ratio of male to female 1:3. The median age at the onset of the first disease was 48 y (ranged from 24 to 77). The interval between the two cancers was longer in patients under 50 y and in males, but without statistical significance. The onset age of the two primary cancers was mainly centered around 40 to 60 y, while 70% of the second cancer occurred within 80 m after the first cancer but half of them occurred within five years. The interval between the two cancers played crucial role in affecting the prognosis (P<0.005). Conclusion: Fewer lethal cancers are involved in either the primary or the secondary malignancies. The interval between the two primaries contributes most to the prognoses.

  7. Image is everything. New York Hospital's institution-wide digital imaging lowers costs and improves care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzi, G; Sostman, H D

    1998-03-01

    The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, Manhattan: a 1,242-licensed bed voluntary non-profit hospital. Conventional imaging technology created expensive logistical problems between the radiology facility and the Greenberg Pavilion, a new 850,000 square foot, 11-floor inpatient tower, located two city blocks away. Use a picture archiving communications system (PACS) to transmit, store and archive digital images. Increased staff efficiencies, improved patient care and reduced costs. "Many years of planning and a full commitment from the staff."

  8. The Influence Of Policy Implementation From The Change Of Institutional Status Toward Quality Of Patient Service In Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang Kusnadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fenomenon and comunity problem in goverment hospital management not aware to wont and need public. Silent safety and consumen satisfaction is fenomenon lack quallity care. Goal this research goal for analysis about influence of policy implementation of hospital change institution status to the quality of patien service in Hospital. Kind of reserch is the quantity desain on approach the eksplanatory survey research analysis regresi linier multipel with analysis method validitas product moment pearson exam and reliability exam is alpha cronbach technique to hypotesis exam is path analysis and statistic exam t. Datum transformation is Skala Likert with measurement the method succesive interval. The population one thausand seventh two person with sample technique stratified random sampling the instrument research is quesioner and interview patien on caunter imforman. The result of assuming research that it is anticipated that implementation of change policy of institution status of hospital X there is significant influence to quality of service of patient Y is 66.31 and the other factor e is 33.69. In the implementation factor is significant to positif influence to quality service is communication X1 is 049 human resources X2 is 025 disposition X3 is 032 and structure birocratic X4 is 033. The conculsion from four factor independen variable X is the implementation of policy to quality service patient Y to influence and can receive in knowledge. To concept the development in implementation of policy need culture job factor because every product policy to contac direct with the community as to basic public policy.

  9. The Organization of European Cancer Institute Pathobiology Working Group and its support of European biobanking infrastructures for translational cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegman, Peter H J; de Jong, Bas W D; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Today's translational cancer research increasingly depends on international multi-center studies. Biobanking infrastructure or comprehensive sample exchange platforms to enable networking of clinical cancer biobanks are instrumental to facilitate communication, uniform sample quality, and rules for exchange. The Organization of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Pathobiology Working Group supports European biobanking infrastructure by maintaining the OECI-TuBaFrost exchange platform and organizing regular meetings. This platform originated from a European Commission project and is updated with knowledge from ongoing and new biobanking projects. This overview describes how European biobanking projects that have a large impact on clinical biobanking, including EuroBoNeT, SPIDIA, and BBMRI, contribute to the update of the OECI-TuBaFrost exchange platform. Combining the results of these European projects enabled the creation of an open (upon valid registration only) catalogue view of cancer biobanks and their available samples to initiate research projects. In addition, closed environments supporting active projects could be developed together with the latest views on quality, access rules, ethics, and law. With these contributions, the OECI Pathobiology Working Group contributes to and stimulates a professional attitude within biobanks at the European comprehensive cancer centers. Improving the fundamentals of cancer sample exchange in Europe stimulates the performance of large multi-center studies, resulting in experiments with the desired statistical significance outcome. With this approach, future innovation in cancer patient care can be realized faster and more reliably.

  10. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Aisling [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Program for Patient Safety and Quality, Boston, MA (United States); Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children

  11. Chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced cancer: A pilot study in Institute of Oncology Bucharest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, Alexandru C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives First objective was better understanding of the indications of chemotherapy in elderly with advanced cancer, tolerability and toxicity of chemotherapy in this age group. The second objective was to define current practice in chemotherapy for elderly people with advanced cancer for a selected group of patients treated in Institute of Oncology Bucharest (IOB). Materials and Methods The study makes a clinical analysis of medical records of 27 patients from the archive of Institute of Oncology Bucharest treated by the same doctor. Patients were selected according to: age ≥ 65 years, ECOG performance status 0–1, normal blood counts and blood biochemistry, histological confirmation of the diagnosis of cancer, patients should received at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy. We extract characteristics of the patients to see if they were a homogeneous group of patients and to compare them with data from the literature. Overall survival was calculated by the Kaplan Meyer curve. Results 295 patients more then 65 years were treated in our site in 2 years 2011, 2012. 93 patients received chemotherapy and only 27 patients were enrolled in this study following inclusion criteria. Common sites of cancer were lung and breast. The most used cytostatics for lung cancer was gemcitabine and carboplatine and cyclophosphamide, metotrexat and 5 fluorouracil for breast cancer. Toxicity was mild with the prevalence of hematologic toxicity. Overall survival without taking into account the type of cancer was 27.7 month. Conclusions For selected patients, chemotherapy was well tolerated and appears to prolong survival regardless of the location of cancer. The relatively small number of elderly patients who received chemotherapy is probably due to lack of compliance to treatment, the increased number of co-morbidities and evaluation of performance status only by the ECOG index known not to be good enough to establish the indication of chemotherapy. PMID:27847881

  12. [Estimation of the excess of lung cancer mortality risk associated to environmental tobacco smoke exposure of hospitality workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M José; Nebot, Manel; Juárez, Olga; Ariza, Carles; Salles, Joan; Serrahima, Eulàlia

    2006-01-14

    To estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with environmental tobacco (ETS) smoke exposure among hospitality workers. The estimation was done using objective measures in several hospitality settings in Barcelona. Vapour phase nicotine was measured in several hospitality settings. These measurements were used to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure for a 40 year working life, using the formula developed by Repace and Lowrey. Excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure was higher than 145 deaths per 100,000 workers in all places studied, except for cafeterias in hospitals, where excess lung cancer mortality risk was 22 per 100,000. In discoteques, for comparison, excess lung cancer mortality risk is 1,733 deaths per 100,000 workers. Hospitality workers are exposed to ETS levels related to a very high excess lung cancer mortality risk. These data confirm that ETS control measures are needed to protect hospital workers.

  13. Epidemiologic factors of colorectal cancer in a county hospital in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Leşe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the most common digestive cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the colorectal cancer’s frequency relatedto age, gender, personal or family history, and also to blood group of the patients operated in the County Emergency Hospital of BaiaMare, Romania. Material and methods: The records of 512 patients with cancer of the colon, rectal cancer and synchronous colorectal cancerwere studied retrospectively in a period of 15 years, admitted to The Department of Surgery in The County Emergency Hospital of Baia Mare,Romania. Results: Colorectal cancers have been found to be more frequent in women under the age of 50 and in men above this age (p=0.004.In urban environments the right colon cancer (59.62% and rectal cancer (55.87% were more frequently encountered. Tumor location had analmost even distribution: 30% right colon, 35.45% left colon, 34.96% rectal cancer and 0.78% synchronous cancers. The association with personaland family history was statistically insignificant, except asthma which was considered a protective factor (p<0.001 for colorectal cancer.The abidance in blood groups shows proportional distribution with their representation in the population of our country, but family historyof colorectal cancer was found only in O and A groups. Conclusions: The study ascertains the left to right shift of the large bowel cancers, theincreasing of medium age of patients and high incidence of colorectal cancer in women under the age of 50 years. Asthma may be a protectivefactor for colorectal cancer, especially for right colon cancer, and genetic factors are present only in patients with O and A blood groups .

  14. Home versus hospital mortality from cancer in Mexico (1999-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Guzmán, Sandra; Palacios-Ríos, Dionicio; Nava-Obregón, Teresa Adriana; Torres-Pérez, Juan Francisco; González-Santiago, Omar

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the place of death from cancer in México from 1999 to 2009 and find the associated factors. We collected data on mortality by cancer from the national database including age, gender, area of residence, level of education, place of death, and type of cancer. The proportion of deaths at home and hospital was 55.67% and 39%, respectively. Factors associated with home deaths were old age, female gender, rural area of residence, and lack of formal education. There was a short but significant decrease in home deaths for cervical cancer and leukemia. In México, mortality in home is greater than in hospital for patients with cancer. Our results have important implications for palliative care professionals and health services of México.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  16. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  17. Risk for cancer in a cohort of patients hospitalized for schizophrenia in Denmark, 1969-1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Mellemkjær, Lene; Thomassen, L.

    2005-01-01

    with schizophrenia (SIR, 1.20; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.38) should be interpreted with caution, given the high proportion of nulliparous women with schizophrenia in Denmark. The data might support reduced risks for prostate and rectal cancer among male patients with schizophrenia, whereas a changing smoking pattern might......We investigated the cancer risk of patients hospitalized for schizophrenia in a nationwide cohort study. All 22766 adults admitted for schizophrenia, ICD-8 295, in Denmark between 1969 and 1993 were followed up for cancer through 1995. The incidence of site-specific cancers was compared...... with national incidence rates, adjusted for sex, age and calendar time. The risk for cancer was increased for both men and women during the first year of follow-up. When the first year of follow-up was excluded, the risk for all tobacco-associated cancers and for prostate and rectal cancers was reduced for male...

  18. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people

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    Durey Angela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals. Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Findings Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v connection to the community. Conclusions Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes.

  19. Challenges associated with the management of gynecological cancers in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 George Onyemaechi Ugwu,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu,2 Osaheni Lucky Lawani,3 Azubuike Kanayo Onyebuchi3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Park Lane, Enugu, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria Background: There are reports of increasing incidence of gynecological cancers in developing countries and this trend increases the need for more attention to gynecological cancer care in these countries. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the presentation and treatment of gynecological cancers and identify barriers to successful gynecological cancer treatment in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria. Methods: This study was a retrospective longitudinal analysis of the presentation and treatment of histologically diagnosed primary gynecological cancers from 2000 to 2010. Analysis was by descriptive and inferential statistics at the 95% level of confidence using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17 software. Results: Records of 200 gynecological cancers managed during the study period were analyzed. Over 94% of cervical cancers presented in advanced stages of the disease and received palliative/symptomatic treatment. Only 1.9% of cervical cancer patients had radical surgical intervention, and postoperative mortality from these radical surgeries was 100%. Approximately 76% of patients with ovarian cancer had debulking surgery as the mainstay of treatment followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative mortality from ovarian cancer surgery was 63%. Cutting edge cytotoxic drugs were not used as chemotherapy for ovarian and chorionic cancers. Compliance with chemotherapy was poor, with over 70% of ovarian cancer patients failing to complete the

  20. Treatment Outcomes in Black and White Children With Cancer: Results From the SEER Database and St Jude Children's Research Hospital, 1992 Through 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Pei, Deqing; Pappo, Alberto S.; Howard, Scott C.; Cheng, Cheng; Sandlund, John T.; Furman, Wayne L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Jeha, Sima; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kun, Larry E.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kocak, Mehmet; Broniscer, Alberto; Metzger, Monika L.; Downing, James R.; Leung, Wing; Evans, William E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Treatment outcome for black patients with cancer has been significantly worse than for their white counterparts. We determined whether recent improved treatment had narrowed the gap in outcome between black and white pediatric patients. Patients and Methods In a parallel comparison, we analyzed survival by disease category between black and white patients with childhood cancer registered in one of the 17 cancer registries of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program or treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital, which provides comprehensive treatment to all patients regardless of their ability to pay, from 1992 to 2000 and from 2001 to 2007. Results Analysis of the SEER data indicated that in both study periods, black patients had significantly poorer rates of survival than did white patients, with the exception of a few types of cancer. Despite significantly improved treatment outcomes for patients who were treated from 2001 to 2007, the racial difference in survival has actually widened for acute myeloid leukemia and neuroblastoma. By contrast, in the cohorts treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital, there were no significant differences in survival between black and white patients in either study period, regardless of the cancer type. Importantly, the outcome of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and retinoblastoma has improved in parallel for both races during the most recent study period. Conclusion With equal access to comprehensive treatment, black and white children with cancer can achieve the same high cure rates. PMID:22547602

  1. Patient safety in organizational culture as perceived by leaderships of hospital institutions with different types of administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Dejigov Monteiro da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the perceptions of leaderships toward patient safety culture dimensions in the routine of hospitals with different administrative profiles: government, social and private organizations, and make correlations among participating institutions regarding dimensions of patient safety culture used. METHOD A quantitative cross-sectional study that used the Self Assessment Questionnaire 30 translated into Portuguese. The data were processed by analysis of variance (ANOVA in addition to descriptive statistics, with statistical significance set at p-value ≤ 0.05. RESULTS According to the participants' perceptions, the significant dimensions of patient safety culture were 'patient safety climate' and 'organizational learning', with 81% explanatory power. Mean scores showed that among private organizations, higher values were attributed to statements; however, the correlation between dimensions was stronger among government hospitals. CONCLUSION Different hospital organizations present distinct values for each dimension of patient safety culture and their investigation enables professionals to identify which dimensions need to be introduced or improved to increase patient safety.

  2. Residence, income and cancer hospitalizations in British Columbia during a decade of policy change

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    Penning MJ

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Through the 1990s, governments across Canada shifted health care funding allocation and organizational foci toward a community-based population health model. Major concerns of reform based on this model include ensuring equitable access to health and health care, and enhancing preventive and community-based resources for care. Reforms may act differentially relative to specific conditions and services, including those geared to chronic versus acute conditions. The present study therefore focuses on health service utilization, specifically cancer hospitalizations, in British Columbia during a decade of health system reform. Methods Data were drawn from the British Columbia Linked Health Data resource; income measures were derived from Statistics Canada 1996 Census public use enumeration area income files. Records with a discharge (separation date between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 1998 were selected. All hospitalizations with ICD-9 codes 140 through 208 (except skin cancer, code 173 as principal diagnosis were included. Specific cancers analyzed include lung; colorectal; female breast; and prostate. Hospitalizations were examined in total (all separations, and as divided into first and all other hospitalizations attributed to any given individual. Annual trends in age-sex adjusted rates were analyzed by joinpoint regression; longitudinal multivariate analyses assessing association of residence and income with hospitalizations utilized generalised estimating equations. Results are evaluated in relation to cancer incidence trends, health policy reform and access to care. Results Age-sex adjusted hospitalization rates for all separations for all cancers, and lung, breast and prostate cancers, decreased significantly over the study period; colorectal cancer separations did not change significantly. Rates for first and other hospitalizations remained stationary or gradually declined over the study period. Area of residence and

  3. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... associated with risk of recurrence in women with early-stage breast cancer can be used to identify the most appropriate ... novel agents, technologies, and markers for better diagnosis, prognosis, screening, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer. Summer 2014 Issue: Volume 9 Number 2 Page ...

  4. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    the Mcm3 gene locus in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) by David Goodrich. This analysis shows novel Mcm3 promoter sites that bind Rb. Fig. 3-5...4. Develop transplantable castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CR-CaP) models of human and mouse prostate cancer lines in which androgen receptor

  5. Quality of life estimate in stomach, colon, and rectal cancer patients in a hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Muhong; Lan, Yanhong; Luo, Shali

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the outcome and coping patterns of patients with stomach, colon, and rectal cancer in a hospital in China. Health-related quality of life was assessed in 118 stomach, colon, and rectal cancer patients in Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China, using the generic version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (QOL) Questionnaire Core 30 Items, Self-rated Anxiety Scores (SAS), Self-rated Depression Scores (SDS), Medical Coping Modes of Questionnaire (MCMQ), and Social Support Requirement Scale (SSRS) questionnaires. The overall QOL was 50.7 ± 6.5, 48.1 ± 7.7, and 47.6 ± 6.4, respectively, for stomach, colon, and rectal cancer groups. Correlations between QOL and SAS and SDS in stomach cancer patients were significantly higher than observed in the cohort of colon or rectal cancer patients (Spearman coefficient of 0.366 and 0.129, respectively). Cluster analysis of MCMQ data revealed four identifiable patterns (resign, confront, avoid-confront, and avoid-resign) of coping in the study group. Subjective support was significantly higher than objective support (p Stomach, colon, and rectal cancer patients had anxiety and depression stemming from their cancer diagnosis and postdiagnosis treatment, and sex dependency was prevalent in SSRS response. Coping patterns were reliable indicators of psychosocial side effects in patients with stomach, colon, and rectal cancers.

  6. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer.

  7. [Radiotherapy for endometrial cancer: experience of the national institute of oncology with 52 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezouri, Imane; Berhili, Soufiane; Mouhajir, Nawal; Bellefqih, Sara; Elkacemi, Hanan; Kebdani, Tayeb; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in the Western world. It affects mainly postmenopausal women. The aim of our study is to report the experience of the radiotherapy department of the National Oncology Institute (INO) in the treatment of endometrial cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 52 cases of endometrial cancer treated in the INO radiotherapy department between 2007-2009. Data obtained from the patient medical records were related to the epidemiologic, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of this cancer. The median age of the patients was 57 years, 87% were postmenopausal. The median of consultation time was six months. The main symptom was metrorrhagia (51 patients). Histological diagnosis was based on biopsic curettage of uterine endometrium in 51% of the cases. Anatomo-pathological examination showed an endometrioid adenocarcinoma in 92% of the cases. After the assessment, 27% of the patients were stage I, 30% stage II, 20% stage III and 1% stage IVA, according to the International Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage classification. After surgery, 51% of the patients received postoperative external radiotherapy. The delivered dose was 46 Gray (Gy). All patients received internal vaginal brachytherapy. From an evolutionary perspective, 83% of the patients had no recurrences during the follow-up period, 8% of patients had a local recurrence and 4% of patients had distant metastases. Therefore, surgery is the main treatment for endometrial cancer. Radiotherapy is the primary adjuvant treatment.

  8. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; O'Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-07-18

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  9. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000-2013: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-04-20

    To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000-2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000-2013. Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded-the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies. Funding agencies and industry should openly document their research investments to

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma: consensus recommendations of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melanie B; Jaffe, Deborah; Choti, Michael M; Belghiti, Jacques; Curley, Steven; Fong, Yuman; Gores, Gregory; Kerlan, Robert; Merle, Phillipe; O'Neil, Bert; Poon, Ronnie; Schwartz, Lawrence; Tepper, Joel; Yao, Francis; Haller, Daniel; Mooney, Margaret; Venook, Alan

    2010-09-01

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults and the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The incidence of HCC in the United States is rising steadily because of the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection and other causes of hepatic cirrhosis. The majority of patients have underlying hepatic dysfunction, which complicates patient management and the search for safe and effective therapies. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) in HCC was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to identify the key knowledge gaps in HCC and define clinical research priorities. The CTPM structured its review according to current evidence-based treatment modalities in HCC and prioritized the recommendations on the basis of the patient populations representing the greatest unmet medical need.

  11. The frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of nosocomial pathogens recovered from cancer patients and hospital environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aymen Mudawe Nurain; Naser Eldin Bilal; Mutasim Elhadi Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance rates of nosocomial pathogens isolated from cancer patients and hospital environments. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2010 to May 2013 at Radiation and Isotopes Centre of Khartoum, Sudan. A total of 1 503 samples (505 clinical and 998 environmental) were examined. Isolates were identified, and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using standard laboratory procedures. Results: Out of 505 clinical samples, nosocomial pathogens were found as 48.1%. Among hospital environment samples, bacterial contaminants were detected in 29.7%of samples. The main microorganisms recovered from cancer patients were Proteus spp. (23.5%), Escherichia coli (22.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (21.0%) and Staphylococcus aureus (20.2%). The most frequent isolates from hospital environ-ments were Bacillus spp. (50.0%), Staphylococcus aureus (14.2%) and P. aeruginosa (11.5%). The proportions of resistance among Gram-negative pathogens from cancer patients were high for ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime and ceftriaxone. Moderate resistance rates were recorded to ciprofloxacin, such as 51.0%for P. aeruginosa, 21.7%for Klebsiella pneumoniae and 55.5%for Escherichia coli. Except Klebsiella, there were no significant differences (P ? 0.05) of resistance rates between Gram-negative isolates from cancer patients to those from the hospital environments. The proportions of extended-spectrum b-lactamase producing isolates from cancer patients were not differ significantly (P=0.763) from those collected from the hospital environments (49.2%;91/185 vs. 47%;32/68). Conclusions: The prevalence of nosocomial infection among cancer patients was high (48.1%) with the increasing of antimicrobial resistance rates. Hospital environments are potential reservoirs for nosocomial infections, which calls for intervention program to reduce environmental transmission of pathogens.

  12. The frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of nosocomial pathogens recovered from cancer patients and hospital environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aymen; Mudawe; Nurain; Naser; Eldin; Bilal; Mutasim; Elhadi; Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance rates of nosocomial pathogens isolated from cancer patients and hospital environments.Methods:A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2010 to May 2013 at Radiation and Isotopes Centre of Khartoum,Sudan.A total of 1 503 samples(505 clinical and 998 environmental)were examined.Isolates were identified,and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using standard laboratory procedures.Results:Out of 505 clinical samples,nosocomial pathogens were found as 48.1%.Among hospital environment samples,bacterial contaminants were detected in 29.7%of samples.The main microorganisms recovered from cancer patients were Proteus spp.(23.5%),Escherichia coli(22.2%),Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P.aeruginosa)(21.0%)and Staphylococcus aureus(20.2%).The most frequent isolates from hospital environments were Bacillus spp.(50.0%),Staphylococcus aureus(14.2%)and P.aeruginosa(11.5%).The proportions of resistance among Gram-negative pathogens from cancer patients were high for ampicillin,cefotaxime,ceftazidime and ceftriaxone.Moderate resistance rates were recorded to ciprofloxacin,such as 51.0%for P.aeruginosa,21.7%for Klebsiella pneumoniae and 55.5%for Escherichia coli.Except Klebsiella,there were no significant differences(P0.05)of resistance rates between Gram-negative isolates from cancer patients to those from the hospital environments.The proportions of extended-spectrum b-lactamase producing isolates from cancer patients were not differ significantly(P=0.763)from those collected from the hospital environments(49.2%;91/185 vs.47%;32/68).Conclusions:The prevalence of nosocomial infection among cancer patients was high(48.1%)with the increasing of antimicrobial resistance rates.Hospital environments are potential reservoirs for nosocomial infections,which calls for intervention program to reduce environmental transmission of pathogens.

  13. PATTERN OF ANTIBIOTICS USAGE IN BIDAR INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, (BRIMS TEACHING HOSPITAL, BIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assesses the pattern of antibiotic utilization and outcome of patients with bacteremia in the hospital. METHODOLOGY: All positive blood cultures (BC over a 12-months period from January-2012 to December-2012 were retrospectively review/ positive BC were recorded in 50patients received antibiotics before or soon after obtaining the BC and ceftriaxone was the most frequently- prescribed antibiotics (42.9%, either alone or in combination with other antibiotics. RESULTS: The bacteremia was due to gram-negative rods in 84.9% and gram-positive cocci in 15.1% cases. Most common gram-negative bacilli were E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella species while most common gram-positive cocci were Staphylococcus aureus. Antibiotics regimen was changed in 37% cases after BC results became available. Most frequent change was addition of meropenem in-case of gram-negative bacilli (29.6% and vancomycin in gram-positive cocci (12.5%. Ten (18.5% patients developed serious sepsis or septic shock; 3(30.0% improved and 7 (70.0%0 had fatal outcome. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic selection needs to be tailor made for each patient. However, most bacteremia necessitating hospital admission is due to gram-negative bacilli and it should be considered in antibiotics selection prior to BC.

  14. [Occupational and environmental cancer in southern Sardinia: a survey on ten years of hospitalizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiolas, F; Marras, V; Porcu, S; Senis, G; Saderi, L; Spada, L; Santus, S; Coppola, R C; Cocco, P; Campagna, M; Steri, G

    2012-01-01

    Based on hospital discharges in 1001-2010, we calculated risk of tumours with an elevated occupational and environmental etiological fraction by health district of residence within the Local Health Unit (LHU) N. 8 of Sardinia. With reference to the age and gender-specific hospitalization rates of the whole LHU, residents in the urban Cagliari health district showed an excess risk of haemolymphopoietic cancer (RR = 1.07; 95% CI 1.03-1.12) and bladder cancer (RR = 1.10; 95% CI 1.05-1.16); in both instances, risks were higher among female residents. The highest excess risk for lung cancer was observed among residents in the Quartu-Parteolla health district (RR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.05-1.21), and it was slightly higher among male residents. The results appear to confirm the role of urban factors in increasing cancer risk.

  15. Psychological process from hospitalization to death among uninformed terminal liver cancer patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobori Eiko

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the attitude among doctors toward disclosing a cancer diagnosis is becoming more positive, informing patients of their disease has not yet become a common practice in Japan. We examined the psychological process, from hospitalization until death, among uninformed terminal cancer patients in Japan, and developed a psychological model. Methods Terminal cancer patients hospitalized during the recruiting period voluntarily participated in in-depth interviews. The data were analyzed by grounded theory. Results Of the 87 uninformed participants at the time of hospitalization, 67% (N = 59 died without being informed of their diagnosis. All were male, 51–66 years of age, and all experienced five psychological stages: anxiety and puzzlement, suspicion and denial, certainty, preparation, and acceptance. At the end of each stage, obvious and severe feelings were observed, which were called "gates." During the final acceptance stage, patients spent a peaceful time with family, even talking about their dreams with family members. Conclusion Unlike in other studies, the uninformed patients in this study accepted death peacefully, with no exceptional cases. Despite several limitations, this study showed that almost 70% of the uninformed terminal cancer patients at hospitalization died without being informed, suggesting an urgent need for culturally specific and effective terminal care services for cancer patients in Japan.

  16. [Gastric cancer in the Honorio Delgado Regional Hospital in Arequipa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estremadoyro, O; Alvarez de Trillo, Y; Estremadoyro Stagnaro, L; Gamero Tejada, D

    1995-01-01

    We present the study of 120 cases of gastric carcinoma, observed in the Hospital Regional Honorio Delgado from Arequipa Peru, in 2683 gastroscopies, with 4.5% of incidence. We offer date of age, sex, race, occupation, antecedents, social-economic conditions, clinics, diagnosis, pathologies aspects and mortality.

  17. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  18. Socio-demographic characteristics of cancer patients: Hospital based cancer registry in a tertiary care hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Puri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the socio-demographic characteristics of cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Review of the Cancer registry, and patient interview. Information on socio-demographic profile, medical history, family history and previous treatment, if any, was retrieved from the patient. If the patient couldn′t be contacted then information was taken from pathology/radiotherapy or medical records department. Results: A total of 684 patients participated in the study. More than 40% of males and 53.7% of females were illiterate, P < 0.05. The majority (33.5% of participants were of low socioeconomic status. The most frequently reported cancer (ca in males it was ca lung (40.9 and ca oesophagus (9.8. In females most common cancer were ca breast (23.9 followed by ca cervix (11.7.

  19. Review of Researches on Hospital Management Institutional Ethics in China%我国医院管理制度伦理研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧; 陈敏生

    2016-01-01

    Based on the review of the existing evidence of the research on the hospital management institutional ethics , this paper found researches in this area in the last two decades focused on the concept and level definition of hospital management institutional ethics;the construction of hospital management institutional ethics;the value and function of hospital management institutional ethics, and the reason and result of lack of hospital management insti-tutional ethics. On this basis, it pointed out the deficiency of the current researches and outlook the prospects.%在回顾已有文献的基础上分析我国医院管理制度伦理的研究成果发现,近二十年间该领域的研究主要集中在:对医院管理制度伦理的概念及层次界定、医院管理制度伦理的建设、医院管理制度伦理的价值和作用、医院管理制度伦理缺失的原因及后果等方面。在此基础上指出了研究的不足,并对该研究的前景作一展望。

  20. Predicting advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy in a diverse population with the National Cancer Institute colorectal cancer risk-assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladabaum, Uri; Patel, Ashley; Mannalithara, Ajitha; Sundaram, Vandana; Mitani, Aya; Desai, Manisha

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring screening to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk could improve screening effectiveness. Most CRCs arise from advanced neoplasia (AN) that dwells for years. To date, no available colorectal neoplasia risk score has been validated externally in a diverse population. The authors explored whether the National Cancer Institute (NCI) CRC risk-assessment tool, which was developed to predict future CRC risk, could predict current AN prevalence in a diverse population, thereby allowing its use in risk stratification for screening. This was a prospective examination of the relation between predicted 10-year CRC risk and the prevalence of AN, defined as advanced or multiple (≥3 adenomatous, ≥5 serrated) adenomatous or sessile serrated polyps, in individuals undergoing screening colonoscopy. Among 509 screenees (50% women; median age, 58 years; 61% white, 5% black, 10% Hispanic, and 24% Asian), 58 (11%) had AN. The prevalence of AN increased progressively from 6% in the lowest risk-score quintile to 17% in the highest risk-score quintile (P = .002). Risk-score distributions in individuals with versus without AN differed significantly (median, 1.38 [0.90-1.87] vs 1.02 [0.62-1.57], respectively; P = .003), with substantial overlap. The discriminatory accuracy of the tool was modest, with areas under the curve of 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.69) overall, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.49-0.70) for women, and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.53-0.73) for men. The results did not change substantively when the analysis was restricted to adenomatous lesions or to screening procedures without any additional incidental indication. The NCI CRC risk-assessment tool displays modest discriminatory accuracy in predicting AN at screening colonoscopy in a diverse population. This tool may aid shared decision-making in clinical practice. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2663-2670. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  1. Impact of a Fast-track Esophagectomy Protocol on Esophageal Cancer Patient Outcomes and Hospital Charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shewale, Jitesh B; Correa, Arlene M; Baker, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a fast-track esophagectomy protocol (FTEP) on esophageal cancer patients' safety, length of hospital stay (LOS), and hospital charges. BACKGROUND: FTEP involved transferring patients to the telemetry unit instead of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) after.......655; 95% confidence interval = 0.456, 0.942; P = 0.022). In addition, the median hospital charges associated with primary admission and readmission within 90 days for group B ($65,649) were lower than that for group A ($79,117; P

  2. Skin Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction (SSMIR for early breast cancer: Eight years single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin Jean

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin Sparing Mastectomy (SSM and immediate breast reconstruction has become increasingly popular as an effective treatment for patients with breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of skin sparing mastectomy in early breast cancer at a single population-based institution. Methods Records of ninety-five consecutive patients with operable breast cancer who had skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstructions between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed. Patient and tumor characteristic, type of reconstruction, postoperative complications, aesthetic results and incidence of recurrence were analyzed. Results Mean age of the patients was 51.6(range 33–72 years. The AJCC pathologic stages were 0 (n = 51, 53.7%, I (n = 20, 21.1%, and II (n = 2, 2.1%. Twenty of the patients had recurrent disease (21.1%. The immediate breast reconstructions were performed with autologus tissue including latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in 63 (66.3% patients and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap in 4 (4.2% patients. Implants were used in 28 (29.4% patients. The average hospital stay was 7.7 days. Flap complication occurred in seven (10.4% patients resulting in four (6% re-operations and there were no delay in accomplishing postoperative adjuvant therapy. At a median follow-up of 69 months (range 48 to 144, local recurrence was seen in one patient (1.1% and systemic recurrence was seen in two patients (2.1%. Conclusion Skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for early breast cancer is associated with low morbidity and low rate of local recurrence.

  3. Estimated costs of advanced lung cancer care in a public reference hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, Renata Erthal; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Pereira, Claudia Cristina de Aguiar; Fortes, Guilherme Bastos

    2017-08-17

    To estimate the direct medical costs of advanced non-small cell lung cancer care. We assessed a cohort of 277 patients treated in the Brazilian National Cancer Institute in 2011. The costs were estimated from the perspective of the hospital as a service provider of reference for the Brazilian Unified Health System. The materials and procedures used were identified and quantified, per patient, and we assigned to them monetary values, consolidated in phases of the assistance defined. The analyses had a descriptive character with costs in Real (R$). Overall, the cohort represented a cost of R$2,473,559.91, being 71.5% related to outpatient care and 28.5% to hospitalizations. In the outpatient care, costs with radiotherapy (34%) and chemotherapy (22%) predominated. The results pointed to lower costs in the initial phase of treatment (7.2%) and very high costs in the maintenance phase (61.6%). Finally, we identified statistically significant differences of average cost by age groups, education levels, physical performance, and histological type. This study provides a current, useful, and relevant picture of the costs of patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated in a public hospital of reference and it provides information on the magnitude of the problem of cancer in the context of public health. The results confirm the importance of radiation treatment and hospitalizations as the main components of the cost of treatment. Despite some losses of follow-up, we assess that, for approximately 80% of the patients included in the study, the estimates presented herein are satisfactory for the care of the disease, from the perspective of a service provider of reference of the Brazilian Unified Health System, as it provides elements for the management of the service, as well as for studies that result in more rational forms of resource allocation. Estimar os custos médicos diretos da assistência ao câncer de pulmão não pequenas células avançado. Foi avaliada uma

  4. Patterns and predictors of in-hospital aneurysmal rebleed: An institutional experience and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Girish

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rebleeding is an important cause for mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Early intervention is believed to reduce the risk of rebleeding. However, in developing countries such as India, early intervention is often difficult due to various reasons. The knowledge about the risks and predictors for rebleeding is essential to prioritize the management policy. Aims: To describe the frequency and impact of rebleeding in the modern era of aneurysm care, to study the clinical profile of patients with rebleed and to review the controversial aspects on aneurysmal rebleed. Materials and Methods: This observational study is based on the retrospective analysis of the case records of all patients admitted with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH since January 1999 in our institute. Twenty patients rebled after admission before surgical clipping, and these patients formed our study group. The findings were compared with all the major series on rebleeding published in literature. Results: Since January 1999, 952 patients underwent treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in our institute. Twenty patients rebled while awaiting surgery following the admission with an incidence of 2.14%. The study group included nine males and eleven females. The age of the patients ranged from 31 to 69 years, but the majority were in the sixth decade. Mean bleed to admission days was 7.9 days (range: 1-27 days, the mean admission to rebleed was 1.42 days (Range: 0-4 and the mean first bleed to rebleed was 9.26 days. The history of loss of consciousness at the time of bleeding was observed in 16 patients. Four patients bled before an angiogram could be performed. Two patients had giant aneurysms, while the rest had small aneurysms; two patients had multiple aneurysms. Angiographic spasm was observed in eight patients. In three patients, rebleeding was precipitated by angiogram. Twelve patients rebled while taking rest or in sleep, while

  5. Cogeneration installation in combination with an emergency power supply at the Netherlands Cancer Institute. Warmte/kracht-noodstroominstallaatie bij het Nederlands Kankerinstituut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmerink, T.C.M. (Technische Dienst, Nederlands Kanker Instituut Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); De Boer, A. (Advies- en Energiedienstenbedrijf Electro Automatisering Energietechniek, Beverwijk (Netherlands))

    1994-10-01

    A tailor-made combined heat and power generating system was installed at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek hospital of the Netherlands Cancer Institute. After an intensive study of energy consumption and the options offered by existing installations it was decided to renovate the emergency and stand-by power system. A new gas engine was built-in, by which the safety and the output were improved considerably. This article is based on a report in which an overview is given of the existing situation at the hospital, the technical and economical innovation options for the electricity and heat supply and the emergency power system. In the report also a plan is elaborated for the installation of a cogeneration/emergency power supply installation in combination with peak load limitations by means of renovated diesel emergency power units. 8 ills.

  6. Blood culture contamination in hospitalized pediatric patients: a single institution experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyewon; Park, Cheong Soo; Kim, Dong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Blood culture is the most important tool for detecting bacteremia in children with fever. However, blood culture contamination rates range from 0.6% to 6.0% in adults; rates for young children have been considered higher than these, although data are limited, especially in Korea. This study determined the contamination rate and risk factors in pediatric patients visiting the emergency room (ER) or being admitted to the ward. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of blood cultures obtained from children who visited Yonsei Severance Hospital, Korea between 2006 and 2010. Positive blood cultures were labeled as true bacteremia or contamination according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Healthcare Safety Network definitions for laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection, after exclusion of cultures drawn from preexisting central lines only. Results Among 40,542 blood cultures, 610 were positive, of which 479 were contaminations and 131 were true bacteremia (overall contamination rate, 1.18%). The contamination rate in the ER was significantly higher than in the ward (1.32% vs. 0.66%, P6 years, respectively). Conclusion Overall, contamination rates were higher in younger children than in older children, given the difficulty of performing blood sampling in younger children. The contamination rates from the ER were higher than those from the ward, not accounted for only by overcrowding and lack of experience among personnel collecting samples. Further study to investigate other factors affecting contamination should be required. PMID:24868215

  7. Breast cancer in a multi-ethnic Asian setting : Results from the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah; Hartman, Mikael; Saxena, Nakul; Lau, Philip; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo Chin; Lim, Siew Eng; Wong, John E. L.; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2011-01-01

    Two hospital-based breast cancer databases (University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia [n = 1513] and National University Hospital, Singapore [n = 2545]) were merged into a regional registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007. A review of the data found 51% of patients diagnos

  8. [Breast cancer care quality analysis of the National Institute of Oncology in Hungary according to the requirements of European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists (EUSOMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Újhelyi, Mihály; Pukancsik, Dávid; Kelemen, Péter; Sávolt, Ákos; Gődény, Mária; Kovács, Eszter; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Bak, Mihály; Polgár, Csaba; Rubovszky, Gábor; Kásler, Miklós; Mátrai, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    The European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists has created quality indicators for breast units to establish minimum standards and to ensure specialist multimodality care with the conscious aim of improving outcomes and decreasing breast cancer mortality. The aim of this study was to analyse the breast cancer care in the National Institute of Oncology according to the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists requirements and in a large number of cases in order to present representative clinico-pathological data on the incidence of breast cancer in Hungary. According to the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists uniformed criteria clinico-pathological data of multimodality treated breast cancer cases were retrospectively analysed between June 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. During the period of interest 906 patients underwent breast surgery for malignant or benign lesions. According to the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists quality indicators the breast cancer care of the National Institute of Oncology is eligible. The diagnostic modalities and multimodality care of breast cancer of the National Institute of Oncology breast unit meets the critical mass and minimum standards of the European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists criteria. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(42), 1674-1682.

  9. Aircraft transfer of pediatric patients with intractable cardiac or airway problems – single-institutional experience of a specialty hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Makoto; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Park, In-Sam; Tomoike, Hitonobu

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a well-established network for the allocation of donor organs for transplantation in Japan, and emergency patients are often transported by the "Doctor Helicopter". However, interhospital transfer of patients, which can require aircraft with specialized equipment, depends on arrangement by each responsible hospital. Since 2009 there were 41 interhospital aviation transfers of pediatric patients with intractable cardiac or airway diseases seeking surgical treatment at Sakakibara Heart Institute. Of these, 22 were newborns, 21 were on continuous drip infusion and 14 on mechanical ventilator support. In 15 cases (36.6%), a commercial airliner was used, with the remaining using chartered emergency aircraft (eg, local fire department helicopter, Self-Defense-Forces of Japan and the Doctor Helicopter). The median transfer time was 239 min for commercial airliners, 51 min for chartered aircraft departing directly from the referring hospital and 120.5 min for chartered aircraft departing from a nearby location. The efficiency of the transfer exemplified by the percentage of the time on board the aircraft was significantly lower for commercial airliners compared with chartered emergency aircraft. Further efforts and cooperation with government are required to obtain geographically uniform availability of carriers with optimal medical equipment to improve pediatric patient outcomes.

  10. Trend and forecasting rate of cancer deaths at a public university hospital using univariate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A.; Hassan, Noor I.

    2013-09-01

    Cancer is one of the principal causes of death in Malaysia. This study was performed to determine the pattern of rate of cancer deaths at a public hospital in Malaysia over an 11 year period from year 2001 to 2011, to determine the best fitted model of forecasting the rate of cancer deaths using Univariate Modeling and to forecast the rates for the next two years (2012 to 2013). The medical records of the death of patients with cancer admitted at this Hospital over 11 year's period were reviewed, with a total of 663 cases. The cancers were classified according to 10th Revision International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Data collected include socio-demographic background of patients such as registration number, age, gender, ethnicity, ward and diagnosis. Data entry and analysis was accomplished using SPSS 19.0 and Minitab 16.0. The five Univariate Models used were Naïve with Trend Model, Average Percent Change Model (ACPM), Single Exponential Smoothing, Double Exponential Smoothing and Holt's Method. The overall 11 years rate of cancer deaths showed that at this hospital, Malay patients have the highest percentage (88.10%) compared to other ethnic groups with males (51.30%) higher than females. Lung and breast cancer have the most number of cancer deaths among gender. About 29.60% of the patients who died due to cancer were aged 61 years old and above. The best Univariate Model used for forecasting the rate of cancer deaths is Single Exponential Smoothing Technique with alpha of 0.10. The forecast for the rate of cancer deaths shows a horizontally or flat value. The forecasted mortality trend remains at 6.84% from January 2012 to December 2013. All the government and private sectors and non-governmental organizations need to highlight issues on cancer especially lung and breast cancers to the public through campaigns using mass media, media electronics, posters and pamphlets in the attempt to decrease the rate of cancer deaths in Malaysia.

  11. Risk Factors for Thyroid Cancer: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in Korean Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Seung-Kwon; Lee, Chan Wha; Lee, Jeonghee; Kim, Jeongseon; Kim, Hyeon Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence of thyroid cancer in Korea has rapidly increased over the past decade, few studies have investigated its risk factors. This study examined the risk factors for thyroid cancer in Korean adults. Materials and Methods The study design was a hospital-based case-control study. Between August 2002 and December 2011, a total of 802 thyroid cancer cases out of 34,211 patients screened from the Cancer Screenee. Cohort of the National Cancer Center in South Korea were included in the analysis. A total of 802 control cases were selected from the same cohort, and matched individually (1:1) by age (±2 years) and area of residence for control group 1 and additionally by sex for control group 2. Results Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis using the control group 1 showed that females and those with a family history of thyroid cancer had an increased risk of thyroid cancer, whereas ever-smokers and those with a higher monthly household income had a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. On the other hand, the analysis using control group 2 showed that a family history of cancer and alcohol consumption were associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer, whereas higher body mass index (BMI) and family history of thyroid cancer were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer. Conclusion These findings suggest that females, those with a family history of thyroid cancer, those with a higher BMI, non-smokers, non-drinkers, and those with a lower monthly household income have an increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. PMID:27338034

  12. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soejarto, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with

  13. Increased cancer risk in patients referred to hospital with suspected fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Kendall, Sally;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether fibromyalgia (FM) and FM-like symptoms are related to an increased incidence of cancer. METHODS: We identified 1361 patients referred on suspicion of FM in the period 1984-99 from hospital records. Following the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, patients...

  14. Gallstone size and the risk of gallbladder cancer, a hospital based case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman CJ; Lagerwaard FJ; Bueno de Mesquita HB; van Dalen A; van Leeuwen MS; Schrover PAHAM; Berns MPH

    1992-01-01

    The relation between gallstone size and gallbladder cancer was studied in a hospital based case-control study. Cases were selected on abdominal surgery. The selection criterion for controls was a cholecystectomy performed for a benign gallbladder disorder. Controls were matched with cases on sex,

  15. A qualitative analysis of communication between members of a hospital-based multidisciplinary lung cancer team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, S; Callen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how patient information is communicated between health professionals within a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team and to identify mechanisms to improve these communications. A qualitative method was employed using semi-structured in-depth interviews with a representative sample (n = 22) of members of a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team including medical, nursing and allied health professionals. Analysis was undertaken using a thematic grounded theory approach to derive key themes to describe communication patterns within the team and how communication could be improved. Two themes with sub-themes were identified: (1) characteristics of communication between team members including the impact of role on direction of communications, and doctors' dominance in communications; and (2) channels of communication including, preference for face-to-face and the suboptimal roles of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting and the hospital medical record as mediums for communication. Traditional influences of role delineation and the dominance of doctors were found to impact on communication within the multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team. Existing guidelines on implementation of multidisciplinary cancer care fail to address barriers to effective team communication. The paper-based medical record does not support team communications and alternative electronic solutions need to be used. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Intensify standardized therapy for esophageal and stomach cancer in tumor hospitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Jie Wang; Deng Gui Wen; Jing Zhang; Xin Man; Hui Liu

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONCancer treatment situation in tumor hospitals inChina has its own unique characteristics which arenot found in other parts of the world. Because ofthe huge population and high incidence rates ofesophageal and stomach cancer[1-5], the number ofcancer patients waiting for admission isinconceivably large.

  17. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment--a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, C; Uhrenfeldt, L; Birkelund, R

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysis process was guided by the hermeneutical-phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment had a significant impact on their mood, generating positive thoughts and feelings. A view to nature also helped them to forget their negative thoughts for a while. The possibility of having a view helped some cancer patients to connect with good memories and personal life stories that enabled them to recall some of their feelings of identity. This paper adds knowledge about how cancer patients experience sensory impressions in the hospital environment. An environment that provides homeliness and offers a view to nature seems to help some patients to preserve their identity. Furthermore, positive sensory impressions and the opportunity for recreation through environmental facilities strengthen the patient's positive thoughts and feelings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Adolescents with sickle cell anaemia: Experience in a private tertiary hospital serving a tertiary institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah John-Olabode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD have adjustment difficulties in the transition period from paediatric care to the adult system because they find themselves in unfamiliar waters where they have to learn to manage themselves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalent crises and morbidities associated with SCD in adolescents in Babcock University Teaching Hospital (BUTH, to also assess the level of knowledge of these adolescents about SCD and to determine their emotional response to the disease. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review of case notes of adolescents with sickle cell anaemia that were seen in BUTH, from May 2013 to April 2014. Data extracted from the case notes was entered into a Microsoft (MS Excel and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results were presented in tables. Results: A total of 50 subjects were seen in the department during this study period. Vaso-occlusive crises in the form of bone pains (93.1% were the commonest crises encountered. Associated morbidities were malaria 34 (85%, tonsilitis 1 (2.5%, pneumonia 1 (2.5%, leg ulcer 1 (2.5%, azotaemia 1 (2.5% and subarachnoid haemorrhage 2 (5%. Majority (88% had adequate knowledge about general health maintenance while knowledge on nutrition and appropriate analgesia use is still inadequate. Eleven (22% had symptoms of depression, four (8% had suicidal ideation while one (2% had a history of attempted suicide. Conclusion: This study emphasizes the importance of psychosocial intervention as part of a comprehensive health management for people with SCD.

  19. Readability of pediatric otolaryngology information by children's hospitals and academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin; Levi, Jessica R

    2017-04-01

    Evaluate the readability of pediatric otolaryngology-related patient education materials from leading online sources. Cross-sectional analysis. All pediatric otolaryngology-related articles from the online patient health libraries of the top 10 US News & World Report-ranked children's hospitals, top 5 Doximity-ranked pediatric otolaryngology fellowships, and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery were collected. Each article was copied in plain text format into a blank document. Web page navigation, appointment information, references, author information, appointment information, acknowledgements, and disclaimers were removed. Follow-up editing was also performed to remove paragraph breaks, colons, semicolons, numbers, percentages, and bullets. Readability grade was calculated using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease Score, Gunning-Fog Index, Coleman-Liau Index, Automated Readability Index, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were assessed. A total of 502 articles were analyzed. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were both excellent, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 and 0.96, respectively. The average readability grade across all authorships and readability assessments exceeded the reading ability of the average American adult. Only 142 articles (28.3%) were written at or below the reading ability of the average American adult, whereas the remaining 360 articles (71.7%) were written above the reading level of the average adult. Current online health information related to pediatric otolaryngology may be too difficult for the average reader to understand. Revisions may be necessary for current materials to benefit a larger readership. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E138-E144, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans fungemia in an institutional hospital during a decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeland, Laurence; Gazon, Mathieu; Guerin, Claude; Argaud, Laurent; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Bastien, Olivier; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Michallet, Mauricette; Picot, Stephane; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Since the outcomes of patients with candidemia is poor and Candida spp. with increased resistance to antifungal therapy may be associated with these results, the emergence of these blood infections caused by non-C. albicans Candida spp. was explored prospectively over a two-year period (2009-2010). Candidemia was defined as the recovery of Candida spp. in culture from a patient's blood sample. The in vitro susceptibility of each isolate to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined. In addition, characteristics of patients and outcomes were investigated in real-time. The Candida distribution was compared to that observed in a similar study 10 years earlier in the same hospital. A total of 182 patients with candidemia were included in the study. While C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (n = 102), non-C. albicans Candida spp. included; C. glabrata (n = 32), C. parapsilosis (n = 21), C. tropicalis (n = 13), C. krusei (n = 8), C. kefyr (n = 3), C. lusitaniae (n = 2), C. lipolytica (n = 2), C. famata (n = 1), C. guilliermondii (n = 1), C. inconspicua (n = 1), C. dubliniensis (n = 1), C. sake (n = 1) and C. nivariensis (n = 1). In seven patients, C. albicans was associated with another Candida spp. Surprisingly, this prospective study demonstrated that regardless of the department (intensive care unit or hematological department), Candida spp. distribution was no different from that found in the 1998-2001 survey, except for C. krusei. A reduction in the proportion of C. krusei isolates was observed from 2000-2010 (P = 0.028) as a result of its decreased recovery in the hematological department.

  1. Racial and Socio-Economic Disparities in Breast Cancer Hospitalization Outcomes by Insurance Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Sakhuja, Swati; Raviv, Neomi Vin

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among women in the US, and despite numerous studies documenting racial disparities in outcomes, the survival difference between Black and White women diagnosed with breast cancer continues to widen. Few studies have assessed whether observed racial disparities in outcomes vary by insurance type e.g. Medicare/Medicaid versus private insurance. Differences in coverage, availability of networked physicians, or cost-sharing policies may influence choice of treatment and treatment outcomes, even after patients have been hospitalized, effects of which may be differential by race. Purpose The aim of this analysis was to examine hospitalization outcomes among patients with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer and assess whether differences in outcome exist by insurance status after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and socio-economic status. Methods We obtained data on over 67,000 breast cancer patients with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer for this cross-sectional study from the 2007-2011 Healthcare Cost and Utilization project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS), and examined breast cancer surgery type (mastectomy vs. breast conserving surgery or BCS), post-surgical complications and in-hospital mortality. Multivariable regression models were used to compute estimates, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results Black patients were less likely to receive mastectomies compared with White women (OR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.71 - 0.90), regardless of whether they had Medicare/Medicaid or Private insurance. Black patients were also more likely to experience post-surgical complications (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.12-1.78) and higher in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.57, 95%: 1.21-2.03) compared with White patients, associations that were strongest among women with Private insurance. Women residing outside of large metropolitan areas were significantly more likely to receive mastectomies (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1

  2. Approaches for the Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention: lessons from the all-Ireland NCI cancer consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Isabel V; Williams, Makeda; Harford, Joe B

    2012-06-01

    The NCI Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention (SCCP) has provided interdisciplinary training in cancer prevention and control to cancer health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, and scientists, since 1986. It has trained over 1,200 participants, 256 of them from Ireland and Northern Ireland through two summer courses: a 4-week course on Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control (PP) and 1-week on Molecular Prevention (MP). This report is our attempt to measure achievements and level of satisfaction among alumni from the island of Ireland upon return to their home institution. A questionnaire was developed to assess this. Our analysis found statistically significant differences in the types of accomplishments reported among respondents of the MP and PP courses as well as statistically significant differences in their level of satisfaction. More data are needed to better explain the differences observed as well as level of resources available to alumni upon their return home.

  3. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a comparative study of quality control adherence at two cancer hospitals in Spain and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundowicz, Magdalena; Macia, Miguel; Marin, Susanna; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Konstanty, Ewelina; Modolel, Ignaci; Malicki, Julian; Guedea, Ferran

    2014-06-01

    We performed a clinical audit of preoperative rectal cancer treatment at two European radiotherapy centres (Poland and Spain). The aim was to independently verify adherence to a selection of indicators of treatment quality and to identify any notable inter-institutional differences. A total of 162 patients, in Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) 68 and in Greater Poland Cancer Centre (GPCC) 94, diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy were included in retrospective study. A total of 7 quality control measures were evaluated: waiting time, multidisciplinary treatment approach, portal verification, in vivo dosimetry, informed consent, guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, and patient monitoring during treatment. Several differences were observed. Waiting time from pathomorphological diagnosis to initial consultation was 31 (ICO) vs. 8 (GPCC) days. Waiting time from the first visit to the beginning of the treatment was twice as long at the ICO. At the ICO, 82% of patient experienced treatment interruptions. The protocol for portal verification was the same at both institutions. In vivo dosimetry is not used for this treatment localization at the ICO. The ICO utilizes locally-developed guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, while the GPCC is currently developing its own guidelines. An independent external clinical audit is an excellent approach to identifying and resolving deficiencies in quality control procedures. We identified several procedures amenable to improvement. Both institutions have since implemented changes to improve quality standards. We believe that all radiotherapy centres should perform a comprehensive clinical audit to identify and rectify deficiencies.

  4. Oncologists' perspectives on concurrent palliative care in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Ahles, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand oncology clinicians' perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. This was a qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: (1) treating the whole patient, (2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, (3) “some patients just want to fight,” and (4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists' views on the complementary role of palliative care: (1) “refer early and often,” (2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals “hospice”; “Heme patients are different,” (3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, (4) palliative care “shares the load,” and (5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care.

  5. Hacking the hospital environment: young adults designing youth-friendly hospital rooms together with young people with cancer experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne; Thomsen, Stine Legarth; Matthiesen, Simon Meggers; Hjerming, Maiken; Hertz, Pernille Grarup

    2015-12-09

    There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon). Students in architecture, design, engineering, communication and anthropology participated (27 young adults) - forming eight groups. Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with current or former cancer experience participated as sparring partners. We provided workspace and food during the weekend. The groups presented their products to a jury and relevant stakeholders. The groups created eight unique design concepts. The young designers were extremely flexible listening to ideas and experiences from the young patients, which led to common features including individual and flexible design, privacy in two-bed wardrooms and social contact with other hospitalized AYA. The winning project included an integrated concept for both wardrooms and the AYA day room, including logos and names for the rooms and an 'energy wall' in the day room. A hackathon event was an effective mode of youth participation. The design concepts and ideas were in line with current evidence regarding pleasing hospital environment and youth-friendly inpatient facilities and may be applicable to other young patients.

  6. CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCER: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil H Agrawal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is heading towards various types of non-communicable diseases, which are also known as modern epidemics. Among these modern epidemics cancer is among the ten commonest cause of mortality in developing countries including India. Oral cancer is a major problem in India and accounts for 50-70% of all the cancers diagnosed. Ninety percent (90% of oral cancers in South East Asia including India are linked to tobacco chewing and tobacco smoking. Research question: What is the profile of Oral cancer (Oral cavity cases reported in the hospital? Objective: To study the clinico-epidemiological profile associated with Oral cancer cases. Methods: Study Design: Hospital based, Cross -sectional study. Settings: Shri Siddhivinayak Ganapati Cancer Hospital, Miraj, Maharashtra. Participants and Sample size: As it is a time bound study sample size comprised of all the confirmed cases of oral cancer reported in the hospital during the study period. The study was carried out from 1st March 2005 to 28th February 2006. Study variables included demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, enquiries regarding modifiable risk factors such as tobacco usage, alcohol consumption, site involved (within oral cavity, staging, histopathological examination, treatment modality used. Data entry and statistical analysis was done using Microsoft excel. Data presented in form of percentages and proportions. Results: Out of the total 160 cases, majority of the subjects were above 40 years age. 36 (22% of subjects were young adults (below 40 years age. 125 (78% subjects were male. Most of the subjects belonged to upper lower and lower middle socio-economic scale according to modified Kuppuswamy classification. It was observed that 139 (87% cases consumed tobacco in all forms. Out of these, ninety cases consumed tobacco in chewable form. Tobacco was chewed mainly in the form of gutka. Only ten (10 female subjects chewed tobacco. No female subjects smoked. The most

  7. The impact of the hospital work environment on social support from physicians in breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Lena; Wirtz, Markus; Kowalski, Christoph; Pfaff, Holger; Visser, Adriaan; Ernstmann, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    Research on determinants of a good patient-physician interaction mainly disregards systemic factors, such as the work environment in healthcare. This study aims to identify stressors and resources within the work environment of hospital physicians that enable or hinder the physicians' provision of social support to patients. Four data sources on 35 German breast cancer center hospitals were matched: structured hospital quality reports and surveys of 348 physicians, 108 persons in hospital leadership, and 1844 patients. Associations between hospital structures, physicians' social resources as well as job demands and control and patients' perceived support from physicians have been studied in multilevel models. Patients feel better supported by their physicians in hospitals with high social capital, a high percentage of permanently employed physicians, and less physically strained physicians. The results highlight the importance of the work environment for a good patient-physician interaction. They can be used to develop interventions for redesigning the hospital work environment, which in turn may improve physician satisfaction, well-being, and performance and consequently the quality of care. Health policy and hospital management could create conditions conducive to better patient-physician interaction by strengthening the social capital and by increasing job security for physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of congenital orthopaedic malformations in an African teaching hospital ... malformation in this environment while congenital hip dislocation (CDH) is rare when .... malformations of radial dysplasia and other congenital malformations.

  9. Preliminary Analysis of Difficulty of Importing Pattern-Based Concepts into the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Geller, James

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of biomedical ontologies is difficult. We have developed a pattern-based method for dealing with the problem of identifying missing concepts in the National Cancer Institute thesaurus (NCIt). Specifically, we are mining patterns connecting NCIt concepts with concepts in other ontologies to identify candidate missing concepts. However, the final decision about a concept insertion is always up to a human ontology curator. In this paper, we are estimating the difficulty of this task for a domain expert by counting possible choices for a pattern-based insertion. We conclude that even with support of our mining algorithm, the insertion task is challenging.

  10. Application of hospital preparations for cancer treatment, and an approach toward their commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kyohei; Goto, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Masada, Mikio

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, pharmacists who are in consultation with doctors independently prepare medications in an attempt to meet the needs of patients in the hospital. In particular, the need for hospital preparations to treat cancer is high and diverse. However, unlike gov]ernment-approved medications, independently and individually prepared hospital preparations raise concerns about their effectiveness, safety, economic efficiency, quality control, etc. One way to address these concerns is to commercialize these preparations and to understand the difference between necessity and demand from various points of view. We have conducted nation-wide utilization surveys and evaluated the literature on hospital preparations. On the basis of the findings of this survey, we have concluded that pharmaceutical companies and the government need to implement the commercialization of hospital preparations in clinical practice. In this report, we discuss the significance of commercialization of hospital preparations, concerns regarding pharmaceutical preparations, and our recent efforts on cancer treatment. We hope to continuously contribute to society and to medical care by improving individualized care and by commercializing medications needed in clinical practice.

  11. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Khaliq

    Full Text Available Disparities in screening mammography use persists among low income women, even those who are insured, despite the proven mortality benefit. A recent study reported that more than a third of hospitalized women were non-adherent with breast cancer screening. The current study explores prevalence of socio-demographic and clinical variables associated with non-adherence to screening mammography recommendations among hospitalized women.A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50-75 years. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between these factors and non-adherence to screening mammography.Of 250 enrolled women, 61% were of low income, and 42% reported non-adherence to screening guidelines. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical predictors, three variables were found to be independently associated with non-adherence to breast cancer screening: low income (OR = 3.81, 95%CI; 1.84-7.89, current or ex-smoker (OR = 2.29, 95%CI; 1.12-4.67, and history of stroke (OR = 2.83, 95%CI; 1.21-6.60. By contrast, hospitalized women with diabetes were more likely to be compliant with breast cancer screening (OR = 2.70, 95%CI 1.35-5.34.Because hospitalization creates the scenario wherein patients are in close proximity to healthcare resources, at a time when they may be reflecting upon their health status, strategies could be employed to counsel, educate, and motivate these patients towards health maintenance. Capitalizing on this opportunity would involve offering screening during hospitalization for those who are overdue, particularly for those who are at higher risk of disease.

  12. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Waseem; Aamar, Ali; Wright, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Disparities in screening mammography use persists among low income women, even those who are insured, despite the proven mortality benefit. A recent study reported that more than a third of hospitalized women were non-adherent with breast cancer screening. The current study explores prevalence of socio-demographic and clinical variables associated with non-adherence to screening mammography recommendations among hospitalized women. A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50-75 years. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between these factors and non-adherence to screening mammography. Of 250 enrolled women, 61% were of low income, and 42% reported non-adherence to screening guidelines. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical predictors, three variables were found to be independently associated with non-adherence to breast cancer screening: low income (OR = 3.81, 95%CI; 1.84-7.89), current or ex-smoker (OR = 2.29, 95%CI; 1.12-4.67), and history of stroke (OR = 2.83, 95%CI; 1.21-6.60). By contrast, hospitalized women with diabetes were more likely to be compliant with breast cancer screening (OR = 2.70, 95%CI 1.35-5.34). Because hospitalization creates the scenario wherein patients are in close proximity to healthcare resources, at a time when they may be reflecting upon their health status, strategies could be employed to counsel, educate, and motivate these patients towards health maintenance. Capitalizing on this opportunity would involve offering screening during hospitalization for those who are overdue, particularly for those who are at higher risk of disease.

  13. Nursing pain management--a qualitative interview study of patients with pain, hospitalized for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustøen, Tone; Gaardsrud, Torill; Leegaard, Marit; Wahl, Astrid K

    2009-03-01

    Pain is a significant symptom in cancer patients. Understanding of patients' experiences in relation to pain management is important in evidence-based nursing in the field of pain. The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' experiences of nursing pain management during hospitalization for cancer treatment. Eighteen cancer patients participated in the study, all with advanced cancer, including skeleton metastases. The female participants all had breast cancer, and the male participants all had prostate cancer. Data were collected by in-depth interviews, and qualitative description was used to entail low-inference interpretation to reach an understanding of the essence of pain and nursing pain management. Patients found it somewhat difficult to express their expectations of nursing pain management and competencies. However, 1) being present and supportive; 2) giving information and sharing knowledge; 3) taking care of medication; and 4) recognizing the pain emerged as themes in nursing pain management. Although patients believed that nurses were caring persons, they perceived differences between nurses in the ways they handled pain management. Furthermore, some patients experienced a lack of information from nurses in relation to pain management. Although cancer patients' experiences showed the importance of nurses in pain management, it seems that nurses should have a clearer role in cancer pain management in relation to counseling and patient education. The results from this study can increase nurses' awareness of their role in pain management as a first step in improving pain management for patients.

  14. Organochlorine pesticides accumulation and breast cancer: A hospital-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting-Ting; Zuo, An-Jun; Wang, Ji-Gang; Zhao, Peng

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the accumulation status of organochlorine pesticides in breast cancer patients and to explore the relationship between organochlorine pesticides contamination and breast cancer development. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in 56 patients with breast cancer and 46 patients with benign breast disease. We detected the accumulation level of several organochlorine pesticides products (β-hexachlorocyclohexane, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, polychlorinated biphenyls-28, polychlorinated biphenyls-52, pentachlorothioanisole, and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane) in breast adipose tissues of all 102 patients using gas chromatography. Thereafter, we examined the expression status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and Ki-67 in 56 breast cancer cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we analyzed the risk of breast cancer in those patients with organochlorine pesticides contamination using a logistic regression model. Our data showed that breast cancer patients suffered high accumulation levels of pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane and polychlorinated biphenyls-52. However, the concentrations of pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane and polychlorinated biphenyls-52 were not related to clinicopathologic parameters of breast cancer. Further logistic regression analysis showed polychlorinated biphenyls-52 and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane were risk factors for breast cancer. Our results provide new evidence on etiology of breast cancer.

  15. Male breast cancer: a report of 127 cases at a Moroccan institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijami Fouad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer (MBC is a rare disease representing less than 1% of all malignancies in men and only 1% of all incident breast cancers. Our study details clinico-pathological features, treatments and prognostic factors in a large Moroccan cohort. Findings One hundred and twenty-seven patients were collected from 1985 to 2007 at the National Institute of Oncology in Rabat, Morocco. Median age was 62 years and median time for consultation 28 months. The main clinical complaint was a mass beneath the areola in 93, 5% of the cases. Most patients have an advanced disease. Ninety-one percent of tumors were ductal carcinomas. Management consisted especially of radical mastectomy; followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and hormonal therapy with or without chemotherapy. The median of follow-up was 30 months. The evolution has been characterized by local recurrence; in twenty two cases (17% of all patients. Metastasis occurred in 41 cases (32% of all patients. The site of metastasis was the bone in twenty cases; lung in twelve cases; liver in seven case; liver and skin in one case and pleura and skin in one case. Conclusion Male breast cancer has many similarities to breast cancer in women, but there are distinct features that should be appreciated. Future research for better understanding of this disease at national or international level are needed to improve the management and prognosis of male patients.

  16. Sexual outcomes after partial penectomy for penile cancer: results from a multi-institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sansalone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer is an uncommon malignancy. Surgical treatment is inevitably mutilating. Considering the strong impact on patients′ sexual life we want to evaluate sexual function and satisfaction after partial penectomy. The patients in this study (n = 25 represented all those who attended our institutions and were diagnosed and treated for penile cancer from October 2011 to November 2013. All patients underwent partial penectomy and followed-up (mean: 14 months; range: 12-25. Sexual presurgical baseline was estimated using the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction 15 (IIEF-15. Sexual outcomes of each patient were estimated considering four standardized and validated questionnaires. We analyzed the means and ranges of IIEF-15 including erectile function (IIEF-1-5 and -15, orgasmic function (IIEF-9 and -10, sexual desire (IIEF-11 and -12, intercourse satisfaction (IIEF-6-8, and overall satisfaction (IIEF-13 and -14. Then, we also used Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ, Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS and Self-Esteem and Relationship (SEAR to evaluate the sexual function and satisfaction of our patients. The final results showed that penile cancer leads to several sexual and psychosexual dysfunctions. Nevertheless, patients who undergo partial penectomy for penile cancer can maintain the sexual outcomes at levels slightly lower to those that existed in the period before surgery.

  17. Transoral resection of pharyngeal cancer: summary of a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, November 6-7, 2011, Arlington, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Haughey, Bruce H; O'Sullivan, Brian; Genden, Eric M; Beitler, Jonathan J; Weinstein, Gregory S; Quon, Harry; Chepeha, Douglas B; Ferris, Robert L; Weber, Randal S; Movsas, Benjamin; Waldron, John; Lowe, Val; Ramsey, Scott; Manola, Judith; Yueh, Bevan; Carey, Thomas E; Bekelman, Justin E; Konski, Andre A; Moore, Eric; Forastiere, Arlene; Schuller, David E; Lynn, Jean; Ullmann, Claudio Dansky

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances now permit resection of many pharyngeal tumors through the open mouth, an approach that can greatly reduce the morbidity of surgical exposure. These transoral techniques are being rapidly adopted by the surgical community and hold considerable promise. On November 6-7, 2011, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address how to further investigate the use of transoral surgery, both in the good prognosis human papillomavirus (HPV)-initiated oropharyngeal cancers, and in those with HPV-unrelated disease. The proceedings of this meeting are summarized.

  18. What do hospital decision-makers in Ontario, Canada, have to say about the fairness of priority setting in their institutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Douglas K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Priority setting, also known as rationing or resource allocation, occurs at all levels of every health care system. Daniels and Sabin have proposed a framework for priority setting in health care institutions called 'accountability for reasonableness', which links priority setting to theories of democratic deliberation. Fairness is a key goal of priority setting. According to 'accountability for reasonableness', health care institutions engaged in priority setting have a claim to fairness if they satisfy four conditions of relevance, publicity, appeals/revision, and enforcement. This is the first study which has surveyed the views of hospital decision makers throughout an entire health system about the fairness of priority setting in their institutions. The purpose of this study is to elicit hospital decision-makers' self-report of the fairness of priority setting in their hospitals using an explicit conceptual framework, 'accountability for reasonableness'. Methods 160 Ontario hospital Chief Executive Officers, or their designates, were asked to complete a survey questionnaire concerning priority setting in their publicly funded institutions. Eight-six Ontario hospitals completed this survey, for a response rate of 54%. Six close-ended rating scale questions (e.g. Overall, how fair is priority setting at your hospital?, and 3 open-ended questions (e.g. What do you see as the goal(s of priority setting in your hospital? were used. Results Overall, 60.7% of respondents indicated their hospitals' priority setting was fair. With respect to the 'accountability for reasonableness' conditions, respondents indicated their hospitals performed best for the relevance (75.0% condition, followed by appeals/revision (56.6%, publicity (56.0%, and enforcement (39.5%. Conclusions For the first time hospital Chief Executive Officers within an entire health system were surveyed about the fairness of priority setting practices in their

  19. Frontiers in cancer epidemiology: a challenge to the research community from the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program at the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; Freedman, Andrew N; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harvey, Chinonye E; Kaefer, Christie; Reid, Britt C; Rogers, Scott; Schully, Sheri D; Seminara, Daniela; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-07-01

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing scientific priorities for cancer epidemiology research in the next decade. We would like to engage the research community and other stakeholders in a planning effort that will include a workshop in December 2012 to help shape new foci for cancer epidemiology research. To facilitate the process of defining the future of cancer epidemiology, we invite the research community to join in an ongoing web-based conversation at http://blog-epi.grants.cancer.gov/ to develop priorities and the next generation of high-impact studies.

  20. Breast cancer in women aging 35 years old and younger: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute (NCI) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, A D; Helal, A M; Aly El-Din, N H; Solaiman, L L; Amin, A

    2017-02-01

    The aim is to identify the epidemiological and clinicopathological features associated with young breast cancer (BC) patients and to discuss factors affecting tumor recurrence and DFS. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on medical records from young females patients aged ≤35 years with pathologically confirmed primary breast cancer treated during 2008-2010 at NCI. Cases with non invasive cancer and non carcinoma histology are excluded. Of the 5408 cases diagnosed with breast cancer, 554 were young. Four hundred & fifty eight patients representing 9.2% were within our inclusion criteria. Almost half of the patients (45.9%) presented with stage III. Axillary nodes involvement was in 63.9%, 83.3% were grade 2. More than one quarter of tumors was hormone receptors negative (28.8%) & Her2 was over-expressed in 30%. Mastectomy was offered in 72% while conservative breast surgery in 26%, 69.2% received chemotherapy either adjuvant, neoadjuvant or both, 82.5% received adjuvant radiotherapy, 68.6% received hormonal therapy. Metastatic disease developed in 51.3%, with 31% having more than one site of metastases. After a median follow up period of 66 months, the median DFS of patients was 60 months. The median DFS was significantly shorter among patients with positive lymph nodes (P Breast cancer in young women is aggressive from the time of diagnosis. Our results provide baseline data of young BC in the Middle East & North Africa region; thus, contributing to future epidemiological and hospital-based researches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cancer-related therapies at the end of life in hospitalized cancer patients from four Swiss cantons: SAKK 89/09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter-Walstra, Klazien W; Achermann, Rita; Rapold, Roland; Klingbiel, Dirk; Bordoni, Andrea; Dehler, Silvia; Jundt, Gernot; Konzelmann, Isabelle; Clough-Gorr, Kerri; Szucs, Thomas; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The use of cancer-related therapies in cancer patients hospitalized at the end of life has increased in many countries over time. Given the scarcity of published Swiss data, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of hospital type and other factors on the delivery of health care during the last month before death. Claims data were used to assess health care utilization of cancer patients (identified by cancer registry data of four participating Swiss cantons) who deceased between 2006 and 2008. Primary endpoints were delivery of cancer-related therapies during the last 30 days before death. Multivariate logistic regression assessed the explanatory value of hospital type, patient and geographic characteristics. Of 3,809 identified cancer patients in the claims database, 2,086 patients dying from cancer were hospitalized during the last 30 days before death, generating 2,262 inpatient episodes. Anticancer drug therapy was given in 22.2% and radiotherapy in 11.7% of episodes. Besides age and cancer type, the canton of residence and hospital type showed independent, statistically significant associations with intensity of care, which was highest in university hospitals. These results should initiate a discussion among oncologists in Switzerland and may question the compliance with standard of care guidelines for terminal cancer patients.

  2. Treatment Outcomes and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Report from Cancer Institute of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Safaee, Seyed Reza; Shahi, Farhad; Jahanzad, Issa; Zahedi, Ghazal; Mehdizadeh, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) have a more aggressive course and are associated with poorer prognosis in comparison with other subtypes of breast cancer. One of the most common subtypes of TNBC is basal-like. The aim of this study was to investigate clinicopathological characteristics and clinical course of TNBC in Iranian women and compare them with other studies. Subjects and Methods: Between March 2009 and February 2011, patients with breast cancer in Cancer Institute of Iran were selected and then followed-up for 2 years. Paraffin-embedded tumor block of all TNBC patients were evaluated for CK5/6 and EGFR using IHC method. Results: Among 267 breast cancer patients, 60 cases with TNBC were identified (22.5%), 31 patients (51.7%) had basal-like and 29 patients (48.3%) had non-basal-like tumors. The median age of participants with TNBC was 49.6 years. Among our patients, 70% had positive lymph nodes.93.4% of all patients at the time of diagnosis were stage II or III and tumor size was at least 3 centimeters. No grade 1 TNBC was found in this study. During the follow-up period, there were 26 recurrences and 7 deaths. Conclusion: The percentage of basal-like subtype among Iranian women with TNBC was lower compared to other studies, while bone metastases, clinical stage, lymph node involvement and tumor size were higher. Clinicopathological findings in basal and non-basal-like subgroups were not different, but the probability of lymph node involvement was more common in patients who were EGFR positive. PMID:28286613

  3. Treatment Outcomes and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Report from Cancer Institute of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Safaee, Seyed Reza; Shahi, Farhad; Jahanzad, Issa; Zahedi, Ghazal; Mehdizadeh, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) have a more aggressive course and are associated with poorer prognosis in comparison with other subtypes of breast cancer. One of the most common subtypes of TNBC is basal-like. The aim of this study was to investigate clinicopathological characteristics and clinical course of TNBC in Iranian women and compare them with other studies. Subjects and Methods: Between March 2009 and February 2011, patients with breast cancer in Cancer Institute of Iran were selected and then followed-up for 2 years. Paraffin-embedded tumor block of all TNBC patients were evaluated for CK5/6 and EGFR using IHC method. Results: Among 267 breast cancer patients, 60 cases with TNBC were identified (22.5%), 31 patients (51.7%) had basal-like and 29 patients (48.3%) had non-basal-like tumors. The median age of participants with TNBC was 49.6 years. Among our patients, 70% had positive lymph nodes.93.4% of all patients at the time of diagnosis were stage II or III and tumor size was at least 3 centimeters. No grade 1 TNBC was found in this study. During the follow-up period, there were 26 recurrences and 7 deaths. Conclusion: The percentage of basal-like subtype among Iranian women with TNBC was lower compared to other studies, while bone metastases, clinical stage, lymph node involvement and tumor size were higher. Clinicopathological findings in basal and non-basal-like subgroups were not different, but the probability of lymph node involvement was more common in patients who were EGFR positive.

  4. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence. © 2016 UICC.

  5. Pediatric cancer pathology review from a single institution: Neuropathology expert opinion is essential for accurate diagnosis of pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabi, Zeina; Boulos, Fouad; Santiago, Teresa; Jenkins, Jesse; Abboud, Miguel; Muwakkit, Samar; Tarek, Nidale; Zaatari, Ghazi; Jeha, Sima; El-Solh, Hassan; Saab, Raya

    2017-07-04

    Second pathology review has been reported to improve accuracy in oncologic diagnoses, including pediatric malignancies. We assessed the impact of second review on the diagnosis of pediatric malignancies at a tertiary care referral center in Beirut, Lebanon. Pathology reports of patients treated at the Children's Cancer Institute in Lebanon were retrospectively reviewed for the period 2008-2016 and compared with same samples' diagnoses at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Diagnostic disagreements were divided into major, minor, and none based on their effect on diagnosis and/or patient management. Second review was requested for 171 cases, accounting for 19% of all cases during that period. Second opinion was mostly requested for brain tumors (62% of all brain tumor cases) and neuroblastoma for NMYC testing (65% of all neuroblastoma), while hematologic malignancies had the fewest referrals (3% of all hematologic cases). Major disagreements in second review occurred in 20 cases (12% of total), and minor disagreements in 21 cases (12% of total). The largest proportion of major disagreements (71%) occurred in pediatric brain tumors, and novel molecular tests contributed to the diagnosis in 55% of these cases. The availability of a specialized pediatric neuropathologist and a basic panel of relevant molecular testing are essential for appropriate diagnosis of pediatric brain tumors. Centers that do not have the available infrastructure in place can benefit greatly from second review referrals for this challenging subset of tumors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ganesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. Objectives : The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka, smoking (bidi, cigarette, comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI, family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods : This an unmatched hospital-based case-control study, comprised of 123 histologically proven prostate ′cancer cases′ and 167 ′normal controls. Univariate and regression analysis were applied for obtaining the odds ratio for risk factors. Results : The study revealed that there was no significant excess risk for chewers, alcohol drinkers, tea and coffee drinkers, family history of cancer, diabetes, vasectomy and dietary factors. However, patients with BMI >25 (OR = 2.1, those with hypertension history (OR = 2.5 and age >55 years (OR = 19.3 had enhanced risk for prostate cancer. Conclusions : In the present study age, BMI and hypertension emerged as risk factors for prostate cancer. The findings of this study could be useful to conduct larger studies in a more detailed manner which in turn can be useful for public interest domain.

  7. Spectrum of pediatric cancers in Mozambique: an analysis of hospital and population-based data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Helena; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Carrilho, Carla; Ferro, Josefo; Sultane, Thebora; Garcia, Carlos; Amod, Faizana; Augusto, Orvalho; Silva-Matos, Carla; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lunet, Nuno

    2014-09-01

    The existing data provide little detail about the epidemiology of pediatric cancers in Mozambique. We aimed at characterizing the spectrum of pediatric cancers (0-14 years) diagnosed in Mozambique in two different calendar periods. Data were obtained from the Pathology Department of the Maputo Central Hospital (DP-HCM) (1999-2000 and 2009-2010), which receives virtually all samples for histopathological diagnosis in Maputo, with the exception of leukemia, and from the population-based Cancer Registry of Beira (2009-2010). In 1999-2000, the DP-HCM diagnosed 61 cancers. Burkitt lymphoma, malignant bone tumors, and rhabdomyosarcomas accounted for 24.6%, 11.5%, and 9.8% of all cases, respectively. In 2009-2010, the number of cancers increased to 150, reflecting a two- to threefold increase in the proportion of Kaposi sarcomas, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, nephroblastomas, and neuroblastomas. In 2009-2010, the Cancer Registry of Beira registered 34 cases, corresponding to an incidence rate of 9.7/100,000 inhabitants in this age group; Kaposi sarcomas, lymphomas, retinoblastomas, and nephroblastomas accounted for 29.4%, 23.5%, 8.8%, and 8.8% of all cases, respectively. These data show that pediatric cancers account for an appreciable burden in Mozambique, probably reflecting a high frequency of HIV-associated cancers and improved access to diagnosis, and highlight the potential for improving surveillance in this low resource setting.

  8. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials.

  9. Ebola virus disease: Case management in the Institute of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Sassari, Sardinia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Giulia; Mannazzu, Marco; Madeddu, Giordano; Are, Riccardo; Muredda, Alberto; Babudieri, Sergio; Calia, Giovanna; Lovigu, Carla; Maida, Ivana; Contini, Luciana; Miscali, Anna; Rubino, Salvatore; Delogu, Fiorenzo; Mura, Maria Stella

    2016-05-31

    Since the onset of the worst epidemic of Ebola virus disease in December 2013, 28,637 cases were reported as confirmed, probable, or suspected. Since the week of 3 January 2016, no more cases have been reported. The total number of deaths have amounted to 11,315 (39.5%). In developed countries, seven cases have been diagnosed: four in the United States, one in Spain, one in the United Kingdom, and one in Italy. On 20 July 2015, Italy was declared Ebola-free. On 9 May 2015, an Italian health worker came back to Italy after a long stay in Sierra Leone working for a non-governmental organization. Forty-eight hours after his arrival, he noticed headache, weakness, muscle pains, and slight fever. The following day, he was safely transported to the Infectious Diseases Unit of University Hospital of Sassari. The patient was hospitalized for 19 hours until an Italian Air Force medical division transferred him to Rome, to the Lazzaro Spallanzani Institute. Nineteen people who had contacts with the patient were monitored daily for 21 days by the Public Health Office of Sassari and none presented any symptoms. So far, neither vaccine nor treatment is available to be proposed on an international scale. Ebola is considered a re-emerging infectious disease which, unlike in the past, has been a worldwide emergency. This case study aimed to establish a discussion about the operative and logistic difficulties to be faced and about the discrepancy arising when protocols clash with the reality of facts.

  10. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Admi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines care transition experiences of cancer patients and assesses barriers to effective transitions.Methods: Participants were adult Hebrew, Arabic, or Russian speaking oncology patients and health care providers from hospital and community settings. Qualitative (n=77 and quantitative (n=422 methods such as focus groups, interviews and self-administered questionnaires were used. Qualitative analysis showed that patients faced difficulties navigating a complex and fragmented healthcare system.Results: Mechanisms to overcome barriers included informal routes such as personal relationships, coordinating roles by nurse coordinators and the patients' general practitioners (GPs. The most significant variable was GPs involvement, which affected transition process quality as rated on the CTM (p<0.001. Our findings point to the important interpersonal role of oncology nurses to coordinate and facilitate the care transition process.Conclusion: Interventions targeted towards supporting the care transition process should emphasize ongoing counseling throughout a patient’s care, during and after hospitalization.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Admi H, Muller E, Shadmi E. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34011.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  11. US News and World Report cancer hospital rankings: do they reflect measures of research productivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Prasad

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Prior research has faulted the US News and World Report hospital specialty rankings for excessive reliance on reputation, a subjective measure of a hospital's performance. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether and to what extent reputation correlates with objective measures of research productivity among cancer hospitals. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: Automated search of NIH Reporter, BioEntrez, BioMedline and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. PARTICIPANTS: The 50 highest ranked cancer hospitals in 2013's US News and World Report Rankings. EXPOSURE: We ascertained the number of NCI funded grants, and the cumulative funds received by each cancer center. Additionally, we identified the number of phase I, phase II, and phase III studies published and indexed in MEDLINE, and registered at clinicaltrials.gov. All counts were over the preceding 5 years. For published articles, we summed the impact factor of the journals in which they appeared. Trials were attributed to centers on the basis of the affiliation of the lead author or study principal investigator. MAIN OUTCOME: Correlation coefficients from simple and multiple linear regressions for measures of research productivity and a center's reputation. RESULTS: All measures of research productivity demonstrated robust correlation with reputation (mean r-squared  = 0.65, median r-squared = 0.68, minimum r-squared = .41, maximum r-squared = 0.80. A multivariable model showed that 93% of the variation in reputation is explained by objective measures. CONCLUSION: Contrary to prior criticism, the majority of reputation, used in US News and World Rankings, can be explained by objective measures of research productivity among cancer hospitals.

  12. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    capabil ptome (RNA eq: exon us mber variati q and FAIR A-seq: miR me: bacteri terials from ic mice and ard operati apture micr A/RNA, link...entification D) and CR- isolate tumo nd quality c ple platform ression) optimize ervised sets aims in the number var ges, micr ll lines and xt-gen seq e...a ers will pe P-seq, micr ncluding the cancer pre signatures abilities of t The long-te researchers ft tumors in bioinformat . 1) ladder can

  13. Part I--IEPS (Institute for the Study of Health Policies) reports. The proper function of teaching hospitals within health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The main points of the discussions from the international seminar organised by the World Health Organisation and the Institute for the Study of Health Policies (IEPS) were published in French by Flammarion Medecine-Sciences in the Collection entitled "The IEPS Reports" and in English by the WHO under the title "The Proper Function of Teaching Hospitals within Health Systems" (1995).

  14. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  15. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  16. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  17. Patient safety in organizational culture as perceived by leaderships of hospital institutions with different types of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Natasha Dejigov Monteiro da; Barbosa, Antonio Pires; Padilha, Kátia Grillo; Malik, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    To identify the perceptions of leaderships toward patient safety culture dimensions in the routine of hospitals with different administrative profiles: government, social and private organizations, and make correlations among participating institutions regarding dimensions of patient safety culture used. A quantitative cross-sectional study that used the Self Assessment Questionnaire 30 translated into Portuguese. The data were processed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) in addition to descriptive statistics, with statistical significance set at p-value ≤ 0.05. According to the participants' perceptions, the significant dimensions of patient safety culture were 'patient safety climate' and 'organizational learning', with 81% explanatory power. Mean scores showed that among private organizations, higher values were attributed to statements; however, the correlation between dimensions was stronger among government hospitals. Different hospital organizations present distinct values for each dimension of patient safety culture and their investigation enables professionals to identify which dimensions need to be introduced or improved to increase patient safety. Identificar percepções das lideranças sobre as dimensões da cultura de segurança do paciente no cotidiano de hospitais de diferentes perfis administrativos: públicos, organizações sociais e privados, e realizar correlação entre as instituições participantes, de acordo com as dimensões da cultura de segurança do paciente utilizadas. Estudo transversal de aspecto quantitativo obtido por meio da aplicação do instrumento Self Assessment Questionnaire 30, traduzido para a língua portuguesa. Os dados foram tratados com análise de variância (ANOVA), além das estatísticas descritivas, considerando como de significância estatística valores de p-valor ≤ 0,05. Segundo a percepção dos participantes do estudo, as dimensões significativas para a cultura de segurança do paciente foram Ambiente de

  18. Breast cancer quality of life evaluation in Mexican Women at La Raza Hospital, Mexico City: A preliminary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Juan Carlos Hinojosa-Cruz2, Consuelo Rubio-Poo31Departments of Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Xochimilco, Mexico; 2La Raza Hospital of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies, Zaragoza (FES-Zaragoza, MexicoAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death among Mexican women over 40 years of age. This study aimed to identify and examine the effects of cancer stage and surgical treatment on the quality of life (QOL of Mexican women with early stage breast cancer (ESBC treated with either modified radical mastectomy (MRM or breast conservative surgery (BCS, plus adjuvant chemotherapy. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23 questionnaires were used to assess QOL. Sociodemographic characteristics and clinical factors of 102 women with early BC were also evaluated; analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed and a statistical significance of p < 0.05 was assumed. Most women were of reproductive age. Meaningful differences in QOL as a result of surgical treatment, in women receiving BCS compared with those receiving MRM, were limited to body image. We conclude that MRM and BCS are essentially equivalent choices in terms of QOL, with the exception of the impact on body image. In general, women who received BCS had a better perceived QOL.Keywords: quality of life, breast cancer, Mexican women

  19. Risk for Hospitalization With Depression After a Cancer Diagnosis: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study of Cancer Patients in Denmark From 1973 to 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, S.O.; Laursen, T.M.; Nylandsted, Lone Ross

    2009-01-01

    ) for depression among cancer survivors relative to the cancer-free population was estimated by Poisson regression analysis with adjustment for age and period and stratified by sex, site of cancer, and extent of disease. Results The risk for depression in the first year after a cancer diagnosis was increased......Purpose As more people survive cancer, it is necessary to understand the long-term impact of cancer. We investigated whether cancer survivors are at increased risk for hospitalization for depression. Methods We linked data on all 5,703,754 persons living in Denmark on January 1, 1973, or born...... for both men and women surviving hormone-related cancers, for women surviving smoking-related cancers, and for men surviving virus- and immune-related cancers. Conclusion This study confirms an increased risk for depression in patients facing a disruptive event like cancer. Early recognition and effective...

  20. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: a retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-09-14

    To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1(st) degree and 12% a 2(nd) degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC.

  1. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: A retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. METHODS: Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. RESULTS: CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1st degree and 12% a 2nd degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CONCLUSION: CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC. PMID:24039357

  2. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids......-treated patients in hospital settings: however, focussing on average pain intensity, the outcome seems favourable compared with other countries. Pain mechanisms were seldom examined and adjuvant drugs were not specifically used for neuropathic pain. Opioid dosing intervals and supplemental opioid doses were most...

  3. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  4. Variation in neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization for epithelial ovarian cancer at high volume hospitals in the United States and associated survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Emma L; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Rossi, Emma C; Gehrig, Paola A; Boggess, John F; Garrett, Joanne M

    2017-06-01

    To estimate variation in the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy by high volume hospitals and to determine the association between hospital utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival. We identified incident cases of stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer in the National Cancer Database from 2006 to 2012. Inclusion criteria were treatment at a high volume hospital (>20 cases/year) and treatment with both chemotherapy and surgery. A logistic regression model was used to predict receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on case-mix predictors (age, comorbidities, stage etc). Hospitals were categorized by the observed-to-expected ratio for neoadjuvant chemotherapy use as low, average, or high utilization hospitals. Survival analysis was performed. We identified 11,574 patients treated at 55 high volume hospitals. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was used for 21.6% (n=2494) of patients and use varied widely by hospital, from 5%-55%. High utilization hospitals (n=1910, 10 hospitals) had a median neoadjuvant chemotherapy rate of 39% (range 23-55%), while low utilization hospitals (n=2671, 14 hospitals) had a median rate of 10% (range 5-17%). For all ovarian cancer patients adjusting for clinical and socio-demographic factors, treatment at a hospital with average or high neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization was associated with a decreased rate of death compared to treatment at a low utilization hospital (HR 0.90 95% CI 0.83-0.97 and HR 0.85 95% CI 0.75-0.95). Wide variation exists in the utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to treat stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer even among high volume hospitals. Patients treated at hospitals with low rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization experience decreased survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characteristics of Incident Testicular Cancer in Lebanon - 1990-2015 Single Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Tarek; Nasr, Fadi; Rassy, Elie El; Ibrahim, Toni; Jabbour, Hicham; Chahine, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that testicular cancer is a major health issue with its increasing incidence, very few studies have described its characteristics in the Middle East, particularly in Lebanon. We report in this paper a retrospective pilot study of the characteristics of testicular cancer in Lebanon. The demographic, epidemiologic and survival characteristics of 178 patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2015 at an oncology clinic affiliated to Hotel Dieu de France Hospital were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 32 ±10 years. The most prevalent testicular tumor was the germ cell type (GCT) (95.2%) of which non-seminomatous tumors (NST) were the commonest (64.7%). Most of our patients were diagnosed at an early stage. Lymph node spread affected most commonly the retroperitoneal region and distant visceral metastases occurred in 14.6%. All patients underwent orchiectomy with 67% receiving adjuvant treatment, mainly chemotherapy. After a median follow up of 2,248 days (75.9 months) 16 patients were reported dead. Two, five and ten-year overall survival rates were 96%, 94% and 89% respectively. The median overall survival rate was not reached. Despite being part of the developing world, demographic, epidemiologic and survival analyses of testicular cancer reported in our study are in line with those reported from developed countries and would allow us to extrapolate management plans from these populations.

  6. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  7. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  8. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  9. Music therapy as part of the alternative-complementary therapy in cancer patients in hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios Athanassakis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the modern health problems of people living in developed countries. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches to cancer patients is constantly updated with new data. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the international literature referred to the application of music therapy in the treatment for pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Method and materials: The method of this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature on MEDLINE (2000-2010 database and using as key words music, music therapy, alternative-complementary therapy, cancer, children. Results: Music therapy, the last few years, seems to be one of the forms of alternative-complementary therapy for patients treated for cancer. Music therapy is applied as part of complementary therapy in pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Complementary-alternative methods are non-invasive, non-toxic, cheap, safe and can be easily used by the patients themselves. Primarily, the music therapy aimed to the reduction of the emotional trauma and the feeling of the pain during the process of the treatment (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, other painful procedures but also in the whole patients life. Conclusions: Scientific bibliographic databases research concerning the music therapy in patients with cancer seem encouraging, especially in children. Nevertheless, the further study of the role of the music during hospitalization in the outcome of the treatment is essential

  10. Clinicopathological Profile of Lung Cancer Patients in a Teaching Hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinath Dhandapani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths in the world. The incidence of lung cancer is increasing in India and there is a need to understand the natural history of this disease. Aim of the study: To study the clinico- pathological- radiological profile of patients diagnosed with lung cancer from January 2013 to May 2015 at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Inpatient records of all patients admitted during the study period were examined and  all patients with a histologically proven diagnosis of bronchogenic carcinoma were recruited. Demographic characteristics, clinical, radiological and pathological details of each patient were recorded. Results: Fifty four patients with lung cancer were identified. Forty three (79.6% were male and 11 (20.4% were female. Thirty two (59.7% were smokers and 22 (40.7% were non smokers. Cough and expectoration (61.1% was the most common presenting symptom followed by breathlessness (59.3%. Mass lesion (81.5% was the most common radiological presentation and adenocarcinoma (42.6% was the most common histological subtype. When compared to fiber optic bronchoscopy, image guided percutaneous biopsy had a better  yield for diagnosing lung cancer (51.9% vs 48.1%. But this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.892 Conclusion: Adenocarcinoma is replacing squamous cell carcinoma as the most common type of lung cancer in India.

  11. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Bisht

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. The data obtained from the patients included symptoms reported by the patients, currently prescribed treatments and the site of cancer. Results: The average number of symptoms reported per patient was 5.33 ± 0.67 (mean ± SE. The most common symptoms were pain, weakness/fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, dyspnea, constipation and cough. Polypharmacy was frequent. Patients consumed approximately 8.7 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE drugs on average during the 2-month period of follow-up. Conclusion: The result gives insight into the varied symptomatology of patients with advanced cancer. Polypharmacy was quite common in patients with advanced cancer, predisposing them to complicated drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  12. A Study on the Directed Living Non-Related Donor Kidney Transplantation Submitted to the Hospital Transplant Ethics Committee at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suguitan, G; Arakama, M-H I; Danguilan, R

    2017-03-01

    In the latter part of 2009, the Department of Health of the Philippines prohibited kidney transplantation with non-related kidney donors. Hence, the National Kidney and Transplant Institute created a Hospital Transplant Ethics Committee. This study describes directed non-related kidney donation at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute. This retrospective study reviewed the profiles of recipients and directed living non-related kidney transplant donors submitted to the Hospital Transplant Ethics Committee. A total 74 recipients and donors were reviewed by the Hospital Transplant Ethics Committee in 2014. Donors initiated the talks about being a donor (75%) to repay the good deeds that were done by the recipient for them or their families; examples of which are: sometime in their lives they needed financial assistance for hospitalization for their relatives and it was the patient who paid the hospital bill; or because they pitied the recipient, whom they found to be a good person, thus they would want to give one of their kidneys. Seventy-four (100%) said that they were not expecting anything in return for this act but wanted to be of help to the recipient. Of these 74 cases, 70 cases (95%) were approved and the others were disapproved. With a Hospital Transplant Ethics Committee in place, directed kidney donation is a valuable tool as an additional source of kidney donor without violating any ethical issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. A study on risk factors of breast cancer among patients attending the tertiary care hospital, in Udupi district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandra Kamath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer has become one of the ten leading causes of death in India. Breast cancer is the most common diagnosed malignancy in India, it ranks second to cervical cancer. An increasing trend in incidence is reported from various registries of national cancer registry project and now India is a country with largest estimated number of breast cancer deaths worldwide. Aim: To study the factors associated with breast cancer. Objectives: To study the association between breast cancer and selected exposure variables and to identify risk factors for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A hospital based Case control study was conducted at Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Center, Manipal, Udupi District. Results: Total 188 participants were included in the study, 94 cases and 94 controls. All the study participants were between 25 to 69 years of age group. The cases and controls were matched by ± 2 years age range. Non vegetarian diet was one of the important risk factors (OR 2.80, CI 1.15-6.81. More than 7 to 12 years of education (OR 4.84 CI 1.51-15.46 had 4.84 times risk of breast cancer as compared with illiterate women. Conclusion: The study suggests that non vegetarian diet is the important risk factor for Breast Cancer and the risk of Breast Cancer is more in educated women as compared with the illiterate women. Limitation: This is a Hospital based study so generalisability of the findings could be limited.

  14. Evaluating patients' walking capacity during hospitalization for lung cancer resection†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Pedro A; Hernández, Nieves; Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo

    2017-05-04

    The goal of this study was to describe non-supervised daily physical activity in patients during the period immediately following anatomical lung resection. The study was an observational study on 50 consecutive patients (33 men) admitted for anatomical lung resection over a 4-month period. All cases were approached using a minimally invasive technique. Patients were instructed by nursing and physiotherapy staff and asked to wear a portable pedometer (Omron HJ-720 T-E2) from admission until hospital discharge, excluding the day of the operation and the first hours in the recovery room. The variables collected included sex, age, body mass index, type of lung resection, cardiopulmonary postoperative complications, percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s, percentage single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s calculated according to functional segments removed at surgery, predicted postoperative single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity calculated according to functional segments removed at surgery, total steps, aerobic steps and daily total strolled distance in metres. Comparison of activity was analysed using the paired t -test for individual data evolution and the unpaired t -test for patients showing complications or not. Body mass index and exercise capacity were analysed using the Spearman correlation analysis. A total of 34 patients underwent lobectomy or bilobectomy. All patients could walk on the first postoperative day. The average walked distance on the first and fourth postoperative days was 6100 m and 7400 m, respectively. Compared with the preoperative day, patients walked significantly fewer total steps on Day 1 and Day 2 (Day 1, P  = 0.0001; Day 2, P  = 0.049). The rate of aerobic to total daily steps was comparable after the second postoperative day. Patients having any postoperative cardiopulmonary complication showed a significantly inferior walking capacity ( P

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer: 30-Year Experience in a Single Institution in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingu, Keiichi, E-mail: kjingu-jr@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Tanabe, Takaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Ariga, Hisanori; Umezawa, Rei; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ken; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Kubozono, Masaki; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Yamada, Shogo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy ({+-} EBRT) for localized pancreatic cancer in the past three decades and to analyze prognostic factors by multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Records for 322 patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT in Tohoku University Hospital between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed. One hundred ninety-two patients who had no distant organ metastases or dissemination at the time of laparotomy were enrolled in the present study. Results: Eighty-three patients underwent gross total resection (R0: 48 patients, R1: 35 patients), and 109 patients underwent only biopsy or palliative resection. Fifty-five patients underwent adjuvant EBRT, and 124 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 and 40 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients had disease recurrence, and 35 patients had local failure. The 2-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates were 71.0% and 16.9%, respectively. Comparison of the results for each decade showed that OS was significantly improved decade by decade (2-year: 25.0% vs. 18.8% vs. 4.2%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection (R0-1 vs. R2, hazard ratio = 1.97, p = 0.001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes vs. no, hazard ratio = 1.54, p = 0.028) had significant impacts on OS. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 4 or 5 was observed in four patients. Conclusion: Excellent local control for pancreatic cancer with few cases of severe late toxicity was achieved by using IORT. OS of patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT improved significantly decade by decade. Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy had significant impacts on OS.

  16. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study1,4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Chan, D.S.; Romieu, I.; Freisling, H.; Ferrari, P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dartois, L.; Li, K.; Tikk, K.; Bergmann, M.M.; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Redondo, M.L.; Agudo, A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Crowe, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Masala, G.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; May, A.; Wirfalt, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Johansson, I.; Hallmans, G.; Lund, E.; Weiderpass, E.; Parr, C.L.; Riboli, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We inves

  17. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe : results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romaguera, Dora; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Chan, Doris S. M.; Romieu, Isabelle; Freisling, Heinz; Ferrari, Pietro; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Dartois, Laureen; Li, Kuanrong; Tikk, Kaja; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Luisa Redondo, Maria; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Crowe, Francesca; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ros, Martine M.; May, Anne; Wirfalt, Elisabet; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hallmans, Goeran; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Parr, Christine L.; Riboli, Elio; Norat, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. Objective: We inves

  18. Skin cancer has a large impact on our public hospitals but prevention programs continue to demonstrate strong economic credentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sophy T F; Carter, Rob; Heward, Sue; Sinclair, Craig

    2017-08-01

    While skin cancer is still the most common cancer in Australia, important information gaps remain. This paper addresses two gaps: i) the cost impact on public hospitals; and ii) an up-to-date assessment of economic credentials for prevention. A prevalence-based cost approach was undertaken in public hospitals in Victoria. Costs were estimated for inpatient admissions, using State service statistics, and outpatient services based on attendance at three hospitals in 2012-13. Cost-effectiveness for prevention was estimated from 'observed vs expected' analysis, together with program expenditure data. Combining inpatient and outpatient costs, total annual costs for Victoria were $48 million to $56 million. The SunSmart program is estimated to have prevented more than 43,000 skin cancers between 1988 and 2010, a net cost saving of $92 million. Skin cancer treatment in public hospitals ($9.20∼$10.39 per head/year) was 30-times current public funding in skin cancer prevention ($0.37 per head/year). At about $50 million per year for hospitals in Victoria alone, the cost burden of a largely preventable disease is substantial. Skin cancer prevention remains highly cost-effective, yet underfunded. Implications for public health: Increased funding for skin cancer prevention must be kept high on the public health agenda. Hospitals would also benefit from being able to redirect resources to non-preventable conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  20. Clinical Features of Male Breast Cancer: Experiences from Seven Institutions Over 20 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Hyung; Ha, Kyung Sun; Jung, Yun Hwa; Won, Hye Sung; An, Ho Jung; Lee, Guk Jin; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Ji Chan; Park, Sarah; Byun, Jae Ho; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Woo Chan; Jung, Sang Seol; Park, Il Young; Chung, Su-Mi; Woo, In Sook

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer treatment has progressed significantly over the past 20 years. However, knowledge regarding male breast cancer (MBC) is sparse because of its rarity. This study is an investigation of the clinicopathologic features, treatments, and clinical outcomes of MBC. Clinical records of 59 MBC patients diagnosed during 1995-2014 from seven institutions in Korea were reviewed retrospectively. Over a 20-year period, MBC patients accounted for 0.98% among total breast cancer patients, and increased every 5 years. The median age of MBC patientswas 66 years (range, 24 to 87 years). Forty-three patients (73%) complained of a palpable breast mass initially. The median symptom duration was 5 months (range, 1 to 36 months). Mastectomy was performed in 96% of the patients. The most frequent histology was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (75%). Ninety-one percent of tumors (38/43) were estrogen receptor-positive, and 28% (11/40) showed epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression. After curative surgery, 42% of patients (19/45) received adjuvant chemotherapy; 77% (27/35) received hormone therapy. Five out of ten patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors did not receive adjuvant anti-HER-2 therapy, while two out of four patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors received palliative trastuzumab for recurrent and metastatic disease. Letrozole was used for one patient in the palliative setting. The median overall survival durations were 7.2 years (range, 0.6 to 17.0 years) in patients with localized disease and 2.9 years (range, 0.6 to 4.3 years) in those with recurrent or metastatic disease. Anti-HER-2 and hormonal therapy, except tamoxifen, have been underutilized in Korean MBC patients compared to female breast cancer patients. With the development of precision medicine, active treatment with targeted agents should be applied. Further investigation of the unique pathobiology of MBC is clinically warranted.

  1. Clinical Features of Male Breast Cancer: Experiences from Seven Institutions Over 20 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Hyung; Ha, Kyung Sun; Jung, Yun Hwa; Won, Hye Sung; An, Ho Jung; Lee, Guk Jin; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Ji Chan; Park, Sarah; Byun, Jae Ho; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Woo Chan; Jung, Sang Seol; Park, Il Young; Chung, Su-Mi; Woo, In Sook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer treatment has progressed significantly over the past 20 years. However, knowledge regarding male breast cancer (MBC) is sparse because of its rarity. This study is an investigation of the clinicopathologic features, treatments, and clinical outcomes of MBC. Materials and Methods Clinical records of 59 MBC patients diagnosed during 1995-2014 from seven institutions in Korea were reviewed retrospectively. Results Over a 20-year period, MBC patients accounted for 0.98% among total breast cancer patients, and increased every 5 years. The median age of MBC patientswas 66 years (range, 24 to 87 years). Forty-three patients (73%) complained of a palpable breast mass initially. The median symptom duration was 5 months (range, 1 to 36 months). Mastectomy was performed in 96% of the patients. The most frequent histology was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (75%). Ninety-one percent of tumors (38/43) were estrogen receptor–positive, and 28% (11/40) showed epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression. After curative surgery, 42% of patients (19/45) received adjuvant chemotherapy; 77% (27/35) received hormone therapy. Five out of ten patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors did not receive adjuvant anti–HER-2 therapy, while two out of four patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors received palliative trastuzumab for recurrent and metastatic disease. Letrozole was used for one patient in the palliative setting. The median overall survival durations were 7.2 years (range, 0.6 to 17.0 years) in patients with localized disease and 2.9 years (range, 0.6 to 4.3 years) in those with recurrent or metastatic disease. Conclusion Anti–HER-2 and hormonal therapy, except tamoxifen, have been underutilized in Korean MBC patients compared to female breast cancer patients. With the development of precision medicine, active treatment with targeted agents should be applied. Further investigation of the unique pathobiology of MBC is clinically warranted

  2. [Incidence of oral cancer in AIDS patients at the "20 de Noviembre" Regional Hospital, ISSSTE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís Morán, C E; Molina Moguel, J L

    1990-09-01

    Ever since its initial outbursts in high-risk groups, AIDS has had an appalling impact within the oncological sphere, since it combines opportunistic pathologies with the occurrence of malignancies caused by loss of defensive cells, thus allowing abnormal or cancerous cells to multiply. This paper conveys some recent concepts on AIDS, as well as a study undertaken at the "20 de Noviembre" Hospital, aimed at identifying the most common opportunistic diseases which often occur in the oral cavity upon contracting AIDS.

  3. International benchmarking of specialty hospitals. A series of case studies on comprehensive cancer centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Lent Wineke AM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benchmarking is one of the methods used in business that is applied to hospitals to improve the management of their operations. International comparison between hospitals can explain performance differences. As there is a trend towards specialization of hospitals, this study examines the benchmarking process and the success factors of benchmarking in international specialized cancer centres. Methods Three independent international benchmarking studies on operations management in cancer centres were conducted. The first study included three comprehensive cancer centres (CCC, three chemotherapy day units (CDU were involved in the second study and four radiotherapy departments were included in the final study. Per multiple case study a research protocol was used to structure the benchmarking process. After reviewing the multiple case studies, the resulting description was used to study the research objectives. Results We adapted and evaluated existing benchmarking processes through formalizing stakeholder involvement and verifying the comparability of the partners. We also devised a framework to structure the indicators to produce a coherent indicator set and better improvement suggestions. Evaluating the feasibility of benchmarking as a tool to improve hospital processes led to mixed results. Case study 1 resulted in general recommendations for the organizations involved. In case study 2, the combination of benchmarking and lean management led in one CDU to a 24% increase in bed utilization and a 12% increase in productivity. Three radiotherapy departments of case study 3, were considering implementing the recommendations. Additionally, success factors, such as a well-defined and small project scope, partner selection based on clear criteria, stakeholder involvement, simple and well-structured indicators, analysis of both the process and its results and, adapt the identified better working methods to the own setting, were found

  4. Days spent in acute care hospitals at the end of life of cancer patients in four Swiss cantons: a retrospective database study (SAKK 89/09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter-Walstra, K W; Achermann, R; Rapold, R; Klingbiel, D; Bordoni, A; Dehler, S; Konzelmann, I; Mousavi, M; Clough-Gorr, K M; Szucs, T; Schwenkglenks, M; Pestalozzi, B C

    2016-02-09

    Number of days spent in acute hospitals (DAH) at the end of life is regarded as an important care quality indicator for cancer patients. We analysed DAH during 90 days prior to death in patients from four Swiss cantons. Claims data from an insurance provider with about 20% market share and patient record review identified 2086 patients as dying of cancer. We calculated total DAH per patient. Multivariable generalised linear modelling served to evaluate potential explanatory variables. Mean DAH was 26 days. In the multivariable model, using complementary and alternative medicine (DAH = 33.9; +8.8 days compared to non-users) and canton of residence (for patient receiving anti-cancer therapy, Zürich DAH = 22.8 versus Basel DAH = 31.4; for other patients, Valais DAH = 22.7 versus Ticino DAH = 33.7) had the strongest influence. Age at death and days spent in other institutions were additional significant predictors. DAH during the last 90 days of life of cancer patients from four Swiss cantons is high compared to most other countries. Several factors influence DAH. Resulting differences are likely to have financial impact, as DAH is a major cost driver for end-of-life care. Whether they are supply- or demand-driven and whether patients would prefer fewer days in hospital remains to be established.

  5. Malnourishment and length of hospital stay among paediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conner, J Michael; Aviles-Robles, Martha J; Asdahl, Peter H;

    2016-01-01

    . The median length of hospital stay for malnourished patients was 15 days, which corresponded with a 50% (TR=1.5, 95% CL 1.0, 2.3) relative increase in length of stay compared with patients who were not malnourished. Patients with body mass indices equal to the mean of the world reference population had...... in Mexico City, and assess the association between malnourishment and length of hospital stay. METHODS: Individuals eligible for this study were paediatric cancer patients (aged Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez (Mexico City) with febrile neutropaenia. Our exposure...... of interest, malnourishment, was defined as an age-adjusted and sex-adjusted z-scorehospital stay. RESULTS: Our study...

  6. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Are general practitioners getting the information they need from hospitals to manage their lung cancer patients?: A qualitative exploration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowlands, Stella; Callen, Joanne; Westbrook, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to investigate perceptions of the quality, format and timeliness of the patient information GPs receive from a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team, and elicit...

  8. Venous thromboembolism and nonsmall cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lisa K; Cheung, Matthew C; Ding, Keyue; Hasan, Baktiar; Seymour, Lesley; Le Maître, Aurélie; Leighl, Natasha B; Shepherd, Frances A

    2009-12-01

    Advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, to the authors' knowledge, the incidence of VTE in early NSCLC, predictors of VTE, and the prognostic significance of VTE in NSCLC have not been explored. Individual patient data from 3 National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group trials were analyzed (n = 1987 patients). Clinical Trial BR.10 was a randomized study of postoperative vinorelbine and cisplatin versus observation in patients with stage IB/II NSCLC (grading determined according to the TNM staging system). Clinical Trial BR.18 was a randomized study of paclitaxel and carboplatin with or without the metalloproteinase inhibitor BMS-275291 in patients with advanced NSCLC. BR.21 was a randomized study of erlotinib versus placebo in patients with previously treated NSCLC. The relations between VTE, treatment, concomitant medications, and patient characteristics were explored in univariate and multivariate analyses. Survival analysis was completed using Cox regression. The incidence of VTE ranged from 0% in patients with early stage NSCLC on the observation arm of BR.10 to 7.9% in patients with advanced NSCLC who received chemotherapy (BR.18). Patients with early stage NSCLC who received chemotherapy (BR.10) and patients with previously treated NSCLC who received erlotinib or placebo (BR.21) had a VTE incidence of approximately 3%. Factors that were found to be predictive of VTE included previous VTE (BR.18; P = .001) and obesity (BR.10; P = .03). In patients with advanced NSCLC, VTE was associated with shorter survival (BR.18: hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.26-2.07 [P = .0002]; BR.21: HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.57-3.04 [P obesity and a history of VTE. VTE was found to be prognostic in patients with advanced stage NSCLC. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  9. Qualification of National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to prequalify imaging facilities at all of the National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including PET. Here we review the CQIE PET/CT scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 y, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantoms, including uniform and American College of Radiology-approved phantoms, PET/CT images, and examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time periods: initial submission (T0) and 2 requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures, and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for scanners that failed. Quantitative results were compared across scanners within a given time period and across time periods for a given scanner. Results: Data from 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 56 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification; 64 scanners passed the qualification. Data from 44 (68%) of those 65 scanners were submitted for T2. From T0 to T2, the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% for T1 to 67% for T2. The most common reasons for failure were SUV outside specifications, incomplete submission, and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and American College of Radiology-approved phantom results between scanner manufacturers were similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process showed that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, for quantitative imaging-based trials, further evaluation of the relationships between the level of

  10. Commercial insurance triples chances of breast cancer survival in a public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Runhua; Mills, Glenn; McLarty, Jerry; Burton, Gary; Shi, Zhenzhen; Glass, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer survival is affected both by endogenous factors and exogenous factors such as socioeconomic status. This study explored the relationship between insurance status and overall survival of 987 female breast cancer patients in a population served by a public hospital. All patients were offered the same level of care regardless of ability to pay. Of the 987 breast cancer patients investigated, 54.6% were African-American. 54.1% of patients were insured (commercial insurance or Medicare), 27.1% with Medicaid, and 18.8% who were uninsured. Overall median survival was 15.5 years and was not statistically significant between Caucasian and African-American women. Median survival times were 15.8, 11.3, and 8.2 years for insured, Medicaid, and uninsured groups, respectively. Uninsured patients had worse overall survival rates compared with insured patients (p insurance was a significant factor affecting survival with hazard ratios of 2.24 and 3.22 for Medicaid and uninsured patients, respectively, compared with insured patients. Even in a public hospital, after adjusting for potential risk factors, insurance status still proved to be an important factor in the survival of breast cancer patients. Further research is necessary to identify causal factors related to the survival disparities associated with insurance status. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evaluation and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer in Shahid Rahnemoon and Afshar Hospitals, Yazd-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HR Dehghan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer of the alimentary system. In women, it is the second leading cause of mortality after breast cancer while in men, it is the third leading cause of death after lung and prostate carcinoma. Prevalence is more in population older than 50 years and increases in older people. Therefore, best treatment and prognosis is early diagnosis of disease. Methods: This study was a retrospective, cross-sectional study that included files of 191 patients of Shahid Rahnemoon and Afshar hospitals (two main hospitals in Yazd, Iran from 1992 till 1999. The aim was to evaluate the abundance and distribution of colorectal cancer with respect to staging, age, occupation, residence, clinical signs and method of treatment. All of the patients had a cancer pathology report. Results: Of the total of 191 patients with colorectal cancer, 186 cases were adenocarcinoma and 5 cases were lymphoma. Prevalence rate in men was more than women and their age range was between 28 and 94 years. 127 patients (67% were in the 60 – 69 years age group , while 7.3% were in the 20 -39 years age group. 106 patients (55.5% were men and 85 patients (44.5% were women. 64.9% were urban dwellers and 35.1% were rural. Surgical treatment included; abdominoperinneal resection (A.P.R in 55 patients (28.8%, anterior resection (A.R and anastomosis in 40 patients (20.9%, right and left hemicolectomy, each in 25 patients and rectosigmoiedectomy and anastomosis in 18 patients(19.4%. Results of treatment were as follows:177 patients (92.76% had relative recovery post operation, 5 cases (2.6% were discharged from the hospital against medical advice, 3 cases (1.6% died and 6 cases (3.1% were discharged with poor condition after laparotomy. Conclusion: Most of the patients with colorectal cancer referred with rectorrhagia, main type of cancer was adenocarcinoma (97.4% and the most frequent surgical procedure performed was A.P.R. Further research

  12. CLINICAL STUDY ON PA NCREATIC CANCER IN G OVERNMENT GENERAL HOSPITAL, GU NTUR, AP, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Kalyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has a lower incidence than many other types of cancer, but is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer, among men and women, being responsible for 6% of all cancer - related deaths. The global annual incidence rate for pancreas cancer is about 8/100,000 persons. Pancreatic cancer disease is notoriously difficult to diagnose in its early stages. Study was carried out in the Department of General Surgery, Government General Hospital, Guntur from October 2010 to 2012, in which 16 cases with a diagnosis of carcinoma pancreas. They were investigated with routine blood investigations. They were treated accordingly with Pylorus preserving pancreaticodenectomy (PPPD or palliative bypass or with non - operative palliative measures. Carcinoma pancreas is an aggressive disease with male preponderance with peak incidence in 5th and 6th decade. Important risk factors are Smoking and alcohol consumption. Nearly 75% of the cases presented in the late stage of the disease. Resection of the tumour had better survival. The limitations of our study are small number of patients and short follow - up

  13. Use of Hospital-Based Food Pantries Among Low-Income Urban Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gany, Francesca; Lee, Trevor; Loeb, Rebecca; Ramirez, Julia; Moran, Alyssa; Crist, Michael; McNish, Thelma; Leng, Jennifer C F

    2015-12-01

    To examine uptake of a novel emergency food system at five cancer clinics in New York City, hospital-based food pantries, and predictors of use, among low-income urban cancer patients. This is a nested cohort study of 351 patients who first visited the food pantries between October 3, 2011 and January 1, 2013. The main outcome was continued uptake of this food pantry intervention. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) statistical analysis was conducted to model predictors of pantry visit frequency. The median number of return visits in the 4 month period after a patient's initial visit was 2 and the mean was 3.25 (SD 3.07). The GEE model showed that younger patients used the pantry less, immigrant patients used the pantry more (than US-born), and prostate cancer and Stage IV cancer patients used the pantry more. Future long-term larger scale studies are needed to further assess the utilization, as well as the impact of food assistance programs such as the this one, on nutritional outcomes, cancer outcomes, comorbidities, and quality of life. Cancer patients most at risk should be taken into particular consideration.

  14. Freedom from local and regional failure of contralateral neck with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy for node-positive tonsil cancer: updated results of an institutional clinical management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Tu D; Raben, David; Schneider, Charles J; Hockstein, Neil G; Witt, Robert L; Dzeda, Michael; Cormier, Jennifer F; Raben, Adam

    2015-06-01

    To update the outcomes of an institutional clinical management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Between August 2003 and April 2014, 61 consecutive patients with ipsilateral node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate were treated at a community hospital-based cancer center with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. Overall survival, disease-free survival and freedom from contralateral failure were calculated. Median follow up was 37.2months (range 4-121months). Freedom from contralateral nodal failure at 5years was 98% with one contralateral nodal failure noted. The patient underwent a salvage neck dissection and was treated with post-operative radiotherapy with no evidence of disease to date. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 92.4% and 5year disease-free survival (DFS) was 86.7%. This represents the single largest series reported from a community hospital-based cancer center in which lateralized tonsil cancers with N+ disease were treated with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy. In this carefully selected cohort of patients with well-lateralized tonsil cancers, the risk of contralateral nodal failure appears to be <5%, suggesting that prophylactic radiation of the contralateral neck may not be necessary. Future planned studies will focus on prospectively selecting subgroups of patients eligible for treatment de-intensification as survivorship issues in excellent prognosis HPV positive patients are increasingly becoming relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients. PMID:23118755

  16. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  17. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Mayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality.

  18. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives.

  19. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Paul C.; Lele, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality. PMID:27669307

  20. National Cancer Institute-supported chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy trials: outcomes and lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majithia, Neil; Temkin, Sarah M.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Beutler, Andreas S.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common and debilitating complications of cancer treatment. Due to a lack of effective management options for patients with CIPN, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a series of trials aimed at both prevention and treatment. A total of 15 such studies were approved, evaluating use of various neuro-modulatory agents which have shown benefit in other neuropathic pain states. Aside from duloxetine, none of the pharmacologic methods demonstrated therapeutic benefit for patients with CIPN. Despite these disappointing results, the series of trials revealed important lessons that have informed subsequent work. Some examples of this include the use of patient-reported symptom metrics, the elimination of traditional—yet unsubstantiated—practice approaches, and the discovery of molecular genetic predictors of neuropathy. Current inquiry is being guided by the results from these large-scale trials, and as such, stands better chance of identifying durable solutions for this treatment-limiting toxicity. PMID:26686859

  1. Underuse of long-term routine hospital follow-up care in patients with a history of breast cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, W.L.; Jansen, L.; Schaapveld, M.; Baas, P.C.; Wiggers, T.; de Bock, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: After primary treatment for breast cancer, patients are recommended to use hospital follow-up care routinely. Long-term data on the utilization of this follow-up care are relatively rare. Methods: Information regarding the utilization of routine hospital follow-up care was retrieved from

  2. Clinical characteristics and rehabilitation of hospitalised cancer patients in a Korean tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Kyeong Eun; Yoon, Tae Hee; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2017-08-01

    With the increase in the patient survival rates of many types of cancers, a greater proportion of cancer patients live with disease-related problems that diminish their quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and rehabilitation of hospitalised cancer patients who were referred to the Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) at Samsung Medical Center, a tertiary university hospital in Seoul, Korea. Hospitalised cancer patients aged > 18 years who were referred to the Department of PRM from January to December 2012 were enrolled in this retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical characteristics of the patients, the principal reasons for their referral and relevant details of their rehabilitative management. A total of 1,340 cases were included. The most common primary cancer was lung cancer (19.0%) and 28.6% of the cases had solid organ metastasis. The most common reason for referral was deconditioning (31.7%), followed by weakness (23.1%) and respiratory problems (14.5%). Bedside exercise was prescribed to 28.4% of the patients, exercise in the rehabilitation therapy unit to 28.0% and pulmonary rehabilitation to 14.3%. Among the 1,340 cases, 107 (8.0%) were transferred to the Department of PRM for comprehensive rehabilitation. The 32 patients with an identifiable Modified Barthel Index score showed significant functional improvement. The findings of the present study contribute to a better understanding of rehabilitation for hospitalised cancer patients. The information obtained will also be helpful in the development of appropriate cancer rehabilitation strategies.

  3. [Nutritional status in patients first hospital admissions service hematology National Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar Luna, E; Omaña Guzmán, L I; Ortiz Hernández, L; Ñamendis-Silva, S A; De Nicola Delfin, L

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos: Determinar el estado de nutrición de los pacientes que ingresan por primera vez a hospitalización del servicio de hematología y que no han recibido tratamiento oncológico, conocer si el estado de nutrición evaluado por medio de la EGS-GP y por concentración sérica de Albúmina se relaciona con la mortalidad de los pacientes. Métodos: Estudio longitudinal, prospectivo, analítico. Por medio de EGS-GP se evaluó el estado nutricional de los pacientes, Se utilizó el paquete estadístico SPSS 19.0 para el análisis de datos. Resultados: Se evaluaron 119 pacientes, 52,1% mujeres y 47,9% hombres. El diagnóstico más común fue Linfoma no Hodgkin en el 43,7%. De acuerdo a la EGSGP el 50,4% de los pacientes presentaba algún grado de desnutrición o estaba en riesgo de padecerla de los cuales: el 31,1% tenía desnutrición moderada y el 19,3% presentaba desnutrición severa. El 49,6% de los pacientes presentaba un adecuado estado nutricio. Del 30,3% de los pacientes que fallecieron el 37% tenía desnutrición severa y el 50% disminución severa de la concentración de albúmina. Conclusiones: La prevalencia de desnutrición en los pacientes hematológicos atendidos en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología de México que aún no reciben tratamiento médico fue elevada. Existe una asociación entre el Estado Nutricio y la mortalidad de éste grupo de pacientes.

  4. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  5. In vivo 31P MR spectral patterns and reproducibility in cancer patients studied in a multi-institutional trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arias-Mendoza, F.; Payne, G.S.; Zakian, K.L.; Schwarz, A.J.; Stubbs, M.; Stoyanova, R.; Ballon, D.; Howe, F.A.; Koutcher, J.A.; Leach, M.O.; Griffiths, J.R.; Heerschap, A.; Glickson, J.D.; Nelson, S.J.; Evelhoch, J.L.; Charles, H.C.; Brown, T.R.

    2006-01-01

    The standardization and reproducibility of techniques required to acquire anatomically localized 31P MR spectra non-invasively while studying tumors in cancer patients in a multi-institutional group at 1.5 T are reported. This initial group of patients was studied from 1995 to 2000 to test the

  6. Objective allergy markers and risk of cancer mortality and hospitalization in a large population-based cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghizadeh, Niloofar; Vonk, Judith M; Hospers, Jeannette J; Postma, Dirkje S; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schouten, Jan P; Boezen, H Marike

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There are indications that a history of allergy may offer some protection against cancer. We studied the relation of three objectively determined allergy markers with cancer mortality and hospitalization risk. METHODS: Associations between three allergy markers (number of peripheral blood e

  7. [Cancer incidence in a Cancer Care Unit of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) in Toluca, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Villanueva, Angel; Chacón Sánchez, Jesús; Santillán Arreygue, Leopoldo; Sánchez González, Yolanda; Romero-Figueroa, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, malignant tumors were responsible for 12% of nearly 56 million deaths that occurred in the world from all causes. To determine the incidence of cancer in a Cancer Care Unit of IMSS in Toluca, Mexico. Prospective cross-sectional study; we identified the primary tumor, age, family history of cancer, comorbidities, risk factors, and ECOG in patients with newly diagnosed cancer. We identified 446 cases, 66.1% were women. The age group of age 50 to 59 had the highest number of cases (98). The most common cancers in women are breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer, and in men, testicular, prostate, and colorectal cancer. The most common cancers in both sexes were breast cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, and testicular cancer.

  8. The recurrence rate of breast cancer conserving operation in Yokohama Citizen's Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Akira; Chishima, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazushige; Kito, Fumihiko; Fukushima, Tumeo [Yokohama Municipal Citizen' s Hospital (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    During the last nine year period from Jan. 1991 to Dec. 1999, a total of 615 patients with primary breast cancer were experienced at our hospital. Eighty-eight patients underwent breast conserving therapy, 9 out of 88 patients received radiation therapy after surgical procedures. Recurrence were observed in five patients (5.7%). One of them had skin metastasis which looked like inflammatory breast cancer. This case was treated by postoperative 50 Gy radiation therapy to the remnant breast tissue but was unsuccessful in this case. We believe that postoperative radiation therapy is indicated for breast cancer patients with cancer-positive surgical margin or massive lymph node metastases. The other recurrent cases included one patient with supraclavicular lymph node metastases and three patients with local recurrence of remnant breast tissue cancer as a result of multicentricity. Our five recurrent patients are now alive after the various salvage therapies. Breast conserving therapy without radiation is thought to be useful in certain indicated cases. (author)

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer at Okayama University Hospital: A Review of 10 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Takao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer by our group at Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences began in June 2001, and in the present report, we review our 10-year experience with this treatment modality at Okayama University Hospital. The local efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer depends on tumor size and the type of electrode used, but not on tumor type. An important factor for the prevention of local failure may be the acquisition of an adequate ablative margin. The combination of embolization and radiation therapy enhances the local efficacy. Local failure may be salvaged by repeating the radiofrequency ablation, particularly in small tumors. Survival rates after radiofrequency ablation are quite promising for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastasis from colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. The complications caused by radiofrequency ablation can be treated conservatively in the majority of cases. However, attention should be paid to rare but serious complications. This review shows that radiofrequency ablation is a promising treatment for patients with lung cancer.

  10. Feasibility and Safety of Laparoscopic Surgery for Obese Korean Women with Endometrial Cancer: Long-Term Results at a Single Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Wha; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Young-Tak; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical feasibility of and survival outcome after laparoscopy in obese Korean women with endometrial cancer which has recently been increasing. We reviewed the medical records of the patients treated at our medical institution between 1999 and 2012. The patients were divided into three groups, non-obese (Body Mass Index [BMI]obese (BMI≥28.0). These patient groups were compared in terms of their clinical characteristics, treatment methods, as well as surgical and survival outcomes. In total, 55 of the 278 eligible patients were obese women. There were no differences in the three groups in terms of the proportion of patients who underwent lymphadenectomy, their cancer stage, histologic type, type of adjuvant treatment administered, intra-, post-operative, and long-term complications, operative time, number of removed lymph nodes, blood loss, and duration of hospitalization (P=0.067, 0.435, 0.757, 0.739, 0.458, 0.173, 0.076, 0.124, 0.770, 0.739, and 0.831, respectively). The Disease-Free Survival (DFS) times were 139.1 vs. 121.6 vs. 135.5 months (P=0.313), and the Overall Survival (OS) times were 145.2 vs. 124.8 vs. 139.5 months (P=0.436) for each group, respectively. Obese women with endometrial cancer can, therefore, be as safely managed using laparoscopy as women with normal BMIs. PMID:25408586

  11. Occupational risk factors of lung cancer: a hospital based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droste, J. H.; Weyler, J. J.; Van Meerbeeck, J. P.; Vermeire, P. A.; van Sprundel, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relation between lung cancer and exposure to occupational carcinogens in a highly industrialised region in western Europe. METHODS: In a case-control study 478 cases and 536 controls, recruited from 10 hospitals in the Antwerp region, were interviewed. Cases were male patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer; controls were male patients without cancer or primary lung diseases. Data were collected by questionnaires to obtain information on occupations, exposures, and smoking history. Job titles were coded with the Office of Populations, Censuses and Surveys industrial classification. Exposure was assessed by self report and by job-task exposure matrix. Exposure odds ratios were calculated with logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, smoking history, and marital and socio-economic status. RESULTS: A job history in the categories manufacturing of transport equipment other than automobiles (for example, shipyard workers), transport support services (for example, dockers), and manufacturing of metal goods (for example, welders) was significantly associated with lung cancer (odds ratios (ORs) 2.3, 1.6, and 1.6 respectively). These associations were independent of smoking, education, civil, and economic status. Self reported exposure to potential carcinogens did not show significant associations with lung cancer, probably due to nondifferential misclassification. When assessed by job-task exposure matrix, exposure to molybdenum, mineral oils, and chromium were significantly associated with lung cancer. A strong association existed between smoking and lung cancer: OR of ex- smokers 4.2, OR of current smokers 14.5 v non-smokers. However, smoking did not confound the relation between occupational exposure and lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The study has shown a significant excess risk of lung cancer among workers in manufacturing of metal goods, manufacturing of transport equipment (other than automobiles), and transport support

  12. Effects of Smoking on Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay among Patients with Lung Cancer in Iran: a Hospital-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ali Akbari; Rezaei, Satar; Arab, Mohammad; Majdzadeh, Reza; Matin, Behzad Karami; Zandian, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a main leading preventable cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is responsible for a considerable nancial burden both on the health system and in society. This study aimed to examine the effect of smoking on cost of hospitalization and length of stay (LoS) among patients with lung cancer in Iran in 2014. A total of 415 patients were included in the study. Data on age, sex, insurance status, type of hospitals, type of insurance, geographic local, length of stay and cost of hospitalization was extracted by medical records and smoking status was obtained from a telephone survey. To compare cost of hospitalization and LoS for different smoking groups, current smokers, former smokers, and never smokers, a gamma regression model and zero-truncated poisson regression were used, respectively. Compared with never smokers, current and former smokers showed a 48% and 35% increase in hospitalization costs, respectively. Also, hospital LoS for current and former smokers was 72% and 31% higher than for never smokers, respectively. Our study indicated that cigarette smoking imposes a signi cant nancial burden on hospitals in Iran. It is, however, recommended that more research should be done to implement and evaluate hospital based smoking cessation interventions to better increase cessation rates in these settings.

  13. Cancer survival among children and adolescents at a state referral hospital in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Perini Zouain-Figueiredo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to analyze the patient characteristics and evaluate overall survival, survival according to demographic variables, the most common tumor groups and subgroups, the stages of disease, and risk factors after at least 5 years among children and adolescents with cancer who were admitted to a state referral hospital between 2000 and 2005. METHODS: the Kaplan-Meier method was employed to estimate survival. The survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. The Cox regression model was used to estimate the effect of independent variables. RESULTS: a total of 571 new cases were registered. The most frequent cancer groups were leukemia (34%, lymphoma (18%, and central nervous system (CNS tumors (15%.The overall survival rate was 59%. The risk factors associated with lower survival were an age of more than 4 years or less than 1 year, the presence of CNS tumors, and non-localized disease. CONCLUSION: although this was not a populationbased study, it provides important epidemiological information about a state where population data on childhood and adolescent cancer are scarce and where hospital-based data do not exist. The survival rate found here should serve as a framework for future improvements, helping to guide policymakers focused on pediatric oncology in the state.

  14. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, V. K.; Sewal, R. K.; Ahmad, Yusra; B Medhi

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and ...

  15. Is Kelantan joining the global cancer epidemic?--experience from hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia; 1987-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nor Hayati; Nor, Zaini Mohd; Biswal, Biswa Mohan

    2008-01-01

    To determine the trend of cancer cases in one major hospital in Kelantan over a 20 year period from 1987 to 2007 and to speculate the change in trend due to the socio-economic and other health status in the state. All data on clinically diagnosed cancer cases in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia [HUSM] were retrieved from the hospital medical records. The cancers were classified according to ICD10 and scrutinized to avoid duplicate or more entries. The increment in cancer incidence was calculated based on total numbers of cancer cases per each 5-6 year period. A total of 12,228 solid cancers were diagnosed during the period. There is an increment of 20.1% for 1991-1996 from 1987-1990 period, 67.4% for 1997-2001 from 1991-1996 period and 305.9% for 2002-2007 from the 1997-2001 period. The rise was steep in the last 5-6 years. After excluding referred cases from states outside Kelantan, the increments were 20.1%, 67.4% and 143.6% for the consecutive 5-6 year periods. The predominant rising trends were seen for cancers of the female organs, digestive tract and endocrine organs. Cancer cases in HUSM are showing a rising trend, associated with increasing prevalence of smoking, obesity and diabetes in the community served by the hospital. Since HUSM is the only hospital managing cancer in the state of Kelantan, to reduce cancer incidence in the state, life-style issues need to be addressed.

  16. [Awareness about medical expenses and certifications of eligibility for limited health insurance payments for chemotherapy among clinicians at the Ehime Cancer Care Network Priority Hospitals (Ehime Cancer Kyoten Hospitals)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushijin, Yoshihiro; Morita, Junko; Yano, Takuya; Matsuhisa, Tetsuaki; Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Kojima, You; Okada, Kenzou; Kamei, Haruhito; Hara, Masamichi; Fujii, Motohiro; Matsuno, Takeshi; Tanimizu, Masahito; Shinkai, Tetsu

    2014-05-01

    The "Cancer Chemotherapy and its Management" subcommittee at the Ehime Cancer Care Network Priority Hospitals (Ehime Cancer Kyoten Hospitals)with a focus on medical expenses associated with chemotherapy, surveyed awareness among 98 clinicians regarding certifications of eligibility for Limited Health Insurance Payments during cancer treatment. This committee also lists social and clinical problems encountered at the Ehime Cancer Care Network Priority Hospitals. In our survey, 78% of clinicians were consulted about medical expenses associated with chemotherapy and were actively involved in resolving medical expense problems and resulting correspondences. However, only 38% of clinicians could explain the details of the Japanese guideline on the catastrophic cap and the certifications of eligibility for Limited Health Insurance Payments. This knowledge deficit was more pronounced in younger residents. From our analyses of the awareness about medical expenses among clinicians, we recommend the establishment of the following systems for the management of cancer patients. First, establish a reporting system and early consultation on the catastrophic cap and the certifications of eligibility before initiating cancer treatment. Second, education regarding medical expenses should be mandatory for clinicians, especially for young residents. Third, patients with cancer suffering in the interval of the medical expense and the social system should be relieved with new systems.

  17. Perception of selected risk factors for cancer and heart attack among visitors of a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sachdeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess perception of selected risk factors for cancer and heart attack among visitors of a public hospital. Materials and Methods: Randomly 1651 ambulatory adults were contacted using predesigned, pretested, semi-structure interview schedule comprising selective 12 risk factors for cancer (increasing age, tobacco, obesity, alcohol, diet-rich in fat/oil, diet-poor in fruits and vegetables (F and V, physical in-activity, environmental pollution, multiple sexual partners, insecticides/pesticides/chemicals, micro-organism, family history and 11 for heart attack (increasing age, tobacco, obesity, alcohol, diet-rich in fat/oil, diet-poor in F and V, physical in-activity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, mental stress, family history. Correct response was awarded one mark and incorrect/do not know response as zero. Results: The study participants comprised of 56.2% attendants and 43.8% patients with mean age of 36.78 (±13.05 years; 71.2% were male, 65% resided in rural area and 32.3% subjects were smoker. A statistically (P = 0.001 higher odds for smoking was found among less educated (odds ratio [OR]: 1.30, rural (OR: 1.60, male (OR: 2.85, patients (OR: 1.41 of more than 30 years of age (OR: 1.67. Nearly, 64.5% and 82.0% subject responded that tobacco causes the heart attack and cancer while obesity was considered as a risk factor by 68.4% (heart attack and 28.1% (cancer. Nearly, 70.7% and 32.0% reported diet rich in fat/oil and poor in F and V could lead to heart attack but only 23.5% and 25.8% mentioned respectively for cancer. Mean risk factors identified for heart attack were 6.64 ± 2.29 (range: 0-11 while for cancer it was 5.01 ± 2.33 (range: 0-12. Nearly, 670 (40.58% and 620 (37.55% subjects mentioned spontaneously at least one type/anatomical site-specific cancer of male and female respectively; 73.4% believed that cancer does not spread by social activity and 54.2% opined that cancer is treatable if detected early. Conclusion

  18. Multistate models for comparing trends in hospitalizations among young adult survivors of colorectal cancer and matched controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutradhar Rinku

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years, the incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing among young adults. A large percentage of these patients live at least 5 years after diagnosis, but it is unknown whether their rate of hospitalizations after this 5-year mark is comparable to the general population. Methods This is a population-based cohort consisting of 917 young adult survivors diagnosed with colorectal cancer in Ontario from 1992–1999 and 4585 matched cancer-free controls. A multistate model is presented to reflect and compare trends in the hospitalization process among survivors and their matched controls. Results Analyses under a multistate model indicate that the risk of a subsequent hospital admission increases as the number of prior hospitalizations increases. Among patients who are yet to experience a hospitalization, the rate of admission is 3.47 times higher for YAS than controls (95% CI (2.79, 4.31. However, among patients that have experienced one and two hospitalizations, the relative rate of a subsequent admission decreases to 3.03 (95% CI (2.01, 4.56 and 1.90 (95% CI (1.19, 3.03, respectively. Conclusions Young adult survivors of colorectal cancer have an increased risk of experiencing hospitalizations compared to cancer-free controls. However this relative risk decreases as the number of prior hospitalizations increases. The multistate approach is able to use information on the timing of hospitalizations and answer questions that standard Poisson and Negative Binomial models are unable to address.

  19. Is quality of colorectal cancer care good enough? Core measures development and its application for comparing hospitals in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Skye H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although performance measurement for assessing care quality is an emerging area, a system for measuring the quality of cancer care at the hospital level has not been well developed. The purpose of this study was to develop organization-based core measures for colorectal cancer patient care and apply these measures to compare hospital performance. Methods The development of core measures for colorectal cancer has undergone three stages including a modified Delphi method. The study sample originated from 2004 data in the Taiwan Cancer Database, a national cancer data registry. Eighteen hospitals and 5585 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients were enrolled in this study. We used indicator-based and case-based approaches to examine adherences simultaneously. Results The final core measure set included seventeen indicators (1 pre-treatment, 11 treatment-related and 5 monitoring-related. There were data available for ten indicators. Indicator-based adherence possesses more meaningful application than case-based adherence for hospital comparisons. Mean adherence was 85.8% (79.8% to 91% for indicator-based and 82.8% (77.6% to 88.9% for case-based approaches. Hospitals performed well (>90% for five out of eleven indicators. Still, the performance across hospitals varied for many indicators. The best and poorest system performance was reflected in indicators T5-negative surgical margin (99.3%, 97.2% - 100.0% and T7-lymph nodes harvest more than twelve(62.7%, 27.6% - 92.2%, both of which related to surgical specimens. Conclusions In this nationwide study, quality of colorectal cancer care still shows room for improvement. These preliminary results indicate that core measures for cancer can be developed systematically and applied for internal quality improvement.

  20. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Consuelo Rubio-Poo21Universidad Autónoma Metropolitano–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Departments: Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS; 2Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies-Zaragoza (FES-ZaragozaAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94 were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS.Keywords: breast cancer, Mexican women, direct and indirect costs

  1. Outcomes of locally advanced prostate cancer: a single institution study of 209 patients in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihiro Saito; Yasuo Kitamura; Shuichi Komatsubara; Yasuo Matsumoto; Tadashi Sugita; Noboru Hara

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the outcomes for Asian populations with locally advanced/clinical stage Ⅲ prostate cancer (Pca)treated with currently prevailing modalities. Methods: We reviewed the record of 209 patients with clinical stage Ⅲ Pca, who were treated at Niigata Cancer Center Hospital between 1992 and 2003. Treatment options included hormone therapy-combined radical prostatectomy (RP+HT), hormone therapy-combined external beam irradiation (EBRT+HT) and primary hormone therapy (PHT). Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 80.3%and 46.1% in all cohorts, respectively. The survival rates were 87.3% and 66.5% in the RP+HT group, 94.9% and 70.0% in the EBRT+HT group and 66.1% and 17.2% in the PHT group, respectively. A significant survival advantage was found in the EBRT+HT group compared with that in the PHT group (P < 0.0001). Also, the RP+HT group had better survival than the PHT group (P = 0.0107). The 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for all cases were 92.5% and 80.0%, respectively. They were 93.8% and 71.4% in the RP+HT group, 96.6% and 93.6% in the EBRT+HT group and 88.6% and 62.3% in the PHT group, respectively. A survival advantage was found in the EBRT+HT group compared with the PHT group (P = 0.029). No significant difference was found in disease-specific survival between the EBRT+HT and RP+HT groups or between the RP+HT and PHT groups. Conclusion: Although our findings indicate that radiotherapy plus HT has a survival advantage in this stage of Pca, we recommend therapies that take into account the patients' social and medical conditions for Asian men with clinical stage Ⅲ PCa.

  2. Analysis of 57 nonagenarian cancer patients treated by radical radiotherapy. A survey of eight institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ishikura, Satoshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Oguchi, Masahiko; Niibe, Hideo; Yorozu, Atsunori; Nakano, Kikuo; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Sadao; Teshima, Teruki

    1999-08-01

    As the human society grows more aged, it is considered important to elucidate factors essential in applying radical radiotherapy (RT) to the elderly, with ages as high as 90 years and greater. A retrospective survey was conducted for patients 90 years of age or older who received radiotherapy with radical intent in eight leading institutions in Japan from 1990 through 1995. Fifty-seven nonagenarian patients were studied. Their ages ranged up to 98 (median 91) and there was a strong female preponderance (M/F: 16/41). The distribution by site was as follows: head and neck, 16; skin and adnexae, 11; uterine cervix, 7; esophagus, 6. The prevailing histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma (34), followed by adenocarcinomas (8). The highest age at RT was 98 years [female, skin cancer, died of senility 2.5 years after treatment, with no evidence of disease (NED)] and the longest survivor is 102 years old (female, glottic cancer T2, age at RT 93, alive NED for 8 years, uses wheel-chair). The rate of completion of treatment was 75% (43/57), if the treatment field was limited to the gross primary tumor volume only and if the cumulative dose was above 80% of the tolerable adult dose. Familial escort was necessary for most of the patients in completing the day-to-day RT. Radiotherapy is feasible with radical intent even in the elderly, if the treatment field is limited to the gross primary tumor volume only, if the cumulative dose is above 80% of the tolerable adult dose and if familial support is adequate. (author)

  3. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  4. The preclinical new drug research program of the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, J S

    1984-01-01

    The discovery and development of anticancer drugs with clinical potential are the responsibility of the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment, National Cancer Institute (NCI). Approximately 10,000 compounds/year are selectively acquired and screened against murine tumor models in order to discover new, active materials. The program required to accomplish this objective, as well as the subsequent tasks of formulation development and toxicology testing, is described. Since its inception in 1955, the preclinical new drug research program of the NCI has played a major role in the discovery and development of new agents which have been entered into clinical trial. The NCI has been responsible for the discovery of eight of the 16 commercially available drugs discovered since 1955. In addition, the NCI has played an important role in the clinical evaluation of all 16 of these New Drug Application (NDA)-approved drugs. During 1977-1982, the NCI filed Investigational New Drug Applications (INDA) for 33 cytotoxic agents. It was responsible for the discovery of the antitumor activity of 73% of these compounds. Most of the INDA compounds were acquired directly through NCI efforts. The DTP active acquisition program was responsible for obtaining 69% of these materials, with an additional 12% coming from the DTP intramural research program. Only 19% were received as voluntary submissions. The DTP active acquisition and screening effort is shown to have played even a larger role in identifying and obtaining those compounds which are currently in earlier stages of the NCI drug discovery and development process.

  5. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  6. High Hospitalization Rates in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study Using Medical Record Linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieswerda, Elske; Font-Gonzalez, Anna; Reitsma, Johannes B; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Heinen, Richard C; Jaspers, Monique W; van der Pal, Helena J; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Caron, Huib N; Geskus, Ronald B; Kremer, Leontien C

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalization rates over time of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) provide insight into the burden of unfavorable health conditions on CCS and health care resources. The objective of our study was to examine trends in hospitalizations of CCS and risk factors in comparison with the general population. We performed a medical record linkage study of a cohort of 1564 ≥five-year CCS with national registers. We obtained a random sample of the general population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year per CCS retrieved. We quantified and compared hospitalization rates of CCS and reference persons from 1995 until 2005, and we analyzed risk factors for hospitalization within the CCS cohort with multivariable Poisson models. We retrieved hospitalization information from 1382 CCS and 25583 reference persons. The overall relative hospitalization rate (RHR) was 2.2 (95%CI:1.9-2.5) for CCS compared to reference persons. CCS with central nervous system and solid tumors had highest RHRs. Hospitalization rates in CCS were increased compared to reference persons up to at least 30 years after primary diagnosis, with highest rates 5-10 and 20-30 years after primary cancer. RHRs were highest for hospitalizations due to neoplasms (10.7; 95%CI:7.1-16.3) and endocrine/nutritional/metabolic disorders (7.3; 95%CI:4.6-11.7). Female gender (P<0.001), radiotherapy to head and/or neck (P<0.001) or thorax and/or abdomen (P = 0.03) and surgery (P = 0.01) were associated with higher hospitalization rates in CCS. In conclusion, CCS have increased hospitalization rates compared to the general population, up to at least 30 years after primary cancer treatment. These findings imply a high and long-term burden of unfavorable health conditions after childhood cancer on survivors and health care resources.

  7. High Hospitalization Rates in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study Using Medical Record Linkage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske Sieswerda

    Full Text Available Hospitalization rates over time of childhood cancer survivors (CCS provide insight into the burden of unfavorable health conditions on CCS and health care resources. The objective of our study was to examine trends in hospitalizations of CCS and risk factors in comparison with the general population. We performed a medical record linkage study of a cohort of 1564 ≥five-year CCS with national registers. We obtained a random sample of the general population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year per CCS retrieved. We quantified and compared hospitalization rates of CCS and reference persons from 1995 until 2005, and we analyzed risk factors for hospitalization within the CCS cohort with multivariable Poisson models. We retrieved hospitalization information from 1382 CCS and 25583 reference persons. The overall relative hospitalization rate (RHR was 2.2 (95%CI:1.9-2.5 for CCS compared to reference persons. CCS with central nervous system and solid tumors had highest RHRs. Hospitalization rates in CCS were increased compared to reference persons up to at least 30 years after primary diagnosis, with highest rates 5-10 and 20-30 years after primary cancer. RHRs were highest for hospitalizations due to neoplasms (10.7; 95%CI:7.1-16.3 and endocrine/nutritional/metabolic disorders (7.3; 95%CI:4.6-11.7. Female gender (P<0.001, radiotherapy to head and/or neck (P<0.001 or thorax and/or abdomen (P = 0.03 and surgery (P = 0.01 were associated with higher hospitalization rates in CCS. In conclusion, CCS have increased hospitalization rates compared to the general population, up to at least 30 years after primary cancer treatment. These findings imply a high and long-term burden of unfavorable health conditions after childhood cancer on survivors and health care resources.

  8. High Hospitalization Rates in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study Using Medical Record Linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieswerda, Elske; Font-Gonzalez, Anna; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Heinen, Richard C.; Jaspers, Monique W.; van der Pal, Helena J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Caron, Huib N.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalization rates over time of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) provide insight into the burden of unfavorable health conditions on CCS and health care resources. The objective of our study was to examine trends in hospitalizations of CCS and risk factors in comparison with the general population. We performed a medical record linkage study of a cohort of 1564 ≥five-year CCS with national registers. We obtained a random sample of the general population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year per CCS retrieved. We quantified and compared hospitalization rates of CCS and reference persons from 1995 until 2005, and we analyzed risk factors for hospitalization within the CCS cohort with multivariable Poisson models. We retrieved hospitalization information from 1382 CCS and 25583 reference persons. The overall relative hospitalization rate (RHR) was 2.2 (95%CI:1.9–2.5) for CCS compared to reference persons. CCS with central nervous system and solid tumors had highest RHRs. Hospitalization rates in CCS were increased compared to reference persons up to at least 30 years after primary diagnosis, with highest rates 5–10 and 20–30 years after primary cancer. RHRs were highest for hospitalizations due to neoplasms (10.7; 95%CI:7.1–16.3) and endocrine/nutritional/metabolic disorders (7.3; 95%CI:4.6–11.7). Female gender (P<0.001), radiotherapy to head and/or neck (P<0.001) or thorax and/or abdomen (P = 0.03) and surgery (P = 0.01) were associated with higher hospitalization rates in CCS. In conclusion, CCS have increased hospitalization rates compared to the general population, up to at least 30 years after primary cancer treatment. These findings imply a high and long-term burden of unfavorable health conditions after childhood cancer on survivors and health care resources. PMID:27433937

  9. Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Pamela; da Motta, Pedro Mourão Roxo; da Silva, Luis G; Stephan, Celso; Lima, Carmen Silvia Passos; de Barros, Nelson Filice

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether individualized Reiki given to cancer patients at a Brazilian hospital improved symptoms and well-being. Data from 36 patients who received 5 Reiki sessions were collected using the MYMOP and were compared before and after their treatment and also with 14 patients who did not receive Reiki and who acted as a comparison group. Twenty-one patients reported feeling better, 12 felt worse, and 3 reported no change. Of the comparison group, 6 patients reported feeling better and 8 felt worse. The Reiki practice delivered as part of the integrative care in oncology did produce clinically significant effects, although not statistically significant results, for more than half of the patients undergoing cancer treatment.

  10. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Josiane Travençolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schütz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members.

  11. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  12. Environmental, occupational and familial risks for testicular cancer: a hospital-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschaerts, Marie; Muller, Audrey; Auger, Jacques; Bujan, Louis; Guérin, Jean-François; Le Lannou, Dominique; Clavert, André; Spira, Alfred; Jouannet, Pierre; Thonneau, Patrick

    2007-08-01

    Testicular cancer (TC) risk factors remain largely unknown, except for personal history of cryptorchidism and familial history of TC. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study on familial, environmental and occupational conditions in which we compared 229 cases and 800 controls. TC was correlated with cryptorchidism (OR = 3.02; CI: 1.90-4.79), a history of cryptorchidism in relatives (OR = 2.85; CI: 1.70-4.79), and TC (OR = 9.58; CI: 4.01-22.88], prostate cancer (OR = 1.80; CI: 1.08-3.02) and breast cancer (OR = 1.77; CI: 1.20-2.60) in relatives. Living in a rural area or having regular gardening activity (growing fruit or vegetables) was associated with an increased risk of TC (OR = 1.63; CI: 1.16-2.29; OR = 1.84; CI: 1.23-2.75). Regarding occupation, we found a relationship with employment in metal trimming (OR = 1.96; CI: 1.00-3.86), chemical manufacture (OR = 1.88; CI: 1.14-3.10), industrial production of glue (OR = 2.21; CI: 1.15-4.25), and welding (OR = 2.84; CI: 1.51-5.35). In a multivariate model, only a history of cryptorchidism in the men, cryptorchidism in relatives, TC, and breast cancer remained significant. Our findings contribute further evidence to a pattern of TC risk factors, which include the significant weight of personal reproductive history and also of testicular and breast cancer in relatives. By including in a multivariate model variables linked to environmental and occupational exposure and related to familial cancer history, neither living in a rural area nor any occupational exposure appeared to be a potential environmental TC risk factor.

  13. Health status in older hospitalized patients with cancer or non-neoplastic chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corica Francesco

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether cancer is more disabling than other highly prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly is not well understood, and represents the objective of the present study. Methods We used data from the Gruppo Italiano di Farmacovigilanza nell'Anziano (GIFA study, a large collaborative observational study based in community and university hospitals located throughout Italy. Our series consisted of three groups of patients with non-neoplastic chronic disease (congestive heart failure, CHF, N = 832; diabetes mellitus, N = 939; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, N = 399, and three groups of patients with cancer (solid tumors without metastasis, N = 813; solid tumors with metastasis, N = 259; leukemia/lymphoma, N = 326. Functional capabilities were ascertained using the activities of daily living (ADL scale, and categorical variables for dependency in at least 1 ADL or dependency in 3 or more ADLs were considered in the analysis. Cognitive status was evaluated by the 10-items Hodgkinson Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT. Results Cognitive impairment was more prevalent in patients with CHF (28.0% or COPD (25.8% than in those with cancer (solid tumors = 22.9%; leukemia/lymphoma = 19.6%; metastatic cancer = 22.8%. Dependency in at least 1 ADL was highly prevalent in patients with metastatic cancer (31.3% vs. 24% for patients with CHF and 22.4% for those with non-metastatic solid tumors, p Conclusion Cancer should not be considered as an ineluctable cause of severe cognitive and physical impairment, at least not more than other chronic conditions highly prevalent in older people, such as CHF and diabetes mellitus.

  14. Cervical cancer awareness and cervical screening uptake at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Afikpo, Southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Justus N; Umeora, Odidika U; Obuna, Johnson A; Egwuatu, Vincent E; Ejikeme, Brown N

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common genital tract malignancy among women in developing countries. To assess the awareness of cervical cancer among Igbo women in a rural population of Southeastern Nigerian and determine their uptake of cervical screening services. A questionnaire-based descriptive cross-sectional study. Structured questionnaires were administered to female attendees to the antenatal and gynecological clinics of a secondary hospital in the outskirts of Afikpo, Southeast Nigeria over a six-month period (1 st July to 31 st December 2007). Data analysis was by SPSS. Five hundred questionnaires were given out. Three hundred and sixty were correctly filled (72%) and analyzed. The mean age of respondents was 36.2 years, 25.0% had tertiary education and 40.3% were self employed. All the respondents were sexually active. There were high incidences of premarital sex, multiple sexual partners and abnormal vaginal discharge and low condom use. Awareness of cervical cancer (37.5%), its preventable nature (31.9%), cervical screening (25%) and screening centers (20.8%) were generally low and screening uptake (0.6%) was abysmally low. Lack of awareness, non-availability of screening centers locally, cost and time were the main reasons adduced by respondents for not being screened. Overall, 62.5% of all the respondents indicated willingness to be screened. The exposure to conditions that predispose women to cervical cancer was high, and the levels of awareness of cervical cancer and cervical screening uptake were low. Continued awareness creation, local provision of cheap and affordable services and poverty alleviation are needed to improve cervical screening uptake with the hope of reducing the incidence of cervical cancer in the long term.

  15. Case study of stomach adenocarcinoma conducted at a cancer referral hospital in northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Campos, Brenda Prazeres de; Sousa, Rachid Marwan Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the world and the incidence of this disease continues to be high in Brazil. In the Northern region, gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer among men and the third among women. In the State of Pará, stomach adenocarcinoma is a public health problem since mortality rates are above the Brazilian average. To analyze the clinical and anatomopathological profile of stomach adenocarcinoma in patients seen at Ofir Loiola Hospital. In a retrospective study, records from 302 patients with gastric cancer undergoing surgery between 2006 and 2008 were analyzed. Data regarding patient profile, early symptoms, alterations upon physical examination, type of surgery, and macroscopic and histological findings were obtained from the records. Most patients (63.9%) were men, 48% were older than 60 years, 50.9% were from the metropolitan region of Belém, 68.2% presented epigastric pain as an early symptom, and abdominal tenderness upon palpation was observed in 63.7%. The antrum was the most affected anatomical site (62.1%), followed by the gastric body (26.9%). Borrmann III (ulcerated-infiltrative) was the predominant endoscopic type. Adenocarcinoma accounted for 95.4% of all cases, including the intestinal type in 56.6% and the diffuse type in 41.3%. Most patients had stage IIIB and IV tumors and total gastrectomy was the most frequent type of surgery (37.4%). The present study demonstrated that gastric adenocarcinoma mainly affected men over the age of 60 who were from the metropolitan region of Belém. Most adenocarcinomas were in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis, a fact requiring more aggressive surgical resection in these cases. These data highlight the urgent need for the implementation of preventive measures and early detection programs of gastric cancer.

  16. Skin cancers in albinos in a teaching Hospital in eastern Nigeria - presentation and challenges of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opara Kingsley O

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Albinism is a genetic disorder characterized by lack of skin pigmentation. It has a worldwide distribution but is commoner in areas close to the equator like Nigeria. Skin cancers are a major risk associated with albinism and are thought to be a major cause of death in African albinos. Challenges faced in the care of these patients need to be highlighted in order to develop a holistic management approach with a significant public health impact. The aim of the study was to determine the pattern of skin cancers seen in Albinos, and to highlight problems encountered in their management. Method Case records of albinos managed in Imo state University teaching Hospital from June 2007 to May 2009 were reviewed. The data obtained was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results and discussion In the period under review, albinos accounted for 67% of patients managed for primary skin cancers. There were twenty patients with thirty eight (38 lesions. Sixty one percent of the patients were below 40 years. Average duration of symptoms at presentation was 26 months. The commonest reason for late presentation was the lack of funds. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest histologic variant. Most patients were unable to complete treatment due to lack of funds. Conclusion Albinism appears to be the most important risk factor in the development of skin cancers in our environment. Late presentation and poor rate of completion of treatment due to poverty are major challenges.

  17. Oral cancer presentation among Malay patients in hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Asmani Abdul; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Abdullah, Nizam

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of oral cancer among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan. A retrospective record review was conducted from August to December 2006 in HUSM. Of 133 patients with oral cancer diagnosed from 1986 to 2005, 118 were Malay. Data on socio-demographic background, high-risk habits practiced, clinical and histological characteristics, and treatment profile of the patients were obtained. Malay patients with oral cancer were predominantly elderly, aged 60 years old and above (51.7%) at the time of diagnosis, with a mean age of 58.1 years (SD 16.81). Most patients were males (64.4%) and the majority of them were married (83.9%). More than half (58.5%) had been smokers, and of those who smoked, 89.9% were males. Some had a betel quid chewing habit (22.9%) but none ever consumed alcohol. The majority of the patients (77.1%) were diagnosed at stage IV. The tongue was the most usual site involved (37.3%) and squamous cell carcinoma was the most common histological type seen (75.4%). The prevalence of oral cancer among Malay patients in HUSM is high (88.7%). It is predominantly found in elderly males and the majority of cases present at advanced stage.

  18. Oral cancer survival among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Asmani Abdul; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Abdullah, Nizam

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to determine oral cancer survival among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan. The medical records of 118 Malay patients with oral cancer admitted in HUSM from 1st January 1986 to 31st December 2005 were reviewed. Data collected include socio-demographic background, high-risk habits practiced, clinical and histological characteristics, and treatment profile of the patients. Survival status and duration were determined by active validation until 31st December 2006. Data entry and analysis were accomplished using SPSS version 12.0. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to perform survival estimates while the log-rank test and the Cox proportional hazards regression model were employed to perform univariate analysis and multivariable analysis of the variables, respectively. The overall five-year survival rate of Malay patients with oral cancer was 18.0%, with a median survival time of 9 months. Significant factors that influenced survival of the patients were age, sex, tumour site, TNM stage, histological type, and treatment received. Survival of oral cancer patients in HUSM was very low. Being elderly, male, presenting with an advanced stage at diagnosis, and not having treatment all contributed to poor survival.

  19. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rico, Jacobo Alejandro; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Cárdenas-Elizalde, Rosario; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94) were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM) surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS) were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS. PMID:22312199

  20. [Epidemiology of bilio-pancreatic cancer in Specialty Hospital UMAE N°71 IMSS in Torreón, Coahuil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güitrón-Cantú, A; Adalid-Martínez, R; Segura-López, Fk

    2011-01-01

    There is a worldwide increase in the incidence of cancer of the biliopancreatic ducts; early diagnosis is difficult and prognosis is poor. To analyze the frequency of malignant biliary strictures diagnosed by Endoscopio Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) at the "Hospital de Especialidades No. 71 UMAE IMSS", Torreon, Coahuila, Mexico. A 5-year retrospective study of consecutive patients referred for ERCP at our institution was performed. Medical records from patients with malignant neoplasms were reviewed. Demographic variables, post-ERCP and final diagnosis, based on cytological and endoscopic or surgical biopsies, imaging studies and clinical outcome were registered. The frequency of biliary-pancreatic neoplasm was 15.6% (301 cases in 1924 ERCP) determined by bile duct cancer (40.7%), pancreas (27.9%) and Vater´s ampulla (12.3%). Brushing was performed for histopathological analysis in 86.7% of cases. The cytology was positive in 91.2%, negative 8.8%, and it was no possible in 13.3% of cases. Therapeutic endoscopy was performed in 273 patients with complications in 1.3% and no procedure-related mortality. Patients with malignant strictures had a higher risk for unsuccessful ERCP (RR 3.01, 95% CI 1.77 - 5.11) and carrying out pre-cut sphincterotomy (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.38 - 2.35). In our center the incidence of biliary-pancreatic neoplasm was 15.6% among patients sent to ERCP and its presence increases the degree of difficulty in performing diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures.

  1. National Cancer Institute's leadership role in promoting State and Community Tobacco Control research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginexi, Elizabeth M; Vollinger, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has been at the vanguard of funding tobacco control research for decades with major efforts such as the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) in 1988 and the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) in 1991, followed by the Tobacco Research Initiative for State and Community Interventions in 1999. Most recently, in 2011, the NCI launched the State and Community Tobacco Control (SCTC) Research Initiative to address gaps in secondhand smoke policies, tax and pricing policies, mass media countermeasures, community and social norms and tobacco marketing. The initiative supported large scale research projects and time-sensitive ancillary pilot studies in response to expressed needs of state and community partners. This special issue of Tobacco Control showcases exciting findings from the SCTC. In this introductory article, we provide a brief account of NCI's historical commitment to promoting research to inform tobacco control policy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. A Picture Really is Worth a Thousand Words: Public Engagement with the National Cancer Institute on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-03-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides pertinent information about cancer prevention, treatment, and research advancements that is considered objective and accurate. NCI's presence on social media is an example of a growing effort in promoting and facilitating audience engagement with evidence-based information about health and cancer. However, it is unknown what strategies are most effective for engaging audiences via this communication platform. To evaluate this important question, we analyzed data on posts, associated comments, and meta-data from official NCI Facebook page between July 2010 and February 2015 (end of data collection). Results show that audience engagement is associated with the format of cancer-related social media posts. Specifically, posts with photos received significantly more likes, comments, and shares than videos, links, and status updates. The findings have important implications for how social media can be more effectively utilized to promote public engagement with important public health issues.

  3. Institute of medicine recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care: what do they mean for the general internist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Wenger, Neil

    2014-10-01

    In order to evaluate and address the deficiencies in the U.S. cancer care system, particularly affecting the growing elderly population, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a panel representing oncology providers, surgeons, primary care providers, researchers, policy makers and patients. The Committee concluded that cancer care is on the brink of crisis and issued recommendations targeting all stakeholders involved in cancer care. General internists play a critical role in the care of cancer patients, from the time of diagnosis, through treatment, survivorship and end of life care. We review the IOM recommendations, highlight those that are particularly relevant to the general internist, and outline clinical, research and educational opportunities where general internists should take an expanded role.

  4. Current Status of Malignant Neuropathic Pain in Chinese Patients with Cancer: Report of a Hospital-based Investigation of Prevalence, Etiology, Assessment, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fan; Song, Li; Xie, Tian; Tian, Jie; Fan, Yuchao; Liu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence, etiology, assessment, treatment of pain in patients with cancer as well as their quality of life (QOL). Patients at the West China Hospital Cancer Center were invited to complete a questionnaire under the guidance of pain specialists. The questionnaire included general information, cancer pain status, its assessment, use of analgesics, and the effects of pain on QOL. In total, 1,050 patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, valid data were collected from 919 patients, among whom 454 (49.4%) suffered from pain, including 333 (36.2%) patients who had neuropathic pain symptoms. On average, the visual analog scale (VAS) score of patients with cancer pain was 3.30 ± 1.68. Significant differences in the VAS score and pain frequency between patients with nociceptive and neuropathic pain were observed (both P pain ranked first (64, 52.9%) among the patients with nociceptive pain, whereas pins and needles pain (97, 64.7%) was the most common type of pain in patients with neuropathic pain. There was a significant difference in QOL between the nociceptive and neuropathic pain groups (P pain used analgesics. Compared with the patients with pain not using any analgesics, those receiving analgesics had a significantly lower average pain relief rate (P = 0.027). Adjuvant analgesics were inadequately used (9.3%) in patients with neuropathic cancer pain. This study revealed the prevalence of neuropathic cancer pain in Chinese patients with cancer. Malignant neuropathic pain significantly impaired the patients' QOL. Insufficient assessment and inadequate analgesia still exist. These require more awareness and attention from both doctors and patients. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  5. Hospitalization costs of lung cancer diagnosis in Turkey: Is there a difference between histological types and stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Murat; Yıldırım, Fatma; Yurdakul, Ahmet Selim; Öztürk, Can

    2016-12-01

    To establish the direct costs of diagnosing lung cancer in hospitalized patients. Hospital data of patients who were hospitalized and diagnosed as lung cancer between September 2013 and August 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who underwent surgery for diagnosis and who were initiated with cancer treatment during the same hospital stay were excluded from study. Histological types and stages of lung cancer were determined. Expenses were grouped as laboratory costs, pathology costs, diagnostic imaging costs, overnight room charges, medication costs, blood center costs, consumable expenditures' costs and inpatient service charges (including consultants' service, electrocardiogram, follow-up, nursing services, diagnostic interventions). Of the 68 patients, 55 (81%) had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 13 (19%) had small cell lung cancer (SCLC). 47% of patients with NSCLC had stage 4 disease and 86% of patients with SCLC had extensive stage disease. Median total cost per patient was 910 (95% CI= 832-1291) Euros (€). Of all costs, 37% were due to inpatient service charges and 22% were medication costs. Median total cost per patient was 912 (95% CI= 783-1213) € in NSCLC patients and 908 (95% CI= 456-2203) € in SCLC patients (p> 0.05). In NSCLC group, total cost per patient was 873 (95% CI= 591-1143) € in stage 1-2-3 diseases and 975 (95% CI= 847-1536) € in stage 4 disease (p> 0.05). In SCLC group total cost per patient was 937 € in limited stage and 502 (95% CI= 452-2508) € in extensive stage (p> 0.05). There is no significant difference between costs related to diagnosis of different lung cancer types and stages in patients hospitalized in a university hospital.

  6. Report of chronic myeloid leukemia from Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Pritanjali

    2013-07-01

    Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center was established in 1993. It's one of the main Health-Care Institution in the state of Bihar. The data of 205 patients was presented in the ICON meeting and 98% of patients were diagnosed in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 91% of patients in 3 months. A total of 197 (96%) patients were alive at the time of analysis of which 179 (87%) were still in chronic phase with hematological remission.

  7. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier Simone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. Methods CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery, and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN, non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. Results We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68% with colon and 381 (32% with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location; whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Conclusions Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care

  8. 河南省医疗卫生机构病床工作效率分析%Hospital bed efficiency analysis of medical institutions in Henan province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢丹; 田庆丰

    2015-01-01

    Objective Different methods were used for the analysis of different medical and health institutions in Henan Province in 2012 of hospital bed utilization,to find bed utilization problems,and provide reference for the rational allocation of resources.Methods Static beds utilization model method (SBMA)and the method of rank sum ratio(RSR)were used for planning of data in“2012 health statistics yearbook of Henan province”,for comprehensive analysis of bed utilization efficiency.Results Among the medical and health institutions in Henan province in 2012,general hospitals,maternal and children hospitals(centers)are found with higher utilization of hospital beds,while other institutions (nursing homes),community health service centers(stations)are found lower.Conclusion Henan Province in 2012 was found on the whole with efficient utilization of hospital beds,yet with rooms of improvement for different medical institutions,especially those at the primary level.%目的:运用不同方法分析河南省2012年不同医疗卫生机构病床利用效率,发现当前病床利用上的问题,为合理配置资源提供参考。方法采用静态床位利用模型法(SBMA)和秩和比法(RSR)对《2012年河南省卫生统计年鉴》中的数据进行规化,综合分析病床利用效率。结果河南省2012年不同医疗卫生机构中,综合医院、妇幼保健院(所、站)2类医疗卫生机构病床利用率较高。其他机构(疗养院)、社区卫生服务中心(站)2类医疗卫生机构病床利用率较低。结论河南省2012年病床利用总体上较为高效,但不同医疗机构差异显著,基层医疗机构有待加强。

  9. An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 93 Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer: Treatment Outcomes, Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors and indexes of a series of 93 patients with breast cancer and brain metastases (BM) in a single institution. Treatment outcomes were evaluated according to the major prognostic indexes (RPA, BSBM, GPA scores) and breast cancer subtypes. Independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) were identified. The median OS values according to GPA 0–1, 1.5–2, 2.5–3 and 3.5–4, were 4.5, 9.5, 14.2 and 19.1 months, respect...

  10. [Myasthenia gravis in adults of institutions pertaining to the Mexican public health system: an analysis of hospital discharges during 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa-Tort, Paulina; Chiquete, Erwin; Domínguez-Moreno, Rogelio; Vega-Boada, Felipe; Reyes-Melo, Isael; Flores-Silva, Fernando; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Estañol-Vidal, Bruno; García-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz-Sandoval, José L; Cantú-Brito, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on myasthenia gravis (MG) in Mexico is mainly derived from experiences in referral centers. To describe the epidemiological characteristics of hospital discharges during 2010 with the diagnosis of MG in adults hospitalized in the Mexican public health system. We consulted the database of hospital discharges during 2010 of the National Health Information System (Ministry of Health, IMSS, IMSS oportunidades, ISSSTE, PEMEX, and the Ministry of Defense). The MG records were identified by the code G70.0 of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision. During 2010 there were 5,314,132 hospital discharges (4,254,312 adults). Among them, 587 (0.01%) were adults with MG (median age: 47 years, 60% women). Women with MG were significantly younger than men (median age: 37 vs. 54 years, respectively; p < 0.001). The median hospital stay was six days. The case fatality rate was 3.4%, without gender differences. Age was associated with the probability of death. We confirmed the bimodal age-gender distribution in MG. The in-hospital case fatality rate in Mexico is consistent with recent reports around the world.

  11. Cancer-associated malnutrition, cachexia and sarcopenia: the skeleton in the hospital closet 40 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Aoife M; Power, Derek G; Daly, Louise; Cushen, Samantha J; Ní Bhuachalla, Ēadaoin; Prado, Carla M

    2016-05-01

    An awareness of the importance of nutritional status in hospital settings began more than 40 years ago. Much has been learned since and has altered care. For the past 40 years several large studies have shown that cancer patients are amongst the most malnourished of all patient groups. Recently, the use of gold-standard methods of body composition assessment, including computed tomography, has facilitated the understanding of the true prevalence of cancer cachexia (CC). CC remains a devastating syndrome affecting 50-80 % of cancer patients and it is responsible for the death of at least 20 %. The aetiology is multifactorial and complex; driven by pro-inflammatory cytokines and specific tumour-derived factors, which initiate an energy-intensive acute phase protein response and drive the loss of skeletal muscle even in the presence of adequate food intake and insulin. The most clinically relevant phenotypic feature of CC is muscle loss (sarcopenia), as this relates to asthenia, fatigue, impaired physical function, reduced tolerance to treatments, impaired quality of life and reduced survival. Sarcopenia is present in 20-70 % depending on the tumour type. There is mounting evidence that sarcopenia increases the risk of toxicity to many chemotherapy drugs. However, identification of patients with muscle loss has become increasingly difficult as 40-60 % of cancer patients are overweight or obese, even in the setting of metastatic disease. Further challenges exist in trying to reverse CC and sarcopenia. Future clinical trials investigating dose reductions in sarcopenic patients and dose-escalating studies based on pre-treatment body composition assessment have the potential to alter cancer treatment paradigms.

  12. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; Franzin, Luisa; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

  13. Comparison of nutritional status assessment parameters in predicting length of hospital stay in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, J; Alves, P; Amaral, T F

    2014-06-01

    Undernutrition has been associated with an increased length of hospital stay which may reflect the patient prognosis. The aim of this study was to quantify and compare the association between nutritional status and handgrip strength at hospital admission with time to discharge in cancer patients. An observational prospective study was conducted in an oncology center. Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 and handgrip strength were conducted in a probabilistic sample of 130 cancer patients. The association between baseline nutritional status, handgrip strength and time to discharge was evaluated using survival analysis with discharge alive as the outcome. Nutritional risk ranged from 42.3 to 53.1% depending on the tool used. According to Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment severe undernutrition was present in 22.3% of the sample. The association between baseline data and time to discharge was stronger in patients with low handgrip strength (adjusted hazard ratio, low handgrip strength: 0.33; 95% confidence interval: 0.19-0.55), compared to undernourished patients evaluated by the other tools; Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment: (adjusted hazard ratio, severe undernutrition: 0.45; 95% confidence interval: 0.27-0.75) and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002: (adjusted hazard ratio, with nutritional risk: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.80). An approximate 3-fold decrease in probability of discharge alive was observed in patients with low handgrip strength. Decreasing handgrip strength tertiles allowed to discriminate between patients who will have longer hospital stay, as well as undernutrition and nutritional risk assessed by Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. [The impacts of the multidisciplinary team model on the length of stay and hospital expenses of patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Xu, Xingxiang; Wang, Daxin; Xu, Jin; Gu, Wenju

    2015-05-01

    To explore the impacts of the multidisciplinary team model on the average length of stay and hospital expenses of patients with lung cancer. After the multidisciplinary team discussion, 97 patients with lung cancer were selected as the lung cancer group according to the enrollment and elimination criteria the control group was 97 patients with lung cancer managed without team discussion during the same period. All the patients were firstly diagnosed to have lung cancer from December 2011 to December 2013 in Subei People's Hospital. The length of stay, hospital expenses, stages of tumor, types of tumor, Zubrod-ECOG-WHO score, the form of payment, smoking history, sex and age of all the patients were collected. The difference in the average length of stay and hospital expenses between the 2 groups and the associated factors were analyzed by using χ² test, t test and multi-factor stepwise regression analysis. There were 68 males and 29 females with a mean age of (61 ± 9) years in the lung cancer group, while there were 73 males and 24 females with a mean age of (63 ± 10) years in the control group. There were no differences between the 2 groups in tumor staging, tumor types, Zubrod-ECOG-WHO score, the form of payment, smoking history, sex and age (χ² = 4.854, P = 0.563, χ² = 4.248, P = 0.097; χ² = 0.395, P = 0.821; χ² = 1.191, P = 0.554; χ² = 0.108, P = 0.977; χ² = 1.011, P = 0.389; χ² = 0.649, P = 0.519; P = 0.474, P = 0.845, respectively). The average hospital expenses (13 303 vs 16 553, Yuan) were lower and the length of stay (10.33 vs 12.49, days) was shorter in the lung cancer group as compared to the control group (t = 2.616, P = 0.010; t = 2.730, P = 0.007), especially so for the first clinical hospitalization (15 953 vs 19 485 yuan, t = 2.315, P = 0.022; 12.71 vs 14.75 days, t = 1.979, P = 0.049). The average length of stay and the tumor stages were the main factors associated with the average hospital expenses. Except for patients with the

  15. Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among cancer patients in a major hospital in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueter, AbdelRahman Mohammad; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Abdullah, Abu Dzarr; Mohamad, Norsarwany; Arifin, Norsyahida; Othman, Nurulhasanah; Noordin, Rahmah

    2014-07-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the most commonly neglected but clinically important parasitic infections worldwide, especially among immunocompromised patients. Evidence of infection among immunocompromised patients in Malaysia is, however, lacking. In this study, microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to detect Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis) infection among cancer patients in a Malaysian hospital. A total of 192 stool and serum samples were collected from cancer patients who were receiving chemotherapy with or without steroid treatment at a hospital in northeastern Malaysia. Stool samples were examined for S. stercoralis using parasitological methods and real-time PCR. Serology by ELISA was performed to detect parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG4 and immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. For comparison, IgG4- and IgG-ELISAs were also performed on the sera of 150 healthy individuals from the same area. Of the 192 samples examined, 1 (0.5%) sample was positive for S. stercoralis by microscopy, 3 (1.6%) by real-time PCR, 8 (4.2%) by IgG-ELISA, 6 (3.1%) by IgG4-ELISA, and none was positive by IgE-ELISA. In comparison, healthy blood donors had significantly lower prevalence of parasite-specific IgG (2.67%, p < 0.05) and IgG4 (2.67%, p < 0.05) responses. This study showed that laboratory testing may be considered as a diagnostic investigation for S. stercoralis among immunocompromised cancer patients.

  16. The Broad Institute: Screening for Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines Using Small Molecules | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using cancer cell-line profiling, we established an ongoing resource to identify, as comprehensively as possible, the drug-targetable dependencies that specific genomic alterations impart on human cancers. We measured the sensitivity of hundreds of genetically characterized cancer cell lines to hundreds of small-molecule probes and drugs that have highly selective interactions with their targets, and that collectively modulate many distinct nodes in cancer cell circuitry.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Clinical Features of Lung Cancer in West China Hospital in 2000 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun YAO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Primary lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. The aim of the current study is to retrospectively analyze the clinical features variation of patients with primary bronchogenic carcinoma in West China Hospital Sichuan University to provide information for early detection and treatment of lung cancer. Methods We collected data of patients of permanent population in Sichuan province who diagnosed primary bronchogenic carcinoma in 2000 and 2010 in West China Hospital Sichuan University respectively for comparative analysis of reasons to visit the doctor, duration from symptom onset to visit the doctor, combined diseases, incidences of bi-primary carcinoma, family history of malignant tumor, sites of tumors, grade of differentiation, tumor staging and initial treatment modalities. Results A total of 2,167 cases (616 cases in 2000 and 1,551 cases in 2010 met inclusion criteria were retrieved for analysis. In 2010, compared with data of 2000, the rate of patients who visit the doctors because abnormalities were detected by health examination elevated remarkably (5.2% vs 16.7%, P<0.001, the duration from symptom onset to visit the doctor abridged significantly (P<0.001, patients with family history of malignant tumor increased significantly (3.9% vs 13.7%, P<0.001, the constituent ratio of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma decreased (72.3% vs 51.8%, P=0.002 accompanied with low differentiated squamous cell carcinoma increased (59.4% vs 76.7%, P=0.002. For NSCLC staging, there is a notably increase of rate of stage Ia (1.0% vs 4.5%, P< 0.001 and stage IV (30.4% vs 37.8%, P<0.001 while decrease of stage IIIa (26.6% vs 14.8%, P=0.002. For initial treatment modalities, there is markedly increased chemotherapy rate of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients (41.8% vs 63.4%, P=0.002 while remarkably increased surgery rate of stage IIIa patients (41.8% vs 63.4%, P=0.002 and decreased surgery rate of stage IV

  18. State-of-the-art prostate cancer treatment and research. A report from the Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, R S; Kumar, P; Hait, W N; Weiss, R E

    2001-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a devastating disease that will be diagnosed in approximately 200,000 men in 2001. New methods for screening, prevention, and treatment are being developed. In addition, novel agents for the treatment of resistant prostate cancer are being developed in clinical trials. This review summarizes the recent efforts in diet, screening, novel systemic therapies, and alternative medicine for prostate cancer.

  19. Cervical cancer and the HPV link: identifying areas for education in Mexico City's public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Tess; Landis, Sarah; García, Sandra G; Becker, Davida; Sanhueza, Patricio; Higuera, Anjarath

    2006-01-01

    To assess Mexico City physicians' knowledge and practices regarding cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) to compare obstetricians/gynecologists (ob/gyns) and general practitioners (GPs) on these variables. In April 2003, 187 ob/gyns and GPs working in 15 hospitals affiliated with the Federal District Secretary of Health (SSDF) completed a self-administered questionnaire. Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare ob/ gyns and GPs on outcome variables. Nearly all providers (93%) identified HPV as the principal cause of cervical cancer. Ob/gyns had more detailed knowledge about HPV than GPs and were more likely to have heard of common oncogenic strains (p = .000). Sixteen percent of all physicians incorrectly stated that Pap tests should be performed every six months regardless of previous results, and 17% recommended hysterectomy as an option for treating mild or moderate dysplasia. While SSDF physicians had basic knowledge about the cervical cancer-HPV link, screening and management norms are priority areas for educational interventions.

  20. Knowledge, attitude and preventive practices of women for breast cancer in the educational institutions of Lahore, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokher, Samina; Qureshi, Warda; Mahmood, Saqib; Saleem, Afaf; Mahmud, Sumbal

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence rates, pattern of presentation and survival rates vary worldwide. High incidence, advanced stage disease presentation and low survival rates have been reported from Pakistan. Lack of awareness and screening facilities along with poor socioeconomic status are the main causes. A survey based upon multiple choice questionnaires was conducted during an awareness campaign in women educational institutions of Lahore, to assess the baseline knowledge, attitude towards breast self examination (BSE), clinical breast examination (CBE) and source of information used by them. 1155 filled questionnaires were analyzed by SPSS version 12. The majority (83.7%) of the respondents were 10 and 31.5% had education. Only 27% had "good" while 14% had "poor" and 59% had "fair" knowledge scores about breast cancer. Television was the most commonly cited source of information but was associated with lower knowledge score. The knowledge scores and practice of BSE had a positive association with education level. The respondents had better knowledge of life time risk and association of early diagnosis with better chances of cure, but worse knowledge of risk factors as compared to women in educational institutions of other countries. Generally the respondents of present study had low level of knowledge of breast cancer. Properly designed awareness campaign on television and in educational institutions can be effective to raise the knowledge level, the best long term strategy for this purpose.

  1. Development and Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Dietary Screener Questionnaire Scoring Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frances E; Midthune, Douglas; Kahle, Lisa; Dodd, Kevin W

    2017-06-01

    Background: Methods for improving the utility of short dietary assessment instruments are needed.Objective: We sought to describe the development of the NHANES Dietary Screener Questionnaire (DSQ) and its scoring algorithms and performance.Methods: The 19-item DSQ assesses intakes of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, added sugars, dairy, fiber, and calcium. Two nonconsecutive 24-h dietary recalls and the DSQ were administered in NHANES 2009-2010 to respondents aged 2-69 y (n = 7588). The DSQ frequency responses, coupled with sex- and age-specific portion size information, were regressed on intake from 24-h recalls by using the National Cancer Institute usual intake method to obtain scoring algorithms to estimate mean and prevalences of reaching 2 a priori threshold levels. The resulting scoring algorithms were applied to the DSQ and compared with intakes estimated with the 24-h recall data only. The stability of the derived scoring algorithms was evaluated in repeated sampling. Finally, scoring algorithms were applied to screener data, and these estimates were compared with those from multiple 24-h recalls in 3 external studies.Results: The DSQ and its scoring algorithms produced estimates of mean intake and prevalence that agreed closely with those from multiple 24-h recalls. The scoring algorithms were stable in repeated sampling. Differences in the means were algorithms is an advance in the use of screeners. However, because these algorithms may not be generalizable to all studies, a pilot study in the proposed study population is advisable. Although more precise instruments such as 24-h dietary recalls are recommended in most research, the NHANES DSQ provides a less burdensome alternative when time and resources are constrained and interest is in a limited set of dietary factors. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Prospective observational study to evaluate the pattern of adverse drug events in cancer patients receiving anti-cancer agents in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja B. Joshi; Neha G. Kadhe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be overlooked. They range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to evaluate the pattern of adverse drug events to anti-cancer agents in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: This observational prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital from 1st January 2011 to 31st December 2011. A total of 213 ...

  3. An economic analysis of inadequate prescription of antiulcer medications for in-hospital patients at a third level institution in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prescription and costs of antiulcer medications for in-hospital use have increased during recent years with reported inadequate use and underused. Aim: To determine the patterns of prescription-indication and also perform an economic analysis of the overcost caused by the non-justified use of antiulcer medications in a third level hospital in Colombia. Materials and methods: Cross-sectional study of prescription-indication of antiulcer medications for patients hospitalized in "Hospital Universitario San Jorge" of Pereira during July of 2012. Adequate or inadequate prescription of the first antiulcer medication prescribed was determined as well as for others prescribed during the hospital stay, supported by clinical practice guidelines from the Zaragoza I sector workgroup, clinical guidelines from the Australian Health Department, and finally the American College of Gastroenterology Criteria for stress ulcer prophylaxis. Daily defined dose per bed/day was used, as well as the cost for 100 beds/day and the cost of each bed/drug. A multivariate analysis was carried out using SPSS 21.0. Results: 778 patients were analyzed, 435 men (55.9% and 343 women, mean age 56.6 ± 20.1 years. The number of patients without justification for the prescription of the first antiulcer medication was 377 (48.5%, and during the whole in-hospital time it was 336 (43.2%. Ranitidine was the most used medication, in 438 patients (56.3%. The cost/month for poorly justified antiulcer medications was € 3,335.6. The annual estimated cost for inadequate prescriptions of antiulcer medications was € 16,770.0 per 100 beds. Conclusion: A lower inadequate prescription rate of antiulcer medications was identified compared with other studies; however it was still high and is troubling because of the major costs that these inadequate prescriptions generates for the institution.

  4. Allocation of aid for health institutions in Ukraine: implications from a case study of Chornobyl (Chernobyl) area hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Renata; Bezchlibnyk-Butler, Kalyna; Wodoslawsky, Marika Dubyk

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous non-governmental organizations have sought to improve the health status of populations struggling with the lingering effects of the Chornobyl (Chernobyl) nuclear disaster. Political and economic features of Ukraine's government produced a health system unable to provide services required by its population. To compensate somewhat for these shortcomings, Ukraine's health institutions rely on foreign donations. However, to effectively target foreign aid efforts, a more thorough understanding of the administration of health institutions in Ukraine is needed. This study investigates the organizational structures, care delivery, and legislative and financial regulations in the country's health system and their implications for patient care. Through an exhaustive study of four representative health institutions across Ukraine, the authors identify how donor organizations can achieve their aid objectives and work within the country's health infrastructure.

  5. Influencing Factor of Postoperation Fast-track Recovery and in Hospital Cost after Lobctomy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua SU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It is unknown that the postoperation fast-track recovery and in hospital cost of the lobectomy in lung cancer, we explored the influencing factor of postoperative fast-track recovery and in hospital cost after undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients (n=176 who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer between January 2010 and November 2011 by a thoracic surgeon. Results The hospital costs of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS lobectomy (47,308.21 ¥ is significantly higher than open lobectomy (45,664.31 ¥(P=0.007. The hospital costs of body mass index (BMI ≥ 24 kg/m2 (51,186.99 ¥ is significantly higher than BMI < 24 kg/m2 (41,701.64 ¥(P=0.032. The hospital stay of VATS lobectomy (5.70 d is significantly less than open lobectomy (7.10 d(P<0.001. Conclusion These findings indicate that preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation and VATS lobectomy is contributed to fast-track recovery for patients who undergo lobectomy, but increase the hospital costs.

  6. Underuse of long-term routine hospital follow-up care in patients with a history of breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaapveld Michael

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After primary treatment for breast cancer, patients are recommended to use hospital follow-up care routinely. Long-term data on the utilization of this follow-up care are relatively rare. Methods Information regarding the utilization of routine hospital follow-up care was retrieved from hospital documents of 662 patients treated for breast cancer. Utilization of hospital follow-up care was defined as the use of follow-up care according to the guidelines in that period of time. Determinants of hospital follow up care were evaluated with multivariate analysis by generalized estimating equations (GEE. Results The median follow-up time was 9.0 (0.3-18.1 years. At fifth and tenth year after diagnosis, 16.1% and 33.5% of the patients had less follow-up visits than recommended in the national guideline, and 33.1% and 40.4% had less frequent mammography than recommended. Less frequent mammography was found in older patients (age > 70; OR: 2.10; 95%CI: 1.62-2.74, patients with comorbidity (OR: 1.26; 95%CI: 1.05-1.52 and patients using hormonal therapy (OR: 1.51; 95%CI: 1.01-2.25. Conclusions Most patients with a history of breast cancer use hospital follow-up care according to the guidelines. In older patients, patients with comorbidity and patients receiving hormonal therapy yearly mammography is performed much less than recommended.

  7. Institutionalism and schizophrenia 30 years on. Clinical poverty and the social environment in three British mental hospitals in 1960 compared with a fourth in 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curson, D A; Pantelis, C; Ward, J; Barnes, T R

    1992-02-01

    In their comparison of chronic schizophrenic patients in three British mental hospitals in 1960, Wing and Brown found a strong association between the poverty of the social environment and the severity of 'clinical poverty' (blunted affect, poverty of speech, and social withdrawal). Between 1960 and 1968 the social environments of all three hospitals improved and a weak causal relationship between social poverty and clinical poverty was reported in a proportion of patients. Using the same assessment instruments as Wing and Brown, the present study re-examined the relationship between social and clinical poverty in the long-stay schizophrenic population of a fourth British mental hospital in 1990. The association found between social and clinical poverty was much weaker than in 1960. Reluctance on the part of patients to be discharged from the institution was unrelated to length of stay. There was no significant difference in severity of illness between the patients in the present study and those in the earlier study. However, patients in the former group spent more time doing nothing than those in the hospital with the most understimulating environment three decades before, with four-fifths doing nothing for over five hours a day, despite a greatly increased ratio of nurses to patients.

  8. Hospital Staff Perceptions of Institutional Readiness for Implementation of Innovations in the Health Sector, Specifically Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG)

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Cortés, Ariel; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Agudelo, Sandra; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Torres, Sergio; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Yepes, Francisco J.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize the state of the innovative culture and attitude of hospital staff towards Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) like an innovation for the Colombian health care.Methods: A case study through convenience sampling among clinical and administrative staff who determine the success of the DRG. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, regression and correspondence analysis.Results: The state of innovative culture in the Hospital is favorable for the inn...

  9. [Cancer of the organs of the pancreatoduodenal region (based on autopsy data from 2 hospitals in the city of Donetsk)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaĭlichenko, V A

    1979-01-01

    The incidence of cancer of the pancreatoduodenal organs (the pancreas, major duodenal papilla, extrahepatic bile ducts, duodenum) is reported according to the autopsy findings obtained at two clinical hospitals (provincial and municipal) of Donetsk city during the period from 1957 to 1973. There is a tendency to the increased mortality due to cancer of the localization concerned against the background of the reduced total mortality.

  10. Breastfeeding and breast cancer: a case-control study in patients at Arzobispo Loayza National Hospital. Lima - Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas Camayo, José; Facultad de Medicina de San Fernando, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (UNMSM). Lima, Perú

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Breast cancer is a global public health problem with incidence increasing in the world. Breastfeeding has been shown to be a protective factor, but evaluation in Latin American populations has scant. Objective: To evaluate the effect of breastfeeding on breast cancer developing risk in a Peruvian population. Design: A case-control study. Setting: Departments of Medical Oncology and Radiology, section of Mammography, at Arzobispo Loayza National Hospital, Lima - Peru. Participant...

  11. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... promising opportunities based on nanotechnology from academic research to the clinical environment; 4... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer...

  12. Prognostic Factors in Primary Vaginal Cancer: A Single Institute Experience and Review of Literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prameela, Chelakkot G; Ravind, Rahul; Gurram, Bharath C; Sheejamol, V S; Dinesh, Makuny

    2016-01-01

    ... cancers.Medical records of all cases of primary vaginal cancers, presented to Department of Oncology, from 2004 to 2012, at a tertiary care center in southern India, were retrieved from electronic medical...

  13. Evaluation of different recall periods for the US National Cancer Institute's PRO-CTCAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Tito R; Dueck, Amylou C; Bennett, Antonia V; Mitchell, Sandra A; Reeve, Bryce B; Atkinson, Thomas M; Li, Yuelin; Castro, Kathleen M; Denicoff, Andrea; Rogak, Lauren J; Piekarz, Richard L; Cleeland, Charles S; Sloan, Jeff A; Schrag, Deborah; Basch, Ethan

    2017-06-01

    The US National Cancer Institute recently developed the PRO-CTCAE (Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events). PRO-CTCAE is a library of questions for clinical trial participants to self-report symptomatic adverse events (e.g. nausea). The objective of this study is to inform evidence-based selection of a recall period when PRO-CTCAE is included in a trial. We evaluated differences between 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-week recall periods, using daily reporting as the reference. English-speaking patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy were enrolled at four US cancer centers and affiliated community clinics. Participants completed 27 PRO-CTCAE items electronically daily for 28 days, and then weekly over 4 weeks, using 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-week recall periods. For each recall period, mean differences, effect sizes, and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate agreement between the maximum of daily ratings and the corresponding ratings obtained using longer recall periods (e.g. maximum of daily scores over 7 days vs 1-week recall). Analyses were repeated using the average of daily scores within each recall period rather than the maximum of daily scores. A total of 127 subjects completed questionnaires (57% male; median age: 57). The median of the 27 mean differences in scores on the PRO-CTCAE 5-point response scale comparing the maximum daily versus the longer recall period (and corresponding effect size) was -0.20 (-0.20) for 1-week recall, -0.36 (-0.31) for 2-week recall, -0.45 (-0.39) for 3-week recall, and -0.47 (-0.40) for 4-week recall. The median intraclass correlation across 27 items between the maximum of daily ratings and the corresponding longer recall ratings for 1-week recall was 0.70 (range: 0.54-0.82), for 2-week recall was 0.74 (range: 0.58-0.83), for 3-week recall was 0.72 (range: 0.61-0.84), and for 4-week recall was 0.72 (range: 0.64-0.86). Similar results were

  14. Treatment of Pancreatic and Periampullary Cancers at a Community Hospital: Successful Application of Tertiary Care Treatment Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Moesinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The treatment of pancreatic cancer and other periampullary neoplasms is complex and challenging. Major high-volume cancer centers can provide excellent multidisciplinary care of these patients but almost two-thirds of pancreatic cancer patients are treated at low volume centers. There is very little published data from low volume community cancer programs in regards to the treatment of periampullary cancer. In this study, a review of comprehensive periampullary cancer care at two low volume hospitals with comparison to national standards is presented. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 70 consecutive patients with periampullary neoplasms who underwent surgery over a 5-year period (2006–2010 at two community hospitals. Results. There were 51 successful resections of 70 explorations (73% including 34 Whipple procedures. Mortality rate was 2.9%. Comparison of these patients to national standards was made in terms of operative mortality, resectability rate, administration of adjuvant therapy, clinical trial participation and overall survival. The results in these patients were comparable to national standards. Conclusions. With adequate commitment of resources and experienced surgical and oncologic practitioners, community cancer centers can meet national tertiary care standards in terms of pancreatic and periampullary cancer care.

  15. Association of SDF-1 with Metastasis in Breast Cancer Patient at Sanglah Hospital, Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristanto Yuli Yarso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: More than 24% breast cancer patients came to Sanglah Teaching Hospital with distant metastasis which cause 90% of cancer related death. Distant metastasis is complex process of interaction between tumor cells and its micro environment involving a chemoattractant cytokines which lead circulating tumor cells toward target organs. One of the most common cytokines involved in metastasis of multiple tumor is SDF-1, produces by target organ or tumor cells itselves. However, only few stucy ever evaluate the relationship between its concentrations in tumor tissue with metastasis. Method: A cross sectional analysis study was conducted involving clinical data and paraffin blocks from 46 patients. Samples were grouped into metastasis and non-metastasis group and level of tumor tissue SDF-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry method. Numerical conversion was done using modified “Mirisola” technique and statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 16 software. Results: The overall median expression of SDF-1 was 4.83 in which the median is 4.08±2.25 in non-metastatic group and 5.71±2.61 in metastatic group (p=0.012. In addition, parenchymal carcinoma cell had significantly higher expression of SDF-1 compared with microenvironmental cell both in metastatic group (carcinoma cell vs microenvironment; 4,57+1,91 vs 3,68 +2,06; p=0,004 and non-metastatic group (3,19 +2,29 vs 2,16+1,11; p=0.011. Finally, logistic regression analysis of SDF-1 expression also gave significant result that MBC had significantly higher expression of SDF-1 (p=0.039.  Conclusions: There was significant association between of SDF-1 expression and distant metastasis in breast cancer and majority of SDF was produced by cancer cells

  16. Epidemiological changes in oesophageal cancer at National Hospital, Bloemfontein: 1995, 2000 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian van der Merwe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oesophageal cancer is a common malignancy with a high mortality rate. The two main histological types are squamous cell and adenocarcinoma. An increase in oesophageal adenocarcinoma has been noted, especially in developed countries.Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the profile of oesophageal cancer by reviewing medical records of patients diagnosed with oesophageal cancer in 1995, 2000 and 2005.Method: The study sample consisted of 474 files of patients diagnosed, for the first time, with oesophageal cancer in 1995, 2000 and 2005, at the National Hospital in Bloemfontein and the outreach clinics in surrounding areas. Information reviewed from patient files included: age, race and gender of the patient, as well as topography, size, histological grade and type of the tumour.Results: The number of newly diagnosed cases of oesophageal carcinoma decreased over the 10-year period. The mean age of patients was > 57 years. The majority of cases were Black patients: 90.5% in 1995, 93.2% in 2000 and 87.7% in 2005. More male patients were seen (71.5% in 1995, 70.1% in 2000 and 64.2% in 2005, although the number of female patients diagnosed with this malignancy increased by 7.3% from 1995 to 2005. The mid- and lower third of the oesophagus were affected most commonly, most lesions were 6 cm – 10 cm in length and classified as Grade II, moderately differentiated tumours. Squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in 76.9% of patients in 1995, 90.5% in 2000 and 94.3% in 2005.Conclusion: The number of newly diagnosed cases of oesophageal carcinoma decreased over the 10-year period, but demographic and disease characteristics remained constant.

  17. Does hospital need more hospice beds? Hospital charges and length of stays by lung cancer inpatients at their end of life: A retrospective cohort design of 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies found that hospice and palliative care reduces healthcare costs for end-of-life cancer patients. To investigate hospital inpatient charges and length-of-stay differences by availability of hospice care beds within hospitals using nationwide data from end-of-life inpatients with lung cancer. A retrospective cohort study was performed using nationwide lung cancer health insurance claims from 2002 to 2012 in Korea. Descriptive and multi-level (patient-level and hospital-level) mixed models were used to compare inpatient charges and lengths of stay. Using 673,122 inpatient health insurance claims, we obtained aggregated hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay from a total of 114,828 inpatients and 866 hospital records. Hospital inpatient charges and length of stay drastically increased as patients approached death; a significant portion of hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay occurred during the end-of-life period. According to our multi-level analysis, hospitals with hospice care beds tend to have significantly lower end-of-life hospital inpatient charges; however, length of stay did not differ. Hospitals with more hospice care beds were associated with reduction in hospital inpatient charges within 3 months before death. Higher end-of-life healthcare hospital charges were found for lung cancer inpatients who were admitted to hospitals without hospice care beds. This study suggests that health policy-makers and the National Health Insurance program need to consider expanding the use of hospice care beds within hospitals and hospice care facilities for end-of-life patients with lung cancer in South Korea, where very limited numbers of resources are currently available. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Effects of music therapy on depression and duration of hospital stay of breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Kai-na; LI Xiao-mei; YAN Hong; DANG Shao-nong; WANG Duo-lao

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer remains the most important cancer among women worldwide. The disease itself and treatment may have a profound impact on the patients' psychological well being and quality of life. Depression is common in breast cancer patients and affects the therapeutic effects as well as prolongs the duration of hospital stay. However,few studies reported the effectiveness of music therapy on depression and duration of hospital stay of female patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. Methods One hundred and twenty subjects were recruited to this clinical trial and randomly allocated to two groups.The experimental group (n=60) received music therapy on the basis of routine nursing care, whereas the control group (n=60) only received the routine nursing care. The whole intervention time was from the first day after radical mastectomy to the third time of admission to hospital for chemotherapy. Data of demographic characteristics and depression were collected by using the General Questionnaire and Chinese version of Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (ZSDS)respectively. One pre-test (the day before radical mastectomy) and three post-tests (the day before discharge from hospital, the second and third admission to hospital for chemotherapy) were utilized. Duration of hospital stay was calculated from the first day after radical mastectomy to the day of discharged from hospital. Results The mean depression score of all subjects was 37.19±6.30. Thirty-six cases (30%) suffered from depression symptoms, with 26 (72.2%) mild depression cases, 9 (25.0%) moderate depression cases, and 1 (2.8%) severe depression case. After music therapy, depression scores of the experimental group were lower than that of the control group in the three post-tests, with significant differences (F=39.13, P<0.001; F=82.09, P<0.001). Duration of hospital stay after radical mastectomy of the experimental group ((13.62±2.04) days) was shorter than that of the control group ((15

  19. [Radiotherapy in vulvar cancer. Experience in the Hospital de Oncología, CMN, SXXI, IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Bahena, J; Padilla Arrieta, P; Ayala Hernández, J R

    1995-11-01

    Between 1986 and 1992, 42 patients with carcinoma of the vulva diagnosis, were treated at the Hospital de Oncologia, CMN, SXXI. Mean age was 63 years. There was 1 case stage I, 5 stage II, 25 stage III, 4 stage IV, 2 with recurrent disease and 5 patients could not be classified. Local control was reached in 60% of patients however, 12 patients developed local recurrence after surgery and/or radiation therapy, finally 43% of patients remained disease free after a mean of 19 months of followup. In the subset of advanced disease patients treated with radical or preoperative radiation therapy (27 patients), 41% of them remained without disease. Mean radiation doses for patients treated only with radiation therapy was 6500 cGy. Late vulvar fibrosis and acute desquamative dermatitis, were the morbidity more frequently observed. New directions in the management of vulvar cancer must be developed to improve treatment results, in patients with advanced disease.

  20. Risk of cancer of unknown primary after hospitalization for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-12-15

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous syndrome diagnosed at metastatic sites. The etiology is unknown but immune dysfunction may be a contributing factor. Patients with autoimmune diseases were identified from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent CUP and compared with subjects without autoimmune diseases. A total of 789,681 patients were hospitalized for any of 32 autoimmune diseases during years 1964-2012; 2,658 developed subsequent CUP, giving an overall SIR of 1.27. A total of 16 autoimmune diseases were associated with an increased risk for CUP; polymyositis/dermatomyositis showed the highest SIR of 3.51, followed by primary biliary cirrhosis (1.81) and Addison's disease (1.77). CUP risk is known to be reduced in long-time users of pain-relieving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin. For patients with ankylosing spondylitis and with some other autoimmune diseases, with assumed chronic medication by NSAIDSs, CUP risks decreased in long-term follow-up. The overall risk of CUP was increased among patients diagnosed with autoimmune diseases, which call for clinical attention and suggest a possible role of immune dysfunction in CUP. The associations with many autoimmune diseases were weak which may imply that autoimmunity may not synergize with CUP-related immune dysfunction. However, long-term NSAID medication probably helped to curtail risks in some autoimmune diseases and CUP risks were generally higher in autoimmune diseases for which NSAIDs are not used and for these CUP appears to be a serious side effect.

  1. [Hospital variation in anastomotic leakage after rectal cancer surgery in the Spanish Association of Surgeons project: The contribution of hospital volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Héctor; Biondo, Sebastiano; Codina, Antonio; Ciga, Miguel Á; Enríquez-Navascués, José; Espín, Eloy; García-Granero, Eduardo; Roig, José Vicente

    2016-04-01

    This multicentre observational study aimed to determine the anastomotic leak rate in the hospitals included in the Rectal Cancer Project of the Spanish Society of Surgeons and examine whether hospital volume may contribute to any variation between hospitals. Hospital variation was quantified using a multilevel approach on prospective data derived from the multicentre database of all adenocarcinomas of the rectum operated by an anterior resection at 84 surgical departments from 2006 to 2013. The following variables were included in the analysis; demographics, American Society of Anaesthesiologists classification, use of defunctioning stoma, tumour location and stage, administration of neoadjuvant treatment, and annual volume of elective surgical procedures. A total of 7231 consecutive patients were included. The rate of anastomotic leak was 10.0%. Stratified by annual surgical volume hospitals varied from 9.9 to 11.3%. In multilevel regression analysis, the risk of anastomotic leak increased in male patients, in patients with tumours located below 12 cm from the anal verge, and advanced tumour stages. However, a defunctioning stoma seemed to prevent this complication. Hospital surgical volume was not associated with anastomotic leak (OR: 0.852, [0.487-1.518]; P=.577). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant variation in anastomotic leak between all departments (MOR: 1.475; [1.321-1.681]; P<0.001). Anastomotic leak varies significantly among hospitals included in the project and this difference cannot be attributed to the annual surgical volume. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Accessibility and Barriers to Oncology Appointments at 40 National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers: Results of a Mystery Shopper Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlyn, Geoffrey S; Hutchins, Kathryn E; Johnston, Abby L; Thomas, Rishonda T; Tian, James; Kamal, Arif H

    2016-10-01

    Patients turn to National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated comprehensive cancer centers because of perceived better quality and more timely access to care. However, recent studies have found that patients at various institutions may struggle to gain access to an appointment or obtain consistent information from attendants. Our study employs a mystery shopper format to identify and quantify barriers faced by patients seeking to make a first consultation appointment across a homogenous sample of 40 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Five mystery shoppers used a standardized call script to inquire about first available appointment times and service offerings. When inquiring about a date for a first available appointment, 29% of callers were unable to secure an estimated date without registering into the center's database, 51% were able to secure an estimated date, and 20% were provided with an actual date. Of estimated or actual dates for a first available appointment, 74% were greater than 1 week away. There was no statistically significant variation between appointment availability across insurance type or US region. Our study highlights the difficulty of accessing information about appointment availability. Although not statistically significant, inquiries regarding first available appointments for Medicaid patients resulted in longer estimated or actual wait times than those for patients with private insurance, and Medicaid shoppers noted qualitative differences. Although our study was limited by small sample size and imperfect analytic methods, our results suggest the need for more efficient and accessible care for patients at our nation's top cancer centers.

  3. Epidemiology of paediatric injury in low income environment: Value of hospital based data prior to the institution of a formal registration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Chichom-Mefire

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little attention is generally paid to paediatric injuries, especially in low income settings. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the epidemiology of hospital-based paediatric injuries in a semi-urban area in Cameroon prior to the initiation of a formal registration system. Patients and Methods: A sixteen items data collection sheet derived from a newly instituted trauma registry is used to retrospectively gather hospital-based basic information about epidemiology of injuries in patients aged 15 years or below in a low income setting. Results: Two hundred and seventy seven cases representing 16% of all injury cases could be analysed. The frequency of injuries significantly increased with age with a peak between 11 and 15 years (P < 0.001. Children in school playgrounds carried a significantly higher risk of sustaining an injury (P < 0.001. Falls and interpersonal violence were the most frequent mechanisms. The face and locomotor systems were the most commonly involved. More than 60% of patients were discharged back home. Conclusions: The data from the present registration system seem to indicate a higher injury rate in pre-adolescent children and in the school playground. The institution of a formal registration system is likely to improve the quality of data recording system.

  4. Breast cancer in malaysia: are our women getting the right message? 10 year-experience in a single institution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Nur Aishah; Yip, Cheng Har; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Ng, C J; Farizah, H

    2007-01-01

    The message that health care providers caring for patients with breast cancer would like to put forth, is that, not only early detection is crucial but early treatment too is important in ensuring survival. This paper examines the pattern of presentation at a single institution over a 10-year period from 1995 to 2005. In Malaysia, education outreach programmes are ongoing, with contributions not only from the public sector, but also private enterprise. Articles on breast cancer in local newspapers and women magazines and television are quite commonplace. However are our women getting the right message? Now is an appropriate time to bring the stakeholders together to formulate a way to reach all women in Malaysia, not excluding the fact that we are from different races, different education levels and backgrounds requiring differing ways of delivering health promotion messages. To answer the question of why women present late, we prospectively studied 25 women who presented with locally advanced disease. A quantitative, quasi-qualitative study was embarked upon, as a prelude to a more detailed study. Reasons for presenting late were recorded. We also looked at the pattern of presentation of breast lumps in women to our breast clinic in UMMC and in the surgical clinic in Hospital Kota Bharu, in the smaller capital of the state of Kelantan, in 2003. There is hope for the future, the government being a socially responsible one is currently making efforts towards mammographic screening in Malaysia. However understanding of the disease, acceptance of medical treatment and providing resources is imperative to ensure that health behaviour exhibited by our women is not self-destructive but self-preserving. Women are an integral part of not only the nation's workforce but the lifeline of the family - hopefully in the next decade we will see great improvement in the survival of Malaysian women with breast cancer.

  5. Implementation of an Ultra-short-stay Program After Breast Cancer Surgery in Four Hospitals : Perceived Barriers and Facilitators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M de; Weijden, T.T. van der; Kessels, A.; Dirksen, C.; Velde, C van de; Roukema, J.; Ent, F van der; Bell, A.; Meyenfeldt, M von

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators that professionals see when implementing a program incorporating ultra-short hospital admission in the treatment of breast cancer. Such an intervention is an essential step when designing a strategy for implementation

  6. Outcomes from the first mouth cancer awareness and clinical check-up day in the Dublin Dental University Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2012-04-01

    To increase public awareness about mouth cancer, the Dublin Dental University Hospital (DDUH) hosted an awareness day and free mouth check-up in September 2010. The messages of information, self-examination and risk management, and the importance of early detection, were available to all attendees. The role of general dental and medical practitioners in examination of the mouth was stressed.

  7. Long-term prognosis of breast cancer: An analysis of 462 patients in a general hospital in south east Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W. Nab (Henk); N. Kluck (Nadine); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); W.C.J. Hop (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the long-term prognosis was analysed of all 462 consecutive female breast cancer patients who were diagnosed and carefully staged between 1970 and 1980 in a 600-bed community hospital in Eindhoven, south east Netherlands. Follow-up of recurrence and causes of death was obta

  8. Large variation between hospitals in immediate breast reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, A C M; Mureau, M A M; Schreuder, K; van Dalen, T; Vrancken Peeters, M T F D; Schrieks, M; Maduro, J H; Siesling, S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to describe the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in hospitals in the Netherlands and determine whether patient and tumor factors account for the variation. METHODS: Patient

  9. Academic hospital staff compliance with a fecal immunochemical test-based colorectal cancer screening program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgia Vlachonikolou; Paraskevas Gkolfakis; Athanasios D Sioulas; Ioannis S Papanikolaou; Anastasia Melissaratou; Giannis-Aimant Moustafa; Eleni Xanthopoulou; Gerasimos Tsilimidos; Ioanna Tsironi; Paraskevas Filippidis; Chrysoula Malli; George D Dimitriadis; Konstantinos Triantafyllou

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To measure the compliance of an Academic Hospital staff with a colorectal cancer(CRC) screening program using fecal immunochemical test(FIT).METHODS: All employees of "Attikon" University General Hospital aged over 50 years were thoroughly informed by a team of physicians and medical students about the study aims and they were invited to undergo CRC screening using two rounds of FIT(DyoniFOB~ Combo H, DyonMed SA, Athens, Greece). The tests were provided for free and subjects tested positive were subsequently referred for colonoscopy. One year after completing the two rounds, participants were asked to be re-screened by means of the same test.RESULTS: Among our target population consisted of 211 employees, 59(27.9%) consented to participate, but only 41(19.4%) and 24(11.4%) completed the first and the second FIT round, respectively. Female gender was significantly associated with higher initial participation(P = 0.005) and test completion- first and second round-(P = 0.004 and P = 0.05) rates, respectively. Phy sician’s(13.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001) participation and test completion rates(7.5% vs 57.6%, P < 0.0001 for the first and 2.3% vs 34%, P < 0.0001 for the second round) were significantly lower compared to those of the administrative/technical staff. Similarly, nurses participated(25.8% vs 70.2%, P = 0.0002) and completed the first test round(19.3% vs 57.6%, P = 0.004) in a significant lower rate than the administrative/technical staff. One test proved false positive. No participant repeated the test one year later.CONCLUSION: Despite the well-organized, guided and supervised provision of the service, the compliance of the Academic Hospital personnel with a FIT-based CRC screening program was suboptimal, especially among physicians.

  10. Breast cancer surgery and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs): patient classification and hospital reimbursement in 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller-Kreinsen, David; Quentin, Wilm; Geissler, Alexander; Busse, Reinhard

    2013-10-01

    Researchers from eleven countries (i.e. Austria, England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden) compared how their DRG systems deal with breast cancer surgery patients. DRG algorithms and indicators of resource consumption were assessed for those DRGs that individually contain at least 1% of all breast cancer surgery patients. Six standardised case vignettes were defined and quasi prices according to national DRG-based hospital payment systems were ascertained. European DRG systems classify breast cancer surgery patients according to different sets of classification variables into three to seven DRGs. Quasi prices for an index case treated with partial mastectomy range from €577 in Poland to €5780 in the Netherlands. Countries award their highest payments for very different kinds of patients. Breast cancer specialists and national DRG authorities should consider how other countries' DRG systems classify breast cancer patients in order to identify potential scope for improvement and to ensure fair and appropriate reimbursement.

  11. Recognition of Lynch Syndrome Amongst Newly Diagnosed Colorectal Cancers at St. Paul’s Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Pi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is the most common cause of inherited colorectal cancer (CRC. In British Columbia, most centres still use clinical criteria (Amsterdam II, Revised Bethesda, or the BC Cancer Agency’s criteria to determine who should undergo further first-line testing in the form of microsatellite instability or immunohistochemistry staining. Given the limitations with this strategy, LS is thought to be underrecognized. Objective. To investigate whether LS is truly underrecognized when compared to the reported prevalence. Methods. A retrospective chart review of all CRC cases diagnosed at St. Paul’s Hospital from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. Results. 246 patients met inclusion criteria. 76% (83/109 with a family history of malignancy were unable to recall the specific malignancy or age of diagnosis. 18% (43/235 were only asked about a history of gastrointestinal related malignancy and 26% (65/246 met at least one of the three criteria but only 21% (13/63 received further investigation. Only 1.6% (4/246 had LS compared to the reported prevalence of 2–5% of all CRC cases. Conclusion. This data supports our hypothesis that LS is underrecognized. Issues at the patient, physician, and systems level need to be evaluated to determine where the limitations preventing appropriate testing are occurring.

  12. Hospital administration team development and support in a children's cancer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Penelope J

    2011-11-01

    The administration team in the Queensland Children's Cancer Centre at the Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, included a team of 16 administration staff supporting the service and the state-wide clinical network. Shortly after the creation of a new expanded service, issues became apparent in administration team morale, relationships, communication, processes, leadership, support and training. The analysis of these issues included team interviews and surveys, consultation with senior administration staff and monthly sick leave monitoring. Strategies implemented included providing information; the joint development of a team business plan and individual performance plans; a review of the team's structure, workload and business processes; engaging staff in quality improvements; and the development of relationships and leadership. As a result, the team reported being more comfortable and supported in their roles, had improved morale and worked better together with more consistent and improving business processes. They had clear purpose and expectations of their roles, displayed better customer service and had reduced sick leave. The study shows that in a high stress environment, such as a children's cancer centre, attention to the team's culture, vision and purpose, providing information and improving communication and relationships, when combined with a team's enthusiasm, will improve the team's growth, cooperation and work outcomes.

  13. Opioid medications and longitudinal risk of delirium in hospitalized cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Jean-David; Gagnon, Pierre; Roy, Marc-André; Harel, François; Tremblay, Annie

    2007-06-01

    Delirium is an important problem in hospitalized cancer patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether exposure to corticosteroids, benzodiazepines, or opioids predicted delirium. A prospective cohort study was conducted in an oncology/internal medicine population. Patients were assessed continuously for the presence of delirium until they were discharged by using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (Nu-DESC). Follow-up for outcome began after incident delirium. The primary outcome was the presence of a delirium event, which was defined as a Nu-DESC score >1. Strengths of associations of medications with delirium were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) in univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 114 patients (1823 patient-days) met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean follow-up from incident delirium was 16 days. The mean number of delirium events by patient was 6 (total number, 667 delirium events). Analysis by day on several occasions revealed significant associations between opioids and delirium. Corticosteroids and benzodiazepines were not associated significantly with an increased risk of delirium on any given day. Analysis by patient using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models showed an increased risk of delirium on any day of follow-up associated with opioid exposure in univariate analysis (OR of 1.70; Phospitalization was associated significantly with an increased longitudinal risk of delirium. (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  14. Factor analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale from a large cancer population.

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    Smith, Adam B; Selby, Peter J; Velikova, Galina; Stark, Dan; Wright, E Penny; Gould, Ann; Cull, Ann

    2002-06-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used as a tool for assessing psychological distress in patients and non-clinical groups. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results regarding the factor structure of the questionnaire for different groups of patients, and the general population. This study investigated the factor structure of the HADS in a large heterogeneous cancer population of 1474 patients. It also sought to investigate emerging evidence that the HADS conforms to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression (Clark & Watson, 1993), and to test the proposal that detection rates for clinical cases of anxiety and depression could be enhanced by partialling out the effects of higher order factors from the HADS (Dunbar et al., 2000). The results demonstrated a two-factor structure corresponding to the Anxiety and Depression subscales of the questionnaire. The factor structure remained stable for different subgroups of the sample, for males and females, as well as for different age groups, and a subgroup of metastatic cancer patients. The two factors were highly correlated (r =.52) and subsequent secondary factor analyses demonstrated a single higher order factor corresponding to psychological distress or negative affectivity. We concluded that the HADS comprises two factors corresponding to anhedonia and autonomic anxiety, which share a common variance with a primary factor namely psychological distress, and that the subscales of the HADS, rather than the residual scores (e.g. Dunbar et al., 2000) were more effective at detecting clinical cases of anxiety and depression.

  15. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital

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    Mohammad Ashraf Wani

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. Results: The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96. This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket. Conclusion: The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  16. Prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

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    Ghazali, Anis Kausar; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Mahmood, Zainal

    2010-07-01

    To determine the 5-year survival rate and prognostic factors for survival in patients with colorectal cancer treated at the Surgical Unit, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan, Malaysia. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 115 patients treated in HUSM from 1996 to 2005. Data of variables considered as prognostic factors were obtained from the records. Simple and multiple Cox proportional hazard regression using the stepwise method were used to model the prognostic factors for survival. We found that the significant prognostic factors were liver metastases [adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 3.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.95-7.22], Dukes C stage (adjusted HR: 4.65; 95% CI: 2.37-9.11), Dukes D stage (adjusted HR: 6.71; 95% CI: 2.92-15.48) and non-surgical treatment (adjusted HR: 3.75; 95% CI: 1.26-11.21). Colorectal patients treated at HUSM with Dukes C staging, presence of liver metastases and received treatment with both chemotherapy and radiotherapy are at the greatest risk of death from colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2010 Asian Surgical Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Awareness and practice of cervical cancer and Pap smear testing in a teaching hospital in Tehran

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    Mansoureh Ghaoomi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is known to be preventable because of long period of pre-invasive stage, availability of screening tools, and effective treatments for early invasive cervical lesions. Screening is main measures to prevent the disease and Pap smear is a screening strategy for cervical cancer. Current paper aimed to evaluate levels of awareness and practice regarding Pap smear screening among women aged between 20 to 65 years in Tehran (Iran. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study conducted in Tehran City of Iran in 2015 at Firoozgar Hospital. The research population included all married, widowed and divorced women aged 20-65 years. Data analysis was performed using the Pearson correlation and Student’s t-tests in SPSS, ver. 23 (Chicago, IL, USA. Results: Among 90 individuals who have fill questionnaire completely, 66.6% subjects had Pap smear tests. 40% of the individuals aged between 30 to 39 and the education level is distributed equally between Intermediate, Diploma and graduate and only 3 percent of them, continue their education to higher level. There was a significant relationship between the awareness of Pap smear and educational level (of both wives and husbands. The people who have graduate degree, have the best awareness. Working women revealed higher level of awareness about Pap smear. Shame and fear of taking the cancer were the most common reasons which lead to avoidance in doing the test by the women, while the most encouraging factors for performing the test were the information mostly provided by physicians and after that, the information provided by friends. Conclusion: The awareness of Pap smear test which was measured by weighting different questions in the questionnaire by experts, prove that the women aged above 39, have an average level of awareness of Pap smear test. Due to high prevalence of cervical cancer and prolonged pre invasive course, role of Pap smear for early diagnosis necessitate the use

  18. Delay in referring and related factors in patients with advanced breast cancer - Emam Hospital (2000

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    "Ghaem Maghami F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of study was to determine the frequency of delay referring and related factors in patients with advanced breast cancer, in Imam Khomeini Hospital in the 2000. Materials and Methods: Successively 200 patients were entered the study if they were consentient. A questionnaire was constructed and information was obtained through interviewing. Results: From the cases, 64 patients (32 percent referred without delay and 136 patients (68 percent referred tardily. The patients who were late in comparison with patients who didn’t late, had significantly higher mean age (P=0.004, lower education level (P=0.002, and lower economic status (P=0.001. The frequency rate of single were lower among them (P=0.001, fewer percent were residual of big cities (P=0.01 and they had less rate of available physician (P=0.004. 24.3 percent of delay referring patients and 53.1 percent of patients without delay has a positive family history of breast cancer (P=0.001. 62.5 percent of delay referring patients and 85 percent of patients without delay were aware about importance of Self Breast Examination (S.B.E (P=0.002 and respectively 84.4 percent and 98.4 percent were award about symptoms of breast cancer (P=0.01. 23.5 percent and 33 percent of patients with and without delay Knew the method of B.S.E respectively. It wasn’t a significant difference. Conclusion: Lack of awareness about necessity of medical consultation, fear, carelessly, unavailable physician and poverty were the major causes of delay in patients who referred late.

  19. Estimating the five-year survival of cervical cancer patients treated in hospital universiti sains malaysia.

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    Razak, Nuradhiathy Abd; Mn, Khattak; Zubairi, Yong Zulina; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Zaki, Nik Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the five-year survival among patients with cervical cancer treated in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. One hundred and twenty cervical cancer patients diagnosed between 1st July 1995 and 30th June 2007 were identified. Data were obtained from medical records. The survival probability was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test was applied to compare the survival distribution between groups. The overall five-year survival was 39.7% [95%CI (Confidence Interval): 30.7, 51.3] with a median survival time of 40.8 (95%CI: 34.0, 62.0) months. The log-rank test showed that there were survival differences between the groups for the following variables: stage at diagnosis (p=0.005); and primary treatment (p=0.0242). Patients who were diagnosed at the latest stage (III-IV) were found to have the lowest survival, 18.4% (95%CI: 6.75, 50.1), compared to stage I and II where the five-year survival was 54.7% (95%CI: 38.7, 77.2) and 40.8% (95%CI: 27.7, 60.3), respectively. The five-year survival was higher in patients who received surgery [52.6% (95%CI: 37.5, 73