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Sample records for cancer initiating cells

  1. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  2. Effects of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells

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    Tiffany M. Phillips

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer anemia causes fatigue and correlates with poor treatment outcome. Erythropoietin has been introduced in an attempt to correct these defects. However, five recent clinical trials reported a negative impact of erythropoietin on survival and/or tumor control, indicating that experimental evaluation of a possible direct effect of erythropoietin on cancer cells is required. Cancer recurrence is thought to rely on the proliferation of cancer initiating cells (CICs. In breast cancer, CICs can be identified by phenotypic markers and their fate is controlled by the Notch pathway. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the effect of erythropoietin on CICs in breast cancer cell lines. Levels of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR, CD24, CD44, Jagged-1 expression, activation of Notch-1 were assessed by flow cytometry. Self-renewing capacity of CICs was investigated in sphere formation assays. RESULTS: EpoR expression was found on the surface of CICs. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo increased the numbers of CICs and self-renewing capacity in a Notch-dependent fashion by induction of Jagged-1. Inhibitors of the Notch pathway and P13-kinase blocked both effects. CONCLUSIONS: Erythropoietin functionally affects CICs directly. Our observation may explain the negative impact of recombinant Epo on local control and survival of cancer patients with EpoR-positive tumors.

  3. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

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    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  4. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

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    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.daidone@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Amadeo 42, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2011-03-16

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup −/low} and/or CD133{sup +} expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1{sup +}), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  5. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

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    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-01

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer.

  6. HSP DNAJB8 Controls Tumor-Initiating Ability in Renal Cancer Stem-like Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishizawa, Satoshi; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Akari; Tamura, Yasuaki; Mori, Takashi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kamiguchi, Kenjiro; Asanuma, Hiroko; Morita, Rena; Sokolovskaya, Alice; Matsuzaki, Junichi; Yamada, Ren; Fujii, Reona; Kampinga, Harm H.; Kondo, Toru; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Hara, Isao; Sato, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are a small population of cancer cells with superior tumor initiating, self-renewal, and differentiation properties. In this study, we show that the cancer-testis antigen and HSP40 family member DNAJB8 contributes to the CSC phenotype in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). DNAJB

  7. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation.

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    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-19

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer.

  8. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

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    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; ZENG, ZHAOSHI; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  9. The Cancer Cell Map Initiative: Defining the Hallmark Networks of Cancer

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    Krogan, Nevan J.; Lippman, Scott; Agard, David A.; Ashworth, Alan; Ideker, Trey

    2017-01-01

    Progress in DNA sequencing has revealed the startling complexity of cancer genomes, which typically carry thousands of somatic mutations. However, it remains unclear which are the key driver mutations or dependencies in a given cancer and how these influence pathogenesis and response to therapy. Although tumors of similar types and clinical outcomes can have patterns of mutations that are strikingly different, it is becoming apparent that these mutations recurrently hijack the same hallmark molecular pathways and networks. For this reason, it is likely that successful interpretation of cancer genomes will require comprehensive knowledge of the molecular networks under selective pressure in oncogenesis. Here we announce the creation of a new effort, called The Cancer Cell Map Initiative (CCMI), aimed at systematically detailing these complex interactions among cancer genes and how they differ between diseased and healthy states. We discuss recent progress that enables creation of these Cancer Cell Maps across a range of tumor types and how they can be used to target networks disrupted in individual patients, significantly accelerating the development of precision medicine. PMID:26000852

  10. Drug-resistant colon cancer cells produce high carcinoembryonic antigen and might not be cancer-initiating cells

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    Lee HC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-chung Lee,1,2 Qing-Dong Ling,1,3 Wan-Chun Yu,4 Chunh-Ming Hung,4 Ta-Chun Kao,4 Yi-Wei Huang,4 Akon Higuchi3–51Graduate Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, 2Department of Surgery, Cathay General Hospital, Da'an District, Taipei, 3Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, Hsi-Chi City, Taipei, 4Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Reproduction, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Okura, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: We evaluated the higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA secreted by the LoVo human colon carcinoma cells in a medium containing anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells were analyzed by subcutaneously xenotransplanting them into mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the drug-resistant cells isolated in this study were cancer-initiating cells, known also as cancer stem cells (CSCs.Methods: The production of CEA was investigated in LoVo cells that were cultured with 0–10 mM of anticancer drugs, and we evaluated the increase in CEA production by the LoVo cells that were stimulated by anticancer drug treatment. The expression of several CSC markers in LoVo cells treated with anticancer drugs was also evaluated. Following anticancer drug treatment, LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the flanks of severe combined immunodeficiency mice in order to evaluate the CSC fraction.Results: Production of CEA by LoVo cells was stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells expressed lower levels of CSC markers, and LoVo cells treated with any of the anticancer drugs tested did not generate tumors within 8 weeks from when the cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results suggest that the drug-resistant LoVo cells have a smaller population of CSCs than the

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 is required for lung cancer stem cell maintenance, tumor initiation and metastatic potential.

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    Verline Justilien

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (Mmps stimulate tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the extracellular matrix. Here we reveal an unexpected role for Mmp10 (stromelysin 2 in the maintenance and tumorigenicity of mouse lung cancer stem-like cells (CSC. Mmp10 is highly expressed in oncosphere cultures enriched in CSCs and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mmp10 leads to a loss of stem cell marker gene expression and inhibition of oncosphere growth, clonal expansion, and transformed growth in vitro. Interestingly, clonal expansion of Mmp10 deficient oncospheres can be restored by addition of exogenous Mmp10 protein to the culture medium, demonstrating a direct role for Mmp10 in the proliferation of these cells. Oncospheres exhibit enhanced tumor-initiating and metastatic activity when injected orthotopically into syngeneic mice, whereas Mmp10-deficient cultures show a severe defect in tumor initiation. Conversely, oncospheres implanted into syngeneic non-transgenic or Mmp10(-/- mice show no significant difference in tumor initiation, growth or metastasis, demonstrating the importance of Mmp10 produced by cancer cells rather than the tumor microenvironment in lung tumor initiation and maintenance. Analysis of gene expression data from human cancers reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor Mmp10 expression and metastatic behavior in many human tumor types. Thus, Mmp10 is required for maintenance of a highly tumorigenic, cancer-initiating, metastatic stem-like cell population in lung cancer. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Mmp10 is a critical lung cancer stem cell gene and novel therapeutic target for lung cancer stem cells.

  12. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

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    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer.

  13. A Quest for Initiating Cells of Head and Neck Cancer and Their Treatment

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    Chen, Chao [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital (China); Köberle, Beate [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-27

    The biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and other cancers have been related to cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Specific markers, which vary considerably depending on tumor type or tissue of origin, characterize CSC. CSC are cancer initiating, sustaining and mostly quiescent. Compared to bulk tumors, CSC are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy and may have low immunogenicity. Therapeutic targeting of CSC may improve clinical outcome. HNSCC has two main etiologies: human papillomavirus, a virus infecting epithelial stem cells, and tobacco and alcohol abuse. Here, current knowledge of HNSCC-CSC biology is reviewed and parallels to CSC of other origin are drawn where necessary for a comprehensive picture.

  14. Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells.

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    Wculek, Stefanie K; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-12-17

    Despite progress in the development of drugs that efficiently target cancer cells, treatments for metastatic tumours are often ineffective. The now well-established dependency of cancer cells on their microenvironment suggests that targeting the non-cancer-cell component of the tumour might form a basis for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. However, the as-yet poorly characterized contribution of host responses during tumour growth and metastatic progression represents a limitation to exploiting this approach. Here we identify neutrophils as the main component and driver of metastatic establishment within the (pre-)metastatic lung microenvironment in mouse breast cancer models. Neutrophils have a fundamental role in inflammatory responses and their contribution to tumorigenesis is still controversial. Using various strategies to block neutrophil recruitment to the pre-metastatic site, we demonstrate that neutrophils specifically support metastatic initiation. Importantly, we find that neutrophil-derived leukotrienes aid the colonization of distant tissues by selectively expanding the sub-pool of cancer cells that retain high tumorigenic potential. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the leukotriene-generating enzyme arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) abrogates neutrophil pro-metastatic activity and consequently reduces metastasis. Our results reveal the efficacy of using targeted therapy against a specific tumour microenvironment component and indicate that neutrophil Alox5 inhibition may limit metastatic progression.

  15. Markers of tumor-initiating cells predict chemoresistance in breast cancer.

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    Chang Gong

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evidence is lacking whether the number of breast tumor-initiating cells (BT-ICs directly correlates with the sensitivity of breast tumors to chemotherapy. Here, we evaluated the association between proportion of BT-ICs and chemoresistance of the tumors. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining(IHC was used to examine the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and TUNEL was used to detect the apoptosis index. The significance of various variables in patient survival was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model. The percentage of BT-ICs in breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors was determined by ALDH1 enzymatic assay, CD44(+/CD24(- phenotype and mammosphere formation assay. RESULTS: ALDH1 expression determined by IHC in primary breast cancers was associated with poor clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and reduced survival in breast cancer patients. Breast tumors that contained higher proportion of BT-ICs with CD44(+/CD24(- phenotype, ALDH1 enzymatic activity and sphere forming capacity were more resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Chemoresistant cell lines AdrR/MCF-7 and SK-3rd, had increased number of cells with sphere forming capacity, CD44(+/CD24(- phenotype and side-population. Regardless the proportion of T-ICs, FACS-sorted CD44(+/CD24(- cells that derived from primary tumors or breast cancer lines were about 10-60 fold more resistant to chemotherapy relative to the non- CD44(+/CD24(- cells and their parental cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that MDR1 (multidrug resistance 1 and ABCG2 (ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 were upregulated in CD44(+/CD24(- cells. Treatment with lapatinib or salinomycin reduced the proportion of BT-ICs by nearly 50 fold, and thus enhanced the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by around 30 fold. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the proportion of BT-ICs is associated with chemotherapeutic

  16. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

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    López Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-initiating cells (CICs are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I. Methods Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP. Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. Results CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR. Conclusions We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among

  17. CD133+ anaplastic thyroid cancer cells initiate tumors in immunodeficient mice and are regulated by thyrotropin.

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    Susan Friedman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most lethal human malignancies. Its rapid onset and resistance to conventional therapeutics contribute to a mean survival of six months after diagnosis and make the identification of thyroid-cancer-initiating cells increasingly important. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In prior studies of ATC cell lines, CD133(+ cells exhibited stem-cell-like features such as high proliferation, self-renewal and colony-forming ability in vitro. Here we show that transplantation of CD133(+ cells, but not CD133(- cells, into immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice is sufficient to induce growth of tumors in vivo. We also describe how the proportion of ATC cells that are CD133(+ increases dramatically over three months of culture, from 7% to more than 80% of the total. This CD133(+ cell pool can be further separated by flow cytometry into two distinct populations: CD133(+/high and CD133(+/low. Although both subsets are capable of long-term tumorigenesis, the rapidly proliferating CD133(+/high cells are by far the most efficient. They also express high levels of the stem cell antigen Oct4 and the receptor for thyroid stimulating hormone, TSHR. Treating ATC cells with TSH causes a three-fold increase in the numbers of CD133(+ cells and elicits a dose-dependent up-regulation of the expression of TSHR and Oct4 in these cells. More importantly, immunohistochemical analysis of tissue specimens from ATC patients indicates that CD133 is highly expressed on tumor cells but not on neighboring normal thyroid cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that CD133(+ ATC cells are solely responsible for tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Our data also give a unique insight into the regulation of CD133 by TSH. These highly tumorigenic CD133(+ cells and the activated TSH signaling pathway may be useful targets for future ATC therapies.

  18. Differentiated human colorectal cancer cells protect tumor-initiating cells from irinotecan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmink, B.L.; Houdt, W.J.; Vries, R.G.J.; Hoogwater, F.J.; Govaert, K.M.; Verheem, A.; Nijkamp, M.W.; Steller, E.J.; Jimenez, C.R.; Clevers, H.; Rinkes, I.H.; Kranenburg, O.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Stem cells of normal tissues have resistance mechanisms that allow them to survive genotoxic insults. The stem cell-like cells of tumors are defined by their tumor-initiating capacity and may have retained these resistance mechanisms, making them resistant to chemotherapy. We stud

  19. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer prevention: Nrf2 signaling, epigenetics, and cell death mechanisms in blocking cancer initiation and progression

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    Lee, Jong Hun; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Fuentes, Francisco; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-01-01

    Reactive metabolites from carcinogens and oxidative stress can drive genetic mutations, genomic instability, neoplastic transformation, and ultimately carcinogenesis. Numerous dietary phytochemicals in vegetables/fruits have been shown to possess cancer chemopreventive effects in both preclinical animal models and human epidemiological studies. These phytochemicals could prevent the initiation of carcinogenesis via either direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) or, more importantly, the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes. These defense enzymes mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against ROS/RNS and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In addition, these compounds would kill initiated/transformed cancer cells in vitro and in in vivo xenografts via diverse anti-cancer mechanisms. These mechanisms include the activation of signaling kinases (e.g., JNK), caspases and the mitochondria damage/cytochrome c pathways. Phytochemicals may also have anti-cancer effects by inhibiting the IKK/NF-κB pathway, inhibiting STAT3, and causing cell cycle arrest. In addition, other mechanisms may include epigenetic alterations (e.g., inhibition of HDACs, miRNAs, and the modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes). In this review, we will discuss: the current advances in the study of Nrf2 signaling; Nrf2-deficient tumor mouse models; the epigenetic control of Nrf2 in tumorigenesis and chemoprevention; Nrf2-mediated cancer chemoprevention by naturally occurring dietary phytochemicals; and the mutation or hyper-expression of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway in advanced tumor cells. The future development of dietary phytochemicals for chemoprevention must integrate in vitro signaling mechanisms, relevant biomarkers of human diseases, and combinations of different phytochemicals and/or non-toxic therapeutic drugs, including

  20. Elimination of head and neck cancer initiating cells through targeting glucose regulated protein78 signaling

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    Huang Chih-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a highly lethal cancer that contains cellular and functional heterogeneity. Previously, we enriched a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic head and neck cancer initiating cells (HN-CICs from HNSCC. However, the molecular mechanisms by which to govern the characteristics of HN-CICs remain unclear. GRP78, a stress-inducible endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, has been reported to play a crucial role in the maintenance of embryonic stem cells, but the role of GRP78 in CICs has not been elucidated. Results Initially, we recognized GRP78 as a putative candidate on mediating the stemness and tumorigenic properties of HN-CICs by differential systemic analyses. Subsequently, cells with GRP78 anchored at the plasma membrane (memGRP78+ exerted cancer stemness properties of self-renewal, differentiation and radioresistance. Of note, xenotransplantation assay indicated merely 100 memGRP78+ HNSCCs resulted in tumor growth. Moreover, knockdown of GRP78 significantly reduced the self-renewal ability, side population cells and expression of stemness genes, but inversely promoted cell differentiation and apoptosis in HN-CICs. Targeting GRP78 also lessened tumorigenicity of HN-CICs both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, co-expression of GRP78 and Nanog predicted the worse survival prognosis of HNSCC patients by immunohistochemical analyses. Finally, depletion of GRP78 in HN-CICs induced the expression of Bax, Caspase 3, and PTEN. Conclusions In summary, memGRP78 should be a novel surface marker for isolation of HN-CICs, and targeting GRP78 signaling might be a potential therapeutic strategy for HNSCC through eliminating HN-CICs.

  1. IKKβ in intestinal mesenchymal cells promotes initiation of colitis-associated cancer.

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    Koliaraki, Vasiliki; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kollias, George

    2015-12-14

    The importance of mesenchymal cells in inflammation and/or neoplastic transformation is well recognized, but their role in the initiation of these processes, particularly in the intestine, remains elusive. Using mouse models of colorectal cancer, we show that IKKβ in intestinal mesenchymal cells (IMCs) is critically involved in colitis-associated, but not spontaneous tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that IMC-specific IKKβ is involved in the initiation of colitis-associated cancer (CAC), as in its absence mice develop reduced immune cell infiltration, epithelial cell proliferation, and dysplasia at the early stages of the disease. At the molecular level, these effects are associated with decreased early production of proinflammatory and protumorigenic mediators, including IL-6, and reduced STAT3 activation. Ex vivo IKKβ-deficient IMCs show defective responses to innate immune stimuli such as LPS, as shown by decreased NF-κB signaling and reduced expression of important NF-κB target genes. Collectively, our results reveal a hitherto unknown role of mesenchymal IKKβ in driving inflammation and enabling carcinogenesis in the intestine.

  2. Chemo-radionuclide therapy for thyroid cancer. Initial experimental study with cultured cells

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    Misaki, Takashi; Iwata, Masahiro; Iida, Yasuhiro; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    Radioiodine therapy has long been used for distant metastases of thyroid cancer. Although partially effective in most cases, it can render a complete cure only in a limited number of patients. One way to enhance its efficacy would be to combine it with antineoplastic agents. Here we describe an initial in vitro evaluation with 4 thyroid cancer cell lines. Cells were sparsely seeded in microtiter plates and allowed to grow for 2 days; then they were exposed to sublethal concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP), doxorubicin (Dox), or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by treatment with I-131 for 48 hr. Cell survival was measured with a commercial kit based on the colorimetry of succinate dehydrogenase activity. Chemotherapeutic drugs exerted similar concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects in all 4 cell lines. The doses necessary to reduce the surviving fraction to half of the control were about 3 {mu}g/ml for CDDP, 0.3 {mu}g/ml for Dox, and 3 {mu}g/ml for 5-FU (when used continuously for 48 hours). On the other hand, sensitivity to I-131 irradiation differed among the lines; same doses (7.4-14.8 MBq/ml) caused the greatest damage in FRO cells, a modest effect in NPA and WRO, and only minimal change in B-CPAP. The combined effect was most demonstrable in wells treated with Dox and radioiodine, whereas the addition of CDDP or 5-FU had marginal or insignificant merit, respectively. In FRO cells, half-lethal doses of the above mentioned CDDP, Dox, and 5-FU, when used together with 14.8 MBq/ml I-131, reduced cell survival to 54.5%, 29.4% and 33.4%, respectively, vs. 60.2% with radioiodine alone. In vitro, clinical concentrations of Dox can accelerate the killing of thyroid cancer cells by radioiodine. These favorable experimental results warrant future studies to evaluate whether this new bidisciplinary approach is clinically relevant and feasible. (author)

  3. Novel population of small tumour-initiating stem cells in the ovaries of women with borderline ovarian cancer

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    Virant-Klun, Irma; Stimpfel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Small stem cells with diameters of up to 5 μm previously isolated from adult human ovaries indicated pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially primordial germ cells, and developed into primitive oocyte-like cells in vitro. Here, we show that a comparable population of small stem cells can be found in the ovarian tissue of women with borderline ovarian cancer, which, in contrast to small stem cells in “healthy” ovaries, formed spontaneous tumour-like structures and expressed some markers related to pluripotency and germinal lineage. The gene expression profile of these small putative cancer stem cells differed from similar cells sorted from “healthy” ovaries by 132 upregulated and 97 downregulated genes, including some important forkhead box and homeobox genes related to transcription regulation, developmental processes, embryogenesis, and ovarian cancer. These putative cancer stem cells are suggested to be a novel population of ovarian tumour-initiating cells in humans. PMID:27703207

  4. Tumour-initiating stem-like cells in human prostate cancer exhibit increased NF-κB signalling

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Androgen depletion is a key strategy for treating human prostate cancer, but the presence of hormone-independent cells escaping treatment remains a major therapeutic challenge. Here, we identify a minor subset of stem-like human prostate tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that do not express prostate cancer markers, such as androgen receptor or prostate specific antigen. These TICs possess stem cell characteristics and multipotency as demonstrated by in vitro sphere-formation and in vivo tumour-i...

  5. Global cancer research initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R Love

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Richard R LoveThe Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Cancer is an increasing problem for low- and middle-income countries undergoing an epidemiologic transition from dominantly acute communicable disease to more frequent chronic disease with increased public health successes in the former domain. Progress against cancer in high-income countries has been modest and has come at enormous expense. There are several well-conceived global policy and planning initiatives which, with adequate political will, can favorably impact the growing global cancer challenges. Most financial resources for cancer, however, are spent on diagnosis and management of patients with disease in circumstances where specific knowledge about effective approaches is significantly limited, and the majority of interventions, other than surgery, are not cost-effective in resource-limited countries by global standards. In summary, how to intervene effectively on a global scale for the majority of citizens who develop cancer is poorly defined. In contrast to technology-transfer approaches, markedly increased clinical research activities are more likely to benefit cancer sufferers. In these contexts, a global cancer research initiative is proposed, and mechanisms for realizing such an effort are suggested.Keywords: breast cancer, research, global, international, low-income, middle-income

  6. Immunomodulating and Immunoresistance Properties of Cancer-Initiating Cells: Implications for the Clinical Success of Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccalli, Cristina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ferrone, Soldano

    2017-04-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) represent a relatively rare subpopulation of cells endowed with self-renewal, stemness properties, tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice, and resistance to standard therapies as well as to immunotherapy. Here, we review the biological and immunological characteristics of CICs with special focus on the immunomodulating mechanisms they utilize to escape from immunosurveillance. The recently developed immunotherapeutic strategies have yielded remarkable clinical results in many types of tumors, indicating that indeed a patient's immune system can mount an immune response, which is effective in controlling tumor growth. However, a high proportion of patients is resistant or acquires resistance to these therapeutic strategies. The latter findings may reflect, at least in some cases, the inability of the immunotherapeutic strategies used to eradicate CICs. The CICs that escape immune recognition and destruction may give rise to new tumors in the same organ site or through the metastatic colonization in other anatomic sites. Identification of novel therapeutic approaches that can eradicate CICs is a major challenge in the cancer therapy area. An improved understanding of the interactions of CICs with immune system and with tumor microenvironment may contribute to optimize the available therapies and to design novel combination treatments for cancer therapy.

  7. A prospective study of PET/CT in initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Langer, S W

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15%-20% of all lung cancer cases. Accurate and fast staging is mandatory when choosing treatment, but current staging procedures are time consuming and lack sensitivity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective study was designed to examine the ro...

  8. Optimization of the tissue source, malignancy, and initial substrate of tumor cell-derived matrices to increase cancer cell chemoresistance against 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2015-02-13

    The low chemoresistance of in vitro cancer cells inhibits the development of new anti-cancer drugs. Thus, development of a new in vitro culture system is required to increase the chemoresistance of in vitro cancer cells. Tumor cell-derived matrices have been reported to increase the chemoresistance of in vitro cancer cells. However, it remains unclear how tissue sources and the malignancy of cells used for the preparation of matrices affect the chemoresistance of tumor cell-derived matrices. Moreover, it remains unclear how the initial substrates used for the preparation of matrices affect the chemoresistance. In this study, we compared the effects of tissue sources and the malignancy of tumor cells, as well as the effect of the initial substrates on chemoresistance against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The chemoresistance of breast and colon cancer cells against 5-FU increased on matrices prepared with cells derived from the corresponding original tissues with higher malignancy. Moreover, the chemoresistance against 5-FU was altered on matrices prepared using different initial substrates that exhibited different characteristics of protein adsorption. Taken together, these results indicated that the appropriate selection of tissue sources, malignancy of tumor cells, and initial substrates used for matrix preparation is important for the preparation of tumor cell-derived matrices for chemoresistance assays.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells in ErbB2-driven breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Borcherding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality for females worldwide [1]. Improving early screening strategies and understanding the events that lead to tumor initiation have led to demonstrable improvements in clinical outcome. Our previous work revealed a variance in the tumorigenic capacity between different mammary epithelial cell populations in an MMTV-ErbB2 mouse model. In order to greater understand how different mammary epithelial cells influence the tumorigenic capacity in ErbB2-induced breast cancer, we transplanted different cell populations from pre-neoplastic MMTV-ErbB2 female mice into recipient mice for tumorigenic study. We found that different mammary epithelial cells bear different tumorigenic potentials even when induced by the same ErbB2 proto-oncogene. To understand the difference in tumors formed from different epithelial cells, we performed gene expression profiling using these tumors (GSE64487. Several genes were further validated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Here we provide further details on the experimental methods and microarray analysis. This data provides a resource to further understanding how different mammary cell populations can initiate ErbB2-driven tumors and the role of these cell populations as putative tumor-initiating cells (TICs.

  10. Phenotypic characterization of drug resistance and tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human bone tumor osteosarcoma cell line OS-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell theory suggest that presence of small subpopulation of cancer stem cells are the major implication in the cancer treatment and also responsible for tumor recurrence. Based on Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique, we have identified about 3.3% of cancer stem like side population (SP cells from human osteosarcoma OS-77 cell line whose prevalence is significantly reduced to 0.3% after treatment with verapamil. The sphere formation assay revealed that osteosarcoma SP cells are highly capable to form tumor spheres (sarcospheres. Further by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR, we show that OS-77 SP cells have enhanced expression of stem cell surface markers such as CD44, Nanog and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene (ABCG2 which contributes to self-renewal and drug resistance, respectively. Our findings help to designing a novel therapeutic drug which could effectively target the cancer stem cells and prevent the tumor relapse.

  11. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; LIN, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding tran...

  12. A mathematical model of cancer stem cell driven tumor initiation: implications of niche size and loss of homeostatic regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara N Gentry

    Full Text Available Hierarchical organized tissue structures, with stem cell driven cell differentiation, are critical to the homeostatic maintenance of most tissues, and this underlying cellular architecture is potentially a critical player in the development of a many cancers. Here, we develop a mathematical model of mutation acquisition to investigate how deregulation of the mechanisms preserving stem cell homeostasis contributes to tumor initiation. A novel feature of the model is the inclusion of both extrinsic and intrinsic chemical signaling and interaction with the niche to control stem cell self-renewal. We use the model to simulate the effects of a variety of types and sequences of mutations and then compare and contrast all mutation pathways in order to determine which ones generate cancer cells fastest. The model predicts that the sequence in which mutations occur significantly affects the pace of tumorigenesis. In addition, tumor composition varies for different mutation pathways, so that some sequences generate tumors that are dominated by cancerous cells with all possible mutations, while others are primarily comprised of cells that more closely resemble normal cells with only one or two mutations. We are also able to show that, under certain circumstances, healthy stem cells diminish due to the displacement by mutated cells that have a competitive advantage in the niche. Finally, in the event that all homeostatic regulation is lost, exponential growth of the cancer population occurs in addition to the depletion of normal cells. This model helps to advance our understanding of how mutation acquisition affects mechanisms that influence cell-fate decisions and leads to the initiation of cancers.

  13. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Li, Jessica; Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-05-04

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC{sub 50} for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC{sub 50} around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  14. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs. Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS, we found that the IC50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 µM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC50 around 1 µM for SUM-149 and around 2 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  15. Dependency of colorectal cancer on a TGF-beta-driven programme in stromal cells for metastasis initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calon, Alexandre; Espinet, Elisa; Palomo-Ponce, Sergio; Tauriello, Daniele V. F.; Iglesias, Mar; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Sevillano, Marta; Nadal, Cristina; Jung, Peter; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Byrom, Daniel; Riera, Antoni; Rossell, David; Mangues, Ramón; Massague, Joan; Sancho, Elena; Batlle, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A large proportion of colorectal cancers (CRCs) display mutational inactivation of the TGF-beta pathway yet paradoxically, they are characterized by elevated TGF-beta production. Here, we unveil a prometastatic programme induced by TGF-beta in the microenvironment that associates with a high-risk of CRC relapse upon treatment. The activity of TGF-beta on stromal cells increases the efficiency of organ colonization by CRC cells whereas mice treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of TGFBR1 are resilient to metastasis formation. Secretion of IL11 by TGF-beta-stimulated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) triggers GP130/STAT3 signalling in tumour cells. This crosstalk confers a survival advantage to metastatic cells. The dependency on the TGF-beta stromal programme for metastasis initiation could be exploited to improve the diagnosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:23153532

  16. Outsmart tumor exosomes to steal the cancer initiating cell its niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuma, Florian; Zöller, Margot

    2014-10-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles that derive from endosomes and are delivered by many cells, including tumor cells that are a particular rich source of exosomes. Exosomes are suggested to be the most potent intercellular communicators. Being recovered in all body fluids, they can communicate with neighboring as well as distant cells. The latter was first described for dendritic cell exosomes that can initiate T cell activation. However, tumor exosomes (TEX) may impede this crosstalk. Besides with hematopoietic cells, TEX communicate with the tumor cell itself, but also with host stroma cells and endothelial cells. This crosstalk received much attention as there is strong evidence that TEX account for angiogenesis and premetastatic niche formation, which may proceed directly via binding and uptake of TEX by cells in the premetastatic organ or indirectly via TEX being taken up by hematopoietic progenitors in the bone marrow (BM), which mature toward lineages with immunosuppressive features or are forced toward premature release from the BM and homing into premetastatic organs. Knowing these deleterious activities of TEX, it becomes demanding to search for modes of therapeutic interference. I here introduce our hypothesis that metastasis formation may be hampered by tailored exosomes that outsmart TEX. The essential prerequisites are an in depth knowledge on TEX binding, uptake, binding-initiated signal transduction and uptake-promoted target cell reprogramming.

  17. Lung cancer tumorigenicity and drug resistance are maintained through ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) tumor initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Zhijie; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Ho, Ka-Yan; Wang, Junwen; Sham, Mai-Har; Wong, Maria Pik

    2013-10-01

    Limited improvement in long term survival of lung cancer patients has been achieved by conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy. To explore the potentials of tumor initiating cells (TIC)-directed therapy, it is essential to identify the cell targets and understand their maintenance mechanisms. We have analyzed the performance of ALDH/CD44 co-expression as TIC markers and treatment targets of lung cancer using well-validated in vitro and in vivo analyses in multiple established and patient-derived lung cancer cells. The ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset showed the highest enhancement of stem cell phenotypic properties compared to ALDH(hi)CD44(lo), ALDH(lo)CD44(hi), ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) cells and unsorted controls. They showed higher invasion capacities, pluripotency genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors expression, lower intercellular adhesion protein expression and higher G2/M phase cell cycle fraction. In immunosuppressed mice, the ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)xenografts showed the highest tumor induction frequency, serial transplantability, shortest latency, largest volume and highest growth rates. Inhibition of sonic Hedgehog and Notch developmental pathways reduced ALDH+CD44+ compartment. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy resulted in higher AALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset viability and ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) subset apoptosis fraction. ALDH inhibition and CD44 knockdown led to reduced stemness gene expression and sensitization to drug treatment. In accordance, clinical lung cancers containing a higher abundance of ALDH and CD44-coexpressing cells was associated with lower recurrence-free survival. Together, results suggested theALDH(hi)CD44(hi)compartment was the cellular mediator of tumorigenicity and drug resistance. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms underlying ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)TIC maintenance would be beneficial for the development of long term lung cancer control.

  18. Small RNAs targeting transcription start site induce heparanase silencing through interference with transcription initiation in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosong Jiang

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPA, an endo-h-D-glucuronidase that cleaves the heparan sulfate chain of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is overexpressed in majority of human cancers. Recent evidence suggests that small interfering RNA (siRNA induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS in human cells. In this study, transfection of siRNA against -9/+10 bp (siH3, but not -174/-155 bp (siH1 or -134/-115 bp (siH2 region relative to transcription start site (TSS locating at 101 bp upstream of the translation start site, resulted in TGS of heparanase in human prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells in a sequence-specific manner. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed no DNA methylation of CpG islands within heparanase promoter in siH3-transfected cells. The TGS of heparanase did not involve changes of epigenetic markers histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 or active chromatin marker acetylated histone H3 (AcH3. The regulation of alternative splicing was not involved in siH3-mediated TGS. Instead, siH3 interfered with transcription initiation via decreasing the binding of both RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B (TFIIB, but not the binding of transcription factors Sp1 or early growth response 1, on the heparanase promoter. Moreover, Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 facilitated the decreased binding of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB on heparanase promoter, and were necessary in siH3-induced TGS of heparanase. Stable transfection of the short hairpin RNA construct targeting heparanase TSS (-9/+10 bp into cancer cells, resulted in decreased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells in vitro and in athymic mice models. These results suggest that small RNAs targeting TSS can induce TGS of heparanase via interference with transcription initiation, and significantly suppress the tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells.

  19. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese;

    2012-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells...... become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors....... We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed...

  1. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  2. The role of maintenance proteins in the preservation of epithelial cell identity during mammary gland remodeling and breast cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradini, Danila; Oriana, Saro

    2014-02-01

    During normal postnatal mammary gland development and adult remodeling related to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and lactation, ovarian hormones and peptide growth factors contribute to the delineation of a definite epithelial cell identity. This identity is maintained during cell replication in a heritable but DNA-independent manner. The preservation of cell identity is fundamental, especially when cells must undergo changes in response to intrinsic and extrinsic signals. The maintenance proteins, which are required for cell identity preservation, act epigenetically by regulating gene expression through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Among the maintenance proteins, the Trithorax (TrxG) and Polycomb (PcG) group proteins are the best characterized. In this review, we summarize the structures and activities of the TrxG and PcG complexes and describe their pivotal roles in nuclear estrogen receptor activity. In addition, we provide evidence that perturbations in these epigenetic regulators are involved in disrupting epithelial cell identity, mammary gland remodeling, and breast cancer initiation.

  3. Docetaxel for non small cell lung cancer harboring the activated EGFR mutation with T790M at initial presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamane H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hiromichi Yamane,1 Nobuaki Ochi,1 Masayuki Yasugi,2 Takayuki Tabayashi,1 Tomoko Yamagishi,1 Yasumasa Monobe,3 Akiko Hisamoto,4 Katsuyuki Kiura,4 Nagio Takigawa1 1Department of General Internal Medicine 4, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Fukuyama Medical Center, Fukuyama, Japan; 3Department of Pathology, Kawasaki Medical School Kawasaki Hospital, Okayama, Japan; 4Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Respiratory Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan Abstract: A 72-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the upper lobe of the right lung, with pleural effusion. Cytologic examination identified adenocarcinoma cells in the right pleural effusion. Furthermore, both a deletion mutation in exon 19 and a threonine–methionine substitution mutation at position 790 in exon 20 (T790M were detected in the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR in the malignant cells. As systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and pemetrexed or erlotinib proved ineffective, docetaxel monotherapy was initiated as a third-line treatment. Following salvage chemotherapy, her Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved from 3 to 1, with tumor regression over 5 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful docetaxel treatment for a patient with NSCLC harboring the T790M EGFR-activating mutation identified before treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, EGFR mutation, pretreatment mutation, T790M, docetaxel

  4. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs.

  5. Integration of Nuclear- and Extranuclear-Initiated Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madak Erdogan, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    Estrogenic hormones exert their effects through binding to Estrogen Receptors (ERs), which work in concert with coregulators and extranuclear signaling pathways to control gene expression in normal as well as cancerous states, including breast tumors. In this thesis, we have used multiple genome-wide analysis tools to elucidate various ways that…

  6. Retreatment with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor After Initial Failure in Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongtong AN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFRTKI shows favorable antitumor activity against chemorefractory non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, patients with advanced NSCLC have limited treatment options available if they are refractory to EGFR-TKI. To study the influence of the retreatment EGFR-TKI after failure of first-line TKI, we carried out this retrospective study. Methods Total 71 patients were analyzed who experienced treatment failure from their initial use of EGFR-TKI. After a period of time, they were retreated with TKI as tumor progression was observed. Results Of the 71 patients who received retreatment TKI, it was observed in 7% in partial response (PR, 36.6% in stable disease (SD, 56.3% in progressive disease (PD. Disease control rate (DCR was 43.7%. Twenty-six (36.6% patients were well controlled by retreatment with TKI monotherapy for not less than 3 months. Five (7.0% patients had partial response. Exon 21 mutation, PFS not less than 6 months during initial treatment TKI, and the interval not less than 3 months between initial treatment, and retreatment with TKI was associated with a good progression free survival based on univariate COX analysis (P=0.034; P=0.013; P=0.046. Conclusion It has been shown the possibility that retreatment with TKI might be useful when (1 Exon 21 has active mutation, (2 initial treatment shows a favorable PFS (≥ 6 months, and (3 there has been a period of time (≥3 months following the termination of the initial TKI treatment.

  7. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    carcinoma 25 15 Cribriform carcinoma 5 Adenosquamous carcinoma 5 5 Glandular carcinoma 5 Mammary carcinoma in situ 5 Lymph node hyperplasia 5... Glandular carcinoma 7.14 Mammary carcinoma in situ 5.00 Lymph node hyperplasia 5.00 14.29 Lymph node with metastasis 5.00 7.14 a n...2010. Bidirectional signaling of mammary epithelium and stroma: implications for breast cancer- preventive actions of dietary factors. J Nutr Biochem

  8. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  9. Identification of cancer initiating cells in K-Ras driven lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Sara; Mijimolle, Nieves; Francoz, Sarah; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Barbacid, Mariano

    2014-01-07

    Ubiquitous expression of a resident K-Ras(G12V) oncogene in adult mice revealed that most tissues are resistant to K-Ras oncogenic signals. Indeed, K-Ras(G12V) expression only induced overt tumors in lungs. To identify these transformation-permissive cells, we induced K-Ras(G12V) expression in a very limited number of adult lung cells (0.2%) and monitored their fate by X-Gal staining, a surrogate marker coexpressed with the K-Ras(G12V) oncoprotein. Four weeks later, 30% of these cells had proliferated to form small clusters. However, only SPC(+) alveolar type II (ATII) cells were able to form hyperplastic lesions, some of which progressed to adenomas and adenocarcinomas. In contrast, induction of K-Ras(G12V) expression in lung cells by intratracheal infection with adenoviral-Cre particles generated hyperplasias in all regions except the proximal airways. Bronchiolar and bronchioalveolar duct junction hyperplasias were primarily made of CC10(+) Clara cells. Some of them progressed to form benign adenomas. However, only alveolar hyperplasias, exclusively made up of SPC(+) ATII cells, progressed to yield malignant adenocarcinomas. Adenoviral infection induced inflammatory infiltrates primarily made of T and B cells. This inflammatory response was essential for the development of K-Ras(G12V)-driven bronchiolar hyperplasias and adenomas, but not for the generation of SPC(+) ATII lesions. Finally, activation of K-Ras(G12V) during embryonic development under the control of a Sca1 promoter yielded CC10(+), but not SPC(+), hyperplasias, and adenomas. These results, taken together, illustrate that different types of lung cells can generate benign lesions in response to K-Ras oncogenic signals. However, in adult mice, only SPC(+) ATII cells were able to yield malignant adenocarcinomas.

  10. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  11. Initiation of GalNAc-type O-glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum promotes cancer cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, David J; Tham, Keit Min; Chia, Joanne; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Steentoft, Catharina; Clausen, Henrik; Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A; Bard, Frederic A

    2013-08-20

    Invasiveness underlies cancer aggressiveness and is a hallmark of malignancy. Most malignant tumors have elevated levels of Tn, an O-GalNAc glycan. Mechanisms underlying Tn up-regulation and its effects remain unclear. Here we show that Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum relocation of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosamine-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) drives high Tn levels in cancer cell lines and in 70% of malignant breast tumors. This process stimulates cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, as well as migration and invasiveness. The GalNAc-Ts lectin domain, mediating high-density glycosylation, is critical for these effects. Interfering with the lectin domain function inhibited carcinoma cell migration in vitro and metastatic potential in mice. We also show that stimulation of cell migration is dependent on Tn-bearing proteins present in lamellipodia of migrating cells. Our findings suggest that relocation of GalNAc-Ts to the endoplasmic reticulum frequently occurs upon cancerous transformation to enhance tumor cell migration and invasiveness through modification of cell surface proteins.

  12. Reprogramming of non-genomic estrogen signaling by the stemness factor SOX2 enhances the tumor-initiating capacity of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cufí, Sílvia; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Vellon, Luciano; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Leis, Olatz; Martín, Ángel G; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    The restoration of pluripotency circuits by the reactivation of endogenous stemness factors, such as SOX2, may provide a new paradigm in cancer development. The tumoral stem cell reprogramming hypothesis, i.e., the ability of stemness factors to redirect normal and differentiated tumor cells toward a less-differentiated and stem-like state, adds new layers of complexity to cancer biology, because the effects of such reprogramming may remain dormant until engaged later in response to (epi)genetic and/or (micro)environmental events. To test this hypothesis, we utilized an in vitro model of a SOX2-overexpressing cancer stem cell (CSC)-like cellular state that was recently developed in our laboratory by employing Yamanaka’s nuclear reprogramming technology in the estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Despite the acquisition of distinct molecular features that were compatible with a breast CSC-like cellular state, such as strong aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, as detected by ALDEFLUOR, and overexpression of the SSEA-4 and CD44 breast CSC markers, the tumor growth-initiating ability of SOX2-overexpressing CSC-like MCF-7 cells solely occurred in female nude mice supplemented with estradiol when compared with MCF-7 parental cells. Ser118 phosphorylation of estrogen receptor α (ERα), which is a pivotal integrator of the genomic and nongenomic E2/ERα signaling pathways, drastically accumulated in nuclear speckles in the interphase nuclei of SOX2-driven CSC-like cell populations. Moreover, SOX2-positive CSC-like cells accumulated significantly higher numbers of actively dividing cells, and the highest levels of phospho-Ser118-ERα occurred when chromosomes lined up on a metaphase plate. The previously unrecognized link between E2/ERα signaling and SOX2-driven stem cell circuitry may significantly impact our current understanding of breast cancer initiation and progression, i.e., SOX2 can promote non-genomic E2 signaling that leads to

  13. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  14. Increased initiation and growth of tumor cell lines, cancer stem cells and biopsy material in mice using basement membrane matrix protein (Cultrex or Matrigel) co-injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Rafael; Benton, Gabriel; Aranoutova, Irina; Kleinman, Hynda K; Bonfil, R Daniel

    2012-05-17

    This protocol requires 2-4 h and presents a method for injecting tumor cells, cancer stem cells or dispersed biopsy material into subcutaneous or orthotopic locations within recipient mice. The tumor cells or biopsy are mixed with basement membrane matrix proteins (CultrexBME or Matrigel) at 4 °C and then injected into recipient animals at preferred anatomical sites. Tumor cells can also be co-injected with additional cell types, such as fibroblasts, stromal cells, endothelial cells and so on. Details are given on appropriate cell numbers, handling and concentration of the basement membrane proteins, recipient animals, injection location and techniques. This procedure enables the growth of tumors from cells or biopsy material (tumor graft) with greater efficiency of take and growth, and with retention of the primary tumor phenotype based on histology. Co-injection with additional cell types provides more physiological models of human cancers for use in drug screening and studying cancer biology.

  15. Gene expression profiling supports the hypothesis that human ovarian surface epithelia are multipotent and capable of serving as ovarian cancer initiating cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matyunina Lilya V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidence suggests that somatic stem cells undergo mutagenic transformation into cancer initiating cells. The serous subtype of ovarian adenocarcinoma in humans has been hypothesized to arise from at least two possible classes of progenitor cells: the ovarian surface epithelia (OSE and/or an as yet undefined class of progenitor cells residing in the distal end of the fallopian tube. Methods Comparative gene expression profiling analyses were carried out on OSE removed from the surface of normal human ovaries and ovarian cancer epithelial cells (CEPI isolated by laser capture micro-dissection (LCM from human serous papillary ovarian adenocarcinomas. The results of the gene expression analyses were randomly confirmed in paraffin embedded tissues from ovarian adenocarcinoma of serous subtype and non-neoplastic ovarian tissues using immunohistochemistry. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed using gene ontology, molecular pathway, and gene set enrichment analysis algorithms. Results Consistent with multipotent capacity, genes in pathways previously associated with adult stem cell maintenance are highly expressed in ovarian surface epithelia and are not expressed or expressed at very low levels in serous ovarian adenocarcinoma. Among the over 2000 genes that are significantly differentially expressed, a number of pathways and novel pathway interactions are identified that may contribute to ovarian adenocarcinoma development. Conclusions Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that human ovarian surface epithelia are multipotent and capable of serving as the origin of ovarian adenocarcinoma. While our findings do not rule out the possibility that ovarian cancers may also arise from other sources, they are inconsistent with claims that ovarian surface epithelia cannot serve as the origin of ovarian cancer initiating cells.

  16. Deletion of Ptp4a3 reduces clonogenicity and tumor-initiation ability of colitis-associated cancer cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Julie M; Zimmerman, Mark W; Thompson, Tim; Homanics, Gregg E; Lazo, John S; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The PTP4A3 gene is highly expressed in human colon cancer and often associates with enhanced metastatic potential. Genetic disruption of the mouse Ptp4a3 gene reduces the frequency of colon tumor formation in mice treated in a colitis-associated cancer model. In the current study, we have examined the role of Ptp4a3 in the tumor-initiating cell population of mouse colon tumors using an in vitro culture system. Tumors generated in vivo following AOM/DSS treatment were isolated, dissociated, and expanded on a feeder layer resulting in a CD133(+) cell population, which expressed high levels of Ptp4a3. Tumor cells deficient for Ptp4a3 exhibited reduced clonogenicity and growth potential relative to WT cells as determined by limiting dilution analysis. Importantly, expanded tumor cells from WT mice readily formed secondary tumors when transplanted into nude mice, while tumor cells without Ptp4a3 expression failed to form secondary tumors and thus were not tumorigenic. These results demonstrate that Ptp4a3 contributes to the malignant phenotype of tumor-initiating cells and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit tumor self-renewal and metastasis.

  17. Deletion of Ptp4a3 reduces clonogenicity and tumor-initiation ability of colitis-associated cancer cells in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Cramer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The PTP4A3 gene is highly expressed in human colon cancer and often associates with enhanced metastatic potential. Genetic disruption of the mouse Ptp4a3 gene reduces the frequency of colon tumor formation in mice treated in a colitis-associated cancer model. In the current study, we have examined the role of Ptp4a3 in the tumor-initiating cell population of mouse colon tumors using an in vitro culture system. Tumors generated in vivo following AOM/DSS treatment were isolated, dissociated, and expanded on a feeder layer resulting in a CD133+ cell population, which expressed high levels of Ptp4a3. Tumor cells deficient for Ptp4a3 exhibited reduced clonogenicity and growth potential relative to WT cells as determined by limiting dilution analysis. Importantly, expanded tumor cells from WT mice readily formed secondary tumors when transplanted into nude mice, while tumor cells without Ptp4a3 expression failed to form secondary tumors and thus were not tumorigenic. These results demonstrate that Ptp4a3 contributes to the malignant phenotype of tumor-initiating cells and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit tumor self-renewal and metastasis.

  18. A mouse model for triple-negative breast cancer tumor-initiating cells (TNBC-TICs exhibits similar aggressive phenotype to the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kau Punit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC exhibit characteristics quite distinct from other kinds of breast cancer, presenting as an aggressive disease--recurring and metastasizing more often than other kinds of breast cancer, without tumor-specific treatment options and accounts for 15% of all types of breast cancer with higher percentages in premenopausal African-American and Hispanic women. The reason for this aggressive phenotype is currently the focus of intensive research. However, progress is hampered by the lack of suitable TNBC cell model systems. Methods To understand the mechanistic basis for the aggressiveness of TNBC, we produced a stable TNBC cell line by sorting for 4T1 cells that do not express the estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PgR or the gene for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. As a control, we produced a stable triple-positive breast cancer (TPBC cell line by transfecting 4T1 cells with rat HER2, ER and PgR genes and sorted for cells with high expression of ER and PgR by flow cytometry and high expression of the HER2 gene by Western blot analysis. Results We isolated tumor-initiating cells (TICs by sorting for CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells from TNBC (TNBC-TICs and TPBC (TPBC-TICs stable cell lines. Limiting dilution transplantation experiments revealed that CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells derived from TNBC (TNBC-TICs and TPBC (TPBC-TICs were significantly more effective at repopulating the mammary glands of naïve female BALB/c mice than CD24-/CD44-/ALDH1- cells. Implantation of the TNBC-TICs resulted in significantly larger tumors, which metastasized to the lungs to a significantly greater extent than TNBC, TPBC-TICs, TPBC or parental 4T1 cells. We further demonstrated that the increased aggressiveness of TNBC-TICs correlates with the presence of high levels of mouse twenty-five kDa heat shock protein (Hsp25/mouse HspB1 and seventy-two kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72/HspA1A. Conclusions

  19. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  20. Patterns of abnormal FDG uptake by various histological types of non-small cell lung cancer at initial staging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.O.; Nunez, R.; Bohdiewicz, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.; Balon, H.; Dickinson, C.; Dworkin, H.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Welsh, R.J.; Chmielewski, G.W.; Pursel, S.E. [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ravikrishnan, K.P. [Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hill, J.C. [Information Service, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify useful patterns of abnormal fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake by different types of non-small cell (NSC) lung cancer and to assess their clinical implications. One hundred and three sequential patients with newly diagnosed, pathology-proven NSC lung cancer were included. FDG positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired using a dedicated PET scanner. There were 35 squamous cell carcinomas (SQC), 17 large cell cancers (LGC), 38 adenocarcinomas (ADC), 1 bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and 12 non-classified NSC cancers. PET images were categorized into detectable patterns of necrotic center in the primary tumor, satellite lesions (T4), hilar lymph nodes (N1), and N2, N3, and M1 lesions by visual interpretation of PET images for SQC, LGC, and ADC (n=90; BAC and non-classified NSC cancers were excluded). The PET lesions were correlated with surgical pathology and with CT findings in inoperable cases. Necrosis was more commonly present in the primary tumors of LGC (53%) and SQC (43%) than in those of ADC (26%) (P<0.0001 and <0.01, respectively). The frequencies of nodal uptake in ADC, SQC and LGC were similar (71%, 60%, and 59%, respectively). However, M1 lesions were present significantly more often in LGC (41%) and ADC (34%) than in SQC (3%) (both P<0.0001). Significantly more surgically inoperable cases were found by PET (T4, N3, M1) in ADC (50%) and LGC (41%) than in SQC (26%) (P<0.001 and <0.02, respectively). Our results suggest a wide variation of PET findings for different types of NSC lung cancer. Identification of these patterns is useful in clinical PET interpretation, in that knowledge of the most probable association between the PET patterns and the histological types will facilitate initial staging and planning of management. (orig.)

  1. The role of maintenance proteins in the preservation of epithelial cell identity during mammary gland remodeling and breast cancer initiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danila Coradini; Saro Oriana

    2014-01-01

    During normal postnatal mammary gland development and adult remodeling related to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and lactation, ovarian hormones and peptide growth factors contribute to the delineation of a definite epithelial cellidentity. This identity is maintained during cellreplication in a heritable but DNA-independent manner. The preservation of cellidentity is fundamental, especialy when cels must undergo changes in response to intrinsic and extrinsic signals. The maintenance proteins, which are required for cellidentity preservation, act epigenetically by regulating gene expression through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Among the maintenance proteins, the Trithorax (TrxG) and Polycomb (PcG) group proteins are the best characterized. In this review, we summarize the structures and activities of the TrxG and PcG complexes and describe their pivotal roles in nuclear estrogen receptor activity. In addition, we provide evidence that perturbations in these epigenetic regulators are involved in disrupting epithelial cellidentity, mammary gland remodeling, and breast cancer initiation.

  2. In vitro and in vivo imaging of initial B-T-cell interactions in the setting of B-cell based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nela Klein; Wennhold, Kerstin; Balkow, Sandra; Kondo, Eisei; Bölck, Birgit; Weber, Tanja; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Grabbe, Stephan; Bloch, Wilhelm; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of B cells for cancer vaccines, since they have yielded promising results in preclinical animal models. Contrary to dendritic cells (DCs), we know little about the migration behavior of B cells in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between CD40-activated B (CD40B) cells and cytotoxic T cells in vitro and the migration behavior of CD40B cells in vivo. Dynamic interactions of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells were observed by time-lapse video microscopy. The migratory and chemoattractant potential of CD40B cells was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using flow cytometry, standard transwell migration assays, and imaging of fluorescently labeled murine CD40B cells. Murine CD40B cells show migratory features similar to human CD40B cells. They express important lymph node homing receptors which were functional and induced chemotaxis of T cells in vitro. Striking differences were observed with regard to interactions of human APCs with T cells. CD40B cells differ from DCs by displaying a rapid migratory pattern undergoing highly dynamic, short-lived and sequential interactions with T cells. In vivo, CD40B cells are home to the secondary lymphoid organs where they accumulate in the B cell zone before traveling to the B/T cell boundary. Moreover, intravenous (i.v.) administration of murine CD40B cells induced an antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell response. Taken together, this data show that CD40B cells home secondary lymphoid organs where they physically interact with T cells to induce antigen-specific T cell responses, thus underscoring their potential as cellular adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26405608

  3. The impact of the RBM4-initiated splicing cascade on modulating the carcinogenic signature of colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Lee, Yuan-Chii; Liang, Yu-Chih; Fann, Yang C.; Johnson, Kory R.; Lin, Ying-Ju

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of studies has demonstrated that dysregulated splicing profiles constitute pivotal mechanisms for carcinogenesis. In this study, we identified discriminative splicing profiles of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells compared to adjacent normal tissues using deep RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). The RNA-seq results and cohort studies indicated a relatively high ratio of exon 4-excluded neuro-oncological ventral antigen 1 (Nova1−4) and intron 2-retained SRSF6 (SRSF6+intron 2) transcripts in CRC tissues and cell lines. Nova1 variants exhibited differential effects on eliminating SRSF6 expression in CRC cells by inducing SRSF6+intron 2 transcripts which were considered to be the putative target of alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Moreover, the splicing profile of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)165/VEGF165b transcripts was relevant to SRSF6 expression, which manipulates the progression of CRC calls. These results highlight the novel and hierarchical role of an alternative splicing cascade that is involved in the development of CRC. PMID:28276498

  4. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Regulate Tumor-Initiating Cell Plasticity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through c-Met/FRA1/HEY1 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Yuen Ting Lau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Like normal stem cells, tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs are regulated extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment. Because HCC develops primarily in the context of cirrhosis, in which there is an enrichment of activated fibroblasts, we hypothesized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs would regulate liver T-ICs. We found that the presence of α-SMA(+ CAFs correlates with poor clinical outcome. CAF-derived HGF regulates liver T-ICs via activation of FRA1 in an Erk1,2-dependent manner. Further functional analysis identifies HEY1 as a direct downstream effector of FRA1. Using the STAM NASH-HCC mouse model, we find that HGF-induced FRA1 activation is associated with the fibrosis-dependent development of HCC. Thus, targeting the CAF-derived, HGF-mediated c-Met/FRA1/HEY1 cascade may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HCC.

  5. Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    TERMS Obesity, Ovarian Cancer, ovarian stem cells, inflammation, adipose tissue 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...transformed ovarian epithelial cells in obese animals. The goal is to identify genes and pathways that lead to ovarian cancer initiation and...progression. We also aim to identify secreted factors from adipose tissue that promote ovarian cancer initiation and progression in obesity

  6. National Cancer Moonshot Initiative platform | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Vice President’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the National Cancer Institute has launched an online engagement platform to enable the research community and the public to submit cancer research ideas to a Blue Ribbon Panel of scientific experts. Any member of the public is encouraged to submit his or her ideas for reducing the incidence of cancer and developing better ways to prevent, treat, and cure all types of cancer. Research ideas may be submitted in the following areas:

  7. Implications of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells for Understanding Fomation and Therapy of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Li; Donglin Wang

    2005-01-01

    Most cancers are heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There is increasing evidence suggesting that only a minority of cancer cells, tumorigenic or tumor initiating cells, possess the capacity to proliferate extensively and form new hematopoietic cancer or solid tumors. Tumor initiating cells share characteristics required for normal stem cells. The dysregulation of self-renewal and proliferation of stem cells is a likely requirement for cancer development. This review formulates a model for the origin of cancer stem cells and regulating self-renewal which influences the way we study and treat cancer.

  8. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  9. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  10. Initiation of GalNAc-type O-glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum promotes cancer cell invasiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, David J; Tham, Keit Min; Chia, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Invasiveness underlies cancer aggressiveness and is a hallmark of malignancy. Most malignant tumors have elevated levels of Tn, an O-GalNAc glycan. Mechanisms underlying Tn up-regulation and its effects remain unclear. Here we show that Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum relocation of polypeptide N...

  11. Dasatinib and Doxorubicin Treatment of Sarcoma Initiating Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm-Pedersen, Ninna; Demuth, Christina; Safwat, Akmal;

    2016-01-01

    Background. One of the major challenges affecting sarcoma treatment outcome, particularly that of metastatic disease, is resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer-initiating cells are considered a major contributor to this resistance. Methods. An immortalised nontransformed human stromal (mesenchymal) s...

  12. Sulindac and Celecoxib regulate cell cycle progression by p53/p21 up regulation to induce apoptosis during initial stages of experimental colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Vivek; Rana, Chandan; Piplani, Honit; Vaiphei, Kim; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-03-01

    In the present study we have elaborated the putative mechanisms could be followed by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz. Sulindac and Celecoxib in the regulation of cell cycle checkpoints along with tumor suppressor proteins to achieve their chemopreventive effects in the initial stages of experimental colorectal cancer. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) to produce early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis. The mRNA expression profiles of various target genes were analyzed by RT-PCR and validated by quantitative real-time PCR, whereas protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Nuclear localization of transcription factors or other nuclear proteins was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunofluorescence. Flowcytometry was performed to analyze the differential apoptotic events and cell cycle regulation. Molecular docking studies with different target proteins were also performed to deduce the various putative mechanisms of action followed by Sulindac and Celecoxib. We observed that DMH administration has abruptly increased the proliferation of colonic cells which is macroscopically visible in the form of multiple plaque lesions and co-relates with the disturbed molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has shown regulatory effects on cell cycle checkpoints via induction of various tumor suppressor proteins. We may conclude that Sulindac and Celecoxib could possibly follow p53/p21 mediated regulation of cell proliferation, where down regulation of NF-κB signaling and activation of PPARγ might serve as important additional events in vivo.

  13. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  14. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  15. N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane sensitizes bladder cancer cells to doxorubicin by preventing epithelial-mesenchymal transition through inhibition of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsong; Yu, Haogang; Shen, Mo; Wei, Wei; Xia, Lihong; Zhao, Peng

    2014-02-01

    Drug resistance greatly reduces the efficacy of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in bladder cancer treatment; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane (GC7), which inhibits eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF5A2) activation, exerts synergistic cytotoxicity with doxorubicin in bladder cancer, and whether eIF5A2 is involved in chemoresistance to doxorubicin-based bladder cancer treatment. BIU-87, J82, and UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cells were transfected with eIF5A2 siRNA or negative control siRNA before incubation with doxorubicin alone or doxorubicin plus GC7 for 48 h. Doxorubicin cytotoxicity was enhanced by GC7 in BIU-87, J82, and UM-UC-3 cells. It significantly inhibited activity of eIF5A2, suppressed doxorubicin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in BIU-87 cells, and promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition in J82 and UM-UC-3 cells. Knockdown of eIF5A2 sensitized bladder cancer cells to doxorubicin, prevented doxorubicin-induced EMT in BIU-87 cells, and encouraged mesenchymal-epithelial transition in J82 and UM-UC-3 cells. Combination therapy with GC7 may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in bladder cancer by inhibiting eIF5A2 activation and preventing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  16. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  17. Androgen signaling promotes translation of TMEFF2 in prostate cancer cells via phosphorylation of the α subunit of the translation initiation factor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Overcash

    Full Text Available The type I transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2, is expressed mainly in brain and prostate. Expression of TMEFF2 is deregulated in prostate cancer, suggesting a role in this disease, but the molecular mechanism(s involved in this effect are not clear. Although androgens promote tmeff2 transcription, androgen delivery to castrated animals carrying CWR22 xenografts increases TMEFF2 protein levels in the absence of mRNA changes, suggesting that TMEFF2 may also be post-transcriptionally regulated. Here we show that translation of TMEFF2 is regulated by androgens. Addition of physiological concentrations of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to prostate cancer cell lines increases translation of endogenous TMEFF2 or transfected TMEFF2-Luciferase fusions, and this effect requires the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR of TMEFF2. Using chemical and siRNA inhibition of the androgen receptor (AR, we show that the androgen effect on TMEFF2 translation is mediated by the AR. Importantly, DHT also promotes phosphorylation of the α subunit of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α in an AR-dependent manner, paralleling the effect on TMEFF2 translation. Moreover, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress conditions, which promote eIF2α phosphorylation, also stimulate TMEFF2 translation. These results indicate that androgen signaling promotes eIF2α phosphorylation and subsequent translation of TMEFF2 via a mechanism that requires uORFs in the 5'-UTR of TMEFF2.

  18. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  19. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  20. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    progenitor cells (NPCs) by expressing an activated form of Notch1 (N1ICD) or oncogenic PIK3CA (PIK3CA*) in the developing mouse cerebellum, using cell...resistance, pediatric cancer, brain tumor, Notch1, PIK3CA, cell of origin, molecular subtypes, neural stem cells, neural progenitor cells, tumor initiation...neural progenitor cells, tumor initiation. 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Major goals of the project: The stated goals of this project are to: 1) test the

  1. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples.

  2. N1-Guanyl-1,7-Diaminoheptane Sensitizes Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Cells to Doxorubicin by Preventing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition through Inhibition of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 5A2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 30% of breast cancer does not express the estrogen receptor (ER, which is necessary for endocrine-based therapy approaches. Many studies demonstrated that eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF5A2 serves as a proliferation-related oncogene in tumorigenic processes. Methods: The present study used cell viability assays, EdU incorporation assays, western blot, and immunofluorescence to explore whether N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane (GC7, which inhibits eIF5A2 activation, exerts synergistic cytotoxicity with doxorubicin in breast cancer. Results: We found that GC7 enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in ER-negative HCC1937 cells but had little effect in ER-positive MCF-7 and Bcap-37 cells. Administration of GC7 reversed the doxorubicin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in ER-negative breast cancer cells. Knockdown of eIF5A2 by siRNA inhibited the doxorubicin-induced EMT in ER-negative HCC1937 cells. Conclusion: These data demonstrated that GC7 combination therapy may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in estrogen negative breast cancer cells by preventing EMT through inhibition of eIF5A2 activation.

  3. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  4. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  5. Comparative assessment of lipid based nano-carrier systems for dendritic cell based targeting of tumor re-initiating cells in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Arpit; Mishra, Dinesh K; Jain, Subodh K; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Lohiya, Nirmal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to identify an optimum nano-carrier system to deliver tumor antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) for efficient targeting of tumor reinitiating cells (TRICs) in gynecological malignancies. Different lipid based nano-carrier systems i.e. liposomes, ethosomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNPs) were examined for their ability to activate DCs in allogeneic settings. Out of these three, the most optimized formulation was subjected for cationic and mannosylated surface modification and pulsed with DCs for specific targeting of tumor cells. In both allogeneic and autologous trials, SLNPs showed a strong ability to activate DCs and orchestrate specific immune responses for targeting TRICs in gynecological malignancies. Our findings suggest that the mannosylated form of SLNPs is a suitable molecular vector for DC based therapeutics. DCs pulsed with mannosylated SLNPs may be utilized as adjuvant therapy for specific removal of TRICs to benefit patients from tumor recurrence.

  6. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  7. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Oncogenic Kras initiates leukemia in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit J Sabnis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available How oncogenes modulate the self-renewal properties of cancer-initiating cells is incompletely understood. Activating KRAS and NRAS mutations are among the most common oncogenic lesions detected in human cancer, and occur in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs and leukemias. We investigated the effects of expressing oncogenic Kras(G12D from its endogenous locus on the proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. MPD could be initiated by Kras(G12D expression in a highly restricted population enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, but not in common myeloid progenitors. Kras(G12D HSCs demonstrated a marked in vivo competitive advantage over wild-type cells. Kras(G12D expression also increased the fraction of proliferating HSCs and reduced the overall size of this compartment. Transplanted Kras(G12D HSCs efficiently initiated acute T-lineage leukemia/lymphoma, which was associated with secondary Notch1 mutations in thymocytes. We conclude that MPD-initiating activity is restricted to the HSC compartment in Kras(G12D mice, and that distinct self-renewing populations with cooperating mutations emerge during cancer progression.

  9. An NQO1-initiated and p53-independent apoptotic pathway determines the anti-tumor effect of tanshinone IIA against non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    Full Text Available NQO1 is an emerging and promising therapeutic target in cancer therapy. This study was to determine whether the anti-tumor effect of tanshinone IIA (TSA is NQO1 dependent and to elucidate the underlying apoptotic cell death pathways. NQO1(+ A549 cells and isogenically matched NQO1 transfected and negative H596 cells were used to test the properties and mechanisms of TSA induced cell death. The in vivo anti-tumor efficacy and the tissue distribution properties of TSA were tested in tumor xenografted nude mice. We observed that TSA induced an excessive generation of ROS, DNA damage, and dramatic apoptotic cell death in NQO1(+ A549 cells and H596-NQO1 cells, but not in NQO1(- H596 cells. Inhibition or silence of NQO1 as well as the antioxidant NAC markedly reversed TSA induced apoptotic effects. TSA treatment significantly retarded the tumor growth of A549 tumor xenografts, which was significantly antagonized by dicoumarol co-treatment in spite of the increased and prolonged TSA accumulations in tumor tissues. TSA activated a ROS triggered, p53 independent and caspase dependent mitochondria apoptotic cell death pathway that is characterized with increased ratio of Bax to Bcl-xl, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, and subsequent caspase activation and PARP-1 cleavage. The results of these findings suggest that TSA is a highly specific NQO1 target agent and is promising in developing as an effective drug in the therapy of NQO1 positive NSCLC.

  10. Initial basal cell carcinomas diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention are smaller than those identified by the conventional medical referral system*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakiyama, Thweicyka Pinheiro; França, Maria Laura Marconi; Carvalho, Larissa Pierri; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma is the malignant tumor most often diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP). Little is known about the profile of these lesions compared to the profile of lesions diagnosed by conventional routes of public dermatological care. OBJECTIVE To identify if basal cell carcinomas identified in prevention campaigns and referred to surgery are smaller than those routinely removed in a same medical institution. METHODS Cross-sectional study including tumors routed from 2011-2014 campaigns and 84 anatomopathological reports of outpatients. RESULTS The campaigns identified 223 individuals with suspicious lesions among 2,531 examinations (9%), with 116 basal cell carcinomas removed. Anatomopathological examinations revealed that the primary lesions identified in the national campaigns were smaller than those referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care (28 [13-50] x 38 [20-113] mm2, p <0.01). On the other hand, after a mean follow-up of 15.6 ± 10.3 months, 31% of cases identified in campaigns showed new basal cell carcinoma lesions. STUDY LIMITATIONS Retrospective study and inaccuracies in the measurements of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS The NCSCP promotes an earlier treatment of basal cell carcinomas compared to patients referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care, which can result in lower morbidity rates and better prognosis. PMID:28225952

  11. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  12. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Adam R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Rachel L. [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Bradley J. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brewster, Abeena [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  13. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  14. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  15. Stem cell concepts renew cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, John E

    2008-12-15

    Although uncontrolled proliferation is a distinguishing property of a tumor as a whole, the individual cells that make up the tumor exhibit considerable variation in many properties, including morphology, proliferation kinetics, and the ability to initiate tumor growth in transplant assays. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in the design of therapeutic strategies. The mechanistic basis of tumor heterogeneity has been uncertain; however, there is now strong evidence that cancer is a cellular hierarchy with cancer stem cells at the apex. This review provides a historical overview of the influence of hematology on the development of stem cell concepts and their linkage to cancer.

  16. An update on the biology of cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bueno, José María; Ocaña, Alberto; Castro-García, Paola; Gil Gas, Carmen; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Poblet, Enrique; Serrano, Rosario; Calero, Raúl; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells are defined as cancer cells with self-renewal capacity. These cells represent a small subpopulation endowed with the ability to form new tumours when injected in nude mice. Markers of differentiation have been used to identify these cancer cells. In the case of breast cancer, CD44+/CD24- select a population with stem cell properties. The fact that these cells have self-renewal ability has suggested that this population could be responsible for new tumour formation and cancer relapse. These cells have been shown to be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than normal cancer cells. The identification of the molecular druggable alterations responsible for the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells is an important goal. In this article we will review all these points with special emphasis on the possible role of new drugs designed to interact with molecular pathways of cancer stem cells.

  17. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    technique for treating left-sided breast cancer, which allows sparing of the heart. The Calypso system provides a previously unavailable level of...from both centers. Task 6. Post-prostatectomy Daily Target Guided Radiotherapy Using Real-Time, State-of-the-Art Motion Tracking with the Calypso...the skin surface to track breathing motion during a breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer treatment. Analysis would reveal the

  18. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  19. MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer -Our Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Jankovic, K; Noveski, P; Chakalova, L; Petrusevska, G; Kubelka, K; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small [∼21 nucleotide (nt)] non coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally. About 3.0% of human genes encode for miRNAs, and up to 30.0% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. Currently, more than 2000 unique human mature microRNAs are known. MicroRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These processes are commonly dysregulated in cancer, implicating miRNAs in carcinogenesis, where they act as tumor supressors or oncogenes. Several miRNAs are associated with breast cancer. Here we present our initial results of miRNA analyses of breast cancer tissues using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (ReTi-PCR) (qPCR) involving stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT) primers combined with TaqMan® PCR and miRNA microarray analysis.

  20. Getting to the heart of the matter in cancer: Novel approaches to targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh; Mori, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. While cancers may initially show good response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it is not uncommon for them to recur at a later date. This phenomenon may be explained by the existence of a small population of cancer stem cells, which are inherently resistant to anti-cancer treatment as well as being capable of self-renewal. Therefore, while most of the tumour bulk consisting of cells that are not cancer stem cells respond to treatment, the cancer stem cells remain, leading to disease recurrence. Following this logic, the effective targeting of cancer stem cells holds promise for providing long-term cure in individuals with cancer. Cancer stem cells, like normal stem cells are endowed with mechanisms to protect themselves against a wide range of insults including anti-cancer treatments, such as the enhancement of the DNA damage response and the ability to extrude drugs. It is therefore important to develop new strategies if cancer stem cells are to be eradicated. In this review, we describe the strategies that we have developed to target cancer stem cells. These strategies include the targeting of the histone demethylase jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B), which we found to be functionally significant in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Other strategies being pursued include reprogramming of cancer stem cells and the targeting of a functional cell surface marker of liver cancer stem cells, the aminopeptidase CD13.

  1. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Koido; Eiichi Hara; Sadamu Homma; Yoshihisa Namiki; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Jianlin Gong; Hisao Tajiri

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived...

  2. Human prostate cancer stem cells: new features unveiled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuting Sun; Wei-Qiang Gao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a rare sub-population of phenotypically distinct cancer cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics.They are tumourigenic, meanwhile capable of self-renewal and forming differentiated progenies.CSCs are believed to be resistant to the standard therapeutics, and provide the cell reservoir for tumour initiation.1 Understanding CSCs or in another word, tumour-initiating cells, is of critical therapeutic importance.

  3. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  4. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  5. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Goffart; Jérôme Kroonen; Bernard Rogister

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays sti...

  6. Cancer Stem Cells in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jing Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer (HNC is the sixth most common malignancy world-wide, however the survival rate has not improved for the past 20 years. In recent years, the cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis has gained ground in several malignancies and there is mounting evidence suggesting CSCs mediate tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. However, the CSC theory is also challenged at least in certain types of cancer. Here we review the progress of CSC studies in HNC, which suggest that HNC conforms to the CSC model. The identified CSC markers and their tumor initiation properties provide a framework for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for HNC.

  7. Laryngeal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the head and neck region with an increased incidence rate worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a group of cells with eternal life or infinite self-renewal ability, which have high migrating, infiltrative, and metastatic abilities. Though CSCs only account for a small proportion in tumors, the high resistance to traditional therapy exempts them from therapy killing and thus they can reconstruct tumors. Our current knowledge, about CSCs in the LSCC, largely depends on head and neck studies with a lack of systematic data about the evidences of CSCs in tumorigenesis of LSCC. Certainly, the combination of therapies aimed at debulking the tumour (e.g. surgery, conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy together with targeted therapies aimed at the elimination of the CSCs might have a positive impact on the long-term outcome of patients with laryngeal cancer (LC in the future and may cast a new light on the cancer treatment.

  8. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  9. Tight junctions: a barrier to the initiation and progression of breast cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that arises from epithelial cells lining the breast ducts and lobules. Correct adhesion between adjacent epithelial cells is important in determining the normal structure and function of epithelial tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that dysregulated cell-cell adhesion is associated with many cancers. This review will focus on one cell-cell adhesion complex, the tight junction (TJ), and summarize recent evidence that TJs may participate in breast cancer development or progression. We will first outline the protein composition of TJs and discuss the functions of the TJ complex. Secondly we will examine how alterations in these functions might facilitate breast cancer initiation or progression; by focussing on the regulatory influence of TJs on cell polarity, cell fate and cell migration. Finally we will outline how pharmacological targeting of TJ proteins may be useful in limiting breast cancer progression. Overall we hope to illustrate that the relationship between TJ alterations and breast cancer is a complex one; but that this area offers promise in uncovering fundamental mechanisms linked to breast cancer progression.

  10. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  11. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    and whether this difference changed the outcome for palliative patients, 6) use of the Calypso system, and other advanced radiation therapy equipment...use of advanced technology radiation therapy techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, in treating palliative patients. The main obstacle to overcome in...treating low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an electromagnetic localization system. IMRT

  12. CERN launches new cancer therapy initiative

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The first meeting of a new European network for research in cancer therapy was held at CERN, in February 2002. ENLIGHT, the European Network for Research in Light Ion Therapy aims to coordinate the development of a variety of projects at European facilities for "light ion therapy" - a form of radiation therapy that uses beams of the nuclei of lightweight atoms" (1/2 page).

  13. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Y Mahller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  14. Connexins in Prostate Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    reported [24,79–81]. Androgens and retinoids are required for the maintenance of normal healthy prostate epithelium as in their absence glandular ...complexes called cell junctions [13] (Figure 1). Most cells in a polarized epithelium are also interconnected by gap junction(GJ)s, which permit the...Mostov, 2008). Most cells in a polarized epithelium are also interconnected by another class of junctions, called GJs, which permit the direct passage

  15. Tumoral stem cell reprogramming as a driver of cancer: Theory, biological models, implications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Hauer, Julia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Ingenhag, Deborah; Rodríguez-Meira, Alba; Auer, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a clonal malignant disease originated in a single cell and characterized by the accumulation of partially differentiated cells that are phenotypically reminiscent of normal stages of differentiation. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumor cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that cancer stem cells could arise through a tumor stem cell reprogramming mechanism, suggesting that genetic lesions that initiate the cancer process might be dispensable for tumor progression and maintenance. This review addresses the impact of these results toward a better understanding of cancer development and proposes new approaches to treat cancer in the future.

  16. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  17. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  19. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  20. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  1. A Stochastic Model for Cancer Stem Cell Origin in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Christine; Fohrer, Helene; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Lewis, Dale W.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Gamblin, T. Clark; Geller, David A.; Lagasse, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Human cancers have been found to include transformed stem cells that may drive cancer progression to metastasis. Here we report that metastatic colon cancer contains clonally derived tumor cells with all of the critical properties expected of stem cells, including self-renewal and to the ability to differentiate into mature colon cells. Additionally, when injected into mice, these cells initiated tumors that closely resemble human cancer. Karyotype analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells expressed many consistent (clonal), along with unique chromosomal aberrations, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in the cancer stem cells. Thus, this new model for cancer origin and metastatic progression includes features of both the hierarchical model for cancerous stem cells and the stochastic model, driven by the observation of chromosomal instability. PMID:18757407

  2. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  3. Cell-of-Origin of Cancer versus Cancer Stem Cells: Assays and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Tang, Dean G

    2015-10-01

    A tumor originates from a normal cell that has undergone tumorigenic transformation as a result of genetic mutations. This transformed cell is the cell-of-origin for the tumor. In contrast, an established clinical tumor is sustained by subpopulations of self-renewing cancer cells operationally called cancer stem cells (CSC) that can generate, intraclonally, both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells. Identifying and characterizing tumor cell-of-origin and CSCs should help elucidate tumor cell heterogeneity, which, in turn, should help understand tumor cell responses to clinical treatments, drug resistance, tumor relapse, and metastatic spread. Both tumor transplantation and lineage-tracing assays have been helpful in characterizing these cancer cell populations, although each system has its strengths and caveats. In this article, we briefly review and summarize advantages and limitations of both assays in support of a combinatorial approach to accurately define the roles of both cancer-initiating and cancer-propagating cells. As an aside, we also wish to clarify the definitions of cancer cell-of-origin and CSCs, which are often interchangeably used by mistake.

  4. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  5. From cell signaling to cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin DING; Yun FENG; Hong-yang WANG

    2007-01-01

    Cancer has been seriously threatening the health and life of humans for a long period. Despite the intensive effort put into revealing the underlying mechanisms of cancer, the detailled machinery of carcinogenesis is still far from fully understood.Numerous studies have illustrated that cell signaling is extensively involved in tumor initiation, promotion and progression. Therefore, targeting the key mol-ecules in the oncogenic signaling pathway might be one of the most promising ways to conquer cancer. Some targeted drugs, such as imatinib mesylate (Gleevec),herceptin, gefitinib (Iressa), sorafenib (Nexavar) and sunitinib (Sutent), which evolve from monotarget drug into multitarget ones, have been developed with encouraging effects.

  6. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  7. Implications of cancer stem cell theory for cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S; Schwartz, Steven J; Sun, Duxin

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anticancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anticancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine and vitamin D(3), are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor-initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival.

  8. Noncoding RNAs in cancer and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianzhi Huang; Angel Alvarez; Bo Hu; Shi-Yuan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are of crucial importance for human cancer. The functional relevance of ncRNAs is particularly evident for microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). miRNAs are endogenously expressed small RNA sequences that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been extensively studied for their roles in cancers, whereas lncRNAs are emerging as important players in the cancer paradigm in recent years. These noncoding genes are often aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, the biological functions of most ncRNAs remain largely unknown. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing how ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells harboring self-renewal and differentiation capacities. These studies provide insight into the functional roles that ncRNAs play in tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapies, and they suggest ncRNAs as attractive therapeutic targets and potential y useful diagnostic tools.

  9. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-03

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer.

  10. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Angela S. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roberts, Paul C. [Biomedical Science and Pathobiology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Frisard, Madlyn I. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Hulver, Matthew W., E-mail: hulvermw@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Schmelz, Eva M., E-mail: eschmelz@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L{sub FFLv} (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth.

  11. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  12. Cancer Stem Cells: A Moving Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Chandler, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Even though the number of anti-cancer drugs entering clinical trials and approved by the FDA has increased in recent years, many cancer patients still experience poor survival outcome. The main explanation for such a dismal prognosis is that current therapies might leave behind a population of cancer cells with the capacity for long-term self-renewal, so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), from which most tumors are believed to be derived and fueled. CSCs might favor local and distant recurrence even many years after initial treatment, thus representing a potential target for therapies aimed at improving clinical outcome. In this review, we will address the CSC hypothesis with a particular emphasis on its current paradigms and debates, and discuss several mechanisms of CSC resistance to conventional therapies.

  13. Cancer stem cells and field cancerization of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple, M; Suresh, Amritha; Das, Debashish; Kuriakose, Moni A

    2015-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a high propensity for local failure, which is attributed to recurrence at the primary site or the development of second primary tumors (SPT). Field cancerization that refers to the existence of transformed cells in areas adjacent to the primary tumor, has been attributed to be one of the probable reasons underlying disease relapse. The carcinogenic process necessitates multiple molecular events for the transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. This implies that only the long-time residents of the epithelium, such as the stem cells, might be the candidates capable of accumulating these genetic hits. These transformed stem cells- the 'Cancer stem cells' (CSCs), are further known to be equipped with the properties of tumor initiation and migration, both of which are essential for orchestrating field cancerization. The concept that the CSCs might be responsible for field cancerization in OSCC has not been explored extensively. If the role of CSCs as the primary units of field cancerization process is established, their presence in the mucosa adjacent to the tumor may be an indicator for local recurrence and/or development of second primary tumors. In this review, we examine the available evidence in literature exploring the possibilities of CSCs driving the process of field cancerization and thereby being the underlying mechanism for disease recurrence and development of SPT.

  14. Health initiatives for the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Rüdiger; Breitbart, Eckhard W; Mohr, Peter; Volkmer, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in white population worldwide. However, because the most prominent risk factor-solar UV-radiation and/or artificial UV from sunbeds-is known, skin cancer is highly preventable be primary prevention. This prevention needs, that the public is informed by simple and balanced messages about the possible harms and benefits of UV-exposure and how a person should behave under certain conditions of UV-exposure. For this purpose information and recommendations for the public must be age- and target-group specific to cover all periods of life and to reach all sub-groups of a population, continuously. There is a need that political institutions together with Health Institutions and Societies (e.g., European Commission, WHO, EUROSKIN, ICNIRP, etc.), which are responsible for primary prevention of skin cancer, find a common language to inform the public, in order not to confuse it. This is especially important in connection with the ongoing Vitamin D debate, where possible positive effects of UV have to be balanced with the well known skin cancer risk of UV. A continuously ongoing evaluation of interventions and programs in primary prevention is a pre-requisite to assess the effectiveness of strategies. There is surely no "no message fits all" approach, but balanced information in health initiatives for prevention of skin cancer, which use evidence-base strategies, will further be needed in the future to reduce the incidence, morbidity and mortality skin cancer.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells and Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K. Friedman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a subpopulation of cells, termed tumor-initiating cells or tumor stem cells (TSC, has been identified in many different types of solid tumors. These TSC, which are typically more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation compared to other tumor cells, have properties similar to normal stem cells including multipotency and the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone. Much of the research on TSC has focused on adult cancers. With considerable differences in tumor biology between adult and pediatric cancers, there may be significant differences in the presence, function and behavior of TSC in pediatric malignancies. We discuss what is currently known about pediatric solid TSC with specific focus on TSC markers, tumor microenvironment, signaling pathways, therapeutic resistance and potential future therapies to target pediatric TSC.

  16. Drug treatment of cancer cell lines: a way to select for cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  17. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Chiodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  18. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara, E-mail: mondello@igm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  19. Generation of breast cancer stem cells by steroid hormones in irradiated human mammary cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Vares

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation was shown to result in an increased risk of breast cancer. There is strong evidence that steroid hormones influence radiosensitivity and breast cancer risk. Tumors may be initiated by a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs. In order to assess whether the modulation of radiation-induced breast cancer risk by steroid hormones could involve CSCs, we measured by flow cytometry the proportion of CSCs in irradiated breast cancer cell lines after progesterone and estrogen treatment. Progesterone stimulated the expansion of the CSC compartment both in progesterone receptor (PR-positive breast cancer cells and in PR-negative normal cells. In MCF10A normal epithelial PR-negative cells, progesterone-treatment and irradiation triggered cancer and stemness-associated microRNA regulations (such as the downregulation of miR-22 and miR-29c expression, which resulted in increased proportions of radiation-resistant tumor-initiating CSCs.

  20. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  2. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  3. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  4. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  5. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in non-small-cell lung cancer: initial response to erlotinib followed by relapse despite continuing radiological resolution of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alvin J X; Benamore, Rachel; Hofer, Monika; Chitnis, Meenali

    2016-09-01

    A 60-year-old male was diagnosed with T3, N3, M1b epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant lung adenocarcinoma. Five months later he developed significant headaches, weakness and numbness of the left leg, and unsteadiness of gait. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain demonstrated subtle gyral enhancement indicative of early leptomeningeal infiltration. He was commenced on second-line erlotinib which improved his lower limb symptoms. Three months later he developed increased urinary frequency and redeveloped leg symptoms. MRI brain showed improvement in the gyral enhancement. Four weeks later, the patient developed new onset confusion and decrease in mobility. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. This case demonstrates radiological and clinical response of leptomeningeal disease to erlotinib in EGFR mutant lung cancer with subsequent clinical relapse despite continued radiological resolution of leptomeningeal disease. This suggests that CSF examination should be considered when monitoring leptomeningeal disease response following treatment as the disease can be undetectable on repeat radiological imaging.

  6. Shared signaling pathways in normal and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam K Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology have led to the identification of a subpopulation of cells within tumors that appear to be responsible for initiating and propagating the cancer. These tumor initiating cells are not only unique in their ability to generate tumors, but also share many similarities with elements of normal adult tissue stem cells, and have therefore been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. These CSCs often inappropriately use many of the same signaling pathways utilized by their normal stem cell counterparts which may present a challenge to the development of CSC specific therapies. Here, we discuss three major stem cell signaling pathways (Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog; with a focus on their function in normal mammary gland development and their misuse in breast cancer stem cell fate determination.

  7. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have the potential of accumulating more years of cell phone exposure than adults do. Thus far, the data from studies in children with cancer do not support this theory. The first published analysis came from a large ...

  8. Combined Cerenkov luminescence and nuclear imaging of radioiodine in the thyroid gland and thyroid cancer cells expressing sodium iodide symporter: initial feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Shin Young; Hwang, Mi-Hye; Kim, Jung Eun; Kang, Sungmin; Park, Jeong Chan; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Lee, Jaetae

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine (RI) such as (131)I or (124)I, can generate luminescent emission and be detected with an optical imaging (OI) device. To evaluate the possibility of a novel Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) for application in thyroid research, we performed feasibility studies of CLI by RI in the thyroid gland and human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells expressing sodium iodide symporter gene (ARO-NIS). For in vitro study, FRTL-5 and ARO-NIS were incubated with RI, and the luminometric and CLI intensity was measured with luminometer and OI device. Luminescence intensity was compared with the radioactivity measured with γ-counter. In vivo CLI of the thyroid gland was performed in mice after intravenous injection of RI with and without thyroid blocking. Mice were implanted with ARO-NIS subcutaneously, and CLI was performed with injection of (124)I. Small animal PET or γ-camera imaging was also performed. CLI intensities of thyroid gland and ARO-NIS were quantified, and compared with the radioactivities measured from nuclear images (NI). Luminometric assay and OI confirmed RI uptake in the cells in a dose-dependent manner, and luminescence intensity was well correlated with radioactivity of the cells. CLI clearly demonstrated RI uptake in thyroid gland and xenografted ARO-NIS cells in mice, which was further confirmed by NI. A strong positive correlation was observed between CLI intensity and radioactivity assessed by NI. We successfully demonstrated dual molecular imaging of CLI and NI using RI both in vitro and in vivo. CLI can provide a new OI strategy in preclinical thyroid studies.

  9. Autophagy and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)/eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinase (eIF2α) pathway protect ovarian cancer cells from metformin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee-Sun; Kim, Boyun; Gwak, HyeRan; Suh, Dong Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, an oral biguanide for the treatment of type II diabetes, has been shown to have anticancer effects in ovarian cancer. Energy starvation induced by metformin causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy. UPR and autophagy act as a survival or death mechanism in cells. In this study, we observed that metformin-induced apoptosis was relieved by autophagy and the PERK/eIF2α pathway in ovarian cancer cells, but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or 'normal' ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE). Increased PARP cleavage and increased LC3B-II with ATG5-ATG12 complex suggested the induction of apoptosis and autophagy, respectively, in metformin-treated ovarian cancer cells. Accumulation of acidic vacuoles in the cytoplasm and downregulation of p62 further supported late-stage autophagy. Interestingly, metformin induced interdependent activation between autophagy and the UPR, especially the PERK/eIF2α pathway. Inhibition of autophagy-induced PERK inhibition, and vice versa, were demonstrated using small molecular inhibitors (PERK inhibitor I, GSK2606414; autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, and BafA1). Moreover, autophagy and PERK activation protected ovarian cancer cells against metformin-induced apoptosis. Metformin treatment in the presence of inhibitors of PERK and autophagy, however, had no cytotoxic effects on OSE or PBMC. In conclusion, these results suggest that inhibition of autophagy and PERK can enhance the selective anticancer effects of metformin on ovarian cancer cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cancer Stem Cells in Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, D; Brown, H K; Tellez-Gabriel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and...

  11. Ionizing Radiation in Glioblastoma Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricruz eRivera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival of 12-15 months with treatment consisting of surgical resection followed by ionizing radiation (IR and chemotherapy. Even aggressive treatment is often palliative due to near universal recurrence. Therapeutic resistance has been linked to a subpopulation of GBM cells with stem-cell like properties termed glioblastoma initiating cells (GICs. Recent efforts have focused on elucidating resistance mechanisms activated in GICs in response to IR. Among these, GICs preferentially activate the DNA damage response (DDR to result in a faster rate of double-strand break (DSB repair induced by IR as compared to the bulk tumor cells. IR also activates NOTCH and the hepatic growth factor (HGF receptor, c-MET, signaling cascades that play critical roles in promoting proliferation, invasion, and resistance to apoptosis. These pathways are preferentially activated in GICs and represent targets for pharmacologic intervention. While IR provides the benefit of improved survival, it paradoxically promotes selection of more malignant cellular phenotypes of glioblastoma. As reviewed here, finding effective combinations of radiation and molecular inhibitors to target GICs and non-GICs is essential for the development of more effective therapies.

  12. Amplification of the 20q chromosomal arm occurs early in tumorigenic transformation and may initiate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available Duplication of chromosomal arm 20q occurs in prostate, cervical, colon, gastric, bladder, melanoma, pancreas and breast cancer, suggesting that 20q amplification may play a causal role in tumorigenesis. According to an alternative view, chromosomal imbalance is mainly a common side effect of cancer progression. To test whether a specific genomic aberration might serve as a cancer initiating event, we established an in vitro system that models the evolutionary process of early stages of prostate tumor formation; normal prostate cells were immortalized by the over-expression of human telomerase catalytic subunit hTERT, and cultured for 650 days till several transformation hallmarks were observed. Gene expression patterns were measured and chromosomal aberrations were monitored by spectral karyotype analysis at different times. Several chromosomal aberrations, in particular duplication of chromosomal arm 20q, occurred early in the process and were fixed in the cell populations, while other aberrations became extinct shortly after their appearance. A wide range of bioinformatic tools, applied to our data and to data from several cancer databases, revealed that spontaneous 20q amplification can promote cancer initiation. Our computational model suggests that 20q amplification induced deregulation of several specific cancer-related pathways including the MAPK pathway, the p53 pathway and Polycomb group factors. In addition, activation of Myc, AML, B-Catenin and the ETS family transcription factors was identified as an important step in cancer development driven by 20q amplification. Finally we identified 13 "cancer initiating genes", located on 20q13, which were significantly over-expressed in many tumors, with expression levels correlated with tumor grade and outcome suggesting that these genes induce the malignant process upon 20q amplification.

  13. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  14. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  15. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types.

  16. 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron-emission tomography is cost-effective in the initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer patients in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerci, Juliano Julio, E-mail: cercijuliano@hotmail.com [PET-CT Center, Quanta - Diagnostico e Terapia, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Instituto do Coracao (InCor) - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Takagaki, Teresa Yae [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Trindade, Evelinda; Morgado, Roberta; Morabito, Fausto; Musolino, Rafael Silva; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio; Soares Junior, Jose [Instituto do Coracao (InCor) - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of metabolic staging (MS) with FDG-PET as compared with the conventional staging (CS) strategy in the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials And Methods: A total of 95 patients with initial diagnosis of NSCLC were staged before undergoing treatment. The MS and CS results were compared with regard to treatment definition and incidence of futile thoracotomies with both strategies. Results: Metabolic staging with FDG-PET upstaged 48.4% and down staged 5.3% of the patients, and would lead to change in the treatment of 41% of cases. Thoracotomy was considered as futile in 47% of the patients with CS, and in 19% of the patients with MS. The cost of futile thoracotomies in eight patients with MS was R$ 79,720, while in 31 patients with CS it would be R$ 308,915. Just such saving in costs would be more than enough to cover the costs of all FDG-PETs (R$ 126,350) or FDG-PET/CTs (R$ 193,515) for the 95 patients. Conclusion: The metabolic staging with FDG-PET is more accurate than CS in patients with NSCLC. Both FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT are cost-effective methods and their utilization is economically justifiable in the Brazilian public health system. (author)

  17. Oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaini, Giancarlo; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial metabolism may play a key role in controlling cancer cells life and proliferation. Recent evidence also indicates how the altered contribution of these organelles to metabolism and the resistance of cancer mitochondria against apoptosis-associated permeabilization are closely related. The hallmarks of cancer growth, increased glycolysis and lactate production in tumours, have raised attention due to recent observations suggesting a wide spectrum of oxidative phosphorylation deficit and decreased availability of ATP associated with malignancies and tumour cell expansion. More specifically, alteration in signal transduction pathways directly affects mitochondrial proteins playing critical roles in controlling the membrane potential as UCP2 and components of both MPTP and oxphos complexes, or in controlling cells life and death as the Bcl-2 proteins family. Moreover, since mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics, are also involved in processes of cells life and death, proper regulation of these mitochondrial functions is crucial for tumours to grow. Therefore a better understanding of the key pathophysiological differences between mitochondria in cancer cells and in their non-cancer surrounding tissue is crucial to the finding of tools interfering with these peculiar tumour mitochondrial functions and will disclose novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. Here, we review the peculiarity of tumour mitochondrial bioenergetics and the mode it is linked to the cell metabolism, providing a short overview of the evidence accumulated so far, but highlighting the more recent advances.

  18. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination.

  19. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaal, Courtney [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Padmanabhan, Jaya [Department of Molecular Medicine and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, 4001 E. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Chellappan, Srikumar, E-mail: Srikumar.Chellappan@moffitt.org [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Goffart

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  1. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffart, Nicolas [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Kroonen, Jérôme [Human Genetics, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); The T& P Bohnenn Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht 3556 (Netherlands); Rogister, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Register@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Department of Neurology, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); GIGA-Development, Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium)

    2013-08-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  2. Therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jeong Kim; Elizabeth L Siegler; Natnaree Siriwon; Pin Wang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic limitations of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs present a challenge for cancer therapy; these shortcomings are largely attributed to the ability of cancer cells to repopulate and metastasize after initial therapies. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have a crucial impact in current shortcomings of cancer therapy because they are largely responsible for tumor initiation, relapse, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the properties and mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatments is necessary to improve patient outcomes and survival rates. In this review, the authors characterize and compare different CSC-speciifc biomarkers that are present in various types of tumors. We further discuss multiple targeting approaches currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show great potential for targeting CSCs. This review discusses numerous strategies to eliminate CSCs by targeting surface biomarkers, regulating CSC-associated oncogenes and signaling pathways, inhibiting drug-eflfux pumps involved in drug resistance, modulating the tumor microenvironment and immune system, and applying drug combination therapy using nanomedicine.

  3. Induction of iPS cells and of cancer stem cells: the stem cell or reprogramming hypothesis of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article as designed to examine whether the "stoichiometric" or "elite models" of the origin of the "induced pluripotent stem" (iPS) cells fits some experiment facts from the developmental biology of adult stem cells and from the field of cancer research. In brief, since the evidence presented to support the stoichiometric model failed to recognize the factual existence of adult organ specific stem cells, the model has not been rigorously tested. In addition, the demonstration of a subset of cells (MUSE cells) in normal primary in vitro cultures of human fibroblasts (the usual source of iPS cells) seems to be the origin of the iPS cells. Moreover, from the field of carcinogenesis, the "stem cell" versus "de-differentiation" or "reprogramming" hypotheses were examined. Again, using the role of glycolysis, known to be associated with the Warburg effect in cancer cells, a list of experiments showing that (a) normal stem cells, which have few mitochondria, metabolize via glycolysis; (b) the stem cells are targets for "initiation" or "immortalization" or the blockage of differentiation and apoptosis of the stem cells by "immortalizing viruses"; (c) Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), when expressed, is associated with glycolysis and therefore, must be expressed in normal adult stem cells, as well as in cancer cells; and (d) p53, depleted or rendered dysfunctional by SV40 Large T antigen, is associated with the reduction of mitochondrial function and mass and is associated with the Warburg effect. Together, these observations from the iPS and "cancer stem cell" fields support the idea that both iPS cells and cancer stem cell are derived from adult organ-specific stem cells that do not restore or switch their metabolism of glucose from oxidative metabolism to glycolysis but, rather, in both cases, the adult stem cell, which metabolizes by glycolysis, is prevented from differentiation or from metabolizing by oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinthalapally V Rao; Altaf Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of allcancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressivetreatment. Recently, there have been important advancesin the molecular, pathological and biological understandingof pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recentnew targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeuticcombinations, no treatment option is viable in patients withadvanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to targetprogression of PC is of intense interest. A small populationof pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been foundto be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation,progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recentlyachieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors,including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads tofocus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. Thefocus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention andtreatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salientdevelopments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here,we provide a review of current updates and new insightson the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression withspecial emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathwaysaltered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention andtreatment of PC.

  5. Linking genomic reorganization to tumor initiation via the giant cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, N; Zhang, J; Zhang, N; Mercado-Uribe, I; Tao, F; Han, Z; Pathak, S; Multani, A S; Kuang, J; Yao, J; Bast, R C; Sood, A K; Hung, M-C; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying our recent paradoxical finding that mitotically incapacitated and genomically unstable polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are capable of tumor initiation, we labeled ovarian cancer cells with α-tubulin fused to green fluorescent protein, histone-2B fused to red fluorescent protein and FUCCI (fluorescent ubiquitination cell cycle indicator), and tracked the spatial and time-dependent change in spindle and chromosomal dynamics of PGCCs using live-cell fluorescence time-lapse recording. We found that single-dose (500 nm) treatment with paclitaxel paradoxically initiated endoreplication to form PGCCs after massive cell death. The resulting PGCCs continued self-renewal via endoreplication and further divided by nuclear budding or fragmentation; the small daughter nuclei then acquired cytoplasm, split off from the giant mother cells and acquired competency in mitosis. FUCCI showed that PGCCs divided via truncated endoreplication cell cycle (endocycle or endomitosis). Confocal microscopy showed that PGCCs had pronounced nuclear fragmentation and lacked expression of key mitotic proteins. PGCC-derived daughter cells were capable of long-term proliferation and acquired numerous new genome/chromosome alterations demonstrated by spectral karyotyping. These data prompt us to conceptualize a giant cell cycle composed of four distinct but overlapping phases, initiation, self-renewal, termination and stability. The giant cell cycle may represent a fundamental cellular mechanism to initiate genomic reorganization to generate new tumor-initiating cells in response to chemotherapy-induced stress and contributes to disease relapse. PMID:27991913

  6. Breast cancer stem cells: current advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Clouthier, Shawn G; Deol, Yadwinder; Liu, Suling; Nagrath, Sunitha; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, are driven by a population of cells that display stem cell properties. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells, not only drive tumor initiation and growth but also mediate tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. In this chapter, we summarize current advances in CSC research with a major focus on breast CSCs (BCSCs). We review the prevailing methods to isolate and characterize BCSCs and recent evidence documenting their cellular origins and phenotypic plasticity that enables them to transition between mesenchymal and epithelial-like states. We describe in vitro and clinical evidence that these cells mediate metastasis and treatment resistance in breast cancer, the development of novel strategies to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that contain CSCs and the use of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in preclinical breast cancer research. Lastly, we highlight several signaling pathways that regulate BCSC self-renewal and describe clinical implications of targeting these cells for breast cancer treatment. The development of strategies to effectively target BCSCs has the potential to significantly improve the outcomes for patients with breast cancer.

  7. Cell migration towards CXCL12 in leukemic cells compared to breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shirley C; Goh, Poh Hui; Kudatsih, Jossie; Ncube, Sithembile; Gurung, Renu; Maxwell, Will; Mueller, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Chemotaxis or directed cell migration is mediated by signalling events initiated by binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors and the activation of a complex signalling cascade. The molecular signalling pathways involved in cell migration are important to understand cancer cell metastasis. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of CXCL12 induced cell migration and the importance of different signalling cascades that become activated by CXCR4 in leukemic cells versus breast cancer cells. We identified Src kinase as being essential for cell migration in both cancer types, with strong involvement of the Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway. We did not detect any involvement of Ras or JAK2/STAT3 in CXCL12 induced migration in Jurkat cells. Preventing PKC activation with inhibitors does not affect migration in Jurkat cells at all, unlike in the adherent breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells. However, in both cell lines, knock down of PKCα prevents migration towards CXCL12, whereas the expression of PKCζ is less crucial for migration. PI3K activation is essential in both cell types, however LY294002 usage in MCF-7 cells does not block migration significantly. These results highlight the importance of verifying specific signalling pathways in different cell settings and with different approaches.

  8. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation.

  9. Establishment and Analysis of Cancer Stem-Like and Non-Cancer Stem-Like Clone Cells from the Human Colon Cancer Cell Line SW480.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Akari; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Murai, Aiko; Morita, Rena; Saijo, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Eri; Kubo, Terufumi; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Tamura, Yasuaki; Takemasa, Ichiro; Kondo, Toru; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Human cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) can be isolated as side population (SP) cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDHhigh) cells or cell surface marker-positive cells including CD44+ cells and CD133+ cells. CSCs/CICs and non-CSCs/CICs are unstable in in vitro culture, and CSCs/CICs can differentiate into non-CSCs/CICs and some non-CSCs/CICs can dedifferentiate into CSCs/CICs. Therefore, experiments using a large amount of CSCs/CICs are technically very difficult. In this study, we isolated single cell clones from SP cells and main population (MP) cells derived from the human colon cancer cell line SW480. SP analysis revealed that SP clone cells had relatively high percentages of SP cells, whereas MP clone cells showed very few SP cells, and the phenotypes were sustainable for more than 2 months of in vitro culture. Xenograft transplantation revealed that SP clone cells have higher tumor-initiating ability than that of MP clone cells and SP clone cell showed higher chemo-resistance compared with MP clone cells. These results indicate that SP clone cells derived from SW480 cells are enriched with CSCs/CICs, whereas MP clone cells are pure non-CSCs/CICs. SP clone cells and MP clone cells are a very stable in vitro CSC/CIC-enriched and non-CSC/CIC model for further analysis.

  10. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  11. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O' Neill, Brian E., E-mail: BEOneill@houstonmethodist.org

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  12. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  13. Phytochemicals as Innovative Therapeutic Tools against Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuele-Salvatore Scarpa; Paolino Ninfali

    2015-01-01

    The theory that several carcinogenetic processes are initiated and sustained by cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been validated, and specific methods to identify the CSCs in the entire population of cancer cells have also proven to be effective. This review aims to provide an overview of recently acquired scientific knowledge regarding phytochemicals and herbal extracts, which have been shown to be able to target and kill CSCs. Many genes and proteins that sustain the CSCs’ self-renewal capacity ...

  14. Cancer Care Initiative: Creation of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at Naval Medical Center Dan Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-24

    clinic had Cancer Care Initiative 6 a dedicated satellite pharmacy staffed by a part-time pharmacist who prepared chemotherapy solutions...patient education information; 80% want clinical research trials; and 79% want end-of-life palliative care to be included as part of a CCC. Physicians...prevention, early detection, staging evaluation, initial and subsequent treatment, long-term follow-up, palliative and hospice care , and supportive

  15. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  16. Cancer stem cells: therapeutic implications and perspectives in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Han

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory is gaining increasing attention from researchers and has become an important focus of cancer research. According to the theory, a minority population of cancer cells is capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding the properties and characteristics of CSCs is key to future study on cancer research, such as the isolation and identification of CSCs, the cancer diagnosis, and the cancer therapy. Standard oncology treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection, can only shrink the bulk tumor and the tumor tends to relapse. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting CSCs and their microenvironmental niche address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies to eradicate the CSCs that otherwise result in therapy resistance. The combined use of traditional therapies with targeted CSC-specific agents may target the whole cancer and offer a promising strategy for lasting treatment and even cure.

  17. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  18. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  19. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Bin, E-mail: yanbin@mercyhealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Mercy Cancer Center, Mercy Medical Center-North Iowa, Mason City, IA 50401 (United States); Ouyang, Ruoyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China); Huang, Chenghui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Liu, Franklin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Neill, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Li, Chuanyuan [Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  20. The Notch Pathway Is Important in Maintaining the Cancer Stem Cell Population in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Ethan V.; Kim, Edward J.; Jingjiang Wu; Mark Hynes; Filip Bednar; Erica Proctor; Lidong Wang; Dziubinski, Michele L; Simeone, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized. Methods Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) that inhi...

  1. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pokrywczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  2. Differential expression profiles of glycosphingolipids in human breast cancer stem cells vs. cancer non-stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Yuh-Jin; Ding, Yao; Levery, Steven B;

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that certain glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are involved in various cell functions, such as cell growth and motility. Recent studies showed changes in GSL expression during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about expression profiles...... of GSLs in cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a small subpopulation in cancer and are proposed as cancer-initiating cells, have been shown to be resistant to numerous chemotherapies, and may cause cancer recurrence. Here, we analyzed GSLs expressed in human breast CSCs by applying a CSC model induced...... significantly reduced the expression of GD2 and GD3 and caused a phenotype change from CSC to a non-CSC, which was detected by reduced mammosphere formation and cell motility. Our results provide insight into GSL profiles in human breast CSCs, indicate a functional role of GD2 and GD3 in CSCs, and suggest...

  3. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  4. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  5. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  6. [Prostate cancer stem cells: advances in current research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Wu, Deng-long

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies threatening men's health, and the mechanisms underlying its initiation and progression are poorly understood. Last decade has witnessed encouraging progress in the studies of prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs), which are considered to play important roles in tumor initiation, recurrence and metastasis, castration resistance, and drug resistance. Therefore, a deeper insight into PCSCs is of great significance for the successful management of prostate cancer. This article presents an overview on the location, origin, and markers of PCSCs as well as their potential correlation with tumor metastasis and castration resistance.

  7. Responses of Cancer Cells Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kushibiki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT involves the administration of a photosensitizer, followed by local irradiation of tumor tissues using a laser of an appropriate wavelength to activate the photosensitizer. Since multiple cellular signaling cascades are concomitantly activated in cancer cells exposed to the photodynamic effect, understanding the responses of cancer cells to PDT will aid in the development of new interventions. This review describes the possible cell-death signaling pathways initiated by PDT. In addition, we describe our latest findings regarding the induction of expression of miRNAs specific to apoptosis in cancer cells and the induction of antitumor immunity following PDT against cancer cells. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to PDT will potentially improve long-term survival of PDT treated patients.

  8. The NF-κB Pathway and Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkenbaugh, Amanda L; Baldwin, Albert S

    2016-04-06

    The NF-κB transcription factor pathway is a crucial regulator of inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, aberrant NF-κB signaling has been identified in many types of cancer. Downstream of key oncogenic pathways, such as RAS, BCR-ABL, and Her2, NF-κB regulates transcription of target genes that promote cell survival and proliferation, inhibit apoptosis, and mediate invasion and metastasis. The cancer stem cell model posits that a subset of tumor cells (cancer stem cells) drive tumor initiation, exhibit resistance to treatment, and promote recurrence and metastasis. This review examines the evidence for a role for NF-κB signaling in cancer stem cell biology.

  9. Advances on Driver Oncogenes of Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei HONG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Next to adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the lung is the most frequent histologic subtype in non-small cell lung cancer. Several molecular alterations have been defined as "driver oncogenes" responsible for both the initiation and maintenance of the malignancy. The squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has recently shown peculiar molecular characteristics which relate with both carcinogenesis and response to targeted drugs. So far, about 40% of lung squamous cell carcinoma has been found harbouring driver oncogenes, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 plays important roles. In this review, we will report the mainly advances on some latest driver mutations of squamous cell lung cancer.

  10. Cancer stem cells: a new approach to tumor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Ciufa Kobayashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many theories have been proposed to explain the origins of cancer. Currently, evidences show that not every tumor cell is capable of initiating a tumor. Only a small part of the cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs, can generate a tumor identical to the original one, when removed from human tumors and transplanted into immunosuppressed mice. The name given to these cells comes from the resemblance to normal stem cells, except for the fact that their ability to divide is infinite. These cells are also affected by their microenvironment. Many of the signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, are altered in this tumoral subpopulation, which also contributes to abnormal proliferation. Researchers have found several markers for CSCs; however, much remains to be studied, or perhaps a universal marker does not even exist, since they vary among tumor types and even from patient to patient. It was also found that cancer stem cells are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This may explain the re-emergence of the disease, since they are not completely eliminated and minimal amounts of CSCs can repopulate a tumor. Once the diagnosis in the early stages greatly increases the chances of curing cancer, identifying CSCs in tumors is a goal for the development of more effective treatments. The objective of this article is to discuss the origin of cancer according to the theory of stem cell cancer, as well as its markers and therapies used for treatment.

  11. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun [Department of Parasitology and Genetics, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Soo Hyun; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun-Sil [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, MA (United States); Jeong, Namkung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Wan-Kyu [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heung Yeol, E-mail: hykyale@yahoo.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hee-Jae, E-mail: hcha@kosin.ac.kr [Department of Parasitology and Genetics, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Medical Science, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker.

  12. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  13. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... promising opportunities based on nanotechnology from academic research to the clinical environment; 4... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer...

  14. Apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisbert-Valenzuela, Edwin O; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a public health problem in the world and breast cancer is the most frequently cancer in women. Approximately 15% of the breast cancers are triple-negative. Apoptosis regulates normal growth, homeostasis, development, embryogenesis and appropriate strategy to treat cancer. Bax is a protein pro-apoptotic enhancer of apoptosis in contrast to Bcl-2 with antiapoptotic properties. Initiator caspase-9 and caspase-8 are features of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway, respectively. NF-κB is a transcription factor known to be involved in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Noscapine, an alkaloid derived from opium is used as antitussive and showed antitumor properties that induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines. The aim of the present study was to determine the apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines compared to breast normal cell line. Three cell lines were used: i) a control breast cell line MCF-10F; ii) a luminal-like adenocarcinoma triple-positive breast cell line MCF-7; iii) breast cancer triple-negative cell line MDA-MB-231. Our results showed that noscapine had lower toxicity in normal cells and was an effective anticancer agent that induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells because it increases Bax gene and protein expression in three cell lines, while decreases Bcl-xL gene expression, and Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in breast cancer cell lines. Therefore, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased in the three cell lines. This drug increased caspase-9 gene expression in breast cancer cell lines and caspase-8 gene expression increased in MCF-10F and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, it increased cleavage of caspase-8, suggesting that noscapine-induced apoptosis is probably due to the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Antiapoptotic gene and protein expression diminished and proapoptotic gene and protein expression increased noscapine-induced expression, probably due to decrease in NF-κB gene and protein expression

  15. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parisha; Bhatia; Koji; Tsumagari; Zakaria; Y; Abd; Elmageed; Paul; Friedlander; Joseph; F; Buell; Emad; Kandil

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  16. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  17. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  18. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  19. Cell size and cancer: a new solution to Peto's paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciak, Sebastian; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, one of the leading health concerns for humans, is by no means a human-unique malady. Accumulating evidence shows that cancer kills domestic and wild animals at a similar rate to humans and can even pose a conservation threat to certain species. Assuming that each physiologically active and proliferating cell is at risk of malignant transformation, any evolutionary increase in the number of cells (and thus body mass) will lead to a higher cancer frequency, all else being equal. However, available data fail to support the prediction that bigger animals are affected by cancer more than smaller ones. The unexpected lack of correlation between body size (and life span) and cancer risk across taxa was dubbed Peto's paradox. In this perspective, several plausible explanations of Peto's paradox are presented, with the emphasis on a largely underappreciated relation of cell size to both metabolism and cell division rates across species, which we believe are key factors underlying the paradox. We conclude that larger organisms have bigger and slowly dividing cells with lower energy turnover, all significantly reducing the risk of cancer initiation. Solving Peto's paradox will enhance our understanding the evolution of cancer and may provide new implications for cancer prevention and treatment.

  20. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for kidney (renal cell) cancer. The list ...

  1. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  2. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design.

  3. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  4. The Therapeutic Targets of miRNA in Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Bimonte; Maddalena Leongito; Antonio Barbieri; Vitale del Vecchio; Michela Falco; Aldo Giudice; Raffaele Palaia; Vittorio Albino; Raimondo Di Giacomo; Antonella Petrillo; Vincenza Granata; Francesco Izzo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer death in patients. Several studies demonstrated that hepatic cancer stem cells (HCSCs), also called tumor-initiating cells, are involved in regulation of HCC initiation, tumor progression, metastasis development, and drug resistance. Despite the extensive research, the underlying mechanisms by which HCSCs are regulated remain still unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are able to r...

  5. The Function of miRNA in Hepatic Cancer Stem Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Qi; Weicheng Liang; Huiqing Jiang; Mary Miuyee Waye

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and ranks third in the leading causes of cancer patient's death. Cancer stem cells (HSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been reported in multiple subtypes of HCC and are considered as the master regulators of HCC initiation, chemotherapy drug resistance, tumor metastasis, and progression. In spite of their clinical importance, the detailed mechanism about how HSCs are intricately regulated in the molecular ...

  6. Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Christensen, Anne Geske Lindhard; Ehmsen, Sidse

    /CD24-/low compartment of human breast cancer is enriched in tumor-initiating cells; however the functional heterogeneity within this subpopulation remains poorly defined. From a triple-negative breast cancer cell line we isolated and cloned CD44hi single-cells that exhibited functional heterogeneity...

  7. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  8. Glucose starvation-mediated inhibition of salinomycin induced autophagy amplifies cancer cell specific cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R.; Jain, Mayur V.; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Roberg, Karin; Lotfi, Kourosh; Łos, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin has been used as treatment for malignant tumors in a small number of humans, causing far less side effects than standard chemotherapy. Several studies show that Salinomycin targets cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells, or CSC) resistant to conventional therapies. Numerous studies show that Salinomycin not only reduces tumor volume, but also decreases tumor recurrence when used as an adjuvant to standard treatments. In this study we show that starvation triggered different st...

  9. CD133, CD15/SSEA-1, CD34 or side populations do not resume tumor-initiating properties of long-term cultured cancer stem cells from human malignant glio-neuronal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalescu-Maingot Maria

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor initiating cells (TICs provide a new paradigm for developing original therapeutic strategies. Methods We screened for TICs in 47 human adult brain malignant tumors. Cells forming floating spheres in culture, and endowed with all of the features expected from tumor cells with stem-like properties were obtained from glioblastomas, medulloblastoma but not oligodendrogliomas. Results A long-term self-renewal capacity was particularly observed for cells of malignant glio-neuronal tumors (MGNTs. Cell sorting, karyotyping and proteomic analysis demonstrated cell stability throughout prolonged passages. Xenografts of fewer than 500 cells in Nude mouse brains induced a progressively growing tumor. CD133, CD15/LeX/Ssea-1, CD34 expressions, or exclusion of Hoechst dye occurred in subsets of cells forming spheres, but was not predictive of their capacity to form secondary spheres or tumors, or to resist high doses of temozolomide. Conclusions Our results further highlight the specificity of a subset of high-grade gliomas, MGNT. TICs derived from these tumors represent a new tool to screen for innovative therapies.

  10. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  11. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: From Identification to Tumor Immune Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, L K; Driver, E R; Wang, X J

    2015-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer. Annually, more than half a million individuals are diagnosed with this devastating disease, with increasing incidence in Europe and Southeast Asia. The diagnosis of HNSCC often occurs in late stages of the disease and is characterized by manifestation of a high-grade primary tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, precluding timely management of this deadly cancer. Recently, HNSCC cancer stem cells have emerged as an important factor for cancer initiation and maintenance of tumor bulk. Like normal stem cells, cancer stem cells can undergo self-renewal and differentiation. This unique trait allows for maintenance of the cancer stem cell pool and facilitates differentiation into heterogeneous neoplastic progeny when necessary. Recent studies have suggested coexistence of different cancer stem cell populations within a tumor mass, where the tumor initiation and metastasis properties of these cancer stem cells can be uncoupled. Cancer stem cells also possess resistant phenotypes that evade standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy, resulting in tumor relapse. Therefore, understanding distinctive pathways relating to cancer stem cells will provide insight into early diagnosis and treatment of HNSCC. In this review, we highlight current advances in identifying cancer stem cells, detail the interactions of these cells with the immune system within the tumor niche, and discuss the potential use of immunotherapy in managing HNSCC.

  12. Red meat and colon cancer : how dietary heme initiates hyperproliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, N.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. The risk to develop colorectal cancer is associated with the intake of red meat. Red meat contains the porphyrin pigment heme. Heme is an irritant for the colonic wall and it is previously shown that the addition of heme to

  13. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  14. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  15. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  16. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  17. Serpins promote cancer cell survival and vascular co-option in brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Obenauf, Anna C; Jin, Xin; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Lee, Derek J; Chaft, Jamie E; Kris, Mark G; Huse, Jason T; Brogi, Edi; Massagué, Joan

    2014-02-27

    Brain metastasis is an ominous complication of cancer, yet most cancer cells that infiltrate the brain die of unknown causes. Here, we identify plasmin from the reactive brain stroma as a defense against metastatic invasion, and plasminogen activator (PA) inhibitory serpins in cancer cells as a shield against this defense. Plasmin suppresses brain metastasis in two ways: by converting membrane-bound astrocytic FasL into a paracrine death signal for cancer cells, and by inactivating the axon pathfinding molecule L1CAM, which metastatic cells express for spreading along brain capillaries and for metastatic outgrowth. Brain metastatic cells from lung cancer and breast cancer express high levels of anti-PA serpins, including neuroserpin and serpin B2, to prevent plasmin generation and its metastasis-suppressive effects. By protecting cancer cells from death signals and fostering vascular co-option, anti-PA serpins provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of brain metastasis in lung and breast cancers.

  18. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Vassilev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  19. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2017-01-25

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  20. Notch signaling and EMT in non-small cell lung cancer: biological significance and therapeutic application

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Han, Na; Xu, Hanxiao; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer cells acquire enhanced ability of migration and invasion, stem cell like characteristics and therapeutic resistance. Notch signaling regulates cell-cell connection, cell polarity and motility during organ development. Recent studies demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and cross-talks with several transcriptional factors to enhance EMT, contributing to the progression of non-small cell lung c...

  1. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  2. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-xiang Yuan; Jingxin Mo; Guixian Zhao; Gang Shu; Hua-lin Fu; Wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  3. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT)-Phenotypic Cells: Are They Cousins or Twins?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Dejuan; Li, Yiwei; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H., E-mail: fsarkar@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and maintain tumor-initiating capacity through differentiation into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the whole tumor. These tumor-initiating cells could provide a resource for cells that cause tumor recurrence after therapy. Although the cell origin of CSCs remains to be fully elucidated, mounting evidence has demonstrated that Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), induced by different factors, is associated with tumor aggressiveness and metastasis and these cells share molecular characteristics with CSCs, and thus are often called cancer stem-like cells or tumor-initiating cells. The acquisition of an EMT phenotype is a critical process for switching early stage carcinomas into invasive malignancies, which is often associated with the loss of epithelial differentiation and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated that EMT plays a critical role not only in tumor metastasis but also in tumor recurrence and that it is tightly linked with the biology of cancer stem-like cells or cancer-initiating cells. Here we will succinctly summarize the state-of-our-knowledge regarding the molecular similarities between cancer stem-like cells or CSCs and EMT-phenotypic cells that are associated with tumor aggressiveness focusing on solid tumors.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT-Phenotypic Cells: Are They Cousins or Twins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlul H. Sarkar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and maintain tumor-initiating capacity through differentiation into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the whole tumor. These tumor-initiating cells could provide a resource for cells that cause tumor recurrence after therapy. Although the cell origin of CSCs remains to be fully elucidated, mounting evidence has demonstrated that Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT, induced by different factors, is associated with tumor aggressiveness and metastasis and these cells share molecular characteristics with CSCs, and thus are often called cancer stem-like cells or tumor-initiating cells. The acquisition of an EMT phenotype is a critical process for switching early stage carcinomas into invasive malignancies, which is often associated with the loss of epithelial differentiation and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated that EMT plays a critical role not only in tumor metastasis but also in tumor recurrence and that it is tightly linked with the biology of cancer stem-like cells or cancer-initiating cells. Here we will succinctly summarize the state-of-our-knowledge regarding the molecular similarities between cancer stem-like cells or CSCs and EMT-phenotypic cells that are associated with tumor aggressiveness focusing on solid tumors.

  5. Dasatinib and Doxorubicin Treatment of Sarcoma Initiating Cells: A Possible New Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninna Aggerholm-Pedersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the major challenges affecting sarcoma treatment outcome, particularly that of metastatic disease, is resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer-initiating cells are considered a major contributor to this resistance. Methods. An immortalised nontransformed human stromal (mesenchymal stem cell line hMSC-TERT4 and a transformed cell line hMSC-TERT20-CE8, known to form sarcoma-like tumours when implanted in immune-deficient mice, were used as models. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK activation was analysed by RTK arrays and cellular viability after tyrosine kinases inhibitor (TKI treatment with or without doxorubicin was assessed by MTS assay. Results. Initial results showed that the hMSC-TERT4 was more doxorubicin-sensitive while hMSC-TERT20-CE8 was less doxorubicin-sensitive evidenced by monitoring cell viability in the presence of doxorubicin at different doses. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR was activated in both cell lines. However hMSC-TERT20-CE8 exhibited significantly higher expression of the EGFR ligands. EGFR inhibitors such as erlotinib and afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin failed to further decrease cell viability of hMSC-TERT20-CE8. However, inhibition with the TKI dasatinib in combination with doxorubicin decreased cell viability of the hMSC-TERT20-CE8 cell line. Conclusion. Our results demonstrate that dasatinib, but not EGFR-directed treatment, can decrease cell viability of stromal cancer stem cells less sensitive to doxorubicin.

  6. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  7. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  8. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Abdelli, Omar; Buy, Xavier [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mathelin, Michel de [University of Strasbourg, Lsiit, Strasbourg (France); Jacqmin, Didier; Lang, Herve [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Urology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-08-15

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  9. Human Nanog pseudogene8 promotes the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Keita, E-mail: uchino13@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hirano, Gen [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hirahashi, Minako [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isobe, Taichi; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Baba, Eishi [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Akashi, Koichi [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2012-09-10

    There is emerging evidence that human solid tumor cells originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs). In cancer cell lines, tumor-initiating CSCs are mainly found in the side population (SP) that has the capacity to extrude dyes such as Hoechst 33342. We found that Nanog is expressed specifically in SP cells of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that NanogP8 but not Nanog was expressed in GI cancer cells. Transfection of NanogP8 into GI cancer cell lines promoted cell proliferation, while its inhibition by anti-Nanog siRNA suppressed the proliferation. Immunohistochemical staining of primary GI cancer tissues revealed NanogP8 protein to be strongly expressed in 3 out of 60 cases. In these cases, NanogP8 was found especially in an infiltrative part of the tumor, in proliferating cells with Ki67 expression. These data suggest that NanogP8 is involved in GI cancer development in a fraction of patients, in whom it presumably acts by supporting CSC proliferation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog maintains pluripotency by regulating embryonic stem cells differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in cancer stem cells of human gastrointestinal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide sequencing revealed that Nanog pseudogene8 but not Nanog was expressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 promotes cancer stem cells proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog pseudogene8 is involved in gastrointestinal cancer development.

  10. Attributes of Oct4 in stem cell biology: perspectives on cancer stem cells of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardzija Chantel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC remains the most lethal of all the gynaecological malignancies with drug resistance and recurrence remaining the major therapeutic barrier in the management of the disease. Although several studies have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms responsible for chemoresistance and subsequent recurrence in EOC, the exact mechanisms associated with chemoresistance/recurrence continue to remain elusive. Recent studies have shown that the parallel characteristics commonly seen between embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC are also shared by a relatively rare population of cells within tumors that display stem cell-like features. These cells, termed ‘cancer initiating cells’ or ‘cancer stem cells (CSCs’ have been shown not only to display increased self renewal and pluripotent abilities as seen in ESCs and iPSCs, but are also highly tumorigenic in in vivo mouse models. Additionally, these CSCs have been implicated in tumor recurrence and chemoresistance, and when isolated have consistently shown to express the master pluripotency and embryonic stem cell regulating gene Oct4. This article reviews the involvement of Oct4 in cancer progression and chemoresistance, with emphasis on ovarian cancer. Overall, we highlight why ovarian cancer patients, who initially respond to conventional chemotherapy subsequently relapse with recurrent chemoresistant disease that is essentially incurable.

  11. Glucose starvation-mediated inhibition of salinomycin induced autophagy amplifies cancer cell specific cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Jain, Mayur V; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Roberg, Karin; Lotfi, Kourosh; Łos, Marek J

    2015-04-30

    Salinomycin has been used as treatment for malignant tumors in a small number of humans, causing far less side effects than standard chemotherapy. Several studies show that Salinomycin targets cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells, or CSC) resistant to conventional therapies. Numerous studies show that Salinomycin not only reduces tumor volume, but also decreases tumor recurrence when used as an adjuvant to standard treatments. In this study we show that starvation triggered different stress responses in cancer cells and primary normal cells, which further improved the preferential targeting of cancer cells by Salinomycin. Our in vitro studies further demonstrate that the combined use of 2-Fluoro 2-deoxy D-glucose, or 2-deoxy D-glucose with Salinomycin is lethal in cancer cells while the use of Oxamate does not improve cell death-inducing properties of Salinomycin. Furthermore, we show that treatment of cancer cells with Salinomycin under starvation conditions not only increases the apoptotic caspase activity, but also diminishes the protective autophagy normally triggered by the treatment with Salinomycin alone. Thus, this study underlines the potential use of Salinomycin as a cancer treatment, possibly in combination with short-term starvation or starvation-mimicking pharmacologic intervention.

  12. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  13. Stem cell characteristics in prostate cancer cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, M.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate the presence of a small, stem-like cell population in several human cancers that is crucial for the tumour (re)population. OBJECTIVE: Six established prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines-DU145, DuCaP, LAPC-4, 22Rv1, LNCaP, and PC-3-were examined for their stem cell pr

  14. Dasatinib and Doxorubicin Treatment of Sarcoma Initiating Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm-Pedersen, Ninna; Demuth, Christina; Safwat, Akmal;

    2016-01-01

    growth factor receptor (EGFR) was activated in both cell lines. However hMSC-TERT20-CE8 exhibited significantly higher expression of the EGFR ligands. EGFR inhibitors such as erlotinib and afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin failed to further decrease cell viability of hMSC-TERT20-CE8......) stem cell line hMSC-TERT4 and a transformed cell line hMSC-TERT20-CE8, known to form sarcoma-like tumours when implanted in immune-deficient mice, were used as models. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation was analysed by RTK arrays and cellular viability after tyrosine kinases inhibitor (TKI....... However, inhibition with the TKI dasatinib in combination with doxorubicin decreased cell viability of the hMSC-TERT20-CE8 cell line. Conclusion. Our results demonstrate that dasatinib, but not EGFR-directed treatment, can decrease cell viability of stromal cancer stem cells less sensitive to doxorubicin....

  15. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  16. On dendritic cell-based therapy for cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morikazu Onji; Sk. Md. Fazle Akbar

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most prevalent antigen-presenting cell in vivo, had been widely characterized in the last three decades. DCs are present in almost all tissues of the body and play cardinal roles in recognition of microbial agents,autoantigens, allergens and alloantigen. DCs process the microbial agents or their antigens and migrate to lymphoid tissues to present the antigenic peptide to lymphocytes. This leads to activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. Initially, it was assumed that DCs are principally involved in the induction and maintenance of adaptive immune responses, but now it is evident that DCs also have important roles in innate immunity. These features make DCs very good candidates for therapy against various pathological conditions including malignancies. Initially, DC-based therapy was used in animal models of cancers. Data from these studies inspired considerable optimism and DC-based therapies was started in human cancers 8 years ago. In general,DC-based therapy has been found to be safe in patients with cancers, although few controlled trials have been conducted in this regard. Because the fundamentals principles of human cancers and animal models of cancers are different, the therapeutic efficacy of the ongoing regime of DC-based therapy in cancer patients is not satisfactory. In this review, we covered the various aspects that should be considered for developing better regime of DC-based therapy for human cancers.

  17. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  18. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  19. Exosomes released from breast cancer carcinomas stimulate cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinari A Harris

    Full Text Available For metastasis to occur cells must communicate with to their local environment to initiate growth and invasion. Exosomes have emerged as an important mediator of cell-to-cell signalling through the transfer of molecules such as mRNAs, microRNAs, and proteins between cells. Exosomes have been proposed to act as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we study the effect of exosomes on cell migration, an important step in metastasis. We performed cell migration assays, endocytosis assays, and exosome proteomic profiling on exosomes released from three breast cancer cell lines that model progressive stages of metastasis. Results from these experiments suggest: (1 exosomes promote cell migration and (2 the signal is stronger from exosomes isolated from cells with higher metastatic potentials; (3 exosomes are endocytosed at the same rate regardless of the cell type; (4 exosomes released from cells show differential enrichment of proteins with unique protein signatures of both identity and abundance. We conclude that breast cancer cells of increasing metastatic potential secrete exosomes with distinct protein signatures that proportionally increase cell movement and suggest that released exosomes could play an active role in metastasis.

  20. Exosomes released from breast cancer carcinomas stimulate cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dinari A; Patel, Sajni H; Gucek, Marjan; Hendrix, An; Westbroek, Wendy; Taraska, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    For metastasis to occur cells must communicate with to their local environment to initiate growth and invasion. Exosomes have emerged as an important mediator of cell-to-cell signalling through the transfer of molecules such as mRNAs, microRNAs, and proteins between cells. Exosomes have been proposed to act as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we study the effect of exosomes on cell migration, an important step in metastasis. We performed cell migration assays, endocytosis assays, and exosome proteomic profiling on exosomes released from three breast cancer cell lines that model progressive stages of metastasis. Results from these experiments suggest: (1) exosomes promote cell migration and (2) the signal is stronger from exosomes isolated from cells with higher metastatic potentials; (3) exosomes are endocytosed at the same rate regardless of the cell type; (4) exosomes released from cells show differential enrichment of proteins with unique protein signatures of both identity and abundance. We conclude that breast cancer cells of increasing metastatic potential secrete exosomes with distinct protein signatures that proportionally increase cell movement and suggest that released exosomes could play an active role in metastasis.

  1. Single-cell analysis in cancer genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatpour, Assieh; Lai, Shujing; Guo, Guoji; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Genetic changes and environmental differences result in cellular heterogeneity among cancer cells within the same tumor, thereby complicating treatment outcomes. Recent advances in single-cell technologies have opened new avenues to characterize the intra-tumor cellular heterogeneity, identify rare cell types, measure mutation rates, and, ultimately, guide diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review the recent single-cell technological and computational advances at the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, and discuss their applications in cancer research. PMID:26450340

  2. Colorectal cancer stem cell and chemoresistant colorectal cancer cell phenotypes and increased sensitivity to Notch pathway inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Tang, Qingchao; You, Qi; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Li, Jiaying; Muhammand, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-08-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (Co-CSCs) are a small subpopulation of tumor cells which have been proposed to be tumor-initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to be implicated in resistance to standard chemotherapy. Chemoresistance is a common problem in the clinic. However, the interrelation between Co-CSCs and chemoresistant cells has yet to be elucidated. The present study investigated the Co-CSC phenotype in colonospheres and chemoresistant CRC cell lines and aimed to identify targets for therapy. Colonospheres and chemoresistant CRC cells were found to be enriched with the CSC markers CD133 and CD44, and exhibited similar phenotypes. Furthermore, it was found that Notch signaling may simultaneously regulate Co-CSCs and chemoresistant cells and may represent a novel strategy for targeting this pathway in CRC.

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-03-31

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A-nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate on liver cancer and cancer stem cells with different p53 status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Lamy

    Full Text Available Isothiocyanates from plants of the order Brassicales are considered promising cancer chemotherapeutic phytochemicals. However, their selective cytotoxicity on liver cancer has been barely researched. Therefore, in the present study, we systematically studied the chemotherapeutic potency of 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC. Selective toxicity was investigated by comparing its effect on liver cancer cells and their chemoresistant subpopulations to normal primary hepatocytes and liver tissue slices. Additionally, in a first assessment, the in vivo tolerability of MTBITC was investigated in mice. Growth arrest at G2/M and apoptosis induction was evident in all in vitro cancer models treated with MTBITC, including populations with cancer initiating characteristics. This was found independent from TP53; however cell death was delayed in p53 compromised cells as compared to wt-p53 cells which was probably due to differential BH3 only gene regulation i. e. Noxa and its antagonist A1. In normal hepatocytes, no apoptosis or necrosis could be detected after repeated administration of up to 50 µM MTBITC. In mice, orally applied MTBITC was well tolerated over 18 days of treatment for up to 50 mg/kg/day, the highest dose tested. In conclusion, we could show here that the killing effect of MTBITC has a definite selectivity for cancer cells over normal liver cells and its cytotoxicity even applies for chemoresistant cancer initiating cells. Our study could serve for a better understanding of the chemotherapeutic properties of isothiocyanates on human liver-derived cancer cells.

  5. From embryonic stem cells to testicular germ cell cancer-- should we be concerned?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Sonne, Si Brask; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E

    2006-01-01

    that initial hypothesis but also indicating that CIS cells have a striking phenotypic similarity to embryonic stem cells (ESC). Many cancers have been proposed to originate from tissue-specific stem cells [so-called 'cancer stem cells' (CSC)] and we argue that CIS may be a very good example of a CSC......, but with exceptional features due to the retention of embryonic pluripotency. In addition, considering the fact that pre-invasive CIS cells are transformed from early fetal cells, possibly due to environmentally induced alterations of the niche, we discuss potential risks linked to the uncontrolled therapeutic use......Since the discovery of testicular carcinoma in situ (CIS) -- the precursor cell for the vast majority of germ cell tumours -- it has been proposed that CIS cells could be derived from transformed primordial germ cells or gonocytes. Here, we review recent discoveries not only substantiating...

  6. A novel strategy for cancer treatment:Targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia; MA LeiNa; WANG YiGang; LIU XinYuan; QIAN QiJun

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) is a subclass of cancer cells possessing parts of properties of normal stem cell. It has a high capacity of proliferation and plays a pivotal role in tumor recurrence and tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. At present, small molecule in-hibitors and fusion proteins are widely used in the CSC-targeting strategy. Gene-virotherapy, which uses oncolytic adenovirus as a vector to mediate the expression of therapeutic gene, shows a signifi-cant superiority to other regimens of cancer treatment and has a good efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors. Thus, it is a promising choice to apply gene-virotherapy into the CSC-targeting treatment. Based on the molecular mechanism underlying CSC self-renewal, a series of effective strategies for targeting CSC have been established. This review will summarize the recent research progresses on CSC-targeting treatment.

  7. Ovarian cancer stem cells are enriched in side population and aldehyde dehydrogenase bright overlapping population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyo Yasuda

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiaiting cells (CICs are defined as a small population of cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity, differentiation potential and high tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs of ovarian cancer have been isolated by side population (SP analysis, ALDEFLUOR assay and using cell surface markers. However, these approaches are not definitive markers for CSCs/CICs, and it is necessary to refine recent methods for identifying more highly purified CSCs/CICs. In this study, we analyzed SP cells and aldehyde dehydrogenese bright (ALDH(Br cells from ovarian cancer cells. Both SP cells and ALDH(Br cells exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability and higher expression level of a stem cell marker, sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2, than those of main population (MP cells and ALDH(Low cells, respectively. We analyzed an SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population (SP/ALDH(Br, and the SP/ALDH(Br population exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability than that of SP cells or ALDH(Br cells, enabling initiation of tumor with as few as 10(2 cells. Furthermore, SP/ADLH(Br population showed higher sphere-forming ability, cisplatin resistance, adipocyte differentiation ability and expression of SOX2 than those of SP/ALDH(Low, MP/ALDH(Br and MP/ALDH(Low cells. Gene knockdown of SOX2 suppressed the tumor-initiation of ovarian cancer cells. An SP/ALDH(Br population was detected in several gynecological cancer cells with ratios of 0.1% for HEC-1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma cells to 1% for MCAS ovary mucinous adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, use of the SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population is a promising approach to isolate highly purified CSCs/CICs and SOX2 might be a novel functional marker for ovarian CSCs/CICs.

  8. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  10. Mast cells and cancer: enemies or allies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyduch, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells are a component of cancer microenvironment the role of which is complex and poorly understood. Mast cells promote cancer growth by stimulation of neoangiogenesis, tissue remodeling and by modulation of the host immune response. The mediators of cancer promotion include protease-activated receptors, mitogen activated protein kinases, prostaglandins and histamine. Histamine may induce tumor proliferation and immunosuppression through H1 and H2 receptors, respectively. The mast cell-derived modulators of immune response include also interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and CD30L. Possibly stimulation of angiogenesis is the most important. Mast cells release potent proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), TNF- α and IL-8, and mast cells' enzymes, like metaloproteinases (MMPs), tryptase and chymase participate in vessels' formation. The anti-cancer actions of mast cells include direct growth inhibition, immunologic stimulation, inhibition of apoptosis and decreased cell mobility; the mediators of these processes include chymase, tryptase, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. The very same mediators may exert both pro- or anti-cancer effects depending on concentration, presence of cofactors or location of secreting cells. In fact, peri- and intra-tumoral mast cells may have dissimilar effects. Understanding of the role of mast cells in cancer could lead to improved prognostication and development of therapeutic methods targeting the mast cells.

  11. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  12. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower

  13. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  14. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  15. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  17. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haeryoung [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients.

  19. MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer —Our Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Jankovic, K; Noveski, P; Chakalova, L; Petrusevska, G; Kubelka, K; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small [∼21 nucleotide (nt)] non coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally. About 3.0% of human genes encode for miRNAs, and up to 30.0% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. Currently, more than 2000 unique human mature microRNAs are known. MicroRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These processes are commonly dysregulated in cancer, implicating miRNAs in carcinogenesis, where they act as tumor supressors or oncogenes. Several miRNAs are associated with breast cancer. Here we present our initial results of miRNA analyses of breast cancer tissues using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (ReTi-PCR) (qPCR) involving stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT) primers combined with TaqMan® PCR and miRNA microarray analysis. PMID:24052751

  20. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  1. Maintenance of leukemia-initiating cells is regulated by the CDK inhibitor Inca1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bäumer

    Full Text Available Functional differences between healthy progenitor and cancer initiating cells may provide unique opportunities for targeted therapy approaches. Hematopoietic stem cells are tightly controlled by a network of CDK inhibitors that govern proliferation and prevent stem cell exhaustion. Loss of Inca1 led to an increased number of short-term hematopoietic stem cells in older mice, but Inca1 seems largely dispensable for normal hematopoiesis. On the other hand, Inca1-deficiency enhanced cell cycling upon cytotoxic stress and accelerated bone marrow exhaustion. Moreover, AML1-ETO9a-induced proliferation was not sustained in Inca1-deficient cells in vivo. As a consequence, leukemia induction and leukemia maintenance were severely impaired in Inca1-/- bone marrow cells. The re-initiation of leukemia was also significantly inhibited in absence of Inca1-/- in MLL-AF9- and c-myc/BCL2-positive leukemia mouse models. These findings indicate distinct functional properties of Inca1 in normal hematopoietic cells compared to leukemia initiating cells. Such functional differences might be used to design specific therapy approaches in leukemia.

  2. 磁珠细胞分选CD133+/CD44+前列腺癌干细胞的初步鉴定%Initial identification of CD133+/CD44+ prostate cancer stem cell through magnetic bead cell sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛夏; 王德林; 李文宾; 罗照

    2013-01-01

    目的:通过磁珠细胞分选(magnetic bead cell sorting,MACS)方法从人前列腺癌细胞系PC-3中分选CD133+/CD44+干细胞,为进一步功能性研究奠定基础.方法:运用流式细胞仪(flow cytometry,FCM)检测MACS分选前后PC-3细胞膜上CD133和CD44表达情况;观察无血清培养成球情况,免疫荧光(immunofluorescenee,IF)表达情况;比较细胞在分选前后的形态学、增殖能力方面的差异;免疫组化(immunohistochemistry,IHC)和Western blot检测诱导分化前后前列腺酸性磷酸酶(prostatic acid phosphatase,PAP)蛋白情况.结果:FCM检测PC-3细胞CD133和CD44的阳性表达分别是(1.33±0.05)%和(0.87±0.06)%,而MACS分选后PAP分别为(84.82±0.07)%和(99.91±0.03)%;IF检测CD133+/CD44+细胞培养后继续呈阳性表达;CD133+/CD44+细胞增殖能力高于PC-3细胞(t=11.0,P=0.008)以及高于诱导后的CD133+/CD44+细胞(t=40.1,P=0.001);CD133+/CD44+细胞经过转化生长因子-β诱导后IHC和Western blot检测PAP表达呈阳性,而未诱导的CD133+/CD44+细胞表达呈阴性.结论:MACS从PC-3细胞株中分选的CD 133+/CD44+细胞经过初步功能性鉴定具有干细胞的某些特性,可为前列腺癌干细胞的进一步探索充当铺垫.

  3. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  4. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunyuan; Ye, Jian; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yanping; Hunborg, Pamela; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft, Daniel F.; Hsueh, Eddy C.; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Immunoediting concept has provided critical insights suggesting dual functions of immune system during the cancer initiation and development. However, the dynamics and roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the pathogenesis of breast cancer remain unclear. Here we utilized two murine breast cancer models (4T1 and E0771) and demonstrated that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were increased and involved in immune responses, but with distinct dynamic trends in breast cancer development. In addition to cell number increases, CD4+ T cells changed their dominant subsets from Th1 in the early stages to Treg and Th17 cells in the late stages of the cancer progression. We also analyzed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration in primary breast cancer tissues from cancer patients. We observed that CD8+ T cells are the key effector cell population mediating effective anti-tumor immunity resulting in better clinical outcomes. In contrast, intra-tumoral CD4+ T cells have negative prognostic effects on breast cancer patient outcomes. These studies indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcomes, which provides new insights relevant for the development of effective cancer immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25968569

  5. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  6. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  7. Application of Organosilane Monolayer Template to Quantitative Evaluation of Cancer Cell Adhesive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanii, Takashi; Sasaki, Kosuke; Ichisawa, Kota; Demura, Takanori; Beppu, Yuichi; Vu, Hoan Anh; Thanh Chi, Hoan; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Sato, Yuko

    2011-06-01

    The adhesive ability of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines was evaluated using organosilane monolayer templates (OMTs). Using the OMT, the spreading area of adhered cells can be limited, and this enables us to focus on the initial attachment process of adhesion. Moreover, it becomes possible to arrange the cells in an array and to quantitatively evaluate the number of attached cells. The adhesive ability of the cancer cells cultured on the OMT was controlled by adding (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which blocks a receptor that mediates cell adhesion and is overexpressed in cancer cells. Measurement of the relative ability of the cancer cells to attach to the OMT revealed that the ability for attachment decreased with increasing EGCG concentration. The results agreed well with the western blot analysis, indicating that the OMT can potentially be employed to evaluate the adhesive ability of various cancer cells.

  8. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and preven

  9. Cancer Stem Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line H446: Higher Dependency on Oxidative Phosphorylation and Mitochondrial Substrate-Level Phosphorylation than Non-Stem Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Gao

    Full Text Available Recently, targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs metabolism is becoming a promising therapeutic approach to improve cancer treatment outcomes. However, knowledge of the metabolic state of CSCs in small cell lung cancer is still lacking. In this study, we found that CSCs had significantly lower oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate than non-stem cancer cells. Meanwhile, this subpopulation of cells consumed less glucose, produced less lactate and maintained lower ATP levels. We also revealed that CSCs could produce more ATP through mitochondrial substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition compared with non-stem cancer cells. Furthermore, they were more sensitive to suppression of oxidative phosphorylation. Therefore, oligomycin (inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation could severely impair sphere-forming and tumor-initiating abilities of CSCs. Our work suggests that CSCs represent metabolically inactive tumor subpopulations which sustain in a state showing low metabolic activity. However, mitochondrial substrate-level phosphorylation of CSCs may be more active than that of non-stem cancer cells. Moreover, CSCs showed preferential use of oxidative phosphorylation over glycolysis to meet their energy demand. These results extend our understanding of CSCs metabolism, potentially providing novel treatment strategies targeting metabolic pathways in small cell lung cancer.

  10. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  11. HMGA1: a master regulator of tumor progression in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep N Shah

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor cells metastasize by co-opting stem cell transcriptional networks, although the molecular underpinnings of this process are poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1 gene drives metastatic progression in triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, Hs578T by reprogramming cancer cells to a stem-like state. Silencing HMGA1 expression in invasive, aggressive breast cancer cells dramatically halts cell growth and results in striking morphologic changes from mesenchymal-like, spindle-shaped cells to cuboidal, epithelial-like cells. Mesenchymal genes (Vimentin, Snail are repressed, while E-cadherin is induced in the knock-down cells. Silencing HMGA1 also blocks oncogenic properties, including proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumorigenesis. Metastatic progression following mammary implantation is almost completely abrogated in the HMGA1 knock-down cells. Moreover, silencing HMGA1 inhibits the stem cell property of three-dimensional mammosphere formation, including primary, secondary, and tertiary spheres. In addition, knock-down of HMGA1 depletes cancer initiator/cancer stem cells and prevents tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions. We also discovered an HMGA1 signature in triple negative breast cancer cells that is highly enriched in embryonic stem cells. Together, these findings indicate that HMGA1 is a master regulator of tumor progression in breast cancer by reprogramming cancer cells through stem cell transcriptional networks. Future studies are needed to determine how to target HMGA1 in therapy.

  12. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  13. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can...... spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found...... that tumorigenic transformation of hMSC-TERT20 cells induced the expression of members of several cancer-germline antigen gene families (ie, GAGE, MAGE-A, and XAGE-1), with promoter hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the corresponding genes. Both in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts derived from...

  14. Glioma-initiating cells and molecular pathology: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Atsushi; Kinjo, Sayano; Yuki, Kanako; Kato, Takenori; Ohno, Masasuke; Motomura, Kazuya; Iwami, Kenichiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2011-02-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gliomas harbor a small population of cells, termed glioma-initiating cells (GICs), characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. The development of therapeutic strategies targeted toward GIC signaling may improve the treatment of malignant gliomas. The characterization of GICs provides a clue to elucidating histological heterogeneity and treatment failure. The role of the stem cell marker CD133 in the initiation and progression of brain tumors is still uncertain. Here, we review some of the signaling mechanisms involved in GIC biology, such as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), sonic hedgehog, Notch, and WNT signaling pathways, maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), BMI1, and Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling. In addition, we discuss the role of microRNAs in GICs by focusing on microRNA-21 regulation by type I interferon.

  15. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  16. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  18. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Kelly

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB (Celdyne, Houston, TX. For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  19. Stem Cells and Cancer; Celulas madre y cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrelles, C.; Paraminio, J. M.; Lorz, C.

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  20. Existence of cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Keigo

    2016-12-18

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been disproved in many cancers. CSCs may exist in blood cancer, while many epithelial cancers may not have CSCs but tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Several independent studies have provided strong evidence for existence of CSCs in brain, skin, and colon cancers (Mani et al. in Cell 133:704-715, 2008, Joseph et al. in Cancer Cell 13:129-140, 2008, Reya et al. in Nature 414:105-111, 2001), while the CSC hypothesis remains controversial (Magee et al. in Cancer Cell 21:283-296, 2012). Liver TICs have bipotential to give rise to two different lineage types: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). In the liver cancer field, the origin of HCC and CC is extensively debated. Several groups have validated that TICs gave rise to HCC and CC. Hepatocytes gave rise to HCC. Several groups have demonstrated that oval cells (or liver progenitor cells) give rise to TICs. However, CSCs may be a myth in gastrointestinal cancer, while many groups have validated liver TICs. The definition of CSCs includes pluripotency, while TICs do not have to have pluripotency and only need to have bi- or multipotential to give rise to diverse tumor types and tumor initiation potential in mouse models. The CSC hypothesis therefore controversial (Magee et al. in Cancer Cell 21:283-296, 2012). Cancer tissues contain subpopulations of cells known as tumor-initiating stem-like cells (TICs, so-called CSCs) that have been identified as key drivers of tumor growth and malignant progression with drug resistance. Stem cells proliferate via self-renewing division in which the two daughter cells differ in proliferative potential, with one displaying differentiated phenotype and the other retaining self-renewing activity.

  1. The Role of Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Metastasis and Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess the capacity to self-renew and to generate heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise tumors. A substantial body of evidence supports a model in which CSCs play a major role in the initiation, maintenance, and clinical outcome of cancers. In contrast, analysis of the role of CSCs in metastasis has been mainly conceptual and speculative. This review summarizes recent data that support the theory of CSCs as the source of metastatic lesions in breast ca...

  2. Increased Levels of Erythropoietin in Nipple Aspirate Fluid and in Ductal Cells from Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Mannello

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Erythropoietin (Epo is an important regulator of erythropoiesis, and controls proliferation and differentiation of both erythroid and non-erythroid tissues. Epo is actively synthesized by breast cells during lactation, and also plays a role in breast tissues promoting hypoxia-induced cancer initiation. Our aims are to perform an exploratory investigation on the Epo accumulation in breast secretions from healthy and cancer patients and its localization in breast cancer cells.

  3. SCA-1 Identifies the Tumor-Initiating Cells in Mammary Tumors of BALB-neuT Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Grange

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells, initiating and sustaining the tumor process, have been isolated in human and murine breast cancer using different cell markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the presence and characteristics of stem/tumor-initiating cells in the model of the mouse mammary neoplasia driven by the activated form of rat Her-2/neu oncogene (BALB-neuT mice. For this purpose, we generated tumor spheres from primary spontaneous BALB-neuT tumors. Tumor sphere cultures were characterized for clonogenicity, self-renewal, and ability to differentiate in epithelial/myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland expressing basal and luminal cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. In addition, tumor spheres were more resistant to doxorubicin compared with parental tumor cells. In the attempt to identify a selected marker for the sphere-generating cells, we found that Sca-1+ cells, present in tumors or enriched in mammospheres, and not CD24+ or CD29+ cells, were responsible for the sphere generation in vitro. Moreover, cells from the tumor spheres showed an increased tumor-generating ability in respect to the epithelial tumor cells. Sca-1+ sorted cells or clonal mammospheres derived from a Sca-1+ cell showed a superimposable tumor-initiating ability. The data of the present study indicate that a Sca-1+ population derived from mammary BALB-neuT tumors is responsible for sphere generation in culture and for initiating tumors in vivo.

  4. Induction of cancer cell stemness by chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingwang; Ghisolfi, Laura; Keates, Andrew C; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Lee, Dong-ki; Li, Chiang J

    2012-07-15

    Recent studies indicate that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in most hematological and solid tumors. CSCs are characterized by their ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into the multitude of cells that comprise the tumor mass. Moreover, these cells have been shown to be intrinsically resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Despite their fundamental role in cancer pathogenesis, the cellular origin of CSCs remains highly controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether heterogeneous cancer cells can acquire stem cell-like properties in response to chemotherapy. We demonstrate that carboplatin can induce the self-renewal (spherogenesis) and pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct3/4 expression) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells grown under stem cell culture conditions. Moreover, we show that non-CSC cells, obtained by side population flow cytometric sorting using Hoechst 33342, can acquire stem-like properties after exposure to carboplatin. Finally, we show that knockdown of Sox2 and Oct3/4 gene expression in HCC cells can reduce carboplatin-mediated increases in sphere formation and increase cellular sensitivity to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data indicate that bulk cancer cells may be an important source of CSCs during tumor development, and that targeting Sox2 and/or Oct3/4 may be a promising approach for targeting CSCs in clinical cancer treatment.

  5. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Invadopodia Are Required for Cancer Cell Extravasation and Are a Therapeutic Target for Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon S. Leong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell extravasation is a key step during cancer metastasis, yet the precise mechanisms that regulate this dynamic process are unclear. We utilized a high-resolution time-lapse intravital imaging approach to visualize the dynamics of cancer cell extravasation in vivo. During intravascular migration, cancer cells form protrusive structures identified as invadopodia by their enrichment of MT1-MMP, cortactin, Tks4, and importantly Tks5, which localizes exclusively to invadopodia. Cancer cells extend invadopodia through the endothelium into the extravascular stroma prior to their extravasation at endothelial junctions. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of invadopodia initiation (cortactin, maturation (Tks5, or function (Tks4 resulted in an abrogation of cancer cell extravasation and metastatic colony formation in an experimental mouse lung metastasis model. This provides direct evidence of a functional role for invadopodia during cancer cell extravasation and distant metastasis and reveals an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in this clinically important process.

  7. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  8. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessio; Papi; Marina; Orlandi

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells,capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells(CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs(BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as wellas to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and proinflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the antiinflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse.

  9. MCF-10A-NeoST: A New Cell System for Studying Cell-ECM and Cell-Cell Interactions in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zantek, Nicole Dodge; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Stewart, Jane; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Robinson, Daniel; Miao, Hui; Wang, Bingcheng; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bissell, Mina J.; Kinch, Michael S.

    2001-08-22

    There is a continuing need for genetically matched cell systems to model cellular behaviors that are frequently observed in aggressive breast cancers. We report here the isolation and initial characterization of a spontaneously arising variant of MCF-10A cells, NeoST, which provides a new model to study cell adhesion and signal transduction in breast cancer. NeoST cells recapitulate important biological and biochemical features of metastatic breast cancer, including anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness in threedimensional reconstituted membranes, loss of E-cadherin expression, and increased tyrosine kinase activity. A comprehensive analysis of tyrosine kinase expression revealed overexpression or functional activation of the Axl, FAK, and EphA2 tyrosine kinases in transformed MCF-10A cells. MCF-10A and these new derivatives provide a genetically matched model to study defects in cell adhesion and signaling that are relevant to cellular behaviors that often typify aggressive breast cancer cells.

  10. Immunology of cancer stem cells in solid tumours. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccalli, Cristina; Volontè, Andrea; Cimminiello, Carolina; Parmiani, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a minor subpopulation of tumour cells that share some features with the normal stem cells of the tissue from which tumour derives and have the properties of self-renewal, multiple differentiation and tumour initiation (tumour-initiating cells, TICs). Thus CSCs/TICs need to survive cancer therapies in order to provide new, more differentiated, metastatic-prone tumour cells. This occurs through different signals delivered within the tumour microenvironment. The immune system of cancer patients may recognise CSCs/TICs and kill them though it is unclear whether this may occur in vivo during spontaneous tumour growth. This review summarises findings on the immunological profile of CSCs/TICs as compared with neoplastic non-stem cells and discusses the possible antigens recognised by the patients' immune system, the in vitro and the potential in vivo immunogenicity of such antigens and the ability of human CSCs/TICs to down-regulate the immune response by the release of a variety of suppressive factors. We conclude that available data on immunological characterisation of CSCs/TICs may be useful in the perspective of designing new translational immunotherapy protocols targeting CSCs/TICs.

  11. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell ...

  12. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  13. Genotoxic Anti-Cancer Agents and Their Relationship to DNA Damage, Mitosis, and Checkpoint Adaptation in Proliferating Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy H. Swift

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When a human cell detects damaged DNA, it initiates the DNA damage response (DDR that permits it to repair the damage and avoid transmitting it to daughter cells. Despite this response, changes to the genome occur and some cells, such as proliferating cancer cells, are prone to genome instability. The cellular processes that lead to genomic changes after a genotoxic event are not well understood. Our research focuses on the relationship between genotoxic cancer drugs and checkpoint adaptation, which is the process of mitosis with damaged DNA. We examine the types of DNA damage induced by widely used cancer drugs and describe their effects upon proliferating cancer cells. There is evidence that cell death caused by genotoxic cancer drugs in some cases includes exiting a DNA damage cell cycle arrest and entry into mitosis. Furthermore, some cells are able to survive this process at a time when the genome is most susceptible to change or rearrangement. Checkpoint adaptation is poorly characterised in human cells; we predict that increasing our understanding of this pathway may help to understand genomic instability in cancer cells and provide insight into methods to improve the efficacy of current cancer therapies.

  14. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000675.htm Low white blood cell count and cancer To use ... high blood pressure, or seizures Continue Reading How Low is too Low? When your blood is tested, ...

  15. Quality assurance in the treatment of colorectal cancer: the EURECCA initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; Boelens, P G; van den Broek, C B M; Cervantes, A; Van Cutsem, E; Schmoll, H J; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe. Over the past few decades, important advances have been made in screening, staging and treatment of colorectal cancer. However, considerable variation between and within European countries remains, which implies that further improvements are possible. The most important remaining question now is: when are we, health care professionals, delivering the best available care to patients with colon or rectal cancer? Currently, quality assurance is a major issue in colorectal cancer care and quality assurance awareness is developing in almost all disciplines involved in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients. Quality assurance has shown to be effective in clinical trials. For example, standardisation and quality control were introduced in the Dutch TME trial and led to marked improvements of local control and survival in rectal cancer patients. Besides, audit structures can also be very effective in monitoring cancer management and national audits showed to further improve outcome in colorectal cancer patients. To reduce the differences between European countries, an international, multidisciplinary, outcome-based quality improvement programme, European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA), has been initiated. In the near future, the EURECCA dataset will perform research on subgroups as elderly patients or patients with comorbidities, which are often excluded from trials. For optimal colorectal cancer care, quality assurance in guideline formation and in multidisciplinary team management is also of great importance. The aim of this review was to create greater awareness and to give an overview of quality assurance in the management of colorectal cancer.

  16. PTEN, Stem Cells, and Cancer Stem Cells*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Reginald; Wu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Like normal stem cells, “cancer stem cells” have the capacity for indefinite proliferation and generation of new cancerous tissues through self-renewal and differentiation. Among the major intracellular signaling pathways, WNT, SHH, and NOTCH are known to be important in regulating normal stem cell activities, and their alterations are associated with tumorigenesis. It has become clear recently that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) is also critical for stem cell...

  17. Distributed Initial Synchronization for 5G small cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Tirkkonen, Olav;

    2014-01-01

    Time synchronization in a large network of small cells enables efficient interference management as well as advanced transmission techniques which can boost the network throughput. In this paper, we focus on the distributed initial synchronization problem and propose different solutions aiming at...

  18. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  19. The effects of telomerase inhibition on prostate tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Calin O; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men, and patients with metastatic disease have poor outcome even with the most advanced therapeutic approaches. Most cancer therapies target the bulk tumor cells, but may leave intact a small population of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), which are believed to be responsible for the subsequent relapse and metastasis. Using specific surface markers (CD44, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and CD133), Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion, and holoclone formation, we isolated TICs from a panel of prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, C4-2 and LNCaP). We have found that prostate TICs have significant telomerase activity which is inhibited by imetelstat sodium (GRN163L), a new telomerase antagonist that is currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for several hematological and solid tumor malignancies. Prostate TICs telomeres were of similar average length to the telomeres of the main population of cells and significant telomere shortening was detected in prostate TICs as a result of imetelstat treatment. These findings suggest that telomerase inhibition therapy may be able to efficiently target the prostate TICs in addition to the bulk tumor cells, providing new opportunities for combination therapies.

  20. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-expressing colon stem cells contribute to tumorigenesis in the transition from colitis to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentino, Joseph E; Hynes, Mark J; Appelman, Henry D; Zheng, Tong; Steindler, Dennis A; Scott, Edward W; Huang, Emina H

    2009-10-15

    Patients with chronic ulcerative colitis are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Although current hypotheses suggest that sporadic colorectal cancer is due to inability to control cancer stem cells, the cancer stem cell hypothesis has not yet been validated in colitis-associated cancer. Furthermore, the identification of the colitis to cancer transition is challenging. We recently showed that epithelial cells with the increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase in sporadic colon cancer correlate closely with tumor-initiating ability. We sought to determine whether ALDH can be used as a marker to isolate tumor-initiating populations from patients with chronic ulcerative colitis. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to identify precursor colon cancer stem cells from colitis patients and report both their transition to cancerous stem cells in xenografting studies as well as their ability to generate spheres in vitro. Similar to sporadic colon cancer, these colitis-derived tumors were capable of propagation as sphere cultures. However, unlike the origins of sporadic colon cancer, the primary colitic tissues did not express any histologic evidence of dysplasia. To elucidate a potential mechanism for our findings, we compared the stroma of these different environments and determined that at least one paracrine factor is up-regulated in the inflammatory and malignant stroma compared with resting, normal stroma. These data link colitis and cancer identifying potential tumor-initiating cells from colitic patients, suggesting that sphere and/or xenograft formation will be useful to survey colitic patients at risk of developing cancer.

  1. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC.

  2. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC. PMID:26486080

  3. Differential expression profiles of glycosphingolipids in human breast cancer stem cells vs. cancer non-stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuh-Jin; Ding, Yao; Levery, Steven B; Lobaton, Marlin; Handa, Kazuko; Hakomori, Sen-itiroh

    2013-03-26

    Previous studies demonstrated that certain glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are involved in various cell functions, such as cell growth and motility. Recent studies showed changes in GSL expression during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about expression profiles of GSLs in cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a small subpopulation in cancer and are proposed as cancer-initiating cells, have been shown to be resistant to numerous chemotherapies, and may cause cancer recurrence. Here, we analyzed GSLs expressed in human breast CSCs by applying a CSC model induced through epithelial-mesenchymal transition, using mass spectrometry, TLC immunostaining, and cell staining. We found that (i) Fuc-(n)Lc4Cer and Gb3Cer were drastically reduced in CSCs, whereas GD2, GD3, GM2, and GD1a were greatly increased in CSCs; (ii) among various glycosyltransferases tested, mRNA levels for ST3GAL5, B4GALNT1, ST8SIA1, and ST3GAL2 were increased in CSCs, which could explain the increased expression of GD3, GD2, GM2, and GD1a in CSCs; (iii) the majority of GD2+ cells and GD3+ cells were detected in the CD44(hi)/CD24(lo) cell population; and (iv) knockdown of ST8SIA1 and B4GALNT1 significantly reduced the expression of GD2 and GD3 and caused a phenotype change from CSC to a non-CSC, which was detected by reduced mammosphere formation and cell motility. Our results provide insight into GSL profiles in human breast CSCs, indicate a functional role of GD2 and GD3 in CSCs, and suggest a possible novel approach in targeting human breast CSCs to interfere with cancer recurrence.

  4. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest—a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  5. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  6. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  7. Cancer and deregulation of stem cells pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Correia Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells may have an important etiological role in cancer. Their classic regulatory pathways are deregulated in tumors, strengthening the stem cell theory of cancer. In this manuscript, we review Wnt, Notch and Hedhehog pathways, describing which of their factors may be responsible for the neoplastic development. Furthermore, we classify these elements as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, demonstrating their mutation implications in cancer. The activation of these pathways is associated with the expression of certain genes which maintain proliferation and apoptosis inhibition. Further work should be carried out in the future in order to control tumor development by controlling these signaling cascades.

  8. Dickkopf3 overexpression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Mei Gu; Yi-Hui Ma; Wu-Gan Zhao; Jie Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the role of dickkopf3 (Dkk3) in human pancreatic cancer cell growth.METHODS: Dkk3 mRNA and protein expression in human pancreatic cancer cell lines were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Methylation of the Dkk3 promoter sequence was examined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and Dkk3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) treatment. The effects of Dkk3 on cancer cell proliferation and in vitro sensitivity to gemcitabine were investigated by CellTiter 96. AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (MTS) after transfecting the Dkk3 expression plasmid into human pancreatic cancer cells. The expression of β-catenin, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) was also examined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting after upregulating Dkk3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells.RESULTS: The results show that the expression levels of both Dkk3 mRNA and protein were low in all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. The Dkk3 promoter sequence was methylated in the MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cell lines, which showed reduced Dkk3 expression. These two cell lines, which initially had a methylated Dkk3 promoter, showed increased Dkk3 mRNA expression that was dependent upon the dosage and timing of the DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-dC, treatment (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). When Dkk3 expression was upregulated following the transfection of a Dkk3 expression plasmid into MIA PaCa-2 cells, the ability of cells to proliferate decreased (P < 0.01), and the expression of β-catenin and pERK was downregulated (P < 0.01). Sensitivity to gemcitabine was enhanced in Dkk3 expression plasmid-transfected cells.CONCLUSION: Our findings, for the first time, implicate Dkk3 as a tumor suppressor in human pancreatic cancer

  9. Role of heterozygous APC mutation in niche succession and initiation of colorectal cancer--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roschen Sasikumar

    Full Text Available Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are found in most colorectal cancers. They cause constitutive activation of proliferative pathways when both alleles of the gene are mutated. However studies on individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP have shown that a single mutated APC allele can also create changes in the precancerous colon crypt, like increased number of stem cells, increased crypt fission, greater variability of DNA methylation patterns, and higher somatic mutation rates. In this paper, using a computational model of colon crypt dynamics, we evolve and investigate a hypothesis on the effect of heterozygous APC mutation that explains these different observations. Based on previous reports and the results from the computational model we propose the hypothesis that heterozygous APC mutation has the effect of increasing the chances for a stem cell to divide symmetrically, producing two stem cell daughters. We incorporate this hypothesis into the model and perform simulation experiments to investigate the consequences of the hypothesis. Simulations show that this hypothesis links together the changes in FAP crypts observed in previous studies. The simulations also show that an APC(+/- stem cell gets selective advantages for dominating the crypt and progressing to cancer. This explains why most colon cancers are initiated by APC mutation. The results could have implications for preventing or retarding the onset of colon cancer in people with inherited or acquired mutation of one APC allele. Experimental validation of the hypothesis as well as investigation into the molecular mechanisms of this effect may therefore be worth undertaking.

  10. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abetov, Danysh; Mustapova, Zhanar; Saliev, Timur; Bulanin, Denis; Batyrbekov, Kanat; Gilman, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of oncologists worldwide is to understand and then intervene in the primary tumor initiation and propagation mechanisms. This is essential to allow targeted elimination of cancer cells without altering normal mitotic cells. Currently, there are two main rival theories describing the process of tumorigenesis. According to the Stochastic Model, potentially any cell, once defunct, is capable of initiating carcinogenesis. Alternatively the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Model posits that only a small fraction of undifferentiated tumor cells are capable of triggering carcinogenesis. Like healthy stem cells, CSCs are also characterized by a capacity for self-renewal and the ability to generate differentiated progeny, possibly mediating treatment resistance, thus leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Moreover, molecular signaling profiles are similar between CSCs and normal stem cells, including Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways. Therefore, development of novel chemotherapeutic agents and proteins (e.g., enzymes and antibodies) specifically targeting CSCs are attractive pharmaceutical candidates. This article describes small molecule inhibitors of stem cell pathways Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, and their recent chemotherapy clinical trials.

  11. Dasatinib and Doxorubicin Treatment of Sarcoma Initiating Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm-Pedersen, Ninna; Demuth, Christina; Safwat, Akmal;

    2016-01-01

    ) treatment with or without doxorubicin was assessed by MTS assay. Results. Initial results showed that the hMSC-TERT4 was more doxorubicin-sensitive while hMSC-TERT20-CE8 was less doxorubicin-sensitive evidenced by monitoring cell viability in the presence of doxorubicin at different doses. The epidermal......) stem cell line hMSC-TERT4 and a transformed cell line hMSC-TERT20-CE8, known to form sarcoma-like tumours when implanted in immune-deficient mice, were used as models. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation was analysed by RTK arrays and cellular viability after tyrosine kinases inhibitor (TKI...... growth factor receptor (EGFR) was activated in both cell lines. However hMSC-TERT20-CE8 exhibited significantly higher expression of the EGFR ligands. EGFR inhibitors such as erlotinib and afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin failed to further decrease cell viability of hMSC-TERT20-CE8...

  12. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  13. Establishment of highly tumorigenic human colorectal cancer cell line (CR4 with properties of putative cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Rowehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC has the third highest mortality rates among the US population. According to the most recent concept of carcinogenesis, human tumors are organized hierarchically, and the top of it is occupied by malignant stem cells (cancer stem cells, CSCs, or cancer-initiating cells, CICs, which possess unlimited self-renewal and tumor-initiating capacities and high resistance to conventional therapies. To reflect the complexity and diversity of human tumors and to provide clinically and physiologically relevant cancer models, large banks of characterized patient-derived low-passage cell lines, and especially CIC-enriched cell lines, are urgently needed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the establishment of a novel CIC-enriched, highly tumorigenic and clonogenic colon cancer cell line, CR4, derived from liver metastasis. This stable cell line was established by combining 3D culturing and 2D culturing in stem cell media, subcloning of cells with particular morphology, co-culture with carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs and serial transplantation to NOD/SCID mice. Using RNA-Seq complete transcriptome profiling of the tumorigenic fraction of the CR4 cells in comparison to the bulk tumor cells, we have identified about 360 differentially expressed transcripts, many of which represent stemness, pluripotency and resistance to treatment. Majority of the established CR4 cells express common markers of stemness, including CD133, CD44, CD166, EpCAM, CD24 and Lgr5. Using immunocytochemical, FACS and western blot analyses, we have shown that a significant ratio of the CR4 cells express key markers of pluripotency markers, including Sox-2, Oct3/4 and c-Myc. Constitutive overactivation of ABC transporters and NF-kB and absence of tumor suppressors p53 and p21 may partially explain exceptional drug resistance of the CR4 cells. CONCLUSIONS: The highly tumorigenic and clonogenic CIC-enriched CR4 cell line may provide an important new

  14. Neurotrophin signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Valérie; Lagadec, Chann; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Le Bourhis, Xuefen

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), are thought to be at the origin of tumor development and resistance to therapies. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of CSC stemness is essential to the design of more effective therapies for cancer patients. Cancer cell stemness and the subsequent expansion of CSCs are regulated by micro-environmental signals including neurotrophins. Over the years, the roles of neurotrophins in tumor development have been well established and regularly reviewed. Especially, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reported to stimulate tumor cell proliferation, survival, migration and/or invasion, and favors tumor angiogenesis. More recently, neurotrophins have been reported to regulate CSCs. This review briefly presents neurotrophins and their receptors, summarizes their roles in different cancers, and discusses the emerging evidence of neurotrophins-induced enrichment of CSCs as well as the involved signaling pathways.

  15. FGFR2 promotes breast tumorigenicity through maintenance of breast tumor-initiating cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungeun Kim

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that some cancers contain a population of stem-like TICs (tumor-initiating cells and eliminating TICs may offer a new strategy to develop successful anti-cancer therapies. As molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of the TIC pool are poorly understood, the development of TIC-specific therapeutics remains a major challenge. We first identified and characterized TICs and non-TICs isolated from a mouse breast cancer model. TICs displayed increased tumorigenic potential, self-renewal, heterogeneous differentiation, and bipotency. Gene expression analysis and immunostaining of TICs and non-TICs revealed that FGFR2 was preferentially expressed in TICs. Loss of FGFR2 impaired self-renewal of TICs, thus resulting in marked decreases in the TIC population and tumorigenic potential. Restoration of FGFR2 rescued the defects in TIC pool maintenance, bipotency, and breast tumor growth driven by FGFR2 knockdown. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of FGFR2 kinase activity led to a decrease in the TIC population which resulted in suppression of breast tumor growth. Moreover, human breast TICs isolated from patient tumor samples were found enriched in a FGFR2+ population that was sufficient to initiate tumor growth. Our data suggest that FGFR2 is essential in sustaining the breast TIC pool through promotion of self-renewal and maintenance of bipotent TICs, and raise the possibility of FGFR2 inhibition as a strategy for anti-cancer therapy by eradicating breast TICs.

  16. Nanodrug Delivery in Reversing Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali eKapse-Mistry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance(MDR which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated proteins(MRP1, MRP2 and breast cancer resistance protein(BCRP. Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1 gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-B. Theragnostics combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  17. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  18. Dynamic Testing of Signal Transduction Deregulation During Breast Cancer Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    pollution, such as chlorine, sulfur and ozone . When these substances react with the silver layer, it becomes tarnished so that the required optical...Evaluation of the effectiveness of anticancer drugs such as the onset of apoptosis in living cells is an important process in drug development and therapy ...quantitatively monitoring the changes in fluorescence signals, caspase-9 activity within a single living MCF- 7 cell was detected. Photodynamic therapy (PDT

  19. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-03-07

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  20. Response to microtubule-interacting agents in primary epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer constitutes nearly 4% of all cancers among women and is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the Western world. Standard first line adjuvant chemotherapy treatments include Paclitaxel (Taxol) and platinum-based agents. Taxol, epothilone B (EpoB) and discodermolide belong to a family of anti-neoplastic agents that specifically interferes with microtubules and arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Despite initial success with chemotherapy treatment, many patients relapse due to chemotherapy resistance. In vitro establishment of primary ovarian cancer cells provides a powerful tool for better understanding the mechanisms of ovarian cancer resistance. We describe the generation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells derived from ascites fluids of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Chemosensitivity of these cell lines to Taxol, EpoB and discodermolide was tested, and cell cycle analysis was compared to that of immortalized ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and Hey. The relationship between drug resistance and αβ-tubulin and p53 status was also investigated. Results All newly generated primary cancer cells were highly sensitive to the drugs. αβ-tubulin mutation was not found in any primary cell lines tested. However, one cell line that harbors p53 mutation at residue 72 (Arg to Pro) exhibits altered cell cycle profile in response to all drug treatments. Immortalized ovarian cancer cells respond differently to EpoB treatment when compared to primary ovarian cancer cells, and p53 polymorphism suggests clinical significance in the anti-tumor response in patients. Conclusions The isolation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells from ovarian cancer patients’ specimens contribute to further understanding the nature of drug resistance to microtubule interacting agents (MIAs) currently used in clinical settings. PMID:23574945

  1. California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives: Setting a research agenda for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, P; Kavanaugh-Lynch, M H E; Plumb, M; Yen, I H; Sarantis, H; Thomsen, C L; Campleman, S; Galpern, E; Dickenson, C; Woodruff, T J

    2015-07-01

    The environment is an underutilized pathway to breast cancer prevention. Current research approaches and funding streams related to breast cancer and the environment are unequal to the task at hand. We undertook the California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives, a four-year comprehensive effort to set a research agenda related to breast cancer, the environment, disparities and prevention. We identified 20 topics for Concept Proposals reflecting a life-course approach and the complex etiology of breast cancer; considering the environment as chemical, physical and socially constructed exposures that are experienced concurrently: at home, in the community and at work; and addressing how we should be modifying the world around us to promote a less carcinogenic environment. Redirecting breast cancer research toward prevention-oriented discovery could significantly reduce the incidence and associated disparities of the disease among future generations.

  2. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  3. Role of autonomous androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer initiation is dichotomous and depends on the oncogenic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzadeh, Sanaz; Cai, Houjian; Janzen, Deanna M; Xin, Li; Lukacs, Rita; Riedinger, Mireille; Zong, Yang; DeGendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2011-05-10

    The steroid hormone signaling axis is thought to play a central role in initiation and progression of many hormonally regulated epithelial tumors. It is unclear whether all cancer-initiating signals depend on an intact hormone receptor signaling machinery. To ascertain whether cell autonomous androgen receptor (AR) is essential for initiation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), the response of AR-null prostate epithelia to paracrine and cell autonomous oncogenic signals was assessed in vivo by using the prostate regeneration model system. Epithelial-specific loss of AR blocked paracrine FGF10-induced PIN, whereas the add back of exogenous AR restored this response. In contrast, PIN initiated by cell-autonomous, chronic-activated AKT developed independent of epithelial AR signaling. Our findings demonstrate a selective role for AR in the initiation of PIN, dependent on the signaling pathways driving tumor formation. Insights into the role of hormone receptor signaling in the initiation of epithelial tumors may help define this axis as a target for chemoprevention of carcinomas.

  4. Differential carbohydrate binding and cell surface glycosylation of human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Nadia X; Tiralongo, Joe; Madge, Paul D; von Itzstein, Mark; Day, Christopher J

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is only a modest level knowledge of the glycosylation status of immortalised cell lines that are commonly used in cancer biology as well as their binding affinities to different glycan structures. Through use of glycan and lectin microarray technology, this study has endeavoured to define the different bindings of cell surface carbohydrate structures to glycan-binding lectins. The screening of breast cancer MDA-MB435 cells, cervical cancer HeLa cells and colon cancer Caco-2, HCT116 and HCT116-FM6 cells was conducted to determine their differential bindings to a variety of glycan and lectin structures printed on the array slides. An inverse relationship between the number of glycan structures recognised and the variety of cell surface glycosylation was observed. Of the cell lines tested, it was found that four bound to sialylated structures in initial screening. Secondary screening in the presence of a neuraminidase inhibitor (4-deoxy-4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en) significantly reduced sialic acid binding. The array technology has proven to be useful in determining the glycosylation signatures of various cell-lines as well as their glycan binding preferences. The findings of this study provide the groundwork for further investigation into the numerous glycan-lectin interactions that are exhibited by immortalised cell lines.

  5. Cancer Cells Hijack Gluconeogenic Enzymes to Fuel Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa-Martinez, Eduardo; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-11-19

    In this issue and the October 15th issue of Molecular Cell, studies by Montal et al. (2015) and Vincent et al. (2015) report that certain types of cancer cells utilize the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 2 (PCK2) to reprogram anabolic metabolism and support cell growth.

  6. BRCA1-IRIS overexpression promotes and maintains the tumor initiating phenotype: implications for triple negative breast cancer early lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Abhilasha; Paul, Bibbin T; Sullivan, Lisa M; Sims, Hillary; El Bastawisy, Ahmed; Yousef, Hend F; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; ElShamy, Wael M

    2017-02-07

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are cancer cells endowed with self-renewal, multi-lineage differentiation, increased chemo-resistance, and in breast cancers the CD44+/CD24-/ALDH1+ phenotype. Triple negative breast cancers show lack of BRCA1 expression in addition to enhanced basal, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and TIC phenotypes. BRCA1-IRIS (hereafter IRIS) is an oncogene produced by the alternative usage of the BRCA1 locus. IRIS is involved in induction of replication, transcription of selected oncogenes, and promoting breast cancer cells aggressiveness. Here, we demonstrate that IRIS overexpression (IRISOE) promotes TNBCs through suppressing BRCA1 expression, enhancing basal-biomarkers, EMT-inducers, and stemness-enforcers expression. IRISOE also activates the TIC phenotype in TNBC cells through elevating CD44 and ALDH1 expression/activity and preventing CD24 surface presentation by activating the internalization pathway EGFR→c-Src→cortactin. We show that the intrinsic sensitivity to an anti-CD24 cross-linking antibody-induced cell death in membranous CD24 expressing/luminal A cells could be acquired in cytoplasmic CD24 expressing IRISOE TNBC/TIC cells through IRIS silencing or inactivation. We show that fewer IRISOE TNBC/TICs cells form large tumors composed of TICs, resembling TNBCs early lesions in patients that contain metastatic precursors capable of disseminating and metastasizing at an early stage of the disease. IRIS-inhibitory peptide killed these IRISOE TNBC/TICs, in vivo and prevented their dissemination and metastasis. We propose IRIS inactivation could be pursued to prevent dissemination and metastasis from early TNBC tumor lesions in patients.

  7. The Haiti Breast Cancer Initiative: Initial Findings and Analysis of Barriers-to-Care Delaying Patient Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Haiti, breast cancer patients present at such advanced stages that even modern therapies offer modest survival benefit. Identifying the personal, sociocultural, and economic barriers-to-care delaying patient presentation is crucial to controlling disease. Methods. Patients presenting to the Hôpital Bon Sauveur in Cange were prospectively accrued. Delay was defined as 12 weeks or longer from initial sign/symptom discovery to presentation, as durations greater than this cutoff correlate with reduced survival. A matched case-control analysis with multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting delay. Results. Of N=123 patients accrued, 90 (73% reported symptom-presentation duration and formed the basis of this study: 52 patients presented within 12 weeks of symptoms, while 38 patients waited longer than 12 weeks. On logistic regression, lower education status (OR = 5.6, P=0.03, failure to initially recognize mass as important (OR = 13.0, P<0.01, and fear of treatment cost (OR = 8.3, P=0.03 were shown to independently predict delayed patient presentation. Conclusion. To reduce stage at presentation, future interventions must educate patients on the recognition of initial breast cancer signs and symptoms and address cost concerns by providing care free of charge and/or advertising that existing care is already free.

  8. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs, are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools.

  9. Functional Sphere Profiling Reveals the Complexity of Neuroblastoma Tumor-Initiating Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Coulon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is a neural crest-derived childhood tumor characterized by a remarkable phenotypic diversity, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal metastatic disease. Although the cancer stem cell (CSC model provides a trail to characterize the cells responsible for tumor onset, the NB tumor-initiating cell (TIC has not been identified. In this study, the relevance of the CSC model in NB was investigated by taking advantage of typical functional stem cell characteristics. A predictive association was established between self-renewal, as assessed by serial sphere formation, and clinical aggressiveness in primary tumors. Moreover, cell subsets gradually selected during serial sphere culture harbored increased in vivo tumorigenicity, only highlighted in an orthotopic microenvironment. A microarray time course analysis of serial spheres passages from metastatic cells allowed us to specifically “profile” the NB stem cell-like phenotype and to identify CD133, ABC transporter, and WNT and NOTCH genes as spheres markers. On the basis of combined sphere markers expression, at least two distinct tumorigenic cell subpopulations were identified, also shown to preexist in primary NB. However, sphere markers-mediated cell sorting of parental tumor failed to recapitulate the TIC phenotype in the orthotopic model, highlighting the complexity of the CSC model. Our data support the NB stem-like cells as a dynamic and heterogeneous cell population strongly dependent on microenvironmental signals and add novel candidate genes as potential therapeutic targets in the control of high-risk NB.

  10. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-03

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  11. Cancer cells with irons in the fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Laura M; Rivella, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and proliferation of cells, as well as for many biological processes that are important for the maintenance and survival of the human body. However, excess iron is associated with the development of cancer and other pathological conditions, due in part to the pro-oxidative nature of iron and its damaging effects on DNA. Current studies suggest that iron depletion may be beneficial for patients that have diseases associated with iron overload or other iron metabolism disorders that may increase the risk for cancer. On the other hand, studies suggest that cancer cells are more vulnerable to the effects of iron depletion and oxidative stress in comparison to normal cells. Therefore, cancer patients might benefit from treatments that alter both iron metabolism and oxidative stress. This review highlights the pro-oxidant effects of iron, the relationship between iron and cancer development, the vulnerabilities of the iron-dependent cancer phenotype, and how these characteristics may be exploited to prevent or treat cancer.

  12. Induction of Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Colon Cancer Cells by Defined Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, Nobu

    2014-01-01

    Oshima N, Yamada Y, Nagayama S, Kawada K, Hasegawa S, et al. (2014) Induction of Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Colon Cancer Cells by Defined Factors. PLoS ONE 9(7): e101735. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101735

  13. Kaempferol nanoparticles achieve strong and selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Haitao Luo,1 Bingbing Jiang,2 Bingyun Li,2–4 Zhaoliang Li,1 Bing-Hua Jiang,5 Yi Charlie Chen11Department of Biology, Natural Science Division, Alderson-Broaddus College, Philippi, 2Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, 3WVNano Initiative, 4Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Morgantown, WV, USA; 5Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women throughout the Western world. Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has shown promise in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer. A common concern about using dietary supplements for chemoprevention is their bioavailability. Nanoparticles have shown promise in increasing the bioavailability of some chemicals. Here we developed five different types of nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol and tested their efficacy in the inhibition of viability of cancerous and normal ovarian cells. We found that positively charged nanoparticle formulations did not lead to a significant reduction in cancer cell viability, whereas nonionic polymeric nanoparticles resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability. Among the nonionic polymeric nanoparticles, poly(ethylene oxide-poly(propylene oxide-poly(ethylene oxide (PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol led to significant reduction in cell viability of both cancerous and normal cells. Poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability together with no significant reduction in cell viability of normal cells compared with kaempferol alone. Therefore, both PEO-PPO-PEO and PLGA nanoparticle formulations were effective in reducing cancer cell viability, while PLGA nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol had selective toxicity against cancer cells and normal cells. A PLGA nanoparticle formulation could be

  14. Colon Cancer Tumorigenesis Initiated by the H1047R Mutant PI3K.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Yueh

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is critical for multiple important cellular functions, and is one of the most commonly altered pathways in human cancers. We previously developed a mouse model in which colon cancers were initiated by a dominant active PI3K p110-p85 fusion protein. In that model, well-differentiated mucinous adenocarcinomas developed within the colon and initiated through a non-canonical mechanism that is not dependent on WNT signaling. To assess the potential relevance of PI3K mutations in human cancers, we sought to determine if one of the common mutations in the human disease could also initiate similar colon cancers. Mice were generated expressing the Pik3caH1047R mutation, the analog of one of three human hotspot mutations in this gene. Mice expressing a constitutively active PI3K, as a result of this mutation, develop invasive adenocarcinomas strikingly similar to invasive adenocarcinomas found in human colon cancers. These tumors form without a polypoid intermediary and also lack nuclear CTNNB1 (β-catenin, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumor initiation mediated by the PI3K pathway. These cancers are sensitive to dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition indicating dependence on the PI3K pathway. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment demonstrated reduction in cellular proliferation and inhibition of PI3K signaling.

  15. PrP(C) from stem cells to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Hirsch, Théo Z; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Halliez, Sophie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Launay, Jean-Marie; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The cellular prion protein PrP(C) was initially discovered as the normal counterpart of the pathological scrapie prion protein PrP(Sc), the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. While clues as to the physiological function of this ubiquitous protein were greatly anticipated from the development of knockout animals, PrP-null mice turned out to be viable and to develop without major phenotypic abnormalities. Notwithstanding, the discovery that hematopoietic stem cells from PrP-null mice have impaired long-term repopulating potential has set the stage for investigating into the role of PrP(C) in stem cell biology. A wealth of data have now exemplified that PrP(C) is expressed in distinct types of stem cells and regulates their self-renewal as well as their differentiation potential. A role for PrP(C) in the fate restriction of embryonic stem cells has further been proposed. Paralleling these observations, an overexpression of PrP(C) has been documented in various types of tumors. In line with the contribution of PrP(C) to stemness and to the proliferation of cancer cells, PrP(C) was recently found to be enriched in subpopulations of tumor-initiating cells. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by PrP(C) in stem cell biology and discuss how the subversion of its function may contribute to cancer progression.

  16. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  17. Squamous cell cancer of the rectum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tara Dyson; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is a rare malignancy. It appears to be associated with chronic inflammatory conditions and infections. The clear association seen between Human Papilloma Virus and various squamous cancers has not been firmly established for the squamous cell cancer of the rectum. The presentation is nonspecific and patients tend to present with advanced stage disease. Diagnosis relies on endoscopic examination with biopsy of the lesion. Distinction from squamous cell cancer of the anus can be difficult, but can be facilitated by immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratins. Staging of the cancer with endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography provides essential information on prognosis and can guide therapy. At present, surgery remains the main therapeutic option; however recent advances have made chemoradiation a valuable therapeutic addition. Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is a distinct entity and it is of crucial importance for the practicing Gastroenterologist to be thoroughly familiar with this disease. Compared to adenocarcinoma of the rectum and squamous cell cancer of the anal canal, squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum has different epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, and prognosis but, most importantly, requires a different therapeutic approach. This review will examine and summarize the available information regarding this disease from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist.

  18. NSAIDs and Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Ettarh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is common worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in patients. Fortunately, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that continuous therapy with NSAIDs offers real promise of chemoprevention and adjunct therapy for colon cancer patients. Tumour growth is the result of complex regulation that determines the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. How NSAIDs affect this balance is important for understanding and improving treatment strategies and drug effectiveness. NSAIDs inhibit proliferation and impair the growth of colon cancer cell lines when tested in culture in vitro and many NSAIDs also prevent tumorigenesis and reduce tumour growth in animal models and in patients, but the relationship to inhibition of tumour cell proliferation is less convincing, principally due to gaps in the available data. High concentrations of NSAIDs are required in vitro to achieve cancer cell inhibition and growth retardation at varying time-points following treatment. However, the results from studies with colon cancer cell xenografts are promising and, together with better comparative data on anti-proliferative NSAID concentrations and doses (for in vitro and in vivo administration, could provide more information to improve our understanding of the relationships between these agents, dose and dosing regimen, and cellular environment.

  19. Germ cell cancer and disorders of spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakkebaek, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Jørgensen, N;

    1998-01-01

    in research in the early stages of testicular cancer (carcinoma in situ testis (CIS)) allows us to begin to answer some of these questions. There is more and more evidence that the CIS cell is a gonocyte with stem cell potential, which explains why an adult man can develop a non-seminoma, which...... is a neoplastic caricature of embryonic growth. We consider the possibility that CIS cells may loose their stem cell potential with ageing. Along these lines, a seminoma is regarded a gonocytoma where the single gonocytes have little or no stem cell potential. The Sertoli and Leydig cells, which are activated......Why is there a small peak of germ cell tumours in the postnatal period and a major peak in young age, starting at puberty? And, paradoxically, small risk in old age, although spermatogenesis is a lifelong process? Why is this type of cancer more common in individuals with maldeveloped gonads...

  20. Immunotherapy of cancer employing adoptive T cell transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOLI

    2005-01-01

    The current concept of“Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy of Cancer”is quite different from how it was originally conceived.With the development of modern technology in molecular biology,cell biology,immunology and biochemistry during the last twenty years or so,adoptive immunotherapy has grown from its initial form of a simple“blood cell transfer”into its present process which involves host vauccination,effector cell activation/polarization and genetic modification.With the use of immune adjuvants and the identification/characterization of tumor-reactive T cell subsets,or in combination with other therapeutic strategies,adoptively transferred T cells have become much more potent inmediating tumor regression.In addition,studies on the trafficking of infused T cells,cell transfer performed in lymphopenic models,as well as the discovery of novel techniques in immune monitoring for the generation of effector cells in vitro and after cell transfer in vivo have provided useful tools to further improve the therapeutic efficacy of this approach.This article will review these related aspects of adoptive T cell immunotherapy of cancer with specific comments on certain critical areas in the application of this approach.With the rapidly evolving advances in this area,it is hoped that this cellular immunologic therapy as it was conceptualized in the past,can become more useful in the treatment of human cancer in the near future.

  1. The characteristics and spatial distributions of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Myung Won; Kim, Mi Hyun; Kim, Jeong Kon; Cho, Kyoung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers following 12-core transrectal biopsy. A total of 45 patients with prostate cancers detected on rebiopsy and 45 patients with prostate cancers initially detected on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy were included in the study. For result analysis, the prostate was divided into six compartments, and the cancer positive rates, estimated tumor burden, and agreement rates between biopsy and surgical specimens, along with clinical data, were evaluated. The largest mean tumor burden was located in the medial apex in both groups. There were significantly more tumors in this location in the rebiopsy group (44.9%) than in the control group (30.1%, P=0.015). The overall sensitivity of biopsy was significantly lower in the rebiopsy group (22.5% vs. 43.4%, P<0.001). The agreement rate of cancer positive cores between biopsy and surgical specimens was significantly lower in the medial apex in the rebiopsy group compared with that of the control group (50.0% vs. 65.6%, P=0.035). The cancer positive rates of target biopsy cores and premalignant lesions in the rebiopsy group were 63.1% and 42.3%, respectively. Rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers showed different spatial distribution and lower cancer detection rate of biopsy cores compared with initially diagnosed cancers. To overcome lower cancer detection rate, target biopsy of abnormal sonographic findings, premalignant lesions and medial apex which revealed larger tumor burden would be recommended when performing rebiopsy.

  2. The characteristics and spatial distributions of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Won You

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers following 12-core transrectal biopsy. Methods: A total of 45 patients with prostate cancers detected on rebiopsy and 45 patients with prostate cancers initially detected on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy were included in the study. For result analysis, the prostate was divided into six compartments, and the cancer positive rates, estimated tumor burden, and agreement rates between biopsy and surgical specimens, along with clinical data, were evaluated. Results: The largest mean tumor burden was located in the medial apex in both groups. There were significantly more tumors in this location in the rebiopsy group (44.9% than in the control group (30.1%, P=0.015. The overall sensitivity of biopsy was significantly lower in the rebiopsy group (22.5% vs. 43.4%, P<0.001. The agreement rate of cancer positive cores between biopsy and surgical specimens was significantly lower in the medial apex in the rebiopsy group compared with that of the control group (50.0% vs. 65.6%, P=0.035. The cancer positive rates of target biopsy cores and premalignant lesions in the rebiopsy group were 63.1% and 42.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers showed different spatial distribution and lower cancer detection rate of biopsy cores compared with initially diagnosed cancers. To overcome lower cancer detection rate, target biopsy of abnormal sonographic findings, premalignant lesions and medial apex which revealed larger tumor burden would be recommended when performing rebiopsy.

  3. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  4. Enteric Bacteria and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacteria can contribute to cell proliferation and cancer development, particularly in chronic infectious diseases in which bacteria and/or bacterial components might interfere with cell function. The number of microbial cells within the gut lumen is estimated to be 100 trillion, which is about 10-times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells in the human body. Because of the complexity of the gut flora, identifying the specific microbial agents related to human diseases remains challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that the stemness of colon cancer cells is, in part, orchestrated by the microenvironment and is defined by high Wnt activity. In this review article, we will discuss recent progress with respect to intestinal stem cells, cancer stem cells, and the molecular mechanisms of enteric bacteria in the activation of the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the roles of other pathways, including JAK-STAT, JNK, and Notch, in regulating stem cell niches during bacterial infections using Drosophila models. Insights gained from understanding how host-bacterial interaction during inflammation and cancer may serve as a paradigm for understanding the nature of self-renewal signals.

  5. Treg/Th17 polarization by distinct subsets of breast cancer cells is dictated by the interaction with mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A.; Dave, Meneka A.; Bliss, Sarah A.; Giec-Ujda, Agata B.; Bryan, Margarette; Pliner, Lillian F.; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) cells (BCCs) exist within a hierarchy beginning with cancer stem cells (CSCs). Unsorted BCCs interact with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs). This study investigated how distinct BCC subsets interacted with MSCs to polarize T-cell response, Tregs versus T helper 17 (Th17). This study tested BC initiating cells (CSCs) and the relatively more mature early and late BC progenitors. CSCs interacted with the highest avidity to MSCs. This interacti...

  6. Developmental Pathways Direct Pancreatic Cancer Initiation from Its Cellular Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Reichert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis, since it is usually diagnosed at advanced stages. In order to employ tools for early detection, a better understanding of the early stages of PDA development from its main precursors, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN is needed. Recent studies on murine PDA models have identified a different exocrine origin for PanINs and IPMNs. In both processes, developmental pathways direct the initiation of PDA precursors from their cellular ancestors. In this review, the current understanding of early PDA development is summarized.

  7. Cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma: Therapeutic implications based on stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite advances in its diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of patients with advanced HCC remains unfavorable. Recent advances in stem cell biology and associated technologies have enabled the identification of minor components of tumorigenic cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells, in cancers such as HCC. Furthermore, because CSC play a central role in tumor development, metastasis and recurrence, they are considered to be a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Hepatic CSC have been successfully identified using functional and cell surface markers. The analysis of purified hepatic CSC has revealed the molecular machinery and signaling pathways involved in their maintenance. In addition, epigenetic transcriptional regulation has been shown to be important in the development and maintenance of CSC. Although inhibitors of CSC show promise as CSC-targeting drugs, novel therapeutic approaches for the eradication of CSC are yet to be established. In this review, we describe recent progress in hepatic CSC research and provide a perspective on the available therapeutic approaches based on stem cell biology.

  8. ICAM1 Is a Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ta Tsai

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC accounts for about 90% of esophageal cancer diagnosed in Asian countries, with its incidence on the rise. Cancer stem cell (CSC; also known as tumor-initiating cells, TIC is inherently resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation and associates with poor prognosis and therapy failure. Targeting therapy against cancer stem cell has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach to develop effective regimens. However, the suitable CSC marker of ESCC for identification and targeting is still limited. In this study, we screened the novel CSC membrane protein markers using two distinct stemness characteristics of cancer cell lines by a comparative approach. After the validation of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot analyses, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1 was identified as a potential CSC marker of ESCC. ICAM1 promotes cancer cell migration, invasion as well as increasing mesenchymal marker expression and attenuating epithelial marker expression. In addition, ICAM1 contributes to CSC properties, including sphere formation, drug resistance, and tumorigenesis in mouse xenotransplantation model. Based on the analysis of ICAM1-regulated proteins, we speculated that ICAM1 regulates CSC properties partly through an ICAM1-PTTG1IP-p53-DNMT1 pathway. Moreover, we observed that ICAM1 and CD44 could have a compensation effect on maintaining the stemness characteristics of ESCC, suggesting that the combination of multi-targeting therapies should be under serious consideration to acquire a more potent therapeutic effect on CSC of ESCC.

  9. Epigenetic reprogramming of breast cancer cells with oocyte extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a disease characterised by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes is an early event in breast carcinogenesis and reversion of gene silencing by epigenetic reprogramming can provide clues to the mechanisms responsible for tumour initiation and progression. In this study we apply the reprogramming capacity of oocytes to cancer cells in order to study breast oncogenesis. Results We show that breast cancer cells can be directly reprogrammed by amphibian oocyte extracts. The reprogramming effect, after six hours of treatment, in the absence of DNA replication, includes DNA demethylation and removal of repressive histone marks at the promoters of tumour suppressor genes; also, expression of the silenced genes is re-activated in response to treatment. This activity is specific to oocytes as it is not elicited by extracts from ovulated eggs, and is present at very limited levels in extracts from mouse embryonic stem cells. Epigenetic reprogramming in oocyte extracts results in reduction of cancer cell growth under anchorage independent conditions and a reduction in tumour growth in mouse xenografts. Conclusions This study presents a new method to investigate tumour reversion by epigenetic reprogramming. After testing extracts from different sources, we found that axolotl oocyte extracts possess superior reprogramming ability, which reverses epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. Therefore this system can be extremely valuable for dissecting the mechanisms involved in tumour suppressor gene silencing and identifying molecular activities capable of arresting tumour growth. These applications can ultimately shed light on the contribution of epigenetic alterations in breast cancer and advance the development of epigenetic therapies.

  10. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  11. Therapeutic dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines: the state of art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strioga, M.M.; Felzmann, T.; Powell, D.J.; Ostapenko, V.; Dobrovolskiene, N.T.; Matuskova, M.; Michalek, J.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, capable of initiating proper adaptive immune responses. Although tumor-infiltrating DCs are able to recognize cancer cells and uptake tumor antigens, they often have impaired functions because of the immunosuppressive t

  12. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K., E-mail: mishima-k@dent.showa-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  13. Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: treating cancer like an infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Ozsvari, Bela; Lisanti, Camilla L; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-03-10

    Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of "stemness", independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point - a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known "side-effect", which could be harnessed instead as a "therapeutic effect". Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally, recent

  14. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Rosemarie C; Ouzounova, Maria; Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J; Clouthier, Shawn G; Hassan, Khaled A; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue-specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch(+)) or reduced activity (Notch(-)) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays, we investigated the role of the Notch pathway in breast CSC regulation. Breast cancer cells with increased Notch activity displayed increased sphere formation as well as expression of breast CSC markers. Interestingly Notch(+) cells displayed higher Notch4 expression in both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, Notch(+) cells demonstrated tumor initiation capacity at serial dilutions in mouse xenografts, whereas Notch(-) cells failed to generate tumors. γ-Secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch blocker but not a chemotherapeutic agent, effectively targets these Notch(+) cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, elevated Notch4 and Hey1 expression in primary patient samples correlated with poor patient survival. Our study revealed a molecular mechanism for the role of Notch-mediated regulation of breast CSCs and provided a compelling rationale for CSC-targeted therapeutics.

  15. The Notch pathway promotes the cancer stem cell characteristics of CD90+ cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Wang, Peng; Wang, Ronghua; Wang, Jinlin; Liu, Man; Xiong, Si; Li, Yawen; Cheng, Bin

    2016-02-23

    CD90 has been identified as a marker for liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumorigenic activity, but it is not known how CD90+ cells contribute to tumor initiation and progression. Our data demonstrated that high expression of CD90 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) tissues correlated with venous filtration in HCC patients. CD90+ cells isolated from HCC cell lines exhibited increased tumorigenicity, chemoresistance, tumor invasion and metastasis. Notch pathway was activated in CD90+ cells and we found that inhibition of Notch pathway in CD90+ CSCs decreased tumorigenicity, cell invasion, migration and expression of stem cell related genes. Activation of Notch pathway in CD90- cells induced self-renewal, invasion and migration. Furthermore, we observed that cancer stem cell features were facilitated by stimulating G1-S transition in the cell cycle phase and inhibiting apoptosis mediated by Notch pathway. Our findings suggested CD90 could be used as a potential biomarker for HCC CSCs, and that cancer stem cell activity was elevated through up activated Notch pathway in CD90+ CSCs.

  16. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  17. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  18. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  19. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy.

  20. Stem cell-like gene expression in ovarian cancer predicts type II subtype and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Schwede

    Full Text Available Although ovarian cancer is often initially chemotherapy-sensitive, the vast majority of tumors eventually relapse and patients die of increasingly aggressive disease. Cancer stem cells are believed to have properties that allow them to survive therapy and may drive recurrent tumor growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells are a rare cell population and difficult to isolate experimentally. Genes that are expressed by stem cells may characterize a subset of less differentiated tumors and aid in prognostic classification of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was the genomic identification and characterization of a subtype of ovarian cancer that has stem cell-like gene expression. Using human and mouse gene signatures of embryonic, adult, or cancer stem cells, we performed an unsupervised bipartition class discovery on expression profiles from 145 serous ovarian tumors to identify a stem-like and more differentiated subgroup. Subtypes were reproducible and were further characterized in four independent, heterogeneous ovarian cancer datasets. We identified a stem-like subtype characterized by a 51-gene signature, which is significantly enriched in tumors with properties of Type II ovarian cancer; high grade, serous tumors, and poor survival. Conversely, the differentiated tumors share properties with Type I, including lower grade and mixed histological subtypes. The stem cell-like signature was prognostic within high-stage serous ovarian cancer, classifying a small subset of high-stage tumors with better prognosis, in the differentiated subtype. In multivariate models that adjusted for common clinical factors (including grade, stage, age, the subtype classification was still a significant predictor of relapse. The prognostic stem-like gene signature yields new insights into prognostic differences in ovarian cancer, provides a genomic context for defining Type I/II subtypes, and potential gene targets which following further

  1. The cancer stem cell theory: is it correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2008-11-30

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis posits that tumor growth is driven by a rare subpopulation of cells, designated cancer stem cells (CSC). Studies supporting this theory are based in large part on xenotransplantation experiments wherein human cancer cells are grown in immunocompromised mice and only CSC, often constituting less than 1% of the malignancy, generate tumors. Herein, we show that all colonies derived from randomly chosen single cells in mouse lung and breast cancer cell lines form tumors following allografting histocompatible mice. Our study suggests that the majority of malignant cells rather than CSC can sustain tumors and that the cancer stem cell theory must be reevaluated.

  2. Biochanin A Modulates Cell Viability, Invasion, and Growth Promoting Signaling Pathways in HER-2-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Sehdev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of HER-2 receptor is associated with poor prognosis and aggressive forms of breast cancer. Scientific literature indicates a preventive role of isoflavones in cancer. Since activation of HER-2 receptor initiates growth-promoting events in cancer cells, we studied the effect of biochanin A (an isoflavone on associated signaling events like receptor activation, downstream signaling, and invasive pathways. HER-2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells, MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells, and NIH-3T3 normal fibroblast cells were treated with biochanin A (2–100 μM for 72 hours. Subsequently cell viability assay, western blotting and zymography were carried out. The data indicate that biochanin A inhibits cell viability, signaling pathways, and invasive enzyme expression and activity in SK-BR-3 cancer cells. Biochanin A did not inhibit MCF-10A and NIH-3T3 cell viability. Therefore, biochanin A could be a unique natural anticancer agent which can selectively target cancer cells and inhibit multiple signaling pathways in HER-2-positive breast cancer cells.

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of Postdiagnosis Initiation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Patients at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Perlman, Adam; Lontok, Oliver; Huhmann, Maureen; Parrott, J. Scott; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Patrick-Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cancer increasingly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in conjunction with conventional oncology treatments. This study looks at the prevalence and correlates of individual CAM modalities initiated after cancer diagnosis.

  4. Targeting the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to nutrient deprivation: anti-austerity compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magolan, Jakob; Coster, Mark J

    2010-12-01

    The emerging "anti-austerity" anti-cancer therapeutic strategy targets the ability of certain cancer cell lines, particularly pancreatic cancer, to survive nutrient deprivation. While biochemical pathways for the tolerance to nutrient deprivation are still not well understood, a growing number of inhibitors of this process are being discovered. A number of natural products have been isolated, structurally characterized and evaluated as inhibitors of austerity, thereby providing valuable initial structure-activity relationship data.

  5. Emerging role of microRNAs in cancer stem cells:Implications in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minal; Garg

    2015-01-01

    A small subset of cancer cells that act as tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells(CSCs) maintain self-renewal and growth promoting capabilities of cancer and are responsible for drug/treatment resistance,tumor recurrence and metastasis. Due to their potential clinical importance,many researchers have put their efforts over decades to unravel the molecular mechanisms that regulate CSCs functions. Micro RNAs(mi RNAs) which are 21-23 nucleotide long,endogenous noncoding RNAs,regulate gene expression through gene silencing at post-transcriptional level by binding to the 3’-untranslated regions or the open reading frames of target genes,thereby result in target mR NA degradation or its translational repression and serve important role in several cellular,physiological and developmental processes. Aberrant mi RNAs expression and their implication in CSCs regulation by controlling asymmetric cell division,drug/treatment resistance and metastasis make mi RNAs a tool of great therapeutic potential against cancer. Recent advancements on the biological complexities of CSCs,modulation in CSCs properties by mi RNA network and development of mi RNA based treatment strategies specifically targeting the CSCs as an attractive therapeutic targets for clinical application are being critically analysed.

  6. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  7. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Cancer: Lessons from Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kid Törnquist

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomyelin is found in the cell membrane of all eukaryotic cells, and was for a long time considered merely as a structural component. However, during the last two decades, metabolites of sphingomyelin, especially sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, have proven to be physiologically significant regulators of cell function. Through its five different G protein-coupled receptors, S1P regulates a wide array of cellular processes, ranging from stimulating cellular proliferation and migration, to the inhibition of apoptosis and induction of angiogenesis and modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis. Many of the processes regulated by S1P are important for normal cell physiology, but may also induce severe pathological conditions, especially in malignancies like cancer. Thus, understanding S1P signaling mechanisms has been the aim of a multitude of investigations. Great interest has also been shown in understanding the action of sphingosine kinase (SphK, i.e., the kinase phosphorylating sphingosine to S1P, and the interactions between S1P and growth factor signaling. In the present review, we will discuss recent findings regarding the possible importance of S1P and SphK in the etiology of thyroid cancer. Although clinical data is still scarce, our in vitro findings suggest that S1P may function as a “double-edged sword”, as the receptor profile of thyroid cancer cells largely determines whether S1P stimulates or blocks cellular migration. We will also discuss the interactions between S1P- and VEGF-evoked signaling, and the importance of a S1P1-VEGF receptor 2 complex in thyroid cancer cells.

  8. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A. [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Kenny, Paraic A. [Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J. [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Monteith, Gregory R., E-mail: gregm@uq.edu.au [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  9. The metabolic landscape of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Biondani, Giulia; Cordani, Marco; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of quiescent cells endowed with self-renewal properties that can sustain the malignant behavior of the tumor mass giving rise to more differentiated cancer cells. For this reason, the specific killing of CSCs represents one of the most important challenges of the modern molecular oncology. However, their particular resistance to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy imposes a thorough understanding of their biological and biochemical features. The metabolic peculiarities of CSCs may be a therapeutic and diagnostic opportunity in cancer research. In this review, we summarize the most significant discoveries on the metabolism of CSCs describing and critically analyzing the studies supporting either glycolysis or mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary source of energy for CSCs.

  10. Modeling core metabolism in cancer cells: surveying the topology underlying the Warburg effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osbaldo Resendis-Antonio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations on glucose consumption and biosynthetic activity of amino acids, lipids and nucleotides are metabolic changes for sustaining cell proliferation in cancer cells. Irrevocable evidence of this fact is the Warburg effect which establishes that cancer cells prefers glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. Regulatory action over metabolic enzymes has opened a new window for designing more effective anti-cancer treatments. This enterprise is not trivial and the development of computational models that contribute to identifying potential enzymes for breaking the robustness of cancer cells is a priority. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work presents a constraint-base modeling of the most experimentally studied metabolic pathways supporting cancer cells: glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate, glutaminolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. To evaluate its predictive capacities, a growth kinetics study for Hela cell lines was accomplished and qualitatively compared with in silico predictions. Furthermore, based on pure computational criteria, we concluded that a set of enzymes (such as lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase perform a pivotal role in cancer cell growth, findings supported by an experimental counterpart. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Alterations on metabolic activity are crucial to initiate and sustain cancer phenotype. In this work, we analyzed the phenotype capacities emerged from a constructed metabolic network conformed by the most experimentally studied pathways sustaining cancer cell growth. Remarkably, in silico model was able to resemble the physiological conditions in cancer cells and successfully identified some enzymes currently studied by its therapeutic effect. Overall, we supplied evidence that constraint-based modeling constitutes a promising computational platform to: 1 integrate high throughput technology and establish a crosstalk between experimental validation and in

  11. Paracrine WNT5A Signaling Inhibits Expansion of Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherding, Nicholas; Kusner, David; Kolb, Ryan; Xie, Qing; Li, Wei; Yuan, Fang; Velez, Gabriel; Askeland, Ryan; Weigel, Ronald J; Zhang, Weizhou

    2015-05-15

    It is not well understood how paracrine communication between basal and luminal cell populations in the mammary gland affects tumorigenesis. During ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis, enriched mammary stem cells that represent a subpopulation of basal cells exhibit enhanced tumorigenic capacity compared with the corresponding luminal progenitors. Transcript profiling of tumors derived from basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells (TIC) revealed preferential loss of the noncanonical Wnt ligand WNT5A in basal TIC-derived tumors. Heterozygous loss of WNT5A was correlated with shorter survival of breast cancer patients. In a mouse model of ErbB2-induced breast cancer, Wnt5a heterozygosity promoted tumor multiplicity and pulmonary metastasis. As a TGFβ substrate, luminal cell-produced WNT5A induced a feed-forward loop to activate SMAD2 in a RYK and TGFβR1-dependent manner to limit the expansion of basal TIC in a paracrine fashion, a potential explanation for the suppressive effect of WNT5A in mammary tumorigenesis. Our results identify the WNT5A/RYK module as a spatial regulator of the TGFβ-SMAD signaling pathway in the context of mammary gland development and carcinogenesis, offering a new perspective on tumor suppression provided by basal-luminal cross-talk in normal mammary tissue.

  12. GLUL Promotes Cell Proliferation in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Shaohua; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zifeng; Wu, Dongmei; Wu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Yuanlin

    2016-10-28

    Glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) belongs to the glutamine synthetase family. It catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia in an ATP-dependent reaction. Here, we found higher expression of GLUL in the breast cancer patients was associated with larger tumor size and higher level of HER2 expression. In addition, GLUL was heterogeneously expressed in various breast cancer cells. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GLUL in SK-BR-3 cells were obviously higher than that in the other types of breast cancer cells. Results showed GLUL knockdown in SK-BR-3 cells could significantly decrease the proliferation ability. Furthermore, GLUL knockdown markedly inhibited the p38 MAPK and ERK1/ERK2 signaling pathways in SK-BR-3 cells. Thus, GLUL may represent a novel target for selectively inhibiting p38 MAPK and ERK1/ERK2 signaling pathways and the proliferation potential of breast cancer cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  14. Analysis of initial cell spreading using mechanistic contact formulations for a deformable cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Odenthal

    Full Text Available Adhesion governs to a large extent the mechanical interaction between a cell and its microenvironment. As initial cell spreading is purely adhesion driven, understanding this phenomenon leads to profound insight in both cell adhesion and cell-substrate interaction. It has been found that across a wide variety of cell types, initial spreading behavior universally follows the same power laws. The simplest cell type providing this scaling of the radius of the spreading area with time are modified red blood cells (RBCs, whose elastic responses are well characterized. Using a mechanistic description of the contact interaction between a cell and its substrate in combination with a deformable RBC model, we are now able to investigate in detail the mechanisms behind this universal power law. The presented model suggests that the initial slope of the spreading curve with time results from a purely geometrical effect facilitated mainly by dissipation upon contact. Later on, the spreading rate decreases due to increasing tension and dissipation in the cell's cortex as the cell spreads more and more. To reproduce this observed initial spreading, no irreversible deformations are required. Since the model created in this effort is extensible to more complex cell types and can cope with arbitrarily shaped, smooth mechanical microenvironments of the cells, it can be useful for a wide range of investigations where forces at the cell boundary play a decisive role.

  15. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer What Is Kidney Cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  16. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  17. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong ZHANG; Ai-zhen CAI; Xue-ming WEI; Li DING; Feng-zhi LI; Ai-ming ZHENG; Da-jiang DAI

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer.Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells,including several gastric cancer cell lines.This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.Methods:We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells.Results:This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells.Five stemness-related gene expression profiles,including OCT-4,SOX-2,NANOG,CD44,and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2,were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells.Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells.When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice,SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells.Conclusions:These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  18. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based...

  19. Colon cancer stem cells: promise of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Intestinal epithelial cells exist for a shorter amount of time than that required to accumulate tumor-inducing genetic changes, so researchers have investigated the concept that CRC arises from the long-lived stem cells, rather than from the differentiated epithelial cells. Colon CSCs were originally identified through the expression of the CD133 glycoprotein using an antibody directed to its epitope AC133. It is not clear if CD133 is a marker of colon CSCs-other cell surface markers, such as epithelial-specific antigen, CD44, CD166, Musashi-1, CD29, CD24, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, have been proposed. In addition to initiating and sustaining tumor growth, CSCs are believed to mediate cancer relapse after chemotherapy. How can we identify and analyze colon CSCs and what agents are being designed to kill this chemotherapy-refractory population?

  20. Side Population Cells as Prototype of Chemoresistant, Tumor-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinitha Richard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classically, isolation of CSCs from tumors exploits the detection of cell surface markers associated with normal stem cells. Invariable expression of these cell surface markers in almost all proliferating tumor cells that albeit impart specific functionality, the universality, and clinical credibility of CSC phenotype based on markers is still dubious. Side Population (SP cells, as defined by Hoechst dye exclusion in flow cytometry, have been identified in many solid tumors and cell lines and the SP phenotype can be considered as an enriched source of stem cells as well as an alternative source for the isolation of cancer stem cells especially when molecular markers for stem cells are unknown. SP cells may be responsible for the maintenance and propagation of tumors and the proportion of SP cells may be a predictor of patient outcome. Several of these markers used in cell sorting have emerged as prognostic markers of disease progression though it is seen that the development of new CSC-targeted strategies is often hindered by poor understanding of their regulatory networks and functions. This review intends to appraise the experimental progress towards enhanced isolation and drug screening based on property of acquired chemoresistance of cancer stem cells.

  1. Phytochemicals as Innovative Therapeutic Tools against Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele-Salvatore Scarpa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The theory that several carcinogenetic processes are initiated and sustained by cancer stem cells (CSCs has been validated, and specific methods to identify the CSCs in the entire population of cancer cells have also proven to be effective. This review aims to provide an overview of recently acquired scientific knowledge regarding phytochemicals and herbal extracts, which have been shown to be able to target and kill CSCs. Many genes and proteins that sustain the CSCs’ self-renewal capacity and drug resistance have been described and applications of phytochemicals able to interfere with these signaling systems have been shown to be operatively efficient both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of specific surface antigens, mammosphere formation assays, serial colony-forming unit assays, xenograft transplantation and label-retention assays coupled with Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 activity evaluation are the most frequently used techniques for measuring phytochemical efficiency in killing CSCs. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that EGCG, curcumin, piperine, sulforaphane, β-carotene, genistein and the whole extract of some plants are able to kill CSCs. Most of these phytochemicals act by interfering with the canonical Wnt (β-catenin/T cell factor-lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF-LEF pathway implicated in the pathogenesis of several cancers. Therefore, the use of phytochemicals may be a true therapeutic strategy for eradicating cancer through the elimination of CSCs.

  2. Phytochemicals as Innovative Therapeutic Tools against Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Emanuele-Salvatore; Ninfali, Paolino

    2015-07-10

    The theory that several carcinogenetic processes are initiated and sustained by cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been validated, and specific methods to identify the CSCs in the entire population of cancer cells have also proven to be effective. This review aims to provide an overview of recently acquired scientific knowledge regarding phytochemicals and herbal extracts, which have been shown to be able to target and kill CSCs. Many genes and proteins that sustain the CSCs' self-renewal capacity and drug resistance have been described and applications of phytochemicals able to interfere with these signaling systems have been shown to be operatively efficient both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of specific surface antigens, mammosphere formation assays, serial colony-forming unit assays, xenograft transplantation and label-retention assays coupled with Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity evaluation are the most frequently used techniques for measuring phytochemical efficiency in killing CSCs. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that EGCG, curcumin, piperine, sulforaphane, β-carotene, genistein and the whole extract of some plants are able to kill CSCs. Most of these phytochemicals act by interfering with the canonical Wnt (β-catenin/T cell factor-lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF-LEF)) pathway implicated in the pathogenesis of several cancers. Therefore, the use of phytochemicals may be a true therapeutic strategy for eradicating cancer through the elimination of CSCs.

  3. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  4. Stem cells in gastrointestinal cancers: The road less travelled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sameh; Mikhail; Amer; Zeidan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells(CSC) are thought to be malignant cells that have the capacity to initiate and maintain tumor growth and survival. Studies have described CSC in various gastrointestinal neoplasms such as colon, pancreas and liver and gastroesophageal tumors. The mechanism by which CSC develop remains unclear. Several studies have explored the role of dysregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin, transformation growth factor-beta and hedhog pathways in generation of CSC. In this review, we discuss the various molecular abnormalities that may be related to formation of CSC in gastrointestinal malignancies, strategies to identify CSC and therapeutic strategies that are based on these concepts. Identification and targeting CSC is an intriguing area and may provide a new therapeutic option for patients with cancer including gastrointestinal malignancies. Although great progress has been made, many issues need to be addressed. Precise targeting of CSC will require precise isolation and characterization of those cells. This field is also evolving but further research is needed to identify markers that are specific for CSC.Although the application of this field has not entered the clinic yet, there continues to be significant optimism about its potential utility in overcoming cancer resistance and curing patients with cancer.

  5. Molecular Pathways: Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostasis in Cancer Cells and Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Veronique; Hay, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in regulating normal cellular processes, but deregulated ROS contribute to the development of various human diseases including cancers. Cancer cells have increased ROS levels compared to normal cells, because of their accelerated metabolism. The high ROS levels in cancer cells, which distinguish them from normal cells, could be pro-tumorigenic, but are also their Achilles’ heel. The high ROS content in cancer cells renders them more susceptible to o...

  6. The role of STAT1 for crosstalk between fibroblasts and colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan eKaler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling between tumor cells and the associated stroma has an important impact on cancer initiation and progression. The tumor microenvironment has a paradoxical role in tumor progression and fibroblasts, a major component of the tumor stroma, have been shown to either inhibit or promote cancer development. In this study we established that normal intestinal fibroblasts activate STAT1 signaling in colon cancer cells and, in contrast to cancer- associated fibroblasts, inhibit growth of tumor cells. Treatment of 18Co fibroblasts with the proinflammatory cytokine TNF interfered with their ability to trigger STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. Accordingly, intestinal myofibroblasts isolated from patients with Ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn’s disease (CD, which are activated and produce high levels of TNF, failed to stimulate STAT1 signaling in tumor cells, demonstrating that activated myofibroblasts lose the ability to trigger growth-inhibitory STAT1 signaling in tumor cells. Finally, we confirmed that silencing of STAT1 in tumor cells alters the crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts, suggesting STAT1 as a novel link between intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. We demonstrated that normal fibroblasts restrain the growth of carcinoma cells, at least in part, through the induction of STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. We showed that changes in the microenvironment, as they occur in inflammatory bowel disease, alter the crosstalk between carcinoma cells and fibroblasts, perturb the homeostasis of intestinal tissue and thereby contribute to tumor progression.

  7. Mammary stem cells and breast cancer--role of Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2007-06-01

    Adult stem cells are found in numerous tissues of the body and play a role in tissue development, replacement and repair. Evidence shows that breast stem cells are multipotent and can self renew, which are key characteristics of stem cells, and a single cell enriched with cell surface markers has the ability to grow a fully functional mammary gland in vivo. Many groups have extrapolated the cancer stem cell hypothesis from the haematopoietic system to solid cancers, where using in vitro culture techniques and in vivo transplant models have established evidence of cancer stem cells in colon, pancreas, prostate, brain and breast cancers. In the report we describe the evidence for breast cancer stem cells; studies consistently show that stem cell like and breast cancer initiating populations can be enriched using cell surface makers CD44+/CD24- and have upregulated genes which include Notch. Notch signalling has been highlighted as a pathway involved in the development of the breast and is frequently dysregulated in invasive breast cancer. We have investigated the role of Notch in a pre-invasive breast lesion, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and have found that aberrant activation of Notch signalling is an early event in breast cancer. High expression of Notch 1 intracellular domain (NICD) in DCIS also predicted a reduced time to recurrence 5 years after surgery. Using a non-adherent sphere culture technique we have grown DCIS mammospheres from primary DCIS tissue, where self-renewal capacity, measured by the number of mammosphere initiating cells, were increased from normal breast tissue. A gamma-secretase inhibitor, DAPT, which inhibits all four Notch receptors and a Notch 4 neutralising antibody were shown to reduce DCIS mammosphere formation, indicating that Notch signalling and other stem cell self-renewal pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets to prevent recurrence of pre-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

  8. Microfluidic chip with integrated electrical cell-impedance sensing for monitoring single cancer cell migration in three-dimensional matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien Anh; Yin, Tsung-I; Reyes, Diego; Urban, Gerald A

    2013-11-19

    Cell migration has been recognized as one hallmark of malignant tumor progression. By integrating the method of electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) with the Boyden chamber design, the state-of-the-art techniques provide kinetic information about cell migration and invasion processes in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrixes. However, the information related to the initial stage of cell migration with single-cell resolution, which plays a unique role in the metastasis-invasion cascade of cancer, is not yet available. In this paper, we present a microfluidic device integrated with ECIS for investigating single cancer cell migration in 3D matrixes. Using microfluidics techniques without the requirement of physical connections to off-chip pneumatics, the proposed sensor chip can efficiently capture single cells on microelectrode arrays for sequential on-chip 2D or 3D cell culture and impedance measurement. An on-chip single-cell migration assay was successfully demonstrated within several minutes. Migration of single metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells in their initial stage can be monitored in real time; it shows a rapid change in impedance magnitude of approximately 10 Ω/s, whereas no prominent impedance change is observed for less-metastasis MCF-7 cells. The proposed sensor chip, allowing for a rapid and selective detection of the migratory properties of cancer cells at the single-cell level, could be applied as a new tool for cancer research.

  9. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casina Kan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow.

  10. Understanding cancer stem cell heterogeneity and plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dean G Tang

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity is an omnipresent feature of mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo.It has been recently realized that even mouse and human embryonic stem cells under the best culture conditions are heterogeneous containing pluripotent as well as partially committed cells.Somatic stem cells in adult organs are also heterogeneous,containing many subpopulations of self-renewing cells with distinct regenerative capacity.The differentiated progeny of adult stem cells also retain significant developmental plasticity that can be induced by a wide variety of experimental approaches.Like normal stem cells,recent data suggest that cancer stem cells(CSCs)similarly display significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity,and that the CSC progeny can manifest diverse plasticity.Here,I discuss CSC heterogeneity and plasticity in the context of tumor development and progression,and by comparing with normal stem cell development.Appreciation of cancer cell plasticity entails a revision to the earlier concept that only the tumorigenic subset in the tumor needs to be targeted.By understanding the interrelationship between CSCs and their differentiated progeny,we can hope to develop better therapeutic regimens that can prevent the emergence of tumor cell variants that are able to found a new tumor and distant metastases.

  11. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Casina; Vargas, Geoffrey; Le Pape, François; Clézardin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow. PMID:27782035

  12. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  13. Microarray-based analysis of microRNA expression in breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhi-xin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to determine the miRNA profile in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs and to explore the functions of characteristic BCSC miRNAs. Methods We isolated ESA+CD44+CD24-/low BCSCs from MCF-7 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. A human breast cancer xenograft assay was performed to validate the stem cell properties of the isolated cells, and microarray analysis was performed to screen for BCSC-related miRNAs. These BCSC-related miRNAs were selected for bioinformatic analysis and target prediction using online software programs. Results The ESA+CD44+CD24-/low cells had up to 100- to 1000-fold greater tumor-initiating capability than the MCF-7 cells. Tumors initiated from the ESA+CD44+CD24-/low cells were included of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells, indicating stem cell properties. We also obtained miRNA profiles of ESA+CD44+CD24-/low BCSCs. Most of the possible targets of potential tumorigenesis-related miRNAs were oncogenes, anti-oncogenes or regulatory genes. Conclusions We identified a subset of miRNAs that were differentially expressed in BCSCs, providing a starting point to explore the functions of these miRNAs. Evaluating characteristic BCSC miRNAs represents a new method for studying breast cancer-initiating cells and developing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating the tumorigenic subpopulation of cells in breast cancer.

  14. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  15. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  16. Identification of transporters associated with Etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and methotrexate sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Wataru; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohmine, Ken; Yamori, Takao; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-02-01

    Membrane transporter proteins may influence the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs that can be recognized as substrates. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that play a key role in the drug sensitivity of stomach and breast cancer cell lines by measuring the absolute protein expression levels of multiple transporters and other membrane proteins and examining their correlation to drug sensitivity. Absolute protein expression levels of 90 membrane proteins were examined by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics using liquid chromatography-linked tandem mass spectrometry. Among them, 11 and 14 membrane proteins, including transporters, were present in quantifiable amounts in membrane fraction of stomach cancer and breast cancer cell lines, respectively. In stomach cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was inversely correlated with etoposide sensitivity. MK571, an MRP inhibitor, increased both the cell-to-medium ratio of etoposide and the etoposide sensitivity of MRP1-expressing stomach cancer cell lines. In breast cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) was directly correlated with methotrexate (MTX) sensitivity. Initial uptake rate and steady-state cell-to-medium ratio of [(3)H]MTX were correlated with both RFC1 expression level and MTX sensitivity. These results suggest that MRP1 modulates the etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and RFC1 modulates the MTX sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that absolute quantification of multiple membrane proteins could be a useful strategy for identification of candidate proteins involved in drug sensitivity.

  17. The Notch pathway is important in maintaining the cancer stem cell population in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan V Abel

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized.Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth.Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population.The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Sphere-forming cell subpopulations with cancer stem cell properties in human hepatoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs are regarded as the cause of tumor formation and recurrence. The isolation and identification of CSCs could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies specifically targeting CSCs. Methods Human hepatoma cell lines were plated in stem cell conditioned culture system allowed for sphere forming. To evaluate the stemness characteristics of spheres, the self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance, tumorigenicity of the PLC/PRF/5 sphere-forming cells, and the expression levels of stem cell related proteins in the PLC/PRF/5 sphere-forming cells were assessed, comparing with the parental cells. The stem cell RT-PCR array was performed to further explore the biological properties of liver CSCs. Results The PLC/PRF/5, MHCC97H and HepG2 cells could form clonal nonadherent 3-D spheres and be serially passaged. The PLC/PRF/5 sphere-forming cells possessed a key criteria that define CSCs: persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, overexpression of liver CSCs related proteins (Oct3/4, OV6, EpCAM, CD133 and CD44. Even 500 sphere-forming cells were able to form tumors in NOD/SCID mice, and the tumor initiating capability was not decreased when spheres were passaged. Besides, downstream proteins DTX1 and Ep300 of the CSL (CBF1 in humans, Suppressor of hairless in Drosophila and LAG1 in C. elegans -independent Notch signaling pathway were highly expressed in the spheres, and a gamma-secretase inhibitor MRK003 could significantly inhibit the sphere formation ability. Conclusions Nonadherent tumor spheres from hepatoma cell lines cultured in stem cell conditioned medium possess liver CSC properties, and the CSL-independent Notch signaling pathway may play a role in liver CSCs.

  19. Alternative splicing isoform of T cell factor 4K suppresses the proliferation and metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y C; Min, L; Chen, H; Liu, Y L

    2015-10-30

    The Wnt pathway has been implicated in the initiation, progression, and metastasis of lung cancer. T cell factor 4, a member of TCF/LEF family, acts as a transcriptional factor for Wnt pathways in lung cancer. Increasing amounts of evidence have shown that TCF-4 has multiple alternative splicing isoforms with transactivation or transrepression activity toward the Wnt pathway. Here, we found the presence of multiple TCF-4 isoforms in lung cancer cell lines and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. TCF-4K isoform expression was significantly decreased in lung cancer cells compared with normal bronchial epithelial cells and was identified as a transcriptional suppressor of the Wnt pathway in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Overexpression of TCF-4K significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells. Collectively, our data indicate that TCF-4K functions as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC by down-regulating the Wnt pathway.

  20. Cross talk Initiated by Endothelial Cells Enhances Migration and Inhibits Anoikis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through STAT3/Akt/ERK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen G. Neiva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that cancer cells secrete angiogenic factors to recruit and sustain tumor vascular networks. However, little is known about the effect of endothelial cell-secreted factors on the phenotype and behavior of tumor cells. The hypothesis underlying this study is that endothelial cells initiate signaling pathways that enhance tumor cell survival and migration. Here, we observed that soluble mediators from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells induce phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK in a panel of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells (OSCC-3, UM-SCC-1, UM-SCC-17B, UM-SCC-74A. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL- 6, interleukin-8 (CXCL8, and epidermal growth factor (EGF are upregulated in endothelial cells cocultured with HNSCC. Blockade of endothelial cell-derived IL-6, CXCL8, or EGF by gene silencing or neutralizing antibodies inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK in tumor cells, respectively. Notably, activation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK by endothelial cells enhanced migration and inhibited anoikis of tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that Bcl-2 is upregulated in tumor microvessels in patients with HNSCC. Here, we observed that Bcl-2 signaling induces expression of IL-6, CXCL8, and EGF, providing a mechanism for the upregulation of these cytokines in tumor-associated endothelial cells. This study expands the contribution of endothelial cells to the pathobiology of tumor cells. It unveils a new mechanism in which endothelial cells function as initiators of molecular crosstalks that enhance survival and migration of tumor cells.

  1. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of docetaxel rechallenge in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) relapsing after an initial good response to first-line docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients with mCRPC w...

  2. The value of detectable thyroglobulin in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after initial I-131 therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, D.; Plukker, J. T. M.; van der Horst-Schrivers, A. N. A.; Jansen, L.; Brouwers, A. H.; Muller-Kobold, A.; Sluiter, W. J.; Links, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the prognostic value of detectable thyroglobulin (Tg) after initial surgery and radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy by comparing patients with a negative post-therapeutic whole body scan (WBS) with either detectable or undetectable Tg. Background Differentiated thyroid cancer has

  3. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Prostate Which Was Initially Misdiagnosed as Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osamu, Soma; Murasawa, Hiromi; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the prostate is a very rare tumor. We report a case of 65-year-old man with SFT of the prostate which was initially misdiagnosed as prostate cancer. Finally, we performed total prostatectomy and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as SFT of the prostate. The patient's clinical course has progressed favorably with no obvious recurrence 18 months postoperatively.

  4. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Stuart C; Metcalf, Robert L; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P E; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Richard E B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Rothwell, Dominic G; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2016-11-09

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form 'endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (Pcisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Lineage traced normal epithelium CSCs (cancer-propagating cells) Multilineage potential LDA & serial tumor transplantations Conditionally expressing...transformation, can initiate prostate cancer in immunodeficient mice (10). The authors developed a system whereby na€ve adult human prostate epithelium is...PSA, the most "important" molecule in defining the prostate as a male glandular organ and in defining fully differentiated luminal epithelial cells

  6. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in ovarian cancer cell lines,RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to detect the expression of COX-2 in 5 ovarian cancer cell lines. The expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein was detected in all 5 cell lines. It is suggested that COX-2 is expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, which provides a basis for the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer.

  7. CD133/Src axis mediates tumor initiating property and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Syuan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Head and Neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a human lethal cancer with clinical, pathological, phenotypical and biological heterogeneity. Caner initiating cells (CICs, which are responsible for tumor growth and coupled with gain of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified. Previously, we enriched a subpopulation of head and neck cancer initiating cells (HN-CICs with up-regulation of CD133 and enhancement of EMT. Others demonstrate that Src kinase interacts with and phosphorylates the cytoplasmic domain of CD133. However, the physiological function of CD133/Src signaling in HNSCCs has not been uncovered. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Herein, we determined the critical role of CD133/Src axis modulating stemness, EMT and tumorigenicity of HNSCC and HN-CICs. Initially, down-regulation of CD133 significantly reduced the self-renewal ability and expression of stemness genes, and promoted the differentiation and apoptotic capability of HN-CICs. Additionally, knockdown of CD133 in HN-CICs also lessened both in vitro malignant properties including cell migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth, and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay. In opposite, overexpression of CD133 enhanced the stemness properties and tumorigenic ability of HNSCCs. Lastly, up-regulation of CD133 increased phosphorylation of Src coupled with EMT transformation in HNSCCs, on the contrary, silence of CD133 or treatment of Src inhibitor inversely abrogated above phenotypic effects, which were induced by CD133 up-regulation in HNSCCs or HN-CICs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggested that CD133/Src signaling is a regulatory switch to gain of EMT and of stemness properties in HNSCC. Finally, CD133/Src axis might be a potential therapeutic target for HNSCC by eliminating HN-CICs.

  8. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Canepa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12 500, 35 000, 75 000, and 100 000 cells cm−2) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing timedependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation...... between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell–substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity...... was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 μM doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell...

  9. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Brian [Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 7416, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Rochefort, Holly [Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, HCT 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Goldkorn, Amir, E-mail: agoldkor@usc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 3440, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  10. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Hu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  11. The evolving paradigm of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of immunity by cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, M; Rodvold, J J; Mahadevan, N R

    2016-01-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) has been thought to influence tumorigenesis mainly through cell-intrinsic, pro-survival effects. In recent years, however, new evidence has emerged showing that the UPR is also the source of cell-extrinsic effects, particularly directed at those immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Here we will review and discuss this new body of information with focus on the role of cell-extrinsic effects on innate and adaptive immunity, suggesting that the transmission of ER stress from cancer cells to myeloid cells in particular is an expedient used by cancer cells to control the immune microenvironment, which acquires pro-inflammatory as well as immune-suppressive characteristics. These new findings can now be seen in the broader context of similar phenomena described in Caenorhabditis elegans, and an analogy with quorum sensing and 'community effects' in prokaryotes and eukaryotes can be drawn, arguing that a cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of heterologous cells may be phylogenetically conserved. Finally, we will discuss the role of aneuploidy as an inducer of proteotoxic stress and potential initiator of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation. In presenting these new views, we wish to bring attention to the cell-extrinsic regulation of tumor growth, including tumor UPR-based cell-nonautonomous signaling as a mechanism of maintaining tumor heterogeneity and resistance to therapy, and suggest therapeutically targeting such mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  13. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  14. Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    comprised of fibroblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes, which collectively form the mammary fat pad . Breast cancer originates from subversions of...luminal epithelial cells embedded in a complex stromal matrix (‘mammary fat pad ’) comprised predominantly of fibroblasts, adipocytes and macrophages (Fig. 1...report, we showed that limited exposure (i.e., in utero and lactational only) of female rat offspring to a maternal diet containing soy protein isolate

  15. Notch signaling and EMT in non-small cell lung cancer: biological significance and therapeutic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Han, Na; Xu, Hanxiao; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Kongming

    2014-12-05

    Through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer cells acquire enhanced ability of migration and invasion, stem cell like characteristics and therapeutic resistance. Notch signaling regulates cell-cell connection, cell polarity and motility during organ development. Recent studies demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and cross-talks with several transcriptional factors to enhance EMT, contributing to the progression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Correspondingly, blocking of Notch signaling inhibits NSCLC migration and tumor growth by reversing EMT. Clinical trials have showed promising effect in some cancer patients received treatment with Notch1 inhibitor. This review attempts to provide an overview of the Notch signal in NSCLC: its biological significance and therapeutic application.

  16. Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    propagation. Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells can initiate and maintain murine intestinal adenomas (6, 7). In mouse models of skin cancer, hair follicle bulge...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0470 TITLE: Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre... Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b

  17. Current therapy of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the most important recent clinical trials on the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Two randomized studies addressing the timing of thoracic radiotherapy in limited stage SCLC are discussed. In the smaller of the two studies (n = 103), a survival benefit was associated...

  18. Forcing Cancer Cells to Commit Suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Mees, Gilles; Peeters, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis plays a crucial role in the normal development, homeostasis of multicellular organisms, carcinogenic process, and response of cancer cells to anticancer drugs. It is a genetically strictly regulated process, controlled by the balance between pro-and antiapoptotic proteins. Resistance to st

  19. Are breast cancer stem cells the key to resolving clinical issues in breast cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hidetaka; Ishikawa, Takashi; Endo, Itaru

    2017-01-01

    Despite the dramatic advances in breast cancer treatment over the past two decades, it is still the most common malignancies in women. One of the reasons patients succumb to breast cancer is treatment resistance leading to metastasis and recurrence. Recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been suggested as a cause of metastasis and recurrence in several cancers because of their unique characteristics, including self-renewal, pluripotency, and high proliferative ability. Increasing evidence has implicated breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) as essential for tumor development, progression, recurrence, and treatment resistance. BCSCs exhibit resistance to treatment owing to several inter-related factors, including overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, DNA repair, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging. In addition, the Notch, Hedgehog, and Wnt signaling pathways have been suggested as the major pathways involved in the self-renewal and differentiation of BCSCs. Despite growing evidence suggesting the importance of BCSCs in progression and metastasis, clear criteria for the identification of BCSCs in clinical practice have yet to be established. Several potential markers have been suggested, including CD44+/CD24−/low, ALDH1, EpCAM/ESA, and nestin; however, there is no standard method to detect BCSCs. Triple-negative breast cancer, which shows initial chemosensitivity, demonstrates worsened prognosis due to therapy resistance, which might be related to the presence of BCSCs. Several clinical trials aimed at the identification of BCSCs or the development of BCSC-targeted therapy are in progress. Determining the clinical relevance of BCSCs may provide clues for overcoming therapy resistance in breast cancer. PMID:28210556

  20. A novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and overcomes gemcitabine resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Sun A; Kwon, Sool Ki; Cha, Hyunju; Lee, Do Young; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, Joong Myung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is predominantly lethal, and is primarily treated using gemcitabine, with increasing resistance. Therefore, novel agents that increase tumor sensitivity to gemcitabine are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging therapeutic agents, since HDAC plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib on pancreatic cancer cells and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Three pancreatic cancer-cell lines were used to evaluate the antitumor effect of CG200745 combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib. CG200745 induced the expression of apoptotic proteins (PARP and caspase-3) and increased the levels of acetylated histone H3. CG200745 with gemcitabine/erlotinib showed significant growth inhibition and synergistic antitumor effects in vitro. In vivo, gemcitabine/erlotinib and CG200745 reduced tumor size up to 50%. CG200745 enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, and decreased the level of ATP-binding cassette-transporter genes, especially multidrug resistance protein 3 (MRP3) and MRP4. The novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, with gemcitabine/erlotinib had a synergistic anti-tumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells. CG200745 significantly improved pancreatic cancer sensitivity to gemcitabine, with a prominent antitumor effect on gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, improved clinical outcome is expected in the future. PMID:28134290

  1. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies.

  2. Cancer stem cell theory: therapeutic implications for nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ke Wang,1 Xianguo Wu,2 Jianwei Wang,3 Jian Huang1,31Cancer Institute (Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Intervention, National Ministry of Education; Provincial Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Medical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, 3Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Evidence continues to accumulate showing that tumors contain a minority population of cells responsible for tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. These are termed "cancer stem cells" (CSCs. Functional assays have identified the self-renewal and tumor-initiation capabilities of CSCs. Moreover, recent studies have revealed that these CSCs is responsible for chemotherapy resistance within a tumor. Several mechanisms of chemoresistance have been proposed, including increased Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling, as well as high expression levels of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters, an active DNA repair capacity, and slow rate of self-renewal. Nanoscale drug-delivery systems, which transport therapeutically active molecules, prolong circulation, and improve biodistribution in the body, may allow more effective and specific therapies to address the challenges posed by CSCs. In particular, some nanovehicles are being exploited for selective drug delivery to CSCs and show promising results. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms of drug resistance and the novel strategies using nanoscale drugs to eliminate CSCs.Keywords: drug resistance, drug delivery, chemoresistance, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Notch signaling

  3. Complex Biological Systems Analysis of Cell Cycling Models in Carcinogenesis: I. The essential roles of modifications in the c-Myc, TP53/p53, p27 and hTERT modules in Cancer Initiation and Progression

    CERN Document Server

    Prisecaru, V I

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to the integration of results from a modular, complex biological systems analysis of nonlinear dynamics in cell cycling network transformations that are leading to carcinogenesis is proposed. Carcinogenesis is a complex process that involves dynamically inter-connected biomolecules in the intercellular, membrane, cytosolic, nuclear and nucleolar compartments that form numerous inter-related pathways referred to as networks. One such network module contains the cell cyclins whose functions are essential to cell cycling and division. Cyclins are proteins that also link to several critical pro-apoptotic and other cell cycling/division components, such as: c-Myc, p27, the tumor suppressor gene TP53 and its product-- the p53 protein with key roles in controlling DNA repair, inducing apoptosis and activating p21 (which can depress cell cyclins if activated), mdm2(with its biosynthesis activated by p53 and also, in its turn, inhibiting p53), p21, the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen(T- antigen),Rb,Bax, Ba...

  4. Expression of cancer stem cell surface markers after chemotherapeutic drug treatment to reflect breast cancer cell regrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Liu; Wings Tjing Yung Loo; Louis Wing Cheong Chow; Kelly Wei Yu Rui

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the cell viability and the expressions of stem cell surface markers after chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Methods We observed the cytotoxic effects of three chemotherapeutic agents [ epirubicin ( Epi ) , fluorouracil ( 5-FU ) and cyclophosphamide ( Cyc ) ] in three cell lines, and the cell viabilities after removed these chemotherapeutic agents. Expressions of stem cell surface markers CD44, CD24, CD90, CD14 and aldehyde dehydrogenase1(ALDH1) in breast cancer cells were analyzed by real-time PCR. The post hoc analysis (Tukey’s tests) in conjunction with one-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results The initial cytotoxic efficacy was most notable. After the treatment of the same therapeutic agents, cell viability was decreased by 64. 8% 35. 14%, 32. 25% in BT-483 cells, 66. 4%, 22. 94% and 45. 88% in MDA-MB-231 cells, 97. 1%, 99. 5% and 76. 4% in MCF cells. The difference was significant compared with that before treatment ( P=0. 000 ) . However, the inhibitory effects were diminished after chemotherapeutic agent withdrawal. Cell viabilities were increased to 167. 9%, 212. 04% and 188. 66% in MDA-MB-231 cells at 48 h after withdrawal. At 72 h after withdrawal, cell viability was increased with a significant difference in three cell lines (all P values=0. 000). Expressions of CD44 and ALDH1 were most prevalent for MDA-MB-231, BT-483 and MCF-7 cells. ALDH1 mRNA level was significant higher in BT-483 ( HER-2 overexpression cell line) than MDA-MB-231 ( triple negative cell line ) ( P = 0. 012 ) . CD14 mRNA level in MCF-7 cells were significantly lower than that in MDA-MB-231 and BT-483 (P=0. 003, 0. 001). BT-483 showed significantly higher level of CD44 than MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell line (P= 0.013, 0.020), and no significant difference was detected between MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells ( P=0. 955 ) . CD90 mRNA expressions were detected in MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells, but not in BT-483 cells. Conclusion Some malignant

  5. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  6. Electric Blanket Use and Risk of Thyroid Cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ikuko; Young, Alicia; Liu, Jingmin; Abrams, Judith; Bock, Cathryn; Simon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer disproportionally affects more women than men. The aim of this study was to assess whether exposure to extremely low frequency electric magnetic fields from electric blankets (EBs) was associated with the development of thyroid cancer. Data were analyzed from 89,527 women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and who responded to questions concerning prior use of EBs. During a mean follow-up of 12.2 years, 190 incident cases of thyroid cancer were identified. We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and 95 percent confidence interval (CI) of incident thyroid cancer associated with EB use by Cox's proportional hazard model, adjusted for selected covariates. A majority, 57 percent, of the women in the cohort reported the use of EBs while sleeping and/or for warming the bed before sleep. No association was found between use of EBs and subsequent risk of thyroid cancer (HR = 0.98, 95 percent CI 0.72-1.32). Duration of EB use measured in years, months, or hours had no effect on risk. These results did not change when the cases were limited to papillary thyroid cancer, the most frequently occurring histologic type. The results of this study do not support possible health hazards of EBs in regards to thyroid cancer risk.

  7. Stemness is derived from thyroid cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng eMa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs. Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre. This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells which do not express TPO.Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15 and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6 week old BRAFV600E mice. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a derived cancer thyroid cell line in which overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of vimentin expression and up regulation of stemness markers Oct4, Rex1, CD15 with enhanced migration ability of the cells. Conclusions: Our findings support our earlier hypothesis that stemness in thyroid cancer is derived via EMT rather than from resident thyroid stem cells. In mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre the neoplastic changes were dependent on thyroid cell differentiation and the onset of stemness must have been derived from differentiated thyroid epithelial cells.

  8. Spontaneous cancer-stromal cell fusion as a mechanism of prostate cancer androgen-independent progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxiang Wang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human prostate cancer cells are capable of acquiring malignant attributes through interaction with stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment, while the interacting stromal cells can also become affected with both phenotypic and genotypic alterations. This study used a co-culture model to investigate the mechanism underlying the co-evolution of cancer and stromal cells. Red fluorescent androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells were cultured with a matched pair of normal and cancer-associated prostate myofibroblast cells to simulate cancer-stromal interaction, and cellular changes in the co-culture were documented by tracking the red fluorescence. We found frequent spontaneous fusions between cancer and stromal cells throughout the co-culture. In colony formation assays assessing the fate of the hybrid cells, most of the cancer-stromal fusion hybrids remained growth-arrested and eventually perished. However, some of the hybrids survived to form colonies from the co-culture with cancer-associated stromal cells. These derivative clones showed genomic alterations together with androgen-independent phenotype. The results from this study reveal that prostate cancer cells are fusogenic, and cancer-stromal interaction can lead to spontaneous fusion between the two cell types. While a cancer-stromal fusion strategy may allow the stromal compartment to annihilate invading cancer cells, certain cancer-stromal hybrids with increased survival capability may escape annihilation to form a derivative cancer cell population with an altered genotype and increased malignancy. Cancer-stromal fusion thus lays a foundation for an incessant co-evolution between cancer and the cancer-associated stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  9. Cancers take their Toll--the function and regulation of Toll-like receptors in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, R; Alvero, A B; Silasi, D-A

    2008-01-01

    Cancer could be deemed as an abnormal and uncontrolled tissue repair process. Therefore, it would not be surprising that factors that function in the tissue repair process, such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, as well as growth signals for compensatory...... proliferation, would also be key factors in regulating and enhancing cancer progression. The TLR pathways, which play a critical role in tissue repair, are also key regulators in cancer progression as well as chemoresistance. TLRs serve as cell surface sensors that can initiate pathways leading to proliferation...

  10. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Stimulate Dedifferentiation of Human Breast Cancer Cells through WNT/β-catenin Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeb, Bisrat G; Lacerda, Lara; Xu, Wei; Larson, Richard; Solley, Travis; Atkinson, Rachel; Sulman, Erik P.; Ueno, Naoto T; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Reuben, James M; Buchholz, Thomas A; Woodward, Wendy A

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that differentiated cancer cells can de-differentiate into cancer stem cells (CSCs) although to date no studies have reported whether this transition is influenced by systemic anti-cancer agents. Valproic acid (VA) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that promotes self renewal and expansion of hematopietic stem cells and facilitates the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells and is currently being investigated in breast cancer clinical trials. We hypothesized that HDAC inhibitors reprogram differentiated cancer cells towards the more resistant stem cell-like state. Two highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines, SUM159 and MDA-231, were FACS-sorted based on ALDH activity and subsequently ALDH-negative and ALDH-positive cells were treated with one of two known HDAC inhibitors, VA or SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid). In addition, primary tumor cells from patients with metastatic breast cancer were evaluated for ALDH activity following treatment with HDAC inhibitors. We demonstrate that single cell sorted ALDH- negative cells spontaneously generated ALDH-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of ALDH-negative cells with HDAC inhibitors promoted the expansion of ALDH-positive cells and increased mammosphere forming efficiency. Most importantly, it significantly increased the tumor-initiating capacity of ALDH- negative cells in limiting dilution outgrowth assays. Moreover, while HDAC inhibitors upregulated β-catenin expression and significantly increased WNT reporter activity, a TCF4 dominant negative construct abolished HDAC-inhibitor induced expansion of CSCs. These results demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors promote the expansion of breast CSCs through dedifferentiation and have important clinical implications for the use of HDAC inhibitors in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22961641

  11. STING activation of tumor endothelial cells initiates spontaneous and therapeutic antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, Olivier; De Gassart, Aude; Coso, Sanja; Gestermann, Nicolas; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Flatz, Lukas; Gaide, Olivier; Michielin, Olivier; Hwu, Patrick; Petrova, Tatiana V; Martinon, Fabio; Modlin, Robert L; Speiser, Daniel E; Gilliet, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Spontaneous CD8 T-cell responses occur in growing tumors but are usually poorly effective. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that drive these responses is of major interest as they could be exploited to generate a more efficacious antitumor immunity. As such, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), an adaptor molecule involved in cytosolic DNA sensing, is required for the induction of antitumor CD8 T responses in mouse models of cancer. Here, we find that enforced activation of STING by intratumoral injection of cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP (cGAMP), potently enhanced antitumor CD8 T responses leading to growth control of injected and contralateral tumors in mouse models of melanoma and colon cancer. The ability of cGAMP to trigger antitumor immunity was further enhanced by the blockade of both PD1 and CTLA4. The STING-dependent antitumor immunity, either induced spontaneously in growing tumors or induced by intratumoral cGAMP injection was dependent on type I IFNs produced in the tumor microenvironment. In response to cGAMP injection, both in the mouse melanoma model and an ex vivo model of cultured human melanoma explants, the principal source of type I IFN was not dendritic cells, but instead endothelial cells. Similarly, endothelial cells but not dendritic cells were found to be the principal source of spontaneously induced type I IFNs in growing tumors. These data identify an unexpected role of the tumor vasculature in the initiation of CD8 T-cell antitumor immunity and demonstrate that tumor endothelial cells can be targeted for immunotherapy of melanoma.

  12. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  13. Anterior prostate biopsy at initial and repeat evaluation: is it useful to detect significant prostate cancer?

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    Pietro Pepe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Detection rate for anterior prostate cancer (PCa in men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy has been prospectively evaluated. Materials and Methods: From January 2013 to March 2014, 400 patients all of Caucasian origin (median age 63.5 years underwent initial (285 cases and repeat (115 cases prostate biopsy; all the men had negative digital rectal examination and the indications to biopsy were: PSA values > 10 ng/mL, PSA between 4.1-10 or 2.6-4 ng/mL with free/total PSA≤25% and ≤20%, respectively. A median of 22 (initial biopsy and 31 cores (repeat biopsy were transperineally performed including 4 cores of the anterior zone (AZ and 4 cores of the AZ plus 2 cores of the transition zone (TZ, respectively. Results: Median PSA was 7.9 ng/mL; overall, a PCa was found in 180 (45% patients: in 135 (47.4% and 45 (36% of the men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. An exclusive PCa of the anterior zone was found in the 8.9 (initial biopsy vs 13.3% (repeat biopsy of the men: a single microfocus of cancer was found in the 61.2% of the cases; moreover, in 7 out 18 AZ PCa the biopsy histology was predictive of significant cancer in 2 (28.5% and 5 (71.5% men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. Conclusions: However AZ biopsies increased detection rate for PCa (10% of the cases, the majority of AZ PCa with histological findings predictive of clinically significant cancer were found at repeat biopsy (about 70% of the cases.

  14. Enrichment and Function Research of Large Cell Lung Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells

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    Wenke YUE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There are no universal method to recognize and screen for lung cancer stem cell markers and indicators. Commonly used methods are flow Cytometry and learning from other cancer stem cell sorting tags to sort lung cancer stem cells. But this method has low specificity screening, the workload is huge. In this study, Serum-free suspension culture was used to enrich lung cancer stem cells, and explore method for lung cancer stem cell screening. Methods Human large lung cancer cell line-L9981 was cultured in serum-free and growth factors added medium, and spheres were obtained. Then the morphological differences of sphere cells and adherent L9981 cells cultured in serum-containing mediums are observed. Cell proliferation was analyzed by Vi-cell viability analyzer; invasion ability was tested by transwell assay; and in vivo tumorigenicity of the two groups of cells was studied in nude mouse. Results Compared with adherent L9981 cells cultured in serum-containing mediums, cells cultured in serum-free medium display sphere appearance. Doubling time of adherent cells and sphere cells are (56.05±1.95 h and (33.00±1.44 h respectively; Spheroid cells had higher invasion and tumorigenicity ability, 5 times and 20 times respectively, than adherent cells. Conclusion Suspension cultured L9981 in Serum-free medium could form spheroid populations. Cells in spheres had higher ability of invasion and Tumorigenicity than adherent L9981 cells. These results indicated spheroid L9981 cells contained enriched lung cancer stem cells, and Serum-free suspension culture can be a candidate method for enriching lung cancer stem cell.

  15. The role of miR-100 in regulating apoptosis of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; He, Tianliang; Yang, Lu; Yang, Geng; Chen, Yulei; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is a serious health problem worldwide. Inhibition of apoptosis plays a major role in breast cancer tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the regulation of apoptosis. However, the regulation of breast cancer apoptosis by miRNAs has not been intensively investigated. To address this issue, the effect of miR-100 on the cell proliferation of different breast cancer cells was characterized in the present study. The results showed that miR-100 was significantly upregulated in SK-BR-3 cells compared with other human breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-453, T47D, HCC1954 and SUM149). Silencing miR-100 expression with anti-miRNA-100 oligonucleotide (AMO-miR-100) initiated apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the overexpression of miR-100 led to the proliferation inhibition of the miR-100-downregulated breast cancer cells. Antagonism of miR-100 in SK-BR-3 cells increased the expression of MTMR3, a target gene of miR-100, which resulted in the activation of p27 and eventually led to G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. The downregulation of miR-100 sensitized SK-BR-3 cells to chemotherapy. Therefore, our finding highlights a novel aspect of the miR-100-MTMR3-p27 pathway in the molecular etiology of breast cancer.

  16. Differential Cytotoxic Potential of Silver Nanoparticles in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells and Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jung Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis postulates that cancer cells are composed of hierarchically-organized subpopulations of cells with distinct phenotypes and tumorigenic capacities. As a result, CSCs have been suggested as a source of disease recurrence. Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been used as antimicrobial, disinfectant, and antitumor agents. However, there is no study reporting the effects of AgNPs on ovarian cancer stem cells (OvCSCs. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of AgNPs and their mechanism of causing cell death in A2780 (human ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs derived from A2780. In order to examine these effects, OvCSCs were isolated and characterized using positive CSC markers including aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and CD133 by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. The anticancer properties of the AgNPs were evaluated by assessing cell viability, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and mitochondrial membrane potential (mt-MP. The inhibitory effect of AgNPs on the growth of ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs was evaluated using a clonogenic assay. Following 1–2 weeks of incubation with the AgNPs, the numbers of A2780 (bulk cells and ALDH+/CD133+ colonies were significantly reduced. The expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes was measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Our observations showed that treatment with AgNPs resulted in severe cytotoxicity in both ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs. In particular, AgNPs showed significant cytotoxic potential in ALDH+/CD133+ subpopulations of cells compared with other subpopulation of cells and also human ovarian cancer cells (bulk cells. These findings suggest that AgNPs can be utilized in the development of novel nanotherapeutic molecules for the treatment of ovarian cancers by specific targeting of the ALDH+/CD133+ subpopulation of cells.

  17. Wnt signaling in cancer stem cells and colon cancer metastasis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayon Basu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Overactivation of Wnt signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC. The Wnt pathway is a key regulator of both the early and the later, more invasive, stages of CRC development. In the normal intestine and colon, Wnt signaling controls the homeostasis of intestinal stem cells (ISCs that fuel, via proliferation, upward movement of progeny cells from the crypt bottom toward the villus and differentiation into all cell types that constitute the intestine. Studies in recent years suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs, similar to ISCs of the crypts, consist of a small subpopulation of the tumor and are responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease. Although various ISC signature genes were also identified as CRC markers and some of these genes were even demonstrated to have a direct functional role in CRC development, the origin of CSCs and their contribution to cancer progression is still debated. Here, we describe studies supporting a relationship between Wnt-regulated CSCs and the progression of CRC.

  18. Blocking NOTCH Pathway can Enhance the Effect of EGFR Inhibitor through Targeting CD133+ Endometrial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Chao; Lang, Bin; Meng, Li-Rong

    2016-10-28

    ABSTACT Although the molecular therapeutics targeting key biomarkers such as epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) shows some success in clinical trials, some internally existing challenges in endothelial cancer biology hinder the drug effects. One of the major challenges stems from cancer stem cell-derived drug resistance. CD133 positive cells are well believed as cancer stem cells (CSC) in endometrial cancers and NOTCH pathway plays a critical role in retaining CD133+ cells by promoting CSC self-renewal and chemoresistance. Here, we initiated a therapeutic strategy to improve effects of EGFR inhibition by targeting NOTCH pathway of CD133+ cells in endometrial cancers. We first detected and purified the CD133+ cell fraction in endometrial cancer cell line Ishikawa (IK), and validated activation of NOTCH pathway in the CD133+ cells that have higher proliferation rate and lower apoptosis rate, comparing to CD133- cells. Results of nude mouse xenograft experiments further demonstrated CD133+ cells retain higher tumorigenesis capacity than CD133- cells, indicating their tumor-initiating property. Last, we applied both NOTCH inhibitor DAPT and EGFR inhibitor AG1478 treatment on endometrial cancer lines IK and HEC-1A and the results suggested improvement effects of the combination therapy compared to the treatments of DAPT or AG1478 alone. These findings indicated targeting NOTCH pathway in CD133+ cells, combining with EGFR inhibition, which provides a novel therapeutic strategy for endometrial cancer diseases.

  19. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  20. Combined effects of lapatinib and bortezomib in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and activity of bortezomib against lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuandong; Niu, Xiuqing; Luo, Jianmin; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Kunwei

    2010-10-01

    Lapatinib and bortezomib are highly active against breast cancer cells. Breast cancer patients who initially respond to lapatinib may eventually manifest acquired resistance to this treatment. Thus, the identification of novel agents that may prevent or delay the development of acquired resistance to lapatinib is critical. In the current study, we show that the combination of lapatinib and bortezomib results in a synergistic growth inhibition in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and that the combination enhances apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells. Importantly, we found that the combination of lapatinib plus bortezomib more effectively blocked activation of the HER2 pathway in SK-BR-3 cells, compared with monotherapy. In addition, we established a model of acquired resistance to lapatinib by chronically challenging SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells with increasing concentrations of lapatinib. Here, we showed that bortezomib notably induced apoptosis of lapatinib-resistant SK-BR-3 pools and further inhibited HER2 signaling in the resistant cells. Taken together, the current data indicate a synergistic interaction between lapatinib and bortezomib in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of these two noncross-resistant targeted therapies. The combination of lapatinib and bortezomib may be a potentially novel approach to prevent or delay the onset of acquired resistance to lapatinib in HER2-overxpressing/estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers.

  1. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Merril C; Peters, Amelia A; Kenny, Paraic A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-05-10

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  2. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

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    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  3. TNFα enhances cancer stem cell-like phenotype via Notch-Hes1 activation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hee; Hong, Hannah S; Liu, Zi Xiao; Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Shin, Ki-Hyuk

    2012-07-20

    Cancer stem-like cell (CSC; also known as tumor initiating cell) is defined as a small subpopulation of cancer cells within a tumor and isolated from various primary tumors and cancer cell lines. CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to anticancer treatments. In this study, we found that prolonged exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), a major proinflammatory cytokine, enhances CSC phenotype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells, such as an increase in tumor sphere-forming ability, stem cell-associated genes expression, chemo-radioresistance, and tumorigenicity. Moreover, activation of Notch1 signaling was detected in the TNFα-exposed cells, and suppression of Notch1 signaling inhibited CSC phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of a Notch downstream target, Hes1, led to suppression of CSC phenotype in the TNFα-exposed cells. We also found that Hes1 expression is commonly upregulated in OSCC lesions compared to precancerous dysplastic lesions, suggesting the possible involvement of Hes1 in OSCC progression and CSC in vivo. In conclusion, inflammatory cytokine exposure may enhance CSC phenotype of OSCC, in part by activating the Notch-Hes1 pathway.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Stromal Evolution and Cancer Progression

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    Francesca Cammarota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of cancer biology has mainly focused on malignant epithelial cancer cells, although tumors also contain a stromal compartment, which is composed of stem cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs, endothelial cells, immune cells, adipocytes, cytokines, and various types of macromolecules comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM. The tumor stroma develops gradually in response to the needs of epithelial cancer cells during malignant progression initiating from increased local vascular permeability and ending to remodeling of desmoplastic loosely vascularized stromal ECM. The constant bidirectional interaction of epithelial cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment allows damaged stromal cell usage as a source of nutrients for cancer cells, maintains the stroma renewal thus resembling a wound that does not heal, and affects the characteristics of tumor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs. Although MSCs have been shown to coordinate tumor cell growth, dormancy, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, recently they have been successfully used in treatment of hematopoietic malignancies to enhance the effect of total body irradiation-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. Hence, targeting the stromal elements in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and usage of MSCs to attenuate graft-versus-host disease may offer new strategies to overcome cancer treatment failure and relapse of the disease.

  5. Fucoidan induces cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the endoplasmic reticulum stress cascades.

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    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis is the main cause leading to disease recurrence and high mortality in cancer patients. Therefore, inhibiting metastasis process or killing metastatic cancer cells by inducing apoptosis is of clinical importance in improving cancer patient survival. Previous studies revealed that fucoidan, a fucose-rich polysaccharide isolated from marine brown alga, is a promising natural product with significant anti-cancer activity. However, little is known about the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in fucoidan-induced cell apoptosis.We reported that fucoidan treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Fucoidan treatments resulted in down-regulation of the glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and of the ER protein 29 (ERp29 in the metastatic HCT116 colon cancer cells. However, fucoidan treatment promoted ER Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII phosphorylation, Bcl-associated X protein (Bax and caspase 12 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in HCT116 cells. In both types of cancer cells, fucoidan activated the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (p-eIF2α\\CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP pro-apoptotic cascade and inhibited the phosphorylation of inositol-requiring kinase 1 (p-IRE-1\\X-box binding proteins 1 splicing (XBP-1s pro-survival cascade. Furthermore, CHOP knockdown prevented DNA damage and cell death induced by fucoidan.Fucoidan exerts its anti-tumor function by modulating ER stress cascades. Contribution of ER stress to the fucoidan-induced cell apoptosis augments our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its anti-tumour activity and provides evidence for the therapeutic application of fucoidan in cancer.

  6. Verrucous Squamous Cell Cancer in the Esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeland, Charlotte; Achiam, Michael P; Federspiel, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a rare, slow-growing type of squamous cell cancer. Fewer than 50 patients with verrucous carcinoma in the esophagus have been described worldwide. In 2014, two male patients were diagnosed with verrucous carcinoma in the distal part of the esophagus. The endoscopic...... examinations showed a similar wart-like, white, irregular mucosa in both cases. The diagnosis was difficult to make since all biopsies taken from the affected area showed no malignancy. This cancer type has a relatively good prognosis when the diagnosis is finally obtained. Both our patients presented...

  7. Tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells possess cancer stem-like cell properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui; ZHANG Heng-wei; SUN Xian-fu; GUO Xu-hui; HE Ya-ning; CUI Shu-de; FAN Qing-xia

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cause of cancer recurrence because they are resistant to conventional therapy and contribute to cancer growth and metastasis.Endocrinotherapy is the most common breast cancer therapy and acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is the main reason for endocrinotherapy failure during such therapy.Although acquired resistance to endocrine treatment has been extensively studied,the underlying mechanisms are unclear.We hypothesized that breast CSCs played an important role in TAM-induced resistance during breast cancer therapy.Therefore,we investigated the biological characteristics of TAM-resistant (TAM-R) breast cancer cells.Methods Mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity of wild-type (WT) and TAM-R MCF7 cells were tested by a mammosphere assay and mouse tumor xenografts respectively.Stem-cell markers (SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were tested by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR.Morphological observation was performed to characterize EMT.Results After induction of TAM resistance,TAM-R MCF7 cells exhibited increased proliferation in the presence of TAM compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05),indicating enhanced TAM resistance of TAM-R MCF7 cells compared to that of WT MCF7 cells.TAM-R MCF7 cells showed enhanced mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity in nude mice compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.01),demonstrating the elevated CSC properties of TAM-R MCF7 cells.Consistently,qRT-PCR revealed that TAM-R MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of stem cell markers including SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133,compared to those of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05).Morphologically,TAM-R MCF7 cells showed a fibroblastic phenotype,but WT MCF7 cells were epithelial-like.After induction of TAM resistance,qRT-PCR indicated that MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of Snail,vimentin,and N-cadherin and decreased levels of E-cadherin,which are considered as EMT characteristics (P <0

  8. Proapoptotic effect of endocannabinoids in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana-Serradell, O; Poblete, C E; Sanchez, C; Castellón, E A; Gallegos, I; Huidobro, C; Llanos, M N; Contreras, H R

    2015-04-01

    In the early stages, prostate cancer is androgen‑ dependent; therefore, medical castration has shown significant results during the initial stages of this pathology. Despite this early effect, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to such treatment. Recent evidence shows that derivatives of Cannabis sativa and its analogs may exert a protective effect against different types of oncologic pathologies. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) on cancer cells with a prostatic origin and to evaluate the effect of the in vitro use of synthetic analogs. In order to do this, we used a commercial cell line and primary cultures derived from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The presence of the CB1 and CB2 receptors was determined by immunohistochemistry where we showed a higher expression of these receptors in later stages of the disease (samples with a high Gleason score). Later, treatments were conducted using anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and a synthetic analog of anandamide, methanandamide. Using the MTT assay, we proved that the treatments produced a cell growth inhibitory effect on all the different prostate cancer cultures. This effect was demonstrated to be dose-dependent. The use of a specific CB1 receptor blocker (SR141716) confirmed that this effect was produced primarily from the activation of the CB1 receptor. In order to understand the MTT assay results, we determined cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, which showed no variation at the different cell cycle stages in all the cultures after treatment. Treatment with endocannabinoids resulted in an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as determined by Annexin V assays and caused an increase in the levels of activated caspase-3 and a reduction in the levels of Bcl-2 confirming that the reduction in cell viability noted in the MTT assay was caused by the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Finally, we observed

  9. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  10. Molecular Cell Biology of Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christopher P; Green, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Cell death is a major mechanism to eliminate cells in which DNA is damaged, organelles are stressed, or oncogenes are overexpressed, all events that would otherwise predispose cells to oncogenic transformation. The pathways that initiate and execute cell death are complex, genetically encoded, and subject to significant regulation. Consequently, while these pathways are often mutated in malignancy, there is considerable interest in inducing cell death in tumor cells as therapy. This chapter addresses our current understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to two cell death pathways, apoptotic cell death and necroptosis, a regulated form of necrotic cell death. Apoptosis can be induced by a wide variety of signals, leading to protease activation that dismantles the cell. We discuss the physiological importance of each apoptosis pathway and summarize their known roles in cancer suppression and the current efforts at targeting each pathway therapeutically. The intricate mechanistic link between death receptor-mediated apoptosis and necroptosis is described, as well as the potential opportunities for utilizing necroptosis in the treatment of malignancy.

  11. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; E; Norton; Kirsten; A; Ward-Hartstonge; Edward; S; Taylor; Roslyn; A; Kemp

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, par-ticularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship betweencancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  12. Specific detection of prostate cancer cells in urine by multiplex immunofluorescence cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Pavlovich, Christian P; Netto, George J; Konishi, Yuko; Isaacs, William B; Ali, Syed; De Marzo, Angelo; Meeker, Alan K

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer biomarkers are enriched in urine after prostatic manipulation, suggesting that whole cells might also be detectable for diagnosis. We tested multiplex staining of urinary sediments as a minimally invasive method to detect prostate cancer. Urine samples were collected from 35 men who had prostatic massage (attentive digital rectal examination) in a urology clinic and from 15 control men without urologic disease and without massage, for a total of 50 specimens (27 cancer-positive cases and 23 cancer-negative cases). LNCaP prostate cancer cells spiked into urine were used for initial marker optimization. Urine sediments were cytospun onto glass slides and stained. Multiplex urine cytology was compared with conventional urine cytology for cancer detection; anti-alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase antibody was used as a marker of prostate cancer cells, anti-Nkx3.1 as a marker of prostate epithelial cells, anti-nucleolin as a marker of nucleoli, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to highlight nuclei. Prostate cancer cells were successfully visualized by combined staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, and nucleolin. Of the 25 informative cases with biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 9 were diagnosed as suspicious or positive by multiplex immunofluorescence urine cytology, but only 4 were similarly judged by conventional cytology. All cases without cancer were read as negative by both methods. The multiplex cytology sensitivity for cancer detection in informative cases was 36% (9/25), and specificity was 100% (8/8). In conclusion, we have successfully achieved multiple staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, nucleolin, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to detect prostate cancer cells in urine. Further refinements in marker selection and technique may increase sensitivity and applicability for prostate cancer diagnosis.

  13. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer.The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach.I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging,stem cells,and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling.The high expression of aging-or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging,stem cells,and cancer.These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation,metabolic process,DNA damage response,apoptosis,p53 signaling pathway,immune/inflammatory response,and other processes,suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging.Moreover,these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation,proliferation,and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells.These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer.Certainly,the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation.This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  14. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer. The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach. I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling. The high expression of aging- or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging, stem cells, and cancer. These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation, metabolic process, DNA damage response, apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, immune/inflammatory response, and other processes, suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging. Moreover, these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells. These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer. Certainly, the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation. This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  15. Deciphering the role of microRNA 21 in cancer stem cells (CSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durairaj Sekar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of positive developments of cancer treatment, the mortality due to various cancers remains high and the mechanisms of cancer initiation and the development also remains mysterious. As we know that microRNAs are considered to be a short noncoding RNA molecules consisting of 21–25 nucleotides (nt in length and they silence their target genes by inhibiting mRNA translation or degrading the mRNA molecules by binding to their 3′-untranslated (UTR region and play a very important role in cancer biology. Recent evidences indicate that miR-21 is over expressed in cancer stem cells and plays a vital role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Even though an increased expression level of miR-21 has been observed in cancer stem cells, studies related to the role of miR-21 in cancer stem cells are limited. The main aim of this mini review is to explain the potency of miR-21 in various cancer stem cells (CSCs and as a new target for therapeutic interventions of cancer progression.

  16. Does the autonomic nervous system contribute to the initiation and progression of prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Sabatino; Evans, Bronwyn A

    2013-11-01

    In the July 12 issue of Science magazine, researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, the Durham VA Medical Centre and Duke University published an elegant study demonstrating that the sympathetic nervous syst