WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer information summaries

  1. Cancer Information Summaries: Screening/Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research & Discovery Stories of ... Editorial Board Integrative Therapies Editorial Board Levels of Evidence Levels of Evidence: Treatment Levels of Evidence: Supportive & ...

  2. 76 FR 21736 - Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer) in Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer) in Support of Summary Information on the... Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information... released an external peer review draft IRIS Toxicological Review for methanol...

  3. Summary information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Information Report (SIR) provides summary data concerning NRC and its licensees for general use by the Chairman, other Commissioners and Commission staff offices, the Executive Director for Operations, and the Office Directors. SIR is published quarterly by the Management Information Branch (49-27834) of the Office of Resource Management

  4. Summary information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Information Report (SIR) provides summary data concerning NRC and its licensees for general use by the Chairman, other Commissioners and Commission staff offices, the Executive Director for Operations, and the Office Directors. SIR is published quarterly by the Management Information Branch (49-27834) of the Office of Resource Management. This branch was formerly part of the Office of Management and Program Analysis

  5. Information applications: Rapporteur summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, S. [National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1990-12-31

    An increased level of mathematical sophistication will be needed in the future to be able to handle the spectrum of information as it comes from a broad array of biological systems and other sources. Classification will be an increasingly complex and difficult issue. Several projects that are discussed are being developed by the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), including a directory of risk assessment projects and a directory of exposure information resources.

  6. Summary Information report. Vol. 2, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Information Report (SIR) provides summary data concerning NRC and its licensees for general use by the Chairman, other Commissioners and Commission staff offices, the Executive Director for Operations, and the Office Directors. SIR is published quarterly by the Management Information Branch (49-27834) of the Office of Resource Management

  7. 76 FR 36534 - Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... thereby support risk management decisions designed to protect public health. II. How To Submit Comments to... addendum addressing additional studies. Description and analyses of these studies are included as an... Information Management Team (Address: Information Management Team, National Center for...

  8. 78 FR 26029 - Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... support risk management decisions designed to protect public health. III. How To Submit Comments to the... Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of a...: Information Management Team, National Center for Environmental Assessment , U.S. Environmental...

  9. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer Key Points Cervical cancer is ... the NCI website . Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy General Information About Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy Treatment of cervical ...

  10. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history can affect the risk of developing colon cancer. ... through. This procedure is called a colostomy. A bag is placed around the stoma to collect the ...

  11. Cancer Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Offices Close + - Text Size Cancer Information on the Internet For many people, the Internet has become the ... Always remember that the information found on the Internet should not take the place of medical advice. ...

  12. Cancer Survivorship Research: A Review of the Literature and Summary of Current NCI-Designated Cancer Center Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Harrop, J. Phil; Dean, Julie A.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2011-01-01

    The number of cancer survivors and amount of cancer survivorship research has grown substantially during the past three decades. This paper provides a review of interventional and observational cancer survivorship research efforts as well as a summary of current cancer survivorship research projects being conducted by National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in an effort to identify areas that need further attention.

  13. Information Technology Assessment Study: Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A team was formed to assess NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) information technology research and development activities. These activities were reviewed for their relevance to OSS missions, for their potential for using products better supplied by industry or other government agencies, and for recommending an IT infusion strategy for appropriate products for OSS missions. Assessment scope and methodology and the findings and recommendations of OSS IT users and providers are presented.

  14. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  15. Informal workshop on intense polarized ion sources: a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Informal Workshop on Intense Polarized Ion Sources was held on March 6, 1980, at the O'Hare Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the Workshop was to discuss problems in developing higher-intensity polarized proton sources, particularly the optically-pumped source recently proposed by L.W. Anderson of the University of Wisconsin. A summary of the discussions is reported

  16. Information architecture. Volume 2, Part 1: Baseline analysis summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture, Volume 2, Baseline Analysis, is a collaborative and logical next-step effort in the processes required to produce a Departmentwide information architecture. The baseline analysis serves a diverse audience of program management and technical personnel and provides an organized way to examine the Department`s existing or de facto information architecture. A companion document to Volume 1, The Foundations, it furnishes the rationale for establishing a Departmentwide information architecture. This volume, consisting of the Baseline Analysis Summary (part 1), Baseline Analysis (part 2), and Reference Data (part 3), is of interest to readers who wish to understand how the Department`s current information architecture technologies are employed. The analysis identifies how and where current technologies support business areas, programs, sites, and corporate systems.

  17. Central index of dose information. Summary of statistics for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HSE Central Index of Dose Information (CIDI) receives annual summaries of radiation doses recorded for employees designated as classified persons under the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR 85). These annual summaries are required from Approved Dosimetry Services (ADS) which operate in Great Britain under IRR 85. Separate information is also sent to CIDI by an ADS whenever an employee terminates employment. Approval to make assessments of doses to classified persons and/or to keep records of such assessments is granted to suitable dosimetry services by HSE. It is a condition of approval for dose record-keeping that annual dose summaries should be sent to CIDI, thus fulfilling the statutory duty on employers under IRR 85 to make arrangements with their ADS to send such data to HSE. The most common form of dose assessment is from measurements by an external body dosemeter of the thermoluminescent (TLD) or film type but ADS may be approved for other kinds of measurement, such as bio-assay, whole or partial body monitoring for internal radionuclides and personal or static air monitoring. The resulting assessments of dose are included in dose records. (author)

  18. Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Cancer) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of kidney cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for kidney cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease.

  19. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  20. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  1. The magnitude of cancer breast in India: a summary

    OpenAIRE

    Nandakumar, A.; Ramnath, T; Chaturvedi, Meesha

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of breast has emerged as the leading site of cancer in most urban populations of India. For the year 2007, there have been an estimated 82,000 new cases of cancer Breast in India. It is rapidly replacing cancer of cervix as the most important leading site of cancer among women. The data collected over the years from five urban population based cancer registries namely Bangalore, Bhopal, Chennai, Delhi and Mumbai, under the network of National Cancer Registry Programme (NCRP) have shown...

  2. The magnitude of cancer breast in India: a summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, A; Ramnath, T; Chaturvedi, Meesha

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of breast has emerged as the leading site of cancer in most urban populations of India. For the year 2007, there have been an estimated 82,000 new cases of cancer Breast in India. It is rapidly replacing cancer of cervix as the most important leading site of cancer among women. The data collected over the years from five urban population based cancer registries namely Bangalore, Bhopal, Chennai, Delhi and Mumbai, under the network of National Cancer Registry Programme (NCRP) have shown a statistical rising trend in the incidence rate of breast cancer. In hospital-based cancer registries, cancer of the breast is the leading site of cancer in Mumbai and Thiruvananthapuram, second leading site in Bangalore, Dibrugarh and Chennai. Cancer of breast constitutes 14.3 to 30.0% of all cancers in women in these HBCRs. The report on 'Development of an Atlas of Cancer in India' showed that Chandigarh (39.5), North Goa (36.8), Aizawl (36.2) and Panchkula (34.6) had the higher microscopic incidence rates of breast cancer compared to that seen in Delhi PBCR that had the highest rate among all PBCRs. PMID:22930611

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  4. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  5. General Information about Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are used to detect testicular cancer: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Tumor marker ... places in the body, and blood levels of AFP, β-hCG, and LDH). Type of cancer. Size ...

  6. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  7. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  8. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  9. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  10. General Information about Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  11. General Information About Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  12. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  13. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  14. Childhood Cancer Genomics Gaps and Opportunities - Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI convened a workshop of representative research teams that have been leaders in defining the genomic landscape of childhood cancers to discuss the influence of genomic discoveries on the future of childhood cancer research.

  15. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  16. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  17. 75 FR 69064 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the... period on September 30, 2010 (75 FR 60454) for the external review draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

  18. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analyses , for information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL and Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project

  19. Cancer News Coverage and Information Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Frosch, Dominick L; Hornik, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged t...

  20. General Information about Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation therapy . Mohs microsurgery . A clinical trial of laser therapy . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer clinical ... nodes in the groin ). External or internal radiation therapy followed by ... clinical trial of laser surgery . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer ...

  1. Summary of avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J H; Andersen, A; Dreyer, L;

    1997-01-01

    An overview is given of the most important known causes of cancer in the five Nordic countries and the resulting number of cancers that are potentially avoidable. The main causes include active and passive smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to asbestos and other occupational carcinogens, solar...

  2. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary in which the features of hereditary cancer and the structure and content of other PDQ cancer genetics summaries are described. The summary also contains an extensive list of genetics resources available online.

  3. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. When the esophagus and ...

  4. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  5. General Information about Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and x-rays ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. Certain factors ...

  6. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  7. General Information about Urethral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The surgeon may use part of the small intestine to make a tube that passes urine through an opening ( stoma ). This is called an ostomy or urostomy . If ... surgeon may also use part of the small intestine to make a new storage pouch ( continent ... the urine through a stoma. Even if the doctor removes all the cancer ...

  8. General Information about Parathyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around it. Sometimes lymph nodes , half of the thyroid gland on the same side of the body as the cancer, and muscles, tissues , and a nerve in the neck are also removed. Tumor debulking : A surgical procedure in which as much ...

  9. Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled 'Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification' that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included

  10. Protocol Information Office | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIO Instructions and ToolsFind instructions, forms, and templates for the management of all types of Division of Cancer Prevention clinical trials.Clinical Trials Reference MaterialsModel clinical agreements, human subject protection and informed consent models, gender and minority inclusion information, and monitoring policy and guidelines. |

  11. Latina breast cancer survivors informational needs: information partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Lena; Gavier, Maria; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2009-01-01

    The ability to access and understand health information is becoming more critical to managing one's own health and illness. Informatics tools are increasingly the central resources for responding to these needs. But just as information is culturally bound, so are the tools used to access it; both are bounded by the contexts in which they are situated. Latinas face more barriers in accessing needed information due to cultural, linguistic and health access inequities in the US. Although breast cancer rates for Latinas are lower than for non-Latina white women, they are more likely to have a more advanced stage at diagnosis and poorer quality of survivorship. Few studies have explored Latina breast cancer survivors' information needs & strategies. This community-based study focused on Mexican American women with breast cancer and explored their health information experiences, needs, and strategies; it examined their perceptions of how their relationships with providers influenced how information was accessed and utilized. Managing information was not an individual responsibility for any of these women. All of these women had access and used the Internet either directly or through their support networks. All emphasized the importance of having a select support network of people (information partners) for receiving, searching, and interpreting all health information about their illness. If information partners are strategies preferred by Latinas, then we must refocus our assessment of e-health literacy competencies on networks rather than individuals. PMID:19592948

  12. Cancer Risk Assessment: Should New Science be Applied? Workgroup summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard J. Bull; Antone L. Brooks

    2002-12-15

    OAK-B135 A symposium discussing the implications of certain phenomena observed in radiation biology for cancer risk assessment in general. In July of 2002 a workshop was convened that explored some of the intercellular phenomena that appear to condition responses to carcinogen exposure. Effects that result from communication between cells that appear to either increase the sphere of damage or to modify the sensitivity of cells to further damage were of particular interest. Much of the discussion focused on the effects of ionizing radiation that were transmitted from cells directly hit to cells not receiving direct exposure to radiation (bystander cells). In cell culture, increased rates of mutation, chromosomal aberration, apoptosis, genomic instability, and decreased clonogenic survival have all been observed in cells that have experienced no direct radiation. In addition, there is evidence that low doses of radiation or certain chemicals give rise to adaptive responses in which the treated cells develop resistance to the effects of high doses given in subsequent exposures. Data were presented at the workshop indicating that low dose exposure of animals to radiation and some chemicals frequently reduces the spontaneous rate of mutation in vitro and tumor responses in vivo. Finally, it was concluded that considerable improvement in understanding of how genetic variation may modify the impact of these phenomena is necessary before the risk implications can be fully appreciated. The workshop participants discussed the substantive challenge that these data present with respect to simple linear methodologies that are currently used in cancer risk assessment and attempted to identify broad strategies by which these phenomena may start to be used to refine cancer risk assessment methods in the future.

  13. Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contact InformationCapital Consulting Corporation is providing logistical support for this meeting. If you have questions or need assistance, please call Jennifer Adona at (301) 468-6073, or e-mail her at jenniferk@capconcorp.com. |

  14. Ways Youth Receive Information about Marihuana. Final Report Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitz, Albert C.; Clark, Richard E.

    A description was sought of the types of sources of information about marijuana used by 300 middle class fifth, seventh, and eleventh grade students. During individual meetings with experienced female interviewers, students were asked to relate sources which were most influential in providing information about marihuana at the following stages:…

  15. 75 FR 16106 - Draft Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... science-based human health assessments to support the Agency's regulatory activities. The IRIS database... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of...

  16. 75 FR 26956 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexachloroethane: In Support of the Summary Information in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... science-based human health assessments to support the Agency's regulatory activities. The IRIS database... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexachloroethane: In Support of the Summary Information in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice...

  17. Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) data summary, calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) is a Department of Energy information system for radioactive solid waste. This document is a summary of the CY 1986 data and the forecasted data for CY 1987 reported by DOE sites. Detailed data are included in the appendices

  18. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text follows: During the five sessions of the workshop, much insight has been gained in a variety of issues and challenges that national programmes will encounter as they approach the construction phase of deep geologic repositories as well as their plans to address and resolve these issues. Due to the wide range of participating programmes and due to the different phases of repository development represented, the information presented at the workshop ranged from general and generic questions to specific technical, managerial, administrative, legal, regulatory and procedural issues. Although many issues still awaiting their resolutions, it can be observed that there were joint views amongst the participants with respect to the nature and specificities of these issues. These include: - the need for flexibility (within a so-called safety envelope) when projects evolve over time, - the need to address targets could be very difficult in nature and in some cases may compete with each other when developing and optimising repository systems, - the central role of management with regard to developing adequate professional attitudes and an appropriate safety culture, taking into account the various professional disciplines involved, - the need for integrating different legal and regulatory fields, often addressed by different authorities, and the question of a 'leading regulator'; - the technical challenge of conceptualising parallel processes such as excavation in parts of a repository and emplacement in others and the need to fulfil related safety requirements (mining and occupational, radiation protection etc.), - monitoring may have different roles in different phases of repository development, or - the outstanding role of the safety case prepared in advance to operation (waste emplacement) compared to the cases prepared at other stages of repository development, and the need to act accordingly in the regulatory

  19. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  20. Fuzzballs and the information paradox: a summary and conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Samir D

    2008-01-01

    The black hole information paradox is one of the most important issues in theoretical physics. We review some recent progress using string theory in understanding the nature of black hole microstates. For all cases where these microstates have been constructed, one finds that they are horizon sized `fuzzballs'. Most computations are for extremal states, but recently one has been able to study a special family of non-extremal microstates, and see `information carrying radiation' emerge from these gravity solutions. We discuss how the fuzzball picture can resolve the information paradox. We use the nature of fuzzball states to make some conjectures on the dynamical aspects of black holes, observing that the large phase space of fuzzball solutions can make the black hole more `quantum' than assumed in traditional treatments.

  1. An Information System for Educational Management: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, John

    Six reports concerning design of an information system to aid the Los Angeles city schools in implementing accountability and program budgeting are summarized. Extensive interviewing and system analysis led to focusing decisionmaking and accountability on the individual school principal, unlike the present centralized decisionmaking and resource…

  2. Information Technology and Communications Services (ITACS) Customer Satisfaction Survey Summary

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    2004 ITACS Customer Satisfaction Survey Report The IT Strategic Plan, The Information Revolution: Planning for Institutional Change, proposed a number of recommendations to improve management, customer responsiveness, and accountability for the IT arena at NPS. A periodic customer satisfaction survey was included as one of those recommendations.

  3. Information summary, Area of Concern: Ashtabula River, Ohio. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatem, H.E.; Brandon, D.L.; Lee, C.R.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.

    1990-12-01

    The Water Quality Act of 1987, Section 118, authorizes the Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) to carry out a 5-year study and demonstration project, Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS), with emphasis on the removal of toxic pollutants from bottom sediments. Information from the ARCS program is to be used to guide the development of Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) for 42 identified Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs) as well as Lake-wide Management Plans. The AOCs are areas where serious impairment of beneficial uses of water or biota (drinking, swimming, fishing, navigation, etc.) is known to exist, or where environmental quality criteria are exceeded to the point that such impairment is likely. Priority consideration was given to the following AOCs: Saginaw Bay, Michigan; Sheboygan Harbor, Wisconsin; Grand Calumet River, Indiana; Ashtabula River, Ohio; and Buffalo River, New York. This report summarizes the information obtained for the Ashtabula River AOC. (GLNPO Subject-Reference Matrix). Data and information from numerous reports have been included as figures and tables; wherever possible, the reference sources are identified.

  4. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following PDQ summaries: Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Testicular Cancer Treatment Age and gender can affect the risk ... summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and ...

  5. 75 FR 59716 - Draft Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)'' [EPA/ 635/R..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for urea will be held on November 16,...

  6. 78 FR 26790 - Summary of Responses To Request for Information (RFI): Opportunities To Apply a Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... Information (RFI): Opportunities To Apply a Department of Health and Human Services Message Library To Advance... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Summary of Responses to Request for Information (RFI). SUMMARY: On January 29, 2013, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) issued a Request for Information (RFI)...

  7. A summary of available information on ferrocyanide tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford site during the mid to late 1950s to make more tank space available for the storage of high level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed as a method of removing 137Cs from existing waste solutions and from process solutions that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in waste tanks. During the coarse of the research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was discovered that ferrocyanide materials when mixed with NaNO3 and/or NaNO2 exploded. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s when the safety associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety associated with these wastes and the current research and waste management programs. Over the past three years, numerous explosive test have been carried out using milligram quantities of cyanide compounds. These tests provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions. On heating a mixture of ferrocyanide and nitrate or nitrite, an explosive reaction normally begins at about 240 degrees C, but may occur well below 200 degrees C in the presence of catalysts or organic compounds that may act as initiators. The energy released is highly dependent on the course of the reaction. Three attempts to model hot spots in local areas of the tanks indicate a very low probability of having a hot spot large enough and hot enough to be of concern. The main purpose of this document is to inform the members of the Tank Waste Science Panel of the background and issues associated with the ferrocyanide wastes. Hopefully, this document fulfills similar needs outside of the framework of the Tank Waste Science Panel. 50 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Knowledge, information and communication among cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Knowledge, information and communication, within oncology, are a core clinical strength for the out-come of the disease and inadequate communication, can cause distress for the patient and their families. Design: A senior doctor conducted this study by filling in the performa after interviewing the subject of the study. Place and duration of study: This study was done in Oncology Department of Service Hospital, Lahore and was completed in four months. Subjects and Method: One hundred cancer patients were interviewed regarding their knowledge about their disease, its causes, prognosis, and information supplied by the health-care providers. They were also asked about their satisfaction regarding this information, deficiencies and pitfalls in this information, need for more information, which should supply the information from among the hospital team or their relative, attitude of the family and their communication regarding the disease. Results: Study revealed that the knowledge about the disease and its causes was present in 53% and 7% respectively. The patients (59%) wanted more information. Majority perceived that the information was not adequate and needed more information and 68% thought that more information would reduce their anxiety. The attitude of family was found encouraging in 87% of patients and 42% were communicating with other family members regarding their diseases. Conclusion: Knowledge about the disease and its cause should be increasingly supplied by the doctors, as it will reduce the anxiety and have a good effect on health. Communication among the family members needs to be improved. (author)

  9. Cancer Information Seeking and Cancer-Related Health Outcomes: A Scoping Review of the Health Information National Trends Survey Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigfall, Lisa T; Friedman, Daniela B

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among adults in the United States. Only 54% of U.S. adults reported seeking cancer information in 2014. Cancer information seeking has been positively associated with cancer-related health outcomes such as screening adherence. We conducted a scoping review of studies that used data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) in order to examine cancer information seeking in depth and the relationship between cancer information seeking and cancer-related health outcomes. We searched five databases and the HINTS website. The search yielded a total of 274 article titles. After review of 114 de-duplicated titles, 66 abstracts, and 50 articles, 22 studies met inclusion criteria. Cancer information seeking was the outcome in only four studies. The other 18 studies focused on a cancer-related health outcome. Cancer beliefs, health knowledge, and information seeking experience were positive predictors of cancer information seeking. Cancer-related awareness, knowledge, beliefs, preventive behaviors, and screening adherence were higher among cancer information seekers. Results from this review can inform other research study designs and primary data collection focused on specific cancer sites or aimed at populations not represented or underrepresented in the HINTS data (e.g., minority populations, those with lower socioeconomic status). PMID:27466828

  10. Adjustment to Cancer: Anxiety and Distress (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the difficult emotional responses many cancer patients experience. This summary focuses on normal adjustment issues, psychosocial distress, and adjustment disorders.

  11. National Information Infrastructure Education Forum: A summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.; Oliver, C.E.

    1994-05-01

    The National Information Infrastructure (NII) Education Forum was held on October 6-8, 1993, in Arlington, Virginia. The Forum was sponsored by the Office of Scientific Computing, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Its purpose was to discuss technology for K-12 education and what role DOE and its national laboratories could play in developing, disseminating, and using technology for K-12. The Forum brought together over 120 people from across the nation. Participants represented six groups: national laboratories; education research institutions; K-12 teachers and administrators; industry; federal agencies; and other institutions. The Forum consisted of a series of structured presentations from each of these six groups; technology demonstrations; and open, small group discussions. The presentations covered the following: important K-12 education and computing issues, national laboratory capabilities, other federal sector initiatives, and industry perspectives. The demonstration room had over 20 computers networked to the Internet. Workshop participants were shown (1) how to use the Internet to access resources anywhere in the world, (2) state-of-the-art network video teleconferencing technology, (3) multi-media technology, and (4) various other educational software systems.

  12. Three Mile Island technical information and examination program instrumentation and electrical summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the investigations on instrumentation and electrical systems that were subjected to a loss-of-coolant accident environment during and following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) on March 28, 1979. The report is a summary of information previously published in GEND-INF reports, plus current knowledge of the investigators

  13. Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary describes highlights from the report, "Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities." City-led efforts to build coordinated systems of afterschool programming are an important strategy for improving the health, safety and academic preparedness of children and…

  14. 75 FR 69662 - Workshop: Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates in Support of Summary Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... AGENCY Workshop: Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates in Support of Summary Information on...: Notice of Peer Consultation Workshop on the Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates; Request... phthalates as set forth in the National Academies of Science (NAS) report ``Phthalates and Cumulative...

  15. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  16. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary in which cancer risk perception, risk communication, and risk counseling are discussed. The summary also contains information about recording and analyzing a family history of cancer and factors to consider when offering genetic testing.

  4. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of prostate cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for prostate cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary prostate cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  5. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  6. Linking Hospital Discharge Summaries from Oncology Departments in Order to Achieve Epidemiological Cancer Monitoring for Strategic Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues J-M; De Laroche G; Martin C.; Quantin C; Trombert-Paviot B

    2001-01-01

    In anticipation of the creation of a cancer institute (ICL) in Saint-Etienne, France, 3 hospitals tested a procedure which permanently links hospital discharge summaries to DRG’s (PMSI). To this end used the asymmetric hashing and encrypting software developed by one of the authors which had been evaluated from 1996 to 1999 by selecting discharge summaries from each institution containing at least one malignant tumour ICD code. Thus, we were able to compile an anonymous 16,000 patient regist...

  7. Communicating Cancer Risk Information: The Challenges of Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L.; Ratner, Pamela A.; Johnson, Joy L.; Lovato, Chris Y.; Joab, S. Amanda

    1998-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive communication of cancer-risk information is important. Based on a literature review of 75 research reports, expert opinion papers, and clinical protocols, a synthesis of what is known about the communication of cancer-risk information is presented. Relevance of information to those not tested is discussed. (Author/EMK)

  8. Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) data summary, fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) information system for radioactive solid waste. This document is a summary of the FY 1982 data and the forecast data for FY 1983 reported by DOE sites. Detailed data are included in the appendices. The SWIMS data base contains data on the solid transuranic and solid low-level waste generated, buried, or stored at DOE sites. The burial and storage data include the period from site initiation through FY 1982

  9. 75 FR 69065 - Draft Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... the draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary... workshop on the draft assessment for Urea will be held via teleconference on December 13, 2010,...

  10. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Cancer-Related Information Seeking Among Cancer Survivors: Trends Over a Decade (2003-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney Rutten, Lila J; Agunwamba, Amenah A; Wilson, Patrick; Chawla, Neetu; Vieux, Sana; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Arora, Neeraj K; Blake, Kelly; Hesse, Bradford W

    2016-06-01

    The demonstrated benefits of information seeking for cancer patients, coupled with increases in information availability, underscore the importance of monitoring patient information seeking experiences over time. We compared information seeking among cancer survivors to those with a family history of cancer and those with no history of cancer. We identified characteristics associated with greater information seeking among cancer survivors, key sources of cancer-related information, and changes in information source use over time. Data from five iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) spanning 2003 to 2013 were merged and analyzed. Frequencies, cross-tabulations, multivariate logistic regression, and multinomial regression analyses were conducted. All data were weighted to provide representative estimates of the adult US population. Cancer information seeking was reported most frequently by cancer survivors (69.8 %). The percentage of cancer survivors who reported information seeking increased from 66.8 % in 2003 to 80.8 % in 2013. Cancer information seeking was independently associated with age, education, and income; seeking was less likely among older adults, those with less education, and those with lower incomes. Compared to respondents in 2003, those in 2005 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.40, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.24-0.65) and 2008 (OR = .43, 95 % CI = 0.26-0.70) were about half as likely to use the Internet as the first source of cancer information compared to a healthcare provider. Despite overall increases in cancer information seeking and access to health information from a variety of sources, healthcare providers remain a key source of health information for cancer survivors. PMID:25712202

  12. Satisfaction with information provided to Danish cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit; Lundstrøm, Louise Hyldborg; Grønvold, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction.......To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction....

  13. Basic Information about Health Disparities in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest in the Southwest. For cancers of the breast and cervix, American Indian/Alaska Native women are less likely than white women to have their cancer found early. References 1 National Cancer Institute. Health Disparities Defined. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and ...

  14. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  15. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  16. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  17. Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). Data summary, Fiscal Year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) maintains computerized records on a master data base. It provides a comprehensive system for cataloging and assembling data into output reports. The system summarizes the solid radioactive waste generation, disposal, and storage information throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). The SWIMS data base contains the information on the transuranic (TRU) and Low-Level Waste (LLW) generated, buried, or stored by DOE facilities. The generation data covers the period from the FY 1976 transition quarter through FY 1979. The burial and storage data includes the period from site initiation through FY 1979. This document includes the DOE Summary Reports from the SWIMS, presenting the FY 1979 data and the FY 1980 forecasts. Each report is detailed by nuclide category. The categorization allows the user to separate TRU data from LLW data, etc

  18. Cancer Fatalism, Literacy, and Cancer Information Seeking in the American Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C.; Smith, Samuel G.

    2016-01-01

    Information seeking is an important behavior for cancer prevention and control, but inequalities in the communication of information about the disease persist. Conceptual models have suggested that low health literacy is a barrier to information seeking, and that fatalistic beliefs about cancer may be a mediator of this relationship. Cancer…

  19. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma — including information about specific gene mutations and related cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing skin cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these syndromes.

  20. Looking beyond the Internet: Examining Socioeconomic Inequalities in Cancer Information Seeking among Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-joo; Ramirez, Susana; Lewis, Nehama; Gray, Stacy W.; Hornik, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The gap in cancer information seeking between high-socioeconomic status (SES) cancer patients and low-SES cancer patients deserves serious attention considering the importance of information and knowledge in cancer control. We thus explored the association of SES, as measured by education, with cancer patients’ overall cancer information seeking, and with seeking from each source (i.e., the Internet, mass media, medical sources, and non-medical interpersonal sources) and across two topic categories (i.e., treatment, quality of life). We then asked whether the effect of education on treatment information seeking is reduced among those who are particularly motivated to control treatment choices. We conducted a survey with breast, prostate, and colon cancer patients diagnosed in 2005 (N = 2,013), who were randomly drawn from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry in the fall of 2006. We found that education was more strongly associated with Internet use than with the use of other sources regardless of topics. Also, when information was sought from mass media, education had a greater association with treatment information seeking than with quality-of-life information seeking. Preference for active participation in treatment decision making, however, did not moderate the effect of education on treatment information seeking. The implications of these findings for public health research and cancer patient education were discussed. PMID:22356137

  1. Sources and summaries of water-quality information for the Rapid Creek basin, western South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogorski, John S.; Zogorski, E.M.; McKallip, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report provides a compilation of water quality information for the Rapid Creek basin in western South Dakota. Two types of information are included: First, past and current water quality monitoring data collected by the South Dakota Department of Water and Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and others are described. Second, a summary is included for all past water quality reports, publications, and theses that could be located during this study. A total of 62 documents were abstracted and included journal articles, abstracts, Federal agency reports and publications, university and State agency reports, local agency reports, and graduate theses. The report should be valuable to water resources managers, regulators, and others contemplating water quality research, monitoring, and regulatory programs in the Rapid Creek basin. (USGS)

  2. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  3. Exposure to and Intention to Discuss Cancer-Related Internet Information Among Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ostroff, Jamie; Heerdt, Alexandra; Li, Yuelin; Dickler, Maura

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have reported a significant number of patients with breast cancer seek cancer-related information from the Internet. Most studies have asked whether a patient has ever read Internet information since her diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency with which patients with breast cancer come to physician appointments having recently read and intending to discuss cancer-related information from the Internet. Patients and Methods: We asked 558 patients with breast cancer who were waiting to see their physicians about their experiences reading cancer-related information from the Internet and their intent to discuss the information in their current visit. Results: Fifteen percent reported reading cancer-related Internet information in the past month. Patients who had read such information in the past month were younger, had been diagnosed more recently, and were more likely to be attending a new visit. Of those who had read in the past month, 45% reported intending to discuss what they had read with their physician. Nineteen percent of patients reported having ever read breast cancer–related Internet information since their diagnosis. Conclusion: The proportion of patients with breast cancer planning to discuss Internet information during their current physician visit was relatively small. Few characteristics were associated with recent Internet use or intent to discuss. PMID:22548010

  4. General Information about Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This may lead to liver cancer. Blood banks test all donated blood for hepatitis B, which greatly lowers the risk of getting the ... This may lead to liver cancer. Blood banks test all donated blood for hepatitis C, which ... infected with hepatitis B. It is caused by hepatitis D virus (HDV) ...

  5. A Study on People's Information Needs of Cancer Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nei-Ching Yeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In daily life, more and more people rely on medical websites to seek medical information and treatment methods. In order to meet the demand of users, especially, before the construction of the websites, information and function need have to he understood first. Accordingly, this research intends to investigate and analyse people's information needs in cancer prevention and treatment. This research applies in-depth interview, focus group, questionnaire and survey research methods, and analyses existing health and cancer websites to get rich materials. The results show people's cancer information need, and the priority of those needs. Finally, the author discusses the needs of provision of folk treatment information in the cancer websites.

  6. Opinions of the Turkish population on cancer and being informed of the diagnosis of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçin, Abdussamed; SILAY, KAMİLE; BÜYÜKÇELİK, Abdullah; IŞIKDOĞAN, ABDURRAHMAN; TÜRK, HACI MEHMET; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol; ÖZDEMİR, FEYYAZ; UĞURLU, Mehmet; Üstü, Yusuf; YALÇIN, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: An opinion survey was conducted to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the Turkish population regarding cancer if they or one of their family members were to receive a diagnosis of cancer. Materials and methods: The opinion survey was completed by 6566 subjects and consisted of questions about the demographics of the participants and their overall opinions about cancer. The other points of the investigation asked whether they would inform relatives who had cancer about...

  7. Social tagging in support of cancer patients’ information interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ådland, Marit Kristine; Lykke, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how social tagging can be useful in an information website for cancer patients and their relatives. Methodology/approach: Three studies have been carried out in order to investigate the research questions. Firstly, we reviewed and...... analyzed literature about cancer patients’ information needs and seeking behavior, and about social tagging and patient terminology. Secondly, we analyzed tags applied to blog postings at Blogomkraeft.dk, a blog site at the Danish information web site Cancer.dk. The tags were compared with the formal...... browsing structure of Cancer.dk. Results from the two studies were used to develop a prototype for social tagging at Cancer.dk. Thus thirdly, we evaluated the prototype in a usability study. Findings: We found that tags have the potential to describe and provide access to web site content from the users...

  8. Youtube as a source of information on cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janak Adhikari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurate information about cervical cancer to general public can lower the burden of the disease including its mortality. Aims: We aimed to look at the quality of information available in YouTube for cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: We searched YouTube (http://www.youtube.com for videos using the keyword "Cervical cancer" on November 12, 2015. Videos were then analyzed for their source and content of information. Results: We studied 172 videos using the keyword "Cervical cancer" on November 12, 2015. We found that there were videos describing the personal stories, risk factors, and the importance of screening. However, videos discussing all the aspects of cancers were lacking. Likewise, videos from the reputed organization were also lacking. Conclusion: Although there were numerous videos available in cervical cancer, videos from reputed organizations including Center for Disease Control and Prevention, American Cancer Society, and World Health Organization were lacking. We strongly believe that quality videos from such organizations via YouTube can help lower the burden of disease.

  9. Health Information Needs of Childhood Cancer Survivors and Their Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Knijnenburg; L.C. Kremer; C. Bos; K.I. Braam; M.W.M. Jaspers

    2010-01-01

    Background. Knowledge about past disease, treatment, and possible late effects has previously been shown to be low in survivors of childhood cancer and their relatives. This study investigated the information needs of childhood cancer survivors and their parents and explored possible determinants fo

  10. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exposure, high levels of estrogen, and a family history of breast cancer can increase a man’s risk ... also show the dimpled appearance called peau d’orange (like the skin of an orange). There may ...

  11. General Information about Childhood Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... β-hCG) or a protein called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Other cancers and certain noncancer conditions, including cirrhosis and hepatitis , can also increase AFP levels. Complete blood count (CBC) : A procedure in ...

  12. Cancer Fatalism, Literacy, and Cancer Information Seeking in the American Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Smith, Samuel G

    2016-08-01

    Information seeking is an important behavior for cancer prevention and control, but inequalities in the communication of information about the disease persist. Conceptual models have suggested that low health literacy is a barrier to information seeking, and that fatalistic beliefs about cancer may be a mediator of this relationship. Cancer fatalism can be described as deterministic thoughts about the external causes of the disease, the inability to prevent it, and the inevitability of death at diagnosis. This study aimed to examine the associations between these constructs and sociodemographic factors, and test a mediation model using the American population-representative Health Information and National Trends Survey (HINTS 4), Cycle 3 (n = 2,657). Approximately one third (34%) of the population failed to answer 2/4 health literacy items correctly (limited health literacy). Many participants agreed with the fatalistic beliefs that it seems like everything causes cancer (66%), that one cannot do much to lower his or her chances of getting cancer (29%), and that thinking about cancer makes one automatically think about death (58%). More than half of the population had "ever" sought information about cancer (53%). In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and family cancer history, people with limited health literacy were less likely to have ever sought cancer information (odds ratio [OR] = 0.63; 0.42-0.95) and more frequently endorsed the belief that "there's not much you can do . . ." (OR = 1.61; 1.05-2.47). This fatalistic belief partially explained the relationship between health literacy and information seeking in the mediation model (14% mediation). Interventions are needed to address low health literacy and cancer fatalism to increase public interest in cancer-related information. PMID:26377524

  13. Linking Hospital Discharge Summaries from Oncology Departments in Order to Achieve Epidemiological Cancer Monitoring for Strategic Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues J-M

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In anticipation of the creation of a cancer institute (ICL in Saint-Etienne, France, 3 hospitals tested a procedure which permanently links hospital discharge summaries to DRG’s (PMSI. To this end used the asymmetric hashing and encrypting software developed by one of the authors which had been evaluated from 1996 to 1999 by selecting discharge summaries from each institution containing at least one malignant tumour ICD code. Thus, we were able to compile an anonymous 16,000 patient register. 5 tumour locations were found in almost half the patients: breast (16.7 %, bowel (9.6 %, lung and bronchi (9.1 %, prostate gland (6.8 %, and skin (5.5 %. We estimate that the future ICL will take care of 2,500 cancer patients annually. We compared the number of new patients hospitalized each year (1,500 to the incidence reported by the manual cancer registers (FRANCIM. We conclude that this linking procedure is both feasible and acceptable when its precise health goal is clearly defined. Following this initial step, we are extending the procedure to involve other health care institutions (both public and private in the Saint Etienne area and to the main regional cancer network (ONCORA. Beginning in 2001 the French ministry of health has approved this DRGs linking procedure throughout France.

  14. Bilingual Cancer Information: Access Is the First Line of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Patrick; Palmer, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Information about cancer, the disease that kills more Americans than any other except heart disease, is essential. In some ways, information is our first line of defense. It allows us to identify individual risk factors, to note when a problem means we should see a professional, and to avoid activities that might put us at risk. However,…

  15. Cancer Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  16. Online Information about Cancer Clinical Trials: Evaluating the Web Sites of Comprehensive Cancer Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Monaco, Valerie; Krills, Sandra K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the information provided on comprehensive cancer centers’ Web sites regarding clinical trials. Thirty-nine Web sites were visually inspected for four categories of variables: navigation to the clinical trial information, search functionality provided to the visitor, information content provided about trials, and the reading level of the information provided. Results indicated that for those Web sites that provided information about clinical trials, t...

  17. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullard Emily

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask. Primary outcomes will be: 1 calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2 timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3 patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. Discussion The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a

  18. Many Experts, Many Audiences: Public Engagement with Science and Informal Science Education. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallie, Ellen; Bell, Larry; Lohwater, Tiffany; Falk, John H.; Lehr, Jane L.; Lewenstein, Bruce V.; Needham, Cynthia; Wiehe, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Science and technology are embedded in every aspect of modern life. This executive summary describes how Public Engagement with Science (PES), in the context of informal science education (ISE), can provide opportunities for public awareness of and participation in science and technology. PES is an approach that has developed in the last 10 years…

  19. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  20. Petroleum and geothermal production technology in Russia: Summary of information obtained during informational meetings with several Russian Institutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Teufel, L.W.

    1995-04-01

    Russian scientists and engineers have drilled the deepest holes in the world. It is recognized that this experience has given them an expertise in drilling superdeep holes, as well as other aspects of drilling, completions, and geophysics. More and more US oil and gas companies are vigorously expanding their exploration and development into Russia. It is important for them to identify and use Russian technology in drilling, completion, logging, and reservoir characterization to the extent possible, in order to both reduce drilling costs and help support the Russian economy. While these US companies are interested in becoming involved in and/or sponsoring research in Russia, they have been unsure as to which scientists and institutes are working on problems of interest. It was also important to determine in which areas Russian technology is farther advanced than in the West. Such technology could then be commercialized as part of the Industrial Partnering Program. In order to develop a clear understanding of these issues, two Sandia engineers with drilling and completions expertise and a geophysicist with expertise in reservoir analysis traveled to Russia to meet with Russian scientists and engineers to discuss their technologies and areas of interest. This report contains a summary of the information obtained during the visit.

  1. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  2. Biomass energy systems program summary. Information current as of September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This program summary describes each of the DOE's Biomass Energy System's projects funded or in existence during fiscal year 1979 and reflects their status as of September 30, 1979. The summary provides an overview of the ongoing research, development, and demonstration efforts of the preceding fiscal year as well. (DMC)

  3. Family Caregivers in Cancer (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the challenges faced by family caregivers of cancer patients. This summary focuses on typical caregiver roles and concerns, and helpful interventions for caregivers.

  4. Accuracy of Self-Reported Breast Cancer Information among Women from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Andriana Barisic; Gord Glendon; Nayana Weerasooriya; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining complete medical record information can be challenging and expensive in breast cancer studies. The current literature is limited with respect to the accuracy of self-report and factors that may influence this. We assessed the agreement between self-reported and medical record breast cancer information among women from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Women aged 20–69 years diagnosed with incident breast cancer 1996–1998 were identified from the Ontario Cancer R...

  5. What Can We Learn from Library Instruction Research? A Content Analysis of Evidence Summaries from Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Kloda, Lorie A; Koufogiannakis, Denise; Mallan, Katrine

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Library instruction can and should be informed by research, and current research should inform librarians’ instructional practices. In order to maximize the impact of research, the journal Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP) publishes evidence summaries - synopses and critical appraisals of published research which facilitate knowledge translation in library and information practice. Each evidence summary consists of a structured abstract describing the objectiv...

  6. Evaluating the quality of internet information for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, A Z; Mahmoud, Y; Som, R

    2016-02-01

    The internet is frequently used by patients for researching information regarding breast cancer. This study aims to assess the quality of these websites using validated tools. The term 'breast cancer' was searched for in 3 search engines. The top 20 results were selected, and duplicates and irrelevant websites were excluded. 26/34 websites were analysed using the DISCERN Plus tool, HONcode and the JAMA benchmarks. 46% of the websites were classed as 'excellent' when assessed with the DISCERN tool. The range of DISCERN scores was wide (range: 25-74). Nine websites were found to be HONcode certified. Seven websites complied with all four JAMA benchmarks. This study shows the quality of breast cancer information on the internet is on the whole good; however the range of quality is wide. We recommend healthcare professionals use all 3 tools together to establish which websites are best to advise which websites patients should trust. PMID:26547835

  7. Young Women's Responses to Smoking and Breast Cancer Risk Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L.; McKeown, Stephanie Barclay; Carey, Joanne; Haines, Rebecca; Okoli, Chizimuzo; Johnson, Kenneth C.; Easley, Julie; Ferrence, Roberta; Baillie, Lynne; Ptolemy, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Current evidence confirms that young women who smoke or who have regular long-term exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) have an increased risk of developing premenopausal breast cancer. The aim of this research was to examine the responses of young women to health information about the links between active smoking and SHS exposure and breast cancer…

  8. Economic Burden for Informal Caregivers of Lung and Colorectal Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Ramsey, Scott D; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Atienza, Audie A.; van Ryn, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This study quantified the economic burden for informal caregivers of lung cancer and colorectal cancer patients, by cancer type, phase of disease, stage at diagnosis, patient age, and relationship, and found this burden to be substantial.

  9. Recognition of medication information from discharge summaries using ensembles of classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doan Son

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraction of clinical information such as medications or problems from clinical text is an important task of clinical natural language processing (NLP. Rule-based methods are often used in clinical NLP systems because they are easy to adapt and customize. Recently, supervised machine learning methods have proven to be effective in clinical NLP as well. However, combining different classifiers to further improve the performance of clinical entity recognition systems has not been investigated extensively. Combining classifiers into an ensemble classifier presents both challenges and opportunities to improve performance in such NLP tasks. Methods We investigated ensemble classifiers that used different voting strategies to combine outputs from three individual classifiers: a rule-based system, a support vector machine (SVM based system, and a conditional random field (CRF based system. Three voting methods were proposed and evaluated using the annotated data sets from the 2009 i2b2 NLP challenge: simple majority, local SVM-based voting, and local CRF-based voting. Results Evaluation on 268 manually annotated discharge summaries from the i2b2 challenge showed that the local CRF-based voting method achieved the best F-score of 90.84% (94.11% Precision, 87.81% Recall for 10-fold cross-validation. We then compared our systems with the first-ranked system in the challenge by using the same training and test sets. Our system based on majority voting achieved a better F-score of 89.65% (93.91% Precision, 85.76% Recall than the previously reported F-score of 89.19% (93.78% Precision, 85.03% Recall by the first-ranked system in the challenge. Conclusions Our experimental results using the 2009 i2b2 challenge datasets showed that ensemble classifiers that combine individual classifiers into a voting system could achieve better performance than a single classifier in recognizing medication information from clinical text. It suggests that

  10. Refining Breast Cancer Risk Stratification: Additional Genes, Additional Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Allison W; Antoniou, Antonis C; Domchek, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have enabled far more rapid, less expensive sequencing of multiple genes than was possible only a few years ago. Advances in bioinformatics also facilitate the interpretation of large amounts of genomic data. New strategies for cancer genetic risk assessment include multiplex sequencing panels of 5 to more than 100 genes (in which rare mutations are often associated with at least two times the average risk of developing breast cancer) and panels of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), combinations of which are generally associated with more modest cancer risks (more than twofold). Although these new multiple-gene panel tests are used in oncology practice, questions remain about the clinical validity and the clinical utility of their results. To translate this increasingly complex genetic information for clinical use, cancer risk prediction tools are under development that consider the joint effects of all susceptibility genes, together with other established breast cancer risk factors. Risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols are underway, with ongoing refinement as genetic knowledge grows. Priority areas for future research include the clinical validity and clinical utility of emerging genetic tests; the accuracy of developing cancer risk prediction models; and the long-term outcomes of risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols, in terms of patients' experiences and survival. PMID:27249685

  11. Navigating the cancer information environment: The reciprocal relationship between patient-clinician information engagement and information seeking from nonmedical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan-Johnson, Mihaela; Tan, Andy SL; Hornik, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Prior theory has argued and empirical studies have shown that cancer patients rely on information from their health care providers as well as lay sources to understand and make decisions about their disease. However, research on the dynamic and interdependent nature of cancer patients’ engagement with different information sources is lacking. This study tested the hypotheses that patient-clinician information engagement and information seeking from nonmedical sources influence one another longitudinally among a representative cohort of 1,293 cancer survivors in Pennsylvania. The study hypotheses were supported in a series of lagged multiple regression analyses. Baseline seeking information from nonmedical sources positively predicted subsequent patient-clinician information engagement at one-year follow-up. The reverse relationship was also statistically significant; baseline patient-clinician information engagement positively predicted information seeking from nonmedical sources at follow-up. These findings suggest that cancer survivors move between nonmedical to clinician sources in a dynamic way to learn about their disease. PMID:24359259

  12. PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AR, TEDESCHI

    2008-08-11

    This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

  13. Gastric cancer-related information on the Internet: incomplete, poorly accessible, and overly commercial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2011-02-01

    Patients increasingly use the Internet for gastric cancer information. However, the quality of the information is questionable. We evaluated the accuracy, completeness, accessibility, reliability, and readability of gastric cancer websites.

  14. The interaction between informal cancer caregivers and health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In order to meet the caregiving challenges, informal caregivers often need a substantial level of interaction with health care professionals (HCPs). This study investigated to which extent the cancer caregivers' needs regarding the interaction with HCPs are met and the associations between...... dissatisfaction with the interaction and socio-demographic and disease-related variables. METHODS: In a cross-sectional questionnaire study, cancer patients with various diagnoses and disease stages were invited to pass on the 'cancer caregiving tasks, consequences and needs questionnaire' (CaTCoN) to up to three...... optimal involvement of the caregivers in the patients' disease, treatment and/or care (30 % were dissatisfied), attention to the caregivers' wellbeing (e.g., 51 % of the caregivers reported that HCPs only sometimes or rarely/never had shown interest in how the caregivers had been feeling), and provision...

  15. Fatalistic Cancer Beliefs and Information Sources among Rural and Urban Adults in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befort, Christie A.; Nazir, Niaman; Engelman, Kimberly; Choi, Won

    2013-01-01

    Fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention can be a significant deterrent to one’s likelihood of engaging in cancer prevention behaviors. Lower education and less access to cancer information among rural residents may influence their level of cancer fatalism. The purpose of this study was to examine rural-urban differences in fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention and cancer information sources using data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (n = 1482 rural and 6192 urban residents). Results showed that rural residents were more likely to endorse multiple fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention than urban residents even after controlling for other significant demographic correlates. Urban residents were more likely to use the internet as their primary cancer information source, whereas rural residents were more likely to rely on print material and healthcare providers. Future educational work to communicate relevant and accurate cancer prevention information to rural residents should consider not only information access but also rural culture and fatalistic perspectives. PMID:23813489

  16. Advances in Treating Metastatic Bone Cancer: Summary Statement for the First Cambridge Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Allan; Berenson, James R; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boyce, Brendan F.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Carducci, Michael A; Cleeland, Charles S.; Clohisy, Denis R.; Coleman, Robert E.; Cook, Richard J.; Guise, Theresa A.; Pearse, Roger N.; Powles, Trevor J; Rogers, Michael J; Roodman, G. David

    2006-01-01

    The First Cambridge Conference on Advances in Treating Metastatic Bone Cancer, a symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 28 to 29, 2005, was convened to discuss recent advances and research related to the natural history of bone metastases and skeletal complications, bone cancer biology, treatment of myeloma and other solid tumors, and treatment-induced bone loss. The conference format combined brief presentations with extended periods of discussion. The conclusions reached during...

  17. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  18. Relationship of Internet health information use with patient behavior and self-efficacy: experiences of newly diagnosed cancer patients who contact the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Ruzek, Sheryl Burt; Gordon, Thomas F; Fleisher, Linda; McKeown-Conn, Nancy; Moore, Dirk

    2006-03-01

    This study examines the relationship of Internet health information use with patient behavior and self-efficacy among 498 newly diagnosed cancer patients. Subjects were classified by types of Internet use: direct use (used Internet health information themselves), indirect use (used information accessed by friends or family), and non-use (never accessing Internet information). Subjects were recruited from callers of the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service, Atlantic Region. They were classified by type of Internet use at enrollment and interviewed by telephone after 8 weeks. There were significant relationships among Internet use and key study variables: subject characteristics, patient task behavior, and self-efficacy. Subjects' Internet use changed significantly from enrollment to 8 week follow-up; 19% of nonusers and indirect users moved to a higher level of Internet use. Significant relationships also were found among Internet use and perceived patient-provider relationship, question asking, and treatment compliance. Finally, Internet use was also significantly associated with self-efficacy variables (confidence in actively participating in treatment decisions, asking physicians questions, and sharing feelings of concern). The results of this study show that patients who are newly diagnosed with cancer perceive the Internet as a powerful tool, both for acquiring information and for enhancing confidence to make informed decisions. PMID:16537289

  19. Antecedent Characteristics of Online Cancer Information Seeking Among Rural Breast Cancer Patients: An Application of the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) Model

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Bret R.; DuBenske, Lori L.; Han, Jeong Yeob; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Bush, Nigel; Gustafson, David H.; McTavish, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Little research has examined the antecedent characteristics of patients most likely to seek online cancer information. This study employs the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) model as a framework to understand what psychosocial characteristics precede online cancer-related information seeking among rural breast cancer patients who often have fewer healthcare providers and limited local support services. Examining 144 patients who were provided free computer hardware, In...

  20. Family Caregivers in Cancer: Roles and Challenges (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the challenges faced by family caregivers of cancer patients. This summary focuses on typical caregiver roles and concerns, and helpful interventions for caregivers.

  1. The iSBTc/SITC primer on tumor immunology and biological therapy of cancer: a summary of the 2010 program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urba Walter J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC (formerly the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer, iSBTc, aims to improve cancer patient outcomes by advancing the science, development and application of biological therapy and immunotherapy. The society and its educational programs have become premier destinations for interaction and innovation in the cancer biologics community. For over a decade, the society has offered the Primer on Tumor Immunology and Biological Therapy of Cancer™ in conjunction with its Annual Scientific Meeting. This report summarizes the 2010 Primer that took place October 1, 2010 in Washington, D.C. as part of the educational offerings associated with the society's 25th anniversary. The target audience was basic and clinical investigators from academia, industry and regulatory agencies, and included clinicians, post-doctoral fellows, students, and allied health professionals. Attendees were provided a review of basic immunology and educated on the current status and most recent advances in tumor immunology and clinical/translational caner immunology. Ten prominent investigators presented on the following topics: innate immunity and inflammation; an overview of adaptive immunity; dendritic cells; tumor microenvironment; regulatory immune cells; immune monitoring; cytokines in cancer immunotherapy; immune modulating antibodies; cancer vaccines; and adoptive T cell therapy. Presentation slides, a Primer webinar and additional program information are available online on the society's website.

  2. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  3. Career Information Delivery Systems: A Summary Status Report. NOICC Occasional Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Valorie; Kinnison, Joyce; Morgenthau, Eleanor; Ollis, Harvey

    The National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee/State Occupational Information Coordinating Committees (NOICC/SOICC) Network sponsors numerous occupational information programs and systems, including career information delivery systems (CIDS). CIDS provide useful national, state, and local information for people who are exploring,…

  4. The Source and Credibility of Colorectal Cancer Information on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SoHyun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Park, Gibeom; Suh, Bongwon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Kim, Jin Won; Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the rapid penetration of social media in modern life, there has been limited research conducted on whether social media serves as a credible source of health information. In this study, we propose to identify colorectal cancer information on Twitter and assess its informational credibility. We collected Twitter messages containing colorectal cancer-related keywords, over a 3-month period. A review of sample tweets yielded content and user categorization schemes. The results of the sample analysis were applied to classify all collected tweets and users, using a machine learning technique. The credibility of the information in the sampled tweets was evaluated. A total of 76,119 tweets were analyzed. Individual users authored the majority of tweets (n = 68,982, 90.6%). They mostly tweeted about news articles/research (n = 16,761, 22.0%) and risk/prevention (n = 14,767, 19.4%). Medical professional users generated only 2.0% of total tweets (n = 1509), and medical institutions rarely tweeted (n = 417, 0.6%). Organizations tended to tweet more about information than did individuals (85.2% vs 63.1%; P public health and empowering users, when used with proper caution. PMID:26886625

  5. The Source and Credibility of Colorectal Cancer Information on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SoHyun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Park, Gibeom; Suh, Bongwon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Kim, Jin Won; Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2016-02-01

    Despite the rapid penetration of social media in modern life, there has been limited research conducted on whether social media serves as a credible source of health information. In this study, we propose to identify colorectal cancer information on Twitter and assess its informational credibility.We collected Twitter messages containing colorectal cancer-related keywords, over a 3-month period. A review of sample tweets yielded content and user categorization schemes. The results of the sample analysis were applied to classify all collected tweets and users, using a machine learning technique. The credibility of the information in the sampled tweets was evaluated.A total of 76,119 tweets were analyzed. Individual users authored the majority of tweets (n = 68,982, 90.6%). They mostly tweeted about news articles/research (n = 16,761, 22.0%) and risk/prevention (n = 14,767, 19.4%). Medical professional users generated only 2.0% of total tweets (n = 1509), and medical institutions rarely tweeted (n = 417, 0.6%). Organizations tended to tweet more about information than did individuals (85.2% vs 63.1%; P social support, Twitter may contribute to enhancing public health and empowering users, when used with proper caution. PMID:26886625

  6. Summary of an Informal Workshop on the Causes of Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Temple

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of an OECD workshop on the causes of economic growth, held 6-7 July 2000. The topics covered include the recent growth resurgence in the United States, the potential importance of ICT and the Internet, and the part played by continual reallocation and restructuring. The paper also discusses the growth role of education, institutions, social capital, the financial sector, international trade and foreign direct investment, and indicates how research on these topics...

  7. The Perceived Information in Obtained From the Informed Consent in Iranian Patients With Cancer in Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective: One of the basic issues in clinical studies is to receive the informed consent; that is to say, all the activities applied in patient’s involvement in the information, decision-making, ability and volunteering in diagnosis, cure and care. In as much as most cancer patients require information about their individual needs, the present study is conducted to determine the perceived information from the informed consent of clinical studies in cancer patients. Methods: This is a descrip...

  8. Early detection of cervical cancer with visual inspection methods: a summary of completed and on-going studies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaranarayanan R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available India is a high-risk country for cervical cancer which accounts a quarter (126 000 new cases, 71 000 deaths around 2 000 of the world burden. The age-standardized incidence rates range from 16-55 per 100 000 women in different regions with particularly high rates in rural areas. Control of cervical cancer by early detection and treatment is a priority of the National Cancer Control Programme of India. There are no organized cytology screening programmes in the country. The technical and financial constraints to organize cytology screening have encouraged the evaluation of visual inspection approaches as potential alternatives to cervical cytology in India. Four types of visual detection approaches for cervical neoplasia are investigated in India: a naked eye inspection without acetic acid application, widely known as 'downstaging'; b naked eye inspection after application of 3-5% acetic acid (VIA; c VIA using magnification devices (VIAM; d visual inspection after the application of Lugol's iodine (VILI. Downstaging has been shown to be poorly sensitive and specific to detect cervical neoplasia and is no longer considered as a suitable screening test for cervical cancer. VIA, VIAM and VILI are currently being investigated in multicentre cross-sectional studies (without verification bias, in which cytology and HPV testing are also simultaneously evaluated, and the results of these investigations will be available in 2003. These studies will provide valuable information on the average, comparative test performances in detecting high-grade cervical cancer precursors and cancer. Results from pooled analysis of data from two completed studies indicated an approximate sensitivity of 93.4% and specificity of 85.1% for VIA to detect CIN 2 or worse lesions; the corresponding figures for cytology were 72.1% and 91.6%. The efficacy of VIA in reducing incidence of and mortality from cervical cancer and its cost-effectiveness is currently being investigated

  9. Early detection of cervical cancer with visual inspection methods: a summary of completed and on-going studies in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Nene, B M; Dinshaw, K; Rajkumar, R; Shastri, S; Wesley, R; Basu, P; Sharma, R; Thara, S; Budukh, A; Parkin, D M

    2003-01-01

    India is a high-risk country for cervical cancer which accounts a quarter (126,000 new cases, 71,000 deaths around 2,000) of the world burden. The age-standardized incidence rates range from 16-55 per 100,000 women in different regions with particularly high rates in rural areas. Control of cervical cancer by early detection and treatment is a priority of the National Cancer Control Programme of India. There are no organized cytology screening programmes in the country. The technical and financial constraints to organize cytology screening have encouraged the evaluation of visual inspection approaches as potential alternatives to cervical cytology in India. Four types of visual detection approaches for cervical neoplasia are investigated in India: a) naked eye inspection without acetic acid application, widely known as 'downstaging'; b) naked eye inspection after application of 3-5% acetic acid (VIA); c) VIA using magnification devices (VIAM); d) visual inspection after the application of Lugol's iodine (VILI). Downstaging has been shown to be poorly sensitive and specific to detect cervical neoplasia and is no longer considered as a suitable screening test for cervical cancer. VIA, VIAM and VILI are currently being investigated in multicentre cross-sectional studies (without verification bias), in which cytology and HPV testing are also simultaneously evaluated, and the results of these investigations will be available in 2003. These studies will provide valuable information on the average, comparative test performances in detecting high-grade cervical cancer precursors and cancer. Results from pooled analysis of data from two completed studies indicated an approximate sensitivity of 93.4% and specificity of 85.1% for VIA to detect CIN 2 or worse lesions; the corresponding figures for cytology were 72.1% and 91.6%. The efficacy of VIA in reducing incidence of an mortality from cervical cancer and its cost-effectiveness is currently being investigated in two

  10. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, C.; Lee, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Reactor Program Management; Chopra, O.K.; Ma, D.C.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal.

  13. Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal

  14. New directions in cellular therapy of cancer: a summary of the summit on cellular therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A summit on cellular therapy for cancer discussed and presented advances related to the use of adoptive cellular therapy for melanoma and other cancers. The summit revealed that this field is advancing rapidly. Conventional cellular therapies, such as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, are becoming more effective and more available. Gene therapy is becoming an important tool in adoptive cell therapy. Lymphocytes are being engineered to express high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs, chimeric antibody-T cell receptors (CARs and cytokines. T cell subsets with more naïve and stem cell-like characteristics have been shown in pre-clinical models to be more effective than unselected populations and it is now possible to reprogram T cells and to produce T cells with stem cell characteristics. In the future, combinations of adoptive transfer of T cells and specific vaccination against the cognate antigen can be envisaged to further enhance the effectiveness of these therapies.

  15. Predicting Cancer Information Seeking Behaviors of Smokers, Former Smokers and Nonsmokers Using the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suekyung

    2013-01-01

    Cancer can be one of the most serious diseases that can result in a costly reduction in the quality of life. Among a number of cancer risk factors, tobacco use has been identified as the leading preventable cause of deaths. Prior research has suggested that cancer information seeking may be a pre-step to adopt health protective behaviors that can…

  16. A novel model to combine clinical and pathway-based transcriptomic information for the prognosis prediction of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. With the increasing awareness of heterogeneity in breast cancers, better prediction of breast cancer prognosis is much needed for more personalized treatment and disease management. Towards this goal, we have developed a novel computational model for breast cancer prognosis by combining the Pathway Deregulation Score (PDS based pathifier algorithm, Cox regression and L1-LASSO penalization method. We trained the model on a set of 236 patients with gene expression data and clinical information, and validated the performance on three diversified testing data sets of 606 patients. To evaluate the performance of the model, we conducted survival analysis of the dichotomized groups, and compared the areas under the curve based on the binary classification. The resulting prognosis genomic model is composed of fifteen pathways (e.g., P53 pathway that had previously reported cancer relevance, and it successfully differentiated relapse in the training set (log rank p-value = 6.25e-12 and three testing data sets (log rank p-value < 0.0005. Moreover, the pathway-based genomic models consistently performed better than gene-based models on all four data sets. We also find strong evidence that combining genomic information with clinical information improved the p-values of prognosis prediction by at least three orders of magnitude in comparison to using either genomic or clinical information alone. In summary, we propose a novel prognosis model that harnesses the pathway-based dysregulation as well as valuable clinical information. The selected pathways in our prognosis model are promising targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. 空间信息对抗综述%Summary of Space Information Countermeasure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾辉; 戴强

    2011-01-01

    Space information countermeasure is a new field of information countermeasure.This paper firstly expatiates the conception of space information countermeasure,then expounds the theory system and technology development of space information counermeasure from three aspects:space information acquirement,space information attack and space information defense,and forecasts the development trend of space information countermeasure,which will be helpful to the development of our military space information countermeasure.%空间信息对抗是信息对抗的一个新的领域。首先阐述了空间信息对抗的概念,然后着重从空间信息获取、空间信息攻击和空间信息防御三个方面对空间信息对抗的理论体系和技术发展进行了综述,并展望了空间信息对抗的发展趋势,以期对我军空间信息对抗的发展有所裨益。

  18. Approaches to cancer assessment in EPA's Integrated Risk Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program develops assessments of health effects that may result from chronic exposure to chemicals in the environment. The IRIS database contains more than 540 assessments. When supported by available data, IRIS assessments provide quantitative analyses of carcinogenic effects. Since publication of EPA's 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, IRIS cancer assessments have implemented new approaches recommended in these guidelines and expanded the use of complex scientific methods to perform quantitative dose-response assessments. Two case studies of the application of the mode of action framework from the 2005 Cancer Guidelines are presented in this paper. The first is a case study of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, as an example of a chemical with a mutagenic mode of carcinogenic action thus warranting the application of age-dependent adjustment factors for early-life exposure; the second is a case study of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, as an example of a chemical with a carcinogenic action consistent with a nonlinear extrapolation approach. The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to quantify interindividual variability and account for human parameter uncertainty as part of a quantitative cancer assessment is illustrated using a case study involving probabilistic PBPK modeling for dichloromethane. We also discuss statistical issues in assessing trends and model fit for tumor dose-response data, analysis of the combined risk from multiple types of tumors, and application of life-table methods for using human data to derive cancer risk estimates. These issues reflect the complexity and challenges faced in assessing the carcinogenic risks from exposure to environmental chemicals, and provide a view of the current trends in IRIS carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  19. Tobacco and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  20. IRSENDF-6. Information Retrieval System for ENDF-6 format libraries. Summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRSENDF-6 is a PC code that will process any library in the ENDF-6 format and display information such as: Mat, NE, MT and the corresponding number of records for this information. This library is available on diskette, free of charge, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  1. Cancer-Related Post-traumatic Stress (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about post-traumatic stress and related symptoms in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and their family members. Assessment and treatment of these symptoms are discussed.

  2. Cancer-Related Post-traumatic Stress (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about post-traumatic stress and related symptoms in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and their family members. Assessment and treatment of these symptoms are discussed.

  3. Summary of the Enterprise Information System (EIS) Value Assurance Framework 

(VAF)

    OpenAIRE

    Gunderson, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Chris Gunderson is a Research Associate at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is the principal investigator of the Open Enterprise Information System (OEIS) research initiative. This project sponsored by the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence and executed in the Northern Virginia. The project objective is to help the government improve its flawed information technology acquisition process through four key activities: Establish a collaborative network of government, industry, and acade...

  4. Radioactive waste management information, 1982 summary and record-to-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes radioactive waste data records for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) compiled since 1952. Kinds of information include volume, radioactivity, isotopic identity, origin, and decay status. The radioactive waste data presented was obtained from the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Information System (RWMIS). This report is updated annually to incorporate waste management data for the current year and reflects changes in previous annual reports. Changes are made to more accurately reflect the current status of waste operations at the INEL

  5. Shaping medicinal product information: a before and after study exploring physicians’ perspectives on the summary of product characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromans, Lisette; Doyle, Gerardine; Petak-Opel, Silvia; Rödiger, Alexander; Röttgermann, Martina; Schlüssel, Elke; Stetter, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish, in the context of the revised European Pharmacovigilance Directive and based on physicians’ perspectives, how Summaries of Product Characteristics (SmPCs) could be more user friendly and better support physicians’ interactions with patients, thereby improving patients’ own understanding of their medicines. Design Qualitative focus group discussions (step 1), development of an alternative SmPC (step 2) and an online quantitative survey (step 3) comparing the alternative SmPC to the currently approved version. Setting Office-based physicians (n=218) from all federal states of Germany. Participants 218 German physicians participated, with an equal representation of office-based general practitioners and specialists. For step 1 (n=18), physicians were recruited who frequently consulted SmPCs. Outcome measures Planned and performed: Mayring's qualitative content analysis of focus group discussions (step 1), rating on a five-point Likert scale of preference of current versus alternative SmPCs (step 3). Results Physicians confirmed the importance of SmPCs as a comprehensive source of medicinal product information, but were moderately satisfied with the current SmPCs, utilised it infrequently and were more likely to engage additional sources of information. The alternative SmPC was consistently preferred. It differed in the way information for particular patient groups was presented, included additional sections (synopsis, checklist for patient information) and used a tabular format. Physicians indicated that SmPCs should be available with search and hyperlink functions, as well as be automatically updated and integrated in available practice software or similar solutions. Conclusions This research contributes to the development of an official, reliable medicinal product information system meeting the needs of a modern information society while providing the reliability of an officially authorised source. In the context of health literacy, Sm

  6. RIBA Project - Risk-Informed approach for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. Project summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for a European review of a Risk-Informed Approach for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components (RIBA) was identified in 1998. This was as a priority item in the programme of activities conducted in the framework of the Council Resolutions of 22 July 1975 and of 18 June 1992 on the Technological Problems of Nuclear Safety. The RIBA Project was established in November 1999 as a 24-month Study Contract funded by the European Commission within the frame of the former DG XI WGCS (Working Group on Codes and Standards). The Study Contract was subsequently managed for the EC by DG TREN. The participants in RIBA were Serco Assurance (project coordinator), Ringhals AB, EDF, Tecnatom SA and Westinghouse Electric Europe. The work is presented in a summary report with the detailed results contained in three companion reports as follows: main conclusions and recommendations, Review of Existing Risk-Informed Methodologies, A Comparative Study of Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection Applications, Conclusions and Recommendations for Risk-Informed in-service inspection methodology applied to Nuclear Power Plants in Europe. (author)

  7. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E; Rowland, Julia H; Northouse, Laurel; Litzelman, Kristin; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Timura, Catherine; O'Mara, Ann; Huss, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Informal/family caregivers are a fundamental source of care for cancer patients in the United States, yet the population of caregivers and their tasks, psychosocial needs, and health outcomes are not well understood. Changes in the nature of cancer care and its delivery, along with the growing population of survivors and their caregivers, warrant increased attention to the roles and demands of caregiving. This article reviews current evidence presented at a 2-day meeting examining the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving that was convened by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Nursing Research. The meeting sought to define who is an informal cancer caregiver, summarize the state of the science in informal cancer caregiving, and describe both the kinds of interventions developed to address caregiving challenges and the various outcomes used to evaluate their impact. This article offers recommendations for moving science forward in 4 areas: 1) improving the estimation of the prevalence and burden of informal cancer caregiving; 2) advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; 3) generating and testing strategies for integrating caregivers into formal health care settings; and 4) promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers. Cancer 2016;122:1987-95. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26991807

  8. Smartphone apps as a source of cancer information: changing trends in health information-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Hasan, Sayeedul; Dubey, Divyanshu; Sarangi, Sasmit

    2013-03-01

    There is an increased interest in smartphone applications as a tool for delivery of health-care information. There have been no studies which evaluated the availability and content of cancer-related smartphone applications. This study aims to identify and analyze cancer-related applications available on the Apple iTunes platform. The Apple iTunes store was searched for cancer-related smartphone applications on July 29, 2011. The content of the applications was analyzed for cost, type of information, validity, and involvement of health-care agencies. A total of 77 relevant applications were identified. There were 24.6 % apps uploaded by health-care agencies, and 36 % of the apps were aimed at health-care workers. Among the apps, 55.8 % provided scientifically validated data. The difference in scientific validity between the apps aimed at general population versus health-care professionals was statistically significant (P smartphone applications and encourage participation by health-care agencies to ensure patient safety. PMID:23275239

  9. Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Brett C.; Coughlin, Jennifer L.; Mathew, Paul A.

    2009-09-08

    This document presents the results of a review of publicly available information on energy use in health care facilities. The information contained in this document and in the sources cited herein provides the background and context for efforts to reduce energy use and costs in health care. Recognizing the breadth and diversity of relevant information, the author acknowledges that the report is likely not comprehensive. It is intended only to present a broad picture of what is currently known about health care energy use. This review was conducted as part of a 'High Performance Health Care Buildings' research study funded by the California Energy Commission. The study was motivated by the recognition that health care facilities collectively account for a substantial fraction of total commercial building energy use, due in large part to the very high energy intensity of hospitals and other inpatient care facilities. The goal of the study was to develop a roadmap of research, development and deployment (RD&D) needs for the health care industry. In addition to this information review, the road map development process included interviews with industry experts and a full-day workshop at LBNL in March 2009. This report is described as 'Version 1' with the intent that it will be expanded and updated as part of an ongoing LBNL program in healthcare energy efficiency. The document is being released in this form with the hope that it can assist others in finding and accessing the resources described within.

  10. Information summary, Area of Concern: Buffalo River, New York. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Simmers, J.W.; Tatem, H.E.; Skogerbee, J.G.

    1991-03-01

    The Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) is carrying out a 5-year study and demonstration project, Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS), with emphasis on removal of toxic pollutants from bottom sediments. Information from the ARCS program is to be used to guide development of Remedial Action Plans for 42 identified Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs). The AOCs are areas where serious impairment of beneficial uses of water or biota (drinking, swimming, fishing, navigation, etc.) is known to exist, or where environmental quality criteria are exceeded to the point that such impairment is likely. Priority consideration was given to five AOCs, including Buffalo River, N.Y. The WES Environmental Lab. reviewed existing data and information for each of these five AOCs. The approach used was to bring together WES scientists who have been conducting research on aspects of contaminant mobility in the aquatic environment to develop a list of information required to evaluate the potential for contaminant mobility. This report summarizes the information obtained for the Buffalo River. Topics include: Fish tissue concentrations, Groundwater, Land use, Metal contamination, Pesticides, Point and nonpoint source discharges, Risk assessment, Spills, Toxicity bioassay, and Water quality.

  11. Information summary, Area of Concern: Saginaw River and Saginaw Bay. Final report, Aug-Dec 88

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, D.L.; Lee, C.R.; Simmers, J.W.; Tatem, H.E.; Skogerboe, J.G.

    1991-03-01

    A 5-year study and demonstration project, Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) was authorized, with emphasis on the removal of toxic pollutants from bottom sediments. Information from the ARCS program is to be used to guide the development of Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) for 42 identified great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC) as well as Lake-wide Management Plans. The AOCs are areas where serious impairment of beneficial uses of water or biota (drinking, swimming, fishing, navigation, etc.) is known to exist, or where environmental quality criteria are exceeded to the point that such impairment is likely. Research was conducted on the various aspects of contaminant mobility in the aquatic environment. A list of information was developed to evaluate the potential for contaminant mobility. This report summarizes the information obtained for the Saginaw River and Saginaw Bay AOC in Michigan. Data tables include information on discharge, volume and migration of contaminants, sediment transport, oil spills, hazardous materials, superfund sites, bioassay data and biological data (i.e. fish, wildlife habitats, plankton, fish and endangered species).

  12. Transferring Evidence into Practice: What Evidence Summaries of Library and Information Studies Research Tell Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloda, Lorie A.; Koufogiannakis, Denise; Mallan, Katrine

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Critical appraisal is a crucial aspect of evidence-based practice. In order to determine whether research is valid, reliable and applicable, the evidence-based practice process advocates that published research be critically appraised. Between 2006 and 2008, the journal Evidence Based Library and Information Practice published 101…

  13. Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). Data summary, calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solid radioactive waste (generated, buried, and stored) information throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) are maintained on the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) data base. DOE Order 5820, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' requires that DOE maintain information on radioactive solid waste. The SWIMS data base contains data on the solid transuranic (TRU) and solid low-level waste (LLW) generated, buried, or stored at DOE sites. The generation data covers the period from the FY 1976 transition quarter through CY 1985. The burial and storage data include the period from site initiation through CY 1985. This document contains reports based on CY 1985 data and CY 1986 forecasts from SWIMS and summarized at the DOE level. Detailed reports of the data summarized at DOE operations office level are also included in the appendices. To aid in separating TRU data from LLW data, information in each report is detailed by nuclide category. The eight nuclide categories are contact handled (TRU), uranium/thorium (LLW, fission product (LLW, induced activity (LLW), tritium (LLW), remote handled (TRU), alpha (LLW), and other

  14. How do people interpret information about colorectal cancer screening: observations from a think-aloud study

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S. G.; Vart, G.; Wolf, M. S.; Obichere, A; Baker, H. J.; Raine, R; Wardle, J.; Von Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    The English NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme biennially invites individuals aged 60-74 to participate in screening. The booklet, 'Bowel Cancer Screening: The Facts' accompanies this invitation. Its primary aim is to inform potential participants about the aims, advantages and disadvantages of colorectal cancer screening.

  15. 09351 Executive Summary -- Information processing, rational belief change and social interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanno, Giacomo; Delgrande, James; Rott, Hans

    2009-01-01

    From August 23, 2009 to August 27, 2009, the Dagstuhl Seminar 09351 "Information processing, rational belief change and social interaction" was held at the International Conference and Research Center (IBFI), Schloss Dagstuhl. During the seminar, several participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. Abstracts of the presentations given during the seminar as well as abstracts of seminar results and ideas are put togethe...

  16. Recognition of medication information from discharge summaries using ensembles of classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Doan Son; Collier Nigel; Xu Hua; Duy Pham; Phuong Tu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Extraction of clinical information such as medications or problems from clinical text is an important task of clinical natural language processing (NLP). Rule-based methods are often used in clinical NLP systems because they are easy to adapt and customize. Recently, supervised machine learning methods have proven to be effective in clinical NLP as well. However, combining different classifiers to further improve the performance of clinical entity recognition systems has n...

  17. A cascade of classifiers for extracting medication information from discharge summaries

    OpenAIRE

    Halgrim Scott; Xia Fei; Solti Imre; Cadag Eithon; Uzuner Özlem

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Extracting medication information from clinical records has many potential applications, and recently published research, systems, and competitions reflect an interest therein. Much of the early extraction work involved rules and lexicons, but more recently machine learning has been applied to the task. Methods We present a hybrid system consisting of two parts. The first part, field detection, uses a cascade of statistical classifiers to identify medication-related named ...

  18. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  19. [Epidemiological cancer data online: an overview of information service in Germany and Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K

    2014-01-01

    Finding reliable data about cancer epidemiology on the World Wide Web is not an easy task. Information is often scattered, and sources are not always clear. This article gives a short overview of the most important websites that provide reliable data for Germany and Europe. Four internet sites are presented: The German Centre for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD), the Association of Population-Based Cancer Registries in Germany (GEKID), and two different websites created by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In combination, they provide comprehensive information about the distribution of cancer in Germany and Europe. PMID:24357168

  20. Compilation of Habitat-Based Catchment Information and Historical Eel Data in Support of Eel Management Plans ‘EEL-PLAN’ – Final Summary Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ltd, Compass Informatics; Ireland, Inland Fisheries; National University of Ireland, Galway

    2011-01-01

    The overall aim of the project was to establish an information management framework for the development of River Basin Eel Management Plans (EMP). This involved the collation of base information to assist the publication of the initial National Plan (DCENR 2008) and, importantly, the establishment of a GIS and database system for continued information collation, analysis, management and planning. This report is the summary report of this project.

  1. Summary of JRC activities related to European-wide exchange of radiological information during nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The large transboundary effects of the radioactive release during the Chernobyl accident evidenced the need for international provisions for data and Information exchange. The JRC, in its EC support activity to DG TREN H.4, called REM (Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring), has more than 10 years experience in developing systems to make early notification and reliable radiological information exchange available to the EU member states in case of nuclear accidents. The aim and status of these systems are described: 1.)ECURIE: The legal basis for the EC systems is the Council Decision 87/600 of 14 December 1987. It resulted in the ECURIE network which allows the EU Member States and Switzerland to notify an accident and to subsequently exchange the radiological information as required by this Council decision. The underlying information exchange code (C.1. structure) does not only provide radiological measurements, but also predicted values, site meteorological data and decisions taken. Software was developed to facilitate coding and decoding of the messages. Initially the messages were transmitted by telex. The latest software (CoDecS, in use since the beginning of 2001) uses ISDN and Internet for the Information exchange. lt runs an the Windows NT and 2000 platforms. Regular exercises test the communication system and the software. In view of improving the efficiency of data and Information transfer for their common Member States, the IAEA and the EC are harmonizing ECURIE and the ENATOM early notification system. A first result has been the definition of an enhanced CIS format. Modifications will be made to the CoDecs software and to the IAEA - ENAC website so that information can be exchanged between the two systems in an automated manner. The EC wishes to extend the ECURIE network to the EU candidate countries. The official agreements are in an advanced state and participation of many candidate countries is foreseen by the end of 2003. It is

  2. Annual summary of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System 1994 data base contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental measurements and geographic data bases of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) contain data of known quality that can be accessed by OREIS users. The data within OREIS include environmental measurements data from the following environmental media: groundwater, surface water, sediment, soils, air, and biota. The types of environmental data within OREIS include but are not limited to chemical, biological, ecological, radiological, geophysical, and lithological data. Coordinate data within the environmental measurements data base provide the spatial context of the measurements data and are used to link the measurements data to the geographic data base. Descriptive and qualifier metadata are also part of the data bases. As of 30 September 1994, the OREIS environmental measurements data base consisted of approximately 380,000 rows associated with data generated by environmental restoration projects. The data base also contained 3,400 supporting codes and other reference data rows. Geographic data included the S-16A base map for the Oak Ridge Reservation, boundaries for operable units and ORNL waste area groupings, boundaries of groundwater coordination areas, contours generated as a result of the gamma radiation survey, representations of the environmentally sensitive areas, information received as part of the remedial investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek, high resolution background raster images for the three ORR installations, and locations of wells and other point features generated from ORACLE tables

  3. General Information about Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common treatment for all stages of lip and oral cavity cancer. Surgery may include the following: Wide local excision : Removal ... cancer may have spread from the lip and oral cavity. Plastic surgery : An operation that restores or improves the appearance ...

  4. "What about diet?" A qualitative study of cancer survivors' views on diet and cancer and their sources of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeken, R J; Williams, K; Wardle, J; Croker, H

    2016-09-01

    Given the abundance of misreporting about diet and cancer in the media and online, cancer survivors are at risk of misinformation. The aim of this study was to explore cancer survivors' beliefs about diet quality and cancer, the impact on their behaviour and sources of information. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with adult cancer survivors in the United Kingdom who had been diagnosed with any cancer in adulthood and were not currently receiving treatment (n = 19). Interviews were analysed using Thematic Analysis. Emergent themes highlighted that participants were aware of diet affecting risk for the development of cancer, but were less clear about its role in recurrence. Nonetheless, their cancer diagnosis appeared to be a prompt for dietary change; predominantly to promote general health. Changes were generally consistent with healthy eating recommendations, although dietary supplements and other non-evidence-based actions were mentioned. Participants reported that they had not generally received professional advice about diet and were keen to know more, but were often unsure about information from other sources. The views of our participants suggest cancer survivors would welcome guidance from health professionals. Advice that provides clear recommendations, and which emphasises the benefits of healthy eating for overall well-being, may be particularly well-received. PMID:27349812

  5. Information summary, Area of Concern: Grand Calumet River, Indiana. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmers, J.W.; Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Tatem, H.E.; Skogerboe, J.G.

    1991-03-01

    A 5-year study and demonstration project, Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediment (ARCS), emphasizes the removal of toxic pollutants from bottom sediments. Information from the ARCS program is to be used to guide the development of Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) for 42 identified Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs) as well as resource management plans. The AOCs are areas where serious impairment of beneficial uses of water or biota (drinking, swimming, fishing, navigation, etc) is known to exist, or where environmental quality criteria are exceeded to the point that such impairment is likely. Among the hazardous materials detected from sampling of sediments are heavy metals, pesticides, various chemicals and industrial wastes. Industrial land use, runoff from watersheds, landfills, waste disposal practices and ground water flow contributed to pollutants found in bottom sediments of rivers and waterways channels.

  6. Information report on state legislation. 1984 Annual summary. Volume 10, Number 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to situations beyond our control, and a need to re-direct our budget resources, this will be the last issue of The Information Report on State Legislation, NUREG/BR-0025. There have been several noteworthy events which have occurred since our last issue in July 1984. In the low-level waste area, the Midwest Compact was introduced in both Houses of Congress (S. 3091, H.R. 6937), for a total of five compacts to be considered for consent in the next congressional session (Northwest, Central, Rocky Mountain, Midwest and Southeast). All five must be re-introduced in the 99th Congress. Representative Morris Udall (D-AZ) has proposed a series of amendments to the compact bills and to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act which address the problems of states without sites after the 1986 deadline. The amendments also concern issues such as volume reduction, the definition of low-level waste, and import/export of waste outside regional boundaries. The staff of the Senate Judiciary Committee also proposed certain conditions to Congressional consent for the compacts. The conditions included use of NRC-proposed consent language, the low-level waste definition and NRC report requirements. The Office of State Programs (OSP) held a workshop in May 1984 on shallow land burial and alternative low-level waste technologies. The Western Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact failed in the closing two days of the California Legislature, although it was enacted by Arizona, the only other eligible state. A working group on HLW siting, sponsored by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), convened December 4-6, 1984, in Las Vegas, Nevada, to inform key legislators and their staffs from the 23 states where DOE is conducting geologic studies for siting two HLW repositories about DOE's progress in implementing the Nuclear Waste Policy Act

  7. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  8. 78 FR 42954 - Scientific Information Request on Imaging Tests for the Staging of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... document due to errors found on our first publication of June 27, 2013 ( http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Scientific Information Request on Imaging...), HHS. ACTION: Request for scientific information submissions. SUMMARY: The Agency for...

  9. Individual breathlessness trajectories do not match summary trajectories in advanced cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results from a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausewein, Claudia; Booth, Sara; Gysels, Marjolein; Kühnbach, Robert; Haberland, Birgit; Higginson, Irene J

    2010-12-01

    Breathlessness is a distressing symptom in advanced disease. Little is known about the trajectories of this symptom over time and towards death. This study aimed to describe and compare the summary and individual trajectories of breathlessness and overall symptom burden over time and towards the end of life following patients with advanced cancer or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in inpatient and outpatient health care settings in Germany. The modified Borg Scale, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form and Palliative Outcome Scale were used as outcome measures. Data were collected at baseline and then monthly over six months or until death. Forty-nine cancer and 60 COPD patients were included. Both groups had similar demographics. Thirty out of the 49 cancer and 6/60 COPD patients died, 7/49 cancer and 20/60 COPD patients dropped out due to physical deterioration or questionnaire fatigue. In cancer patients, breathlessness increased towards death. In COPD patients, breathlessness increased over time. Twenty-one cancer and 43 COPD patients provided data for individual breathlessness trajectories. These revealed wide individual variations with four different patterns: fluctuation, increasing, stable and decreasing breathlessness. Symptom trajectories on the population level reflecting the whole group mask individual variation, which is reflected in distinct symptom trajectories with different patterns. PMID:20847087

  10. Cancer Information Seeking Behaviors of Korean American Women: A Mixed-Methods Study Using Surveys and Focus Group Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, KM; Jun, J; Zhao, X.; Kreps, GL; Lee, EE

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 2015. Despite the high risk of cancer to the population, Korean Americans are known to have lower knowledge about cancer related information and a lower level of adherence to cancer prevention guidelines. This indicates the necessity of cancer interventions targeting the Korean American population. To reach this population effectively, it is imperative to understand Korean Americans cancer information seeking behaviors. This study (a) identified cancer ...

  11. Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Kim, Jane J; Halm, Ethan A; Ballard, Rachel M; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Multiple advisory groups now recommend that high-risk smokers be screened for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given that the development of lung cancer screening programs will face many of the same issues that have challenged other cancer screening programs, the National Cancer Institute-funded Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium was used to identify lessons learned from the implementation of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening that should inform the introduction of lung cancer screening. These lessons include the importance of developing systems for identifying and recruiting eligible individuals in primary care, ensuring that screening centers are qualified and performance is monitored, creating clear communication standards for reporting screening results to referring physicians and patients, ensuring follow-up is available for individuals with abnormal test results, avoiding overscreening, remembering primary prevention, and leveraging advances in cancer genetics and immunology. Overall, this experience emphasizes that effective cancer screening is a multistep activity that requires robust strategies to initiate, report, follow up, and track each step as well as a dynamic and ongoing oversight process to revise current screening practices as new evidence regarding screening is created, new screening technologies are developed, new biological markers are identified, and new approaches to health care delivery are disseminated. Cancer 2016;122:1338-1342. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26929386

  12. Summary of global warming uncertainties and the value of information: An analysis using CETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigate the sensitivity of optimal carbon control strategies to parameters of the Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment (CETA) Model, and they use CETA in a simple decision tree framework to estimate the value of information about global warming uncertainties. They find that if an optimal control policy is used under uncertainty, the eventual resolution of uncertainty has high value relative to current research budgets, and resolving uncertainty about the costs of warming is nearly as important as resolving uncertainty about the extent of warming. In addition, the authors find that there is not a high premium on immediate resolution of uncertainty, if resolution would otherwise occur within, say, twenty years; this implies that time is available to plan and execute a carefully designed research program. On the other hand, they find that if the real-world political process would result in a suboptimal control policy being chosen under uncertainty, and this choice could be prevented by early resolution of uncertainty, the benefit of early resolution may be as much as three orders of magnitude greater

  13. Annual summary of the contents of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) 1993 data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data base of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) contains data of known quality that can be accessed by OREIS users. OREIS meets data management/access requirements for environmental data as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation and the State Oversight Agreement between the State of Tennessee and the Department of Energy. The types of environmental data within OREIS include measurement data from the following environmental disciplines: groundwater, surface water, sediment, soils, air, and biota. In addition to measurement data, the OREIS data base contains extensive descriptive and qualifier metadata to help define data quality and to enable end users to analyze the appropriateness of data for their purposes. Another important aspect of measurement data is their spatial context; OREIS maintains a comprehensive library of geographic data and tools to analyze and display spatial relationships of the data. As of November 1993, the OREIS data base consists of approximately 100,000 records associated with three environmental restoration projects along with coordinate data and background map data. The data base also contains 2,700 supporting codes and other reference data records. Geographic data include the S-16A base map for the Oak Ridge Reservation, boundaries for operable units, and high-resolution raster images for each of the sites

  14. Annual summary of the contents of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) 1993 data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, R.A.; Herr, D.D.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Monroe, F.E.; Olson, R.J.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.

    1994-06-01

    The data base of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) contains data of known quality that can be accessed by OREIS users. OREIS meets data management/access requirements for environmental data as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation and the State Oversight Agreement between the State of Tennessee and the Department of Energy. The types of environmental data within OREIS include measurement data from the following environmental disciplines: groundwater, surface water, sediment, soils, air, and biota. In addition to measurement data, the OREIS data base contains extensive descriptive and qualifier metadata to help define data quality and to enable end users to analyze the appropriateness of data for their purposes. Another important aspect of measurement data is their spatial context; OREIS maintains a comprehensive library of geographic data and tools to analyze and display spatial relationships of the data. As of November 1993, the OREIS data base consists of approximately 100,000 records associated with three environmental restoration projects along with coordinate data and background map data. The data base also contains 2,700 supporting codes and other reference data records. Geographic data include the S-16A base map for the Oak Ridge Reservation, boundaries for operable units, and high-resolution raster images for each of the sites.

  15. Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

  16. Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues

  17. Cancer recurrence worry, risk perception, and informational-coping styles among Appalachian cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Shedlosky-Shoemaker, Randi; Porter, Kyle; Desimone, Philip; Andrykowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the psychosocial impact of the threat of cancer recurrence, underserved populations, such as those from the Appalachian region, have been understudied. To examine worry and perceived risk in cancer survivors, Appalachian and non-Appalachian cancer patients at an ambulatory oncology clinic in a university hospital were surveyed. Appalachians had significantly higher worry than non-Appalachians. Cancer type and lower need for cognition were associated with greater worry. Those with missing perceived risk data were generally older, less educated, and lower in monitoring, blunting, and health literacy. Additional resources are needed to assist Appalachians and those with cancers with poor prognoses (e.g., liver cancer, pancreatic cancer) to cope with worry associated with developing cancer again. More attention for cancer prevention is critical to improve quality of life in underserved populations where risk of cancer is greater. PMID:21240722

  18. An exploratory study on the information needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos P. Kassianos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the information needs of men with prostate cancer and their partners retrospectively at various points in the treatment process. An online questionnaire was used to collect information from men with prostate cancer and their partners about information needs, and when these developed. Readers of a Prostate Care Cookbook and members of a Prostate Cancer Charity were invited to participate: 73 men with prostate cancer and 25 partners completed the questionnaire. Responses showed that participants develop their information needs close to diagnosis. Less educated men with prostate cancer and partners developed their needs closer to the time after diagnosis than those with higher education. Partners develop an interest on information related to treatment and interaction earlier than patients. Patients prioritised treatment and disease-specific information. Patients and partners differ in how their information needs develop. Medical information is prioritized by patients as opposed to practical information by partners. Health care provision can be tailored to meet the different needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners at different times in the treatment process

  19. An Exploratory Study on the Information Needs of Prostate Cancer Patients and Their Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassianos, Angelos P; Raats, Monique M; Gage, Heather

    2016-06-23

    The aim of this study is to explore the information needs of men with prostate cancer and their partners retrospectively at various points in the treatment process. An online questionnaire was used to collect information from men with prostate cancer and their partners about information needs, and when these developed. Readers of a Prostate Care Cookbook and members of a Prostate Cancer Charity were invited to participate: 73 men with prostate cancer and 25 partners completed the questionnaire. Responses showed that participants develop their information needs close to diagnosis. Less educated men with prostate cancer and partners developed their needs closer to the time after diagnosis than those with higher education. Partners develop an interest on information related to treatment and interaction earlier than patients. Patients prioritised treatment and disease-specific information. Patients and partners differ in how their information needs develop. Medical information is prioritized by patients as opposed to practical information by partners. Health care provision can be tailored to meet the different needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners at different times in the treatment process. PMID:27403460

  20. Assessment of cultural sensitivity of cancer information in ethnic print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniela B; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2006-06-01

    Ethnic minority populations prefer cancer information that is respectful of their customs and beliefs about health and illness. Community newspapers are an important source of cancer information for ethnic groups. Our purpose is to evaluate the cultural sensitivity of cancer information in mass print media targeting ethnic minority readership. We assessed for cultural sensitivity 27 cancer articles published in English-language ethnic newspapers (Jewish, First Nations, Black/Caribbean, East Indian) in 2000 using the Cultural Sensitivity Assessment Tool (CSAT). We found that the overall average CSAT score of 27 cancer articles was 2.71. (Scorespapers. Cancer articles from East Indian newspapers had a mean CSAT score of 2.30 and were classified as culturally insensitive. Four articles were considered culturally sensitive but did not mention ethnic populations as intended readers or as high-risk groups for cancer. We found that, using the CSAT measure, overall, cancer articles in ethnic newspapers included in this study were culturally sensitive. Given limitations of this instrument, we recommend an additional checklist for evaluating the cultural sensitivity of printed cancer information. PMID:16720539

  1. Internet Access and Online Cancer Information Seeking Among Latino Immigrants From Safety Net Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SELSKY, CLAIRE; LUTA, GEORGE; NOONE, ANNE-MICHELLE; HUERTA, ELMER E.; MANDELBLATT, JEANNE S.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use is widespread, but little is known about Internet use for cancer information among Latinos, especially those who rely on safety net clinics. The authors investigated access to and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among low income, immigrant Latinos predominately from Central and South America. A cross-sectional study of 1,273 Latinos 21 years and older attending safety net clinics or health fairs was conducted from June 2007 to November 2008. The authors used logistic regression models to evaluate associations of age, acculturation, psychosocial factors and other covariates with Internet access and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among those with access. Of the sample, 44% reported Internet access. Higher information self-efficacy and greater trust in the Internet were independently associated with Internet access (p= .05 and p < .001, respectively). Among those with access, 53.8% reported they intended to seek cancer help online if they needed information. Those with younger age and higher acculturation, education and self-efficacy had higher odds of intended Internet use for cancer information, considering covariates. In addition, those with high (vs. low) perceived risk of cancer (OR = 1.76; 95% CI [1.14, 2.73]; p = .01) and higher levels of trust in online health information (OR = 1.47 per one-point increase; 95% [CI 1.19, 1.82]; p = .0004) were more likely to intend to seek cancer information online. These findings that Internet access is fairly high in the immigrant Latino population and that the Internet is a trusted source of cancer information suggest that the Internet may be a channel for cancer control interventions. PMID:23066874

  2. Breast cancer information on the internet: analysis of accessibility and accuracy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, E M

    2012-02-18

    Studies show internet sourced information often has poor accuracy. However, it is rapidly becoming a major source of patient information. Our aim was to assess accuracy of breast cancer-related information on the internet. The top five breast cancer-related search terms were identified using the commercial program "Wordtracker". These terms were searched using the search-engine "Google" and the top 100 webpages per topic analysed for applicability and accuracy of information. Overall 500 webpages were analysed. 42% were inapplicable to the question asked. Applicable accuracy rates were variable amongst the five terms: "breast cancer symptoms" 84%, "breast cancer care" 87%, "breast cancer stage" 88%, "breast cancer survival" 91% and "breast cancer signs" 78%. Educational websites were more likely to be accurate(p < 0.001) and interest group administered websites less likely to be accurate(p = 0.018) than other websites. Finding accurate breast cancer information on the internet is difficult due to large numbers of inapplicable unregulated websites preferentially returned via search engines.

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSA tests. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 10 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advanced melanoma. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 12 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain people. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 11 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  6. Cancer pain management: Basic information for the young pain physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk-benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain.

  7. The use of videotaped information in cancer genetic counselling: a randomized evaluation study.

    OpenAIRE

    Cull, A; Miller, H.; Porterfield, T.; Mackay, J.; Anderson, E D; Steel, C. M.; Elton, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    A video of introductory information about inherited susceptibility to breast cancer was made in consultation with clinicians in four Scottish cancer family clinics. One hundred and twenty-eight women, newly referred for breast cancer risk counselling were randomized to receive the video before (n = 66) or after (n = 62) counselling. Data were collected before randomization at clinic and by postal follow-up at 1 month. The Video Before group had shorter consultations with the breast surgeon (m...

  8. Bridging the Critical Chasm Between Service and Research: The Cancer Information Service’s Collaboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Squiers, Linda; Bush, Nigel; Vanderpool, Robin; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Fabrizio, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    As a collaboratory for cancer communication and education research, the National Cancer Institute’s (NCIs) Cancer Information Service (CIS) is in an ideal position to bridge the critical chasm that exists between service and research. This article describes the CIS’ current research program as well as the CIS Research Agenda launched in 2005. The CIS’ progress in developing and supporting recently funded studies that address this agenda is detailed. The unique resources and opportunities avai...

  9. Age Differences in Dual Information-Processing Modes: Implications for Cancer Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Ellen; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Hess, Thomas M.; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Age differences in affective/experiential and deliberative processes have important theoretical implications for cancer decision making as cancer is often a disease of older adulthood. We examine evidence for adult age differences in affective and deliberative information processes, review the sparse evidence about age differences in decision making and introduce how dual process theories and their findings might be applied to cancer decision making. Age-related declines in the efficiency of ...

  10. Cancer Carepartners: Improving patients' symptom management by engaging informal caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Maria J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have found that cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy can effectively manage their own symptoms when given tailored advice. This approach, however, may challenge patients with poor performance status and/or emotional distress. Our goal is to test an automated intervention that engages a friend or family member to support a patient through chemotherapy. Methods/Design We describe the design and rationale of a randomized, controlled trial to assess the efficacy of 10 weeks of web-based caregiver alerts and tailored advice for helping a patient manage symptoms related to chemotherapy. The study aims to test the primary hypothesis that patients whose caregivers receive alerts and tailored advice will report less frequent and less severe symptoms at 10 and 14 weeks when compared to patients in the control arm; similarly, they will report better physical function, fewer outpatient visits and hospitalizations related to symptoms, and greater adherence to chemotherapy. 300 patients with solid tumors undergoing chemotherapy at two Veteran Administration oncology clinics reporting any symptom at a severity of ≥4 and a willing informal caregiver will be assigned to either 10 weeks of automated telephonic symptom assessment (ATSA alone, or 10 weeks of ATSA plus web-based notification of symptom severity and problem solving advice to their chosen caregiver. Patients and caregivers will be surveyed at intake, 10 weeks and 14 weeks. Both groups will receive standard oncology, hospice, and palliative care. Discussion Patients undergoing chemotherapy experience many symptoms that they may be able to manage with the support of an activated caregiver. This intervention uses readily available technology to improve patient caregiver communication about symptoms and caregiver knowledge of symptom management. If successful, it could substantially improve the quality of life of veterans and their families during the stresses of

  11. Childhood Cancer Genomics (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genomics of childhood cancer. The summary describes the molecular subtypes for specific pediatric cancers and their associated clinical characteristics, the recurring genomic alterations that characterize each subtype at diagnosis or relapse, and the therapeutic and prognostic significance of the genomic alterations. The genomic alterations associated with brain tumors, kidney tumors, leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and other cancers are discussed.

  12. Cancer Recurrence Worry, Risk Perception, and Informational-Coping Styles among Appalachian Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Shedlosky-Shoemaker, Randi; Porter, Kyle; DeSimone, Philip; Andrykowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the psychosocial impact of the threat of cancer recurrence, underserved populations, such as those from the Appalachian region, have been understudied. To examine worry and perceived risk in cancer survivors, cancer patients at an ambulatory oncology clinic in a university hospital were surveyed. Appalachians had significantly higher worry than non-Appalachians. Cancer type and lower need for cognition were associated with greater worry. Those with missing perc...

  13. Correlates of Cancer Information Overload: Focusing on Individual Ability and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jiyoung; Lee, Chul-joo; Jensen, Jakob D

    2016-01-01

    The present study defined cancer information overload (CIO) as an aversive disposition wherein a person is confused and overwhelmed by cancer information, which occurs when he or she fails to effectively categorize new information due to a lack of resources for effective learning. Based on the definition and informed by previous studies on information overload and the cognitive mediation model, we hypothesized that low ability and motivation to process cancer information would lead to CIO. We used education level and trait anxiety as factors related to ability. Cancer history and the use of active media channels (such as the Internet and print media) were adopted as motivational factors. Four samples (three from the United States and one from South Korea) were used to explore the relationship between ability/motivation and CIO. Among them, only Sample 4 participants answered questions about stomach cancer, and other participants were asked about cancer in general. In all four samples, trait anxiety was positively associated with CIO. Health information use from active media channels (print or the Internet) was negatively associated with CIO in three samples. The associations between family history and CIO, and between education and CIO, were found in two samples. In short, the present study demonstrated that CIO partly depends on individual ability and motivation, thereby showing that CIO is influenced by personal characteristics as well as environmental factors. PMID:26512760

  14. Patterns of information-seeking for cancer on the internet: an analysis of real world data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishai Ofran

    Full Text Available Although traditionally the primary information sources for cancer patients have been the treating medical team, patients and their relatives increasingly turn to the Internet, though this source may be misleading and confusing. We assess Internet searching patterns to understand the information needs of cancer patients and their acquaintances, as well as to discern their underlying psychological states. We screened 232,681 anonymous users who initiated cancer-specific queries on the Yahoo Web search engine over three months, and selected for study users with high levels of interest in this topic. Searches were partitioned by expected survival for the disease being searched. We compared the search patterns of anonymous users and their contacts. Users seeking information on aggressive malignancies exhibited shorter search periods, focusing on disease- and treatment-related information. Users seeking knowledge regarding more indolent tumors searched for longer periods, alternated between different subjects, and demonstrated a high interest in topics such as support groups. Acquaintances searched for longer periods than the proband user when seeking information on aggressive (compared to indolent cancers. Information needs can be modeled as transitioning between five discrete states, each with a unique signature representing the type of information of interest to the user. Thus, early phases of information-seeking for cancer follow a specific dynamic pattern. Areas of interest are disease dependent and vary between probands and their contacts. These patterns can be used by physicians and medical Web site authors to tailor information to the needs of patients and family members.

  15. Are members of multidisciplinary teams in breast cancer aware of each other's informational roles?

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, V; Fallowfield, L.; Poole, K

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To conduct a commissioned survey of multidisciplinary breast team members' expectations of their own and each other's roles in providing different kinds of information to women with breast cancer.

  16. Toward Cultural Oncology: The Evolutionary Information Dynamics of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Rodrick; Wallace, Deborah; Robert G Wallace

    2003-01-01

    'Racial' disparities among cancers, particularly of the breast and prostate, are something of a mystery. For the US, in the face of slavery and its sequelae, centuries of interbreeding have greatly leavened genetic differences between 'Blacks' and 'whites', but marked contrasts in disease prevalence and progression persist. 'Adjustment' for socioeconomic status and lifestyle, while statistically accounting for much of the variance in breast cancer, only begs the question of ultimate causali...

  17. Adapting the Content of Cancer Web Sites to the Information Needs of Patients: Reliability and Readability

    OpenAIRE

    Alba-Ruiz, Ruben; Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Pernett, Jaime Jiménez; Garcia-Gutierrez, Jose Francisco; Cózar-Olmo, José Manuel; Valero-Aguilera, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Background: People who use the Internet to research health topics do not usually find all the information they need and do not trust what they read. This study was designed to assess the reliability, accessibility, readability, and popularity of cancer Web sites in Spanish and to analyze the suitability of Web site content in accordance with the specific information needs of cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This was a two-phase, cross-sectional, descriptive study. The first ph...

  18. Cancer Genetic Counselor Information Needs for Risk Communication: A Qualitative Evaluation of Interview Transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    George Hripcsak; Rita Kukafka; Chung, Wendy K.; Casey Lynnette Overby

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a model of healthcare that is predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory (“P4 Medicine”). Genetic counselors are an ideal group to study when designing tools to support cancer P4 Medicine activities more broadly. The goal for this work was to gain a better understanding of the information cancer genetic counselors seek from their patients to facilitate effective information exchange for discussing risk. This was an analysis of a qualitative data set from i...

  19. Sources of Breast and Cervical Cancer Information for Hmong Women and Men

    OpenAIRE

    Thorburn, Sheryl; Keon, Karen Levy; Kue, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Despite low breast and cervical cancer screening levels among Hmong women in the U.S. reported in the literature, understanding of the barriers to screening for Hmong women is limited. Health literacy issues may influence screening behavior for this population. This qualitative study explored sources of information about breast and cervical cancer including screening and identified barriers to seeking such information for Hmong women and men. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Expansion of On-Line Database Use by the Cancer Information Service

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Sharon Watkins; Fox, Laurie

    1987-01-01

    Vincent DeVita, the director of the National Cancer Institute, has been promoting the use of the user-friendly cancer database system, Physician's Data Query (PDQ), both by physicians and by the public. Because on-line access to PDQ is limited to physicians or other qualified health care professionals, the Cancer Information Service, through its toll-free 1-800-4-CANCER telephone number, provides a major point of access to this system. This paper analyzes changes in the patterns of PDQ use ov...

  2. Relationships among Internet health information use, patient behavior and self efficacy in newly diagnosed cancer patients who contact the National Cancer Institute's NCI Atlantic Region Cancer Information Service (CIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Linda; Bass, Sarah; Ruzek, Sheryl Burt; McKeown-Conn, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This NCI funded study examined the relationship between the use of Internet health information by people newly diagnosed with cancer (N=500), with patient task behavior and perceived self efficacy. Study variables were compared among Direct users of Internet health information (people using the Internet themselves), Indirect users of Internet health information (people receiving Internet health information from friends or family members), and Non-users of Internet health information (people not using the Internet or receiving health information from the Internet). The subjects were recruited from persons who called the Atlantic Region of the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS), located at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA. Follow up phone interviews were done with participants six weeks after initial contact to assess impact of the use of the Internet on perceived patient task behavior and self efficacy. Results show significant relationships between Internet use and all study variables. PMID:12463827

  3. Guidelines for lung cancer in 2015: Consensus and controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shun; Yong-feng YU; Wen-xiang JI

    2016-01-01

    The standardization of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer has important significance for improving the prognosis of patients with lung cancer. A thorough and accurate interpretation of the guidelines of lung cancer is conducive to enhance a deeper understanding of the standardized diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. The authors of this article intend to give a brief summary and comment for the latest information about diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer at home and abroad, focusing...

  4. Use of information sources by cancer patients: results of a systematic review of the research literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyani Ankem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Existing findings on cancer patients' use of information sources were synthesized to 1 rank the most and least used information sources and the most helpful information sources and to 2 find the impact of patient demographics and situations on use of information sources. Method. . To synthesize results found across studies, a systematic review was conducted. Medline and CINAHL were searched to retrieve literature on cancer patients' information source use. The retrieved articles were carefully selected according to predetermined criteria, and several articles were eliminated in a systematic approach. Analysis. The twelve articles that met the criteria were systematically analysed by extracting data from articles and summarizing data for the purpose of synthesis to determine the meaning of findings on most used information sources, least used information sources, most helpful information sources, effect of patient characteristics on preference for an information source, and effect of patient situations on preference for an information source. Results. In descending order of use, health care professionals, medical pamphlets, and family and friends were most used information sources. Internet and support groups were least used. In descending order of helpfulness, books, health care professionals and medical pamphlets were found to be most helpful information sources. Younger patients used health care professionals and certain forms of written information sources more than older patients. Conclusion. . The systematic review shows that many areas of cancer patients' information source use have been either neglected or barely analysed. An in-depth understanding of cancer patients' use of information sources and the characteristics in information sources they consider to be helpful is important for developing successful interventions to better inform patients.

  5. Breast Cancer Risk Perceptions among Relatives of Women with Uninformative Negative BRCA1/2 Test Results: The Moderating Effect of the Amount of Shared Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Deborah O; Clayton, Margaret F; Donaldson, Gary W; Ellington, Lee; Buys, Saundra S; Kinney, Anita Y

    2016-04-01

    The most common result of BRCA1/2 mutation testing when performed in a family without a previously identified mutation is an uninformative negative test result. Women in these families may have an increased risk for breast cancer because of mutations in non-BRCA breast cancer predisposition genes, including moderate- or low-risk genes, or shared environmental factors. Genetic counselors often encourage counselees to share information with family members, however it is unclear how much information counselees share and the impact that shared information may have on accuracy of risk perception in family members. We evaluated 85 sisters and daughters of women who received uninformative negative BRCA1/2 results. We measured accuracy of risk perception using a latent variable model where accuracy was represented as the correlation between perceived risk (indicators = verbal and quantitative measures) and calculated risk (indicators = Claus and BRCAPRO). Participants who reported more information was shared with them by their sister or mother about her genetic counseling session had greater accuracy of risk perception (0.707, p = 0.000) than those who reported little information was shared (0.326, p = 0.003). However, counselees shared very little information; nearly 20 % of family members reported their sister or mother shared nothing with them about her genetic counseling. Family members were generally not aware of the existence of a genetic counseling summary letter. Our findings underscore the need for effective strategies that facilitate counselees to share information about their genetic counseling sessions. Such communication may help their relatives better understand their cancer risks and enhance risk appropriate cancer prevention. PMID:26245632

  6. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. CONCLUSIONS: The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language......, structured text and illustrations to improve the informed consent process and thereby patient enrolment into clinical trials....

  7. Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening and Sources of Cancer Information Among Older Women in the United States: Results From the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven S. Coughlin, PhD

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe number of people in the United States aged 65 years and older is increasing. Older people have a higher risk of dying from cancer; however, recent information about breast and colorectal cancer screening rates among women aged 65 years and older and about sources of health information consulted by these women is limited.MethodsWe examined data from the Health Information National Trends Survey for women aged 65 years and older who had no personal history of breast or colorectal cancer. Women whose self-reported race and ethnicity was non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, or Hispanic were included in the analysis. The overall response rate for the 2003 survey was 34.5%.ResultsWomen aged 75 years and older had lower rates of recent mammography (mammogram in previous 2 years than did women aged 65 to 74 years. In both age groups, rates were especially low for Hispanic women and women with a household income of less than $15,000 per year. Rates of recent colorectal cancer screening (fecal occult blood test in previous year or endoscopy in previous 5 years were markedly lower for non-Hispanic black women aged 75 years and older than for other women in this age group, and for Hispanic women aged 65 to 74 years than for non-Hispanic women in this age group. Screening rates were lowest for women with an annual household income of less than $15,000, no family history of cancer, no usual health care provider, or 1 or no provider visits in the previous year.Differences were found in the groups’ preferred channel for receiving health information. Women who had had a mammogram in the previous 2 years were more likely to pay attention to health information on the radio or in newspapers and magazines than were women who had not received a recent mammogram. Women who had had a recent colorectal cancer screening test were more likely to pay attention to health information in magazines or on the Internet than were those who had not

  8. A quantitative assessment of changing trends in internet usage for cancer information.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, Seamus M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The internet is an important source of healthcare information. To date, assessment of its use as a source of oncologic information has been restricted to retrospective surveys. METHODS: The cancer-related searches of approximately 361,916,185 people in the United States and the United Kingdom were examined. Data were collected from two separate 100-day periods in 2008 and 2010. RESULTS: In 2008, there were 97,531 searches. The majority of searches related to basic cancer information (18,700, 19%), followed by treatment (8404, 9%) and diagnosis (6460, 7%). This compares with 179,025 searches in 2010 representing an increase of 183%. In 2008 breast cancer accounted for 21,102 (21%) individual searches, increasing to 85,825 searches in 2010. In 2010 a total of 0.2% (321) of searches focused on litigation, with those searching for breast cancer information most likely to research this topic (P=0.000). CONCLUSION: Use of the internet as a source of oncological information is increasing rapidly. These searches represent the most sensitive information relating to cancer, including prognosis and litigation. It is imperative now that efforts are made to ensure the reliability and comprehensiveness of this information.

  9. The Effects of Viewing and Preferences for Online Cancer Information Among Patients' Loved Ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauckner, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Emotional and psychological distress is common among loved ones of cancer patients, who sometimes report more severe mental health issues than the patients themselves. In addition, many loved ones feel as though their information needs are not being met, which can lead them to seek out additional information online. This survey research examined the experiences of cancer patients' loved ones in viewing online content about the disease and the emotional outcomes of such browsing sessions. Participants (N = 191) were recruited from cancer- and caregiver-related nonprofits and online discussion boards. Results indicated that patients' loved ones were active users of online cancer Web sites. They primarily viewed and expressed a desire for information-based, rather than support-based, content. Many individuals desired in-depth treatment information, and those who viewed it had significantly more hope. Interestingly, multiple regression analysis revealed that viewing user-generated content was associated only with negative emotions, illustrating the potential dangers of social media spaces. Overall, this study shows the need for supporting patients' loved ones during their almost inevitable viewings of online cancer information. More research is needed in order to determine the best methods of mitigating potential negative effects of cancer Web sites and developing a useful online resource for this population. PMID:26636409

  10. Scripted Sexual Health Informational Intervention in Improving Sexual Function in Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-10

    Anxiety Disorder; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Sexual Dysfunction; Uterine Sarcoma; Vaginal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer

  11. Audiotaped social comparison information for cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy : Differential effects of procedural, emotional and coping information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennenbroek, FTC; Buunk, BP; Stiegelis, HE; Hagedoorn, M; Sanderman, R; Van den Bergh, ACM; Botke, G; Buunk, Abraham (Bram)

    2003-01-01

    The present study focused on the effects of social comparison information on subjective understanding of radiation therapy, validation of emotions, and self-efficacy of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. The effects of three different audiotapes, containing different kinds of social compa

  12. Early detection of cervical cancer with visual inspection methods: a summary of completed and on-going studies in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaranarayanan R; BM Nene; Dinshaw K; Rajkumar R; Shastri S; Wesley R; Basu P; Sharma R; Thara S; Budukh A; Parkin DM

    2003-01-01

    India is a high-risk country for cervical cancer which accounts a quarter (126 000 new cases, 71 000 deaths around 2 000) of the world burden. The age-standardized incidence rates range from 16-55 per 100 000 women in different regions with particularly high rates in rural areas. Control of cervical cancer by early detection and treatment is a priority of the National Cancer Control Programme of India. There are no organized cytology screening programmes in the country. The technical and fina...

  13. Accuracy of Self-Reported Breast Cancer Information among Women from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriana Barisic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining complete medical record information can be challenging and expensive in breast cancer studies. The current literature is limited with respect to the accuracy of self-report and factors that may influence this. We assessed the agreement between self-reported and medical record breast cancer information among women from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Women aged 20–69 years diagnosed with incident breast cancer 1996–1998 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry, sampled on age and family history. We calculated kappa statistics, proportion correct, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values and conducted unconditional logistic regression to examine whether characteristics of the women influenced agreement. The proportions of women who correctly reported having received a broad category of therapy (hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery as well as sensitivity and specificity were above 90%, and the kappa statistics were above 0.80. The specific type of hormonal or chemotherapy was reported with low-to-moderate agreement. Aside from recurrence, no factors were consistently associated with agreement. Thus, most women were able to accurately report broad categories of treatment but not necessarily specific treatment types. The finding of this study can aid researchers in the use and design of self-administered treatment questionnaires.

  14. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    of future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. CONCLUSIONS: The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language...

  15. Health literacy and informed decision making regarding colorectal cancer screening: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Uiters, E.; Schuit, J.; Rademakers, J.; Fransen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Making an informed decision about participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening may be challenging for invitees with lower health literacy skills. The aim of this systematic review is to explore to what extent the level of a person’s health literacy is related to their informed decision making

  16. Understanding receptivity to informal supportive cancer care in regional and rural Australia: a Heideggerian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, J; Johnson, N; Dickson-Swift, V; McGrath, P; Dangerfield, F

    2016-05-01

    The concept of receptivity is a new way of understanding the personal and social factors that affect a person living with and beyond cancer, and how these factors influence access to formal supportive care service provision and planning. This article contributes to new knowledge through applying the concept of receptivity to informal supportive cancer care in regional Australia. Literature indicates that a cancer diagnosis is a life-changing experience, particularly in regional communities, where survival rates are lower and there are significant barriers to accessing services. Heideggerian phenomenology informed the design of the study and allowed for a rich and nuanced understanding of participants lived experiences of informal supportive cancer care. These experiences were captured using in-depth interviews, which were subsequently thematically analysed. Nineteen participants were recruited from across regional Victoria, Australia. Participants self-reported a range of stages and types of cancer. Significantly, findings revealed that most participants were not referred to, and did not seek, formal supportive care. Instead, they were receptive to informal supportive care. Understanding receptivity and the role of anxiety and fear of death has implications for partners, family, community members, as well as professionals working with people with living with and beyond cancer. PMID:26047366

  17. Symposium summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is provided of the issues discussed at the climate change implications for water and ecological resources conference, and recommendations that came out of the conference. The objectives of the meeting were to present and discuss results of recent climate change experiments undertaken in Canada; evaluate a variety of climate models and impact analyses and to develop methods and strategies for future study; and to establish working linkages between modellers and analysts in the fields of climate, hydrology, and ecosystem research, as well as between social scientists and policy makers interested in the implications of climate change. Recommendations were made in the five areas of research, monitoring, risk assessment, policy and information dissemination. Additional research should be undertaken to foster improved understanding of relationships between climate, climate change, and ecological and human processes. A suitable monitoring program, including a national wetlands monitoring program, should be established. Risk assessments should be undertaken to evaluate vulnerabilities of ecosystem components, to assess options, and to provide the information required to develop and implement appropriate policy objectives. The impacts of a range of public policy responses and feedbacks should be assessed. The dissemination of well-targeted and accurate information is vital if basic societal attitudes regarding the value of water and ecosystems are to be changed

  18. Child cancer follow-up ontology and information system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Subaihi, J.A.; Anton, François; Mioc, Darka; Andersen, S.V.; Lausen, B.

    2013-01-01

    treatment processes, compensations to patients due to medical negligence and duplication of work and effort. In order to address a solution for healthcare practitioners, a small subgroup of patients and diseases is chosen from all chronic diseases. Namely, children diagnosed with cancer. This research...... brings the methodology for child cancer treatment plan that produces an ontology to create a conceptual model and a database model. To construct the ontology, the "methontology" method is used as a structured approach for the ontology process. The method guides the ontology developer from scratch to...... building a complete model. The ontology is developed in two phases. In the first phase, research from other countries and process models are reviewed and the generic model is built from this research. The generic model is adapted to the ontology for the Danish hospitals including the NOPHO-ALL 2008...

  19. How Do Cancer Patients Navigate the Public Information Environment? Understanding Patterns and Motivations for Movement Among Information Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantan, Anca; Kelly, Bridget J.; Stevens, Robin S.; Gray, Stacy W.; Hull, Shawnika J.; Ramirez, A. Susana; Hornik, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how patients move among information sources to fulfill unmet needs. We interviewed 43 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients. Using a grounded theory approach, we identified patterns and motivations for movement among information sources. Overall, patients reported using one source (e.g., newspaper) followed by the use of another source (e.g., Internet), and five key motivations for such cross-source movement emerged. Patients’ social networks often played a central role in this movement. Understanding how patients navigate an increasingly complex information environment may help clinicians and educators to guide patients to appropriate, high-quality sources. PMID:20204573

  20. Sources of Breast and Cervical Cancer Information for Hmong Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    THORBURN, SHERYL; KEON, KAREN LEVY; KUE, JENNIFER

    2013-01-01

    Despite low breast and cervical cancer screening levels among Hmong women in the U.S. reported in the literature, understanding of the barriers to screening for Hmong women is limited. Health literacy issues may influence screening behavior for this population. This qualitative study explored sources of information about breast and cervical cancer including screening and identified barriers to seeking such information for Hmong women and men. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 84 Hmong women and men living in Oregon, USA. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcripts of 83 usable interviews were analyzed using content analysis. Health care providers and the Internet were the most frequently cited sources of information about breast and cervical cancer including screening. Other sources were family, friends, and other media. Over half of the participants indicated that nothing would prevent them from seeking information about these topics. These findings suggested that health care providers and the Internet may be important sources of information about breast and cervical cancer screening for Hmong women. Additional research is needed to examine further Hmong women’s health literacy needs and preferences with regards to breast and cervical cancer screening. PMID:23879458

  1. Cancer Genetic Counselor Information Needs for Risk Communication: A Qualitative Evaluation of Interview Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Hripcsak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is a model of healthcare that is predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory (“P4 Medicine”. Genetic counselors are an ideal group to study when designing tools to support cancer P4 Medicine activities more broadly. The goal for this work was to gain a better understanding of the information cancer genetic counselors seek from their patients to facilitate effective information exchange for discussing risk. This was an analysis of a qualitative data set from interviews of eight cancer genetic counselors, recruited from three institutions. Genetic counselors at each site were interviewed using a semi-structured, open-ended questionnaire. A selective coding approach was used to determine major themes associated with genetic counseling information needs for communicating risk. We generated a model for understanding categories of genetic counseling information needs to support risk communication activities. Common activities for risk communication included risk assessment and tailoring communication. Categories of information needs included: (a clinical patient characteristics, (b social and cognitive patient characteristics and (c patient motivation and goals for the genetic counseling session. A logical next step is for this model to inform the design of software systems for pre-visit patient planning and delivering just-in-time educational information to facilitate cancer risk communication activities.

  2. Disclosure of Cancer Information in Iran: a Perspective of Patients, Family Members, and Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Beyraghi N; Mottaghipour Y; Mehraban A; Eslamian E; Esfahani F

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the last decades cancer has become one of the important causes of death in Iran .This study examined perspective of a group of Iranian health professionals, patients and patients’ family members regarding their view on disclosure of cancer information at a university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Methods: The method of study was qualitative semi-structured focused group content analysis. Two group leaders (psychologist and psychiatrist) run the focus groups. Oncol...

  3. Managing the unmet psychosocial and information needs of patients with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamson, Kathleen, RN,MS

    2010-01-01

    Kathleen Abrahamson1, Morgan Durham1, Rebekah Fox21Department of Public Health, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA; 2Department of Communication, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USAAbstract: In this article, we synthesize current literature regarding the unmet needs of cancer patients, with a specific focus on interventions that address psychosocial distress, social support, and information deficits. Research indicates many patients diagnosed with cancer express unmet...

  4. Quantitative evaluation of an information leaflet to increase prompt help-seeking for gynaecological cancer symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Melanie; Friedemann Smith, Claire; Boxell, Emily; Wardle, Jane; Simon, Alice; Waller, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Background Provision of written information may improve awareness of cancer symptoms and encourage timely presentation in primary care. This study assessed changes in symptom knowledge, perceived barriers to help-seeking, anxiety and intention to seek help, following exposure to a leaflet to raise awareness of gynaecological cancer symptoms. Methods Women (N = 484) completed questionnaires before and after reading the leaflet. The primary outcome was change in anticipated time to help-seeking...

  5. The role of companions in aiding older cancer patients to recall medical information.

    OpenAIRE

    J. Jansen; Weert, J.C.M. van; Wijngaards-de Meij, L.; Van Dulmen, S.; Heeren, T. J.; Bensing, J M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates information recall in unaccompanied and accompanied older cancer patients and their companions.Methods: One hundred cancer patients (aged >/=65 years) and 71 companions completed a recall questionnaire after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment. Recall was checked against the actual communication in video-recordings of the consultations. Patients also completed measures of anxiety and memory-related beliefs.Results: Findings revealed that...

  6. Application of integrative information system improves the quality and effectiveness of cancer case management

    OpenAIRE

    Lee PY; Chang TR

    2015-01-01

    Pei-Yi Lee,1,2 Tsue-Rung Chang11Department of Nursing, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Nursing, MacKay Medical College, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Cancer case management provides consecutive care during the entire process through diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. We established an integrative information system with integration of the health information system. This integrative information system shortened the time spent on case screening, follow-up data management, ...

  7. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  8. Cancer patients' preferences for written prognostic information provided outside the clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, H M; Butow, P N; Armstrong, B K

    2003-10-20

    Cancer patients' preferences for written prognostic information independent of the clinical context have not previously been investigated. This study aimed to assist a state cancer organisation to provide information to patients by assessing patients' understanding of statistical information; eliciting their preferences for framing, content and presentation; and assessing the acceptability of a card sort for obtaining preferences. With the exception of conditional and relative survival, initial difficulties in understanding statistical concepts were improved with a plain language explanation. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed that participants generally supported the provision of written information about survival in booklets and on the Internet. They wanted positive, relevant and clear information. Participants said that the use of, and preferences for, this information would be affected by a patient's age, time since diagnosis, ability to cope with having cancer and the perceived credibility of the information source. They found the card sort acceptable, saying it made the assessment of understanding and selection of preferences easy. This study has identified two fundamental, and sometimes conflicting, factors underlying patients' preferences: the communication of hope and the need to understand information it has also identified patient characteristics thought to influence preferences. These factors and characteristics need to be taken into account when developing written prognostic information for patients. PMID:14562016

  9. Approval Summary: Pemetrexed Maintenance Therapy of Advanced/Metastatic Nonsquamous, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Martin H.; Cortazar, Patricia; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The study that led to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of pemetrexed injection for maintenance treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer whose disease has not progressed after four cycles of platinum-based doublet induction chemotherapy is reviewed.

  10. Quality of health information for cervical cancer treatment on the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Trina

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet has become a frequently used and powerful tool for patients seeking medical information. This information may not undergo the same quality consideration as the peer-review criteria for publication of information in a journal. The aim of this study is to assess the quality of internet sites providing information on the treatment of cervical cancer, with comparisons between the quality assessments made by an educated lay person and an expert in the field. Methods A search of the World Wide Web was made by a lay person to identify sites containing information on the treatment of cervical cancer. The credibility and accuracy of these sites was assessed using predefined criteria based on 'Criteria for Assessing the Quality of Health Information on the Internet' and accepted guidelines for the treatment of cervical cancer. The assessment was made independently and in duplicate by the lay reviewer and medical expert in order to allow comparison. Results 46 relevant websites were assessed. Only one site contained all the credibility and accuracy criteria, with a further website containing all the credibility criteria. The majority of sites, 38/46, were deemed easy to navigate. The agreement between lay person and expert was good with only 6 items in total changed by the expert. Conclusion This study clearly shows there is wide variation in quality of websites available to patients on the treatment of cervical cancer. Further research and consideration is needed on the effects of website information on gynaecological cancer patients and how steps can be made to insure the posting of good quality information.

  11. Meeting the information needs of lower income cancer survivors: results of a randomized control trial evaluating the american cancer society's "I can cope".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michelle Y; Evans, Mary B; Kratt, Polly; Pollack, Lori A; Smith, Judith Lee; Oster, Robert; Dignan, Mark; Prayor-Patterson, Heather; Watson, Christopher; Houston, Peter; Andrews, Shiquina; Liwo, Amandiy; Tseng, Tung Sung; Hullett, Sandral; Oliver, Joann; Pisu, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The American Cancer Society is a leader in the development of cancer survivorship resources. One resource of the American Cancer Society is the I Can Cope program, an educational program for cancer survivors and their families. Evaluations of this program indicate that cancer patients highly rate its objectives. Yet, there are gaps in the understanding of the full impact of the program on diverse cancer survivors. In this study, the authors used a randomized trial to evaluate the program. Participants included 140 low-income survivors (79% Black; 38% breast cancer) from community hospitals who were randomized to 4 sessions of I Can Cope (learning about cancer; understanding cancer treatments; relieving cancer pain; and keeping well in mind and body) or 4 sessions of a wellness intervention (humor, meditation, relaxation, and music therapy). The authors' primary outcome was "met information needs." After controlling for covariates, their analysis indicated that I Can Cope was no more effective than the wellness intervention in addressing survivor information needs relative to the learning objectives. Participants provided high overall ratings for both interventions. Self-efficacy for obtaining advice about cancer, age, education, and income were associated with information needs. Educational programs tailored to levels of self-efficacy and patient demographics may be needed. PMID:24433231

  12. Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell BJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bethany J Russell, Alicia M WardSouthern Adelaide Palliative Services, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Communicating effectively with patients who have advanced cancer is one of the greatest challenges facing physicians today. Whilst guiding the patient through complex diagnostic and staging techniques, treatment regimens and trials, the physician must translate often imprecise or conflicting data into meaningful personalized information that empowers the patient to make decisions about their life and body. This requires understanding, compassion, patience, and skill. This narrative literature review explores current communication practices, information preferences of oncology patients and their families, and communication strategies that may assist in these delicate interactions. Overwhelmingly, the literature suggests that whilst the majority of patients with advanced cancer do want to know their diagnosis and receive detailed prognostic information, this varies not only between individuals but also for a given individual over time. Barriers to the delivery and understanding of information exist on both sides of the physician–patient relationship, and family dynamics are also influential. Despite identifiable trends, the information preferences of a particular patient cannot be reliably predicted by demographic, cultural, or cancer-specific factors. Therefore, our primary recommendation is that the physician regularly asks the patient what information they would like to know, who else should be given the information and be involved in decision making, and how that information should be presented.Keywords: metastatic, communication, prognosis, physician–patient relations

  13. Multi-agent systems: effective approach for cancer care information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, prevent or determine the effectiveness of treatment, and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The cancer care environment has become more complex because of the need for coordination and communication among health care professionals with different skills in a variety of roles and the existence of large amounts of data with various formats. The goals of health care systems in such a complex environment are correct health data management, providing appropriate information needs of users to enhance the integrity and quality of health care, timely access to accurate information and reducing medical errors. These roles in new systems with use of agents efficiently perform well. Because of the potential capability of agent systems to solve complex and dynamic health problems, health care system, in order to gain full advantage of E- health, steps must be taken to make use of this technology. Multi-agent systems have effective roles in health service quality improvement especially in telemedicine, emergency situations and management of chronic diseases such as cancer. In the design and implementation of agent based systems, planning items such as information confidentiality and privacy, architecture, communication standards, ethical and legal aspects, identification opportunities and barriers should be considered. It should be noted that usage of agent systems only with a technical view is associated with many problems such as lack of user acceptance. The aim of this commentary is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers of this new artificial intelligence tool for cancer care information as an approach to improve cancer care management. PMID:24460364

  14. Summary of blog

    CERN Document Server

    Reader, Capitol

    2013-01-01

    This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Hugh Hewitt in his book "Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation that's Changing Your World". This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Hugh Hewitt's book.Hewitt argues that blogs have an important potential and he believes that it would be a dreadful mistake to avoid their power.

  15. Child cancer follow-up ontology and information system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Subaihi, J.A.; Anton, François; Mioc, Darka;

    2013-01-01

    brings the methodology for child cancer treatment plan that produces an ontology to create a conceptual model and a database model. To construct the ontology, the "methontology" method is used as a structured approach for the ontology process. The method guides the ontology developer from scratch...... to building a complete model. The ontology is developed in two phases. In the first phase, research from other countries and process models are reviewed and the generic model is built from this research. The generic model is adapted to the ontology for the Danish hospitals including the NOPHO-ALL 2008...... protocol. To develop the ontology, a data dictionary is first proposed. Then, the relationships between concepts are identified and verified: the oriented graph, where nodes are concepts and oriented edges are dependence relationships, where the definition of the concept at the origin of the edge depends...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  17. Differences among college women for breast cancer prevention acquired information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and daughter-initiated information to mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Amatya, Anup; Vilchis, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine among college women acquired breast cancer prevention information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and information given to mothers. Using a cross-sectional study, a survey was administered to college women at a southwestern university. College women (n = 546) used the Internet (44 %) for active breast cancer prevention information-seeking and used the Internet (74 %), magazines (69 %), and television (59 %) for passive information receipt. Over half of the participants desired breast cancer prevention apps (54 %) and texts (51 %). Logistic regression analyses revealed predictors for interest to receive apps were ethnicity (Hispanic), lower self-efficacy, actively seeking online information, and older age and predictors for interest to receive texts were lower self-efficacy and higher university level. Eighteen percent of college women (n = 99) reported giving information to mothers and reported in an open-ended item the types of information given to mothers. Predictors for giving information to mothers were actively and passively seeking online information, breast self-exam practice, and higher university level. Screenings were the most frequent types of information given to mothers. Breast cancer prevention information using apps, texts, or Internet and daughter-initiated information for mothers should be considered in health promotion targeting college students or young women in communities. Future research is needed to examine the quality of apps, texts, and online information and cultural differences for breast cancer prevention sources. PMID:23979671

  18. Cancer Patient and Survivor Research from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium: A Preview of Three Large Randomized Trials and Initial Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARCUS, ALFRED C.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.; STANTON, ANNETTE L.; MILLER-HALEGOUA, SUZANNE N.; FLEISHER, LINDA; RAICH, PETER C.; MORRA, MARION E.; PEROCCHIA, ROSEMARIE SLEVIN; TRAN, ZUNG VU; BRIGHT, MARY ANNE

    2014-01-01

    Three large randomized trials are described from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium (CISRC). Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 is also testing a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the two-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1 = 208, Project 2 = 340, Project 3 = 792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52% and 67% for Projects 1–3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most or some) was 90%, 85% and 83% for Projects 1–3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the CISRC interventions, perceived utility and benefit was high, and more than 90% would recommend them to other cancer patients. Five initial lessons learned are presented that may help inform future cancer communications research. PMID:23448232

  19. 信息集成服务管理论要%Summary of Information Integrated Service Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍忠文

    2000-01-01

    Beginning with the thought on the development of scientific and technical information in the "Tenth Five-Year Plan" period, the paper briefly discusses the concept, task, management and systematic structure of information integrated service from the viewpoint of information management.

  20. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  1. Real-time moment-to-moment emotional responses to narrative and informational breast cancer videos in African American women

    OpenAIRE

    Bollinger, Sarah; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    In a randomized experiment using moment-to-moment audience analysis methods, we compared women’s emotional responses with a narrative versus informational breast cancer video. Both videos communicated three key messages about breast cancer: (i) understand your breast cancer risk, (ii) talk openly about breast cancer and (iii) get regular mammograms. A community-based convenience sample of African American women (n = 59) used a hand-held audience response device to report the intensity of thei...

  2. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng;

    2013-01-01

    means that the summaries can be merged in a way akin to other algebraic operators such as sum and max, which is especially useful for computing summaries on massive distributed data. Several data summaries are trivially mergeable by construction, most notably all the sketches that are linear functions...... of the datasets. But some other fundamental ones, like those for heavy hitters and quantiles, are not (known to be) mergeable. In this article, we demonstrate that these summaries are indeed mergeable or can be made mergeable after appropriate modifications. Specifically, we show that for ϵ-approximate heavy...... to geometric summaries such as ϵ-approximations which permit approximate multidimensional range counting queries. While most of the results in this article are theoretical in nature, some of the algorithms are actually very simple and even perform better than the previously best known algorithms, which we...

  3. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  4. Older cancer patients' information and communication needs: what they want is what they get?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J.C.M. van; Bolle, S.; Dulmen, S. van; Jansen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate what information and communication aspects older cancer patients (≥65) consider important in preparing for chemotherapy treatment (CT), the extent to which this corresponds with what oncology nurses consider important, and the extent to which nurses attend to these aspects dur

  5. A Time Series Analysis of Cancer-Related Information Seeking: Hints From the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2003-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Timothy R; Walker, Daniel M; Johnson, Tyler; Ford, Eric W

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological changes, such as the growth of the Internet, have made cancer information widely available. However, it remains unknown whether changes in access have resulted in concomitant changes in information seeking behavior. Previous work explored the cancer information seeking behaviors of the general population using the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). This article aims to reproduce, replicate, and extend that existing analysis using the original dataset and five additional iterations of HINTS (2007, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014). This approach builds on the earlier work by quantifying the magnitude of change in information seeking behaviors. Bivariate comparison of the 2003 and 2014 data revealed very similar results; however, the multivariate model including all years of data indicated differences between the original and extended models: individuals age 65 and older were no longer less likely to seek cancer information than the 18-35 reference population, and Hispanics were also no longer less likely to be cancer information seekers. The results of our analysis indicate an overall shift in cancer information seeking behaviors and also illuminate the impact of increased Internet usage over the past decade, suggesting specific demographic groups that may benefit from cancer information seeking encouragement. PMID:27565190

  6. A survey of cancer patients' unmet information and coordination needs in handovers -- a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Gad; Grøne, Bettina Haastrup; Wulff, Christian Nielsen; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    handovers. The objectives of this study were to examine cancer patients' unmet needs for information and coordination in handovers and to analyse the association between patients' demographic and clinical characteristics and unmet information and coordination needs.......The care responsibilities for cancer patients are frequently handed over from one healthcare professional to another. These handovers are known to pose a threat to the safety of patients and the efficiency of the healthcare system. Little is known about specific needs of cancer patients in...

  7. Information provided by Italian breast cancer screening programmes: a comparison between 2001 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagno, Roberta; Canuti, Debora; Petrella, Marco; Bucchi, Lauro; Fedato, Chiara; Garena, Francesca; Giordano, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Debate on efficacy, benefits, and risks of breast cancer screening continues to rage, and scientific controversy surrounding overdiagnosis, false positives/false negatives, raises questions about communication to women attending screening programmes. The study compares information provided by invitation letters and leaflets of Italian breast screening programmes in 2001 (N=47) and 2014 (N=80). At both times, nearly all programmes provided adequate practical information and details about screening objectives and test procedures. Information regarding epidemiology/figures was scarce or absent in 2001, while in 2014 a number of programmes began to inform women about screening risks (false negative and positive results and overdiagnosis, 65%, 16%, and 21% respectively) although actual figures were rarely supplied. Despite this small improvement, Italian programmes are still far from giving balanced information. Further efforts should be addressed to providing accurate and transparent information, enabling women to make an informed choice. PMID:26405776

  8. Improving the Deaf community's access to prostate and testicular cancer information: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadler Georgia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Deaf community face communication barriers to accessing health information. To resolve these inequalities, educational programs must be designed in the appropriate format and language to meet their needs. Methods Deaf men (102 were surveyed before, immediately following, and two months after viewing a 52-minute prostate and testicular cancer video in American Sign Language (ASL with open text captioning and voice overlay. To provide the Deaf community with information equivalent to that available to the hearing community, the video addressed two cancer topics in depth. While the inclusion of two cancer topics lengthened the video, it was anticipated to reduce redundancy and encourage men of diverse ages to learn in a supportive, culturally aligned environment while also covering more topics within the partnership's limited budget. Survey data were analyzed to evaluate the video's impact on viewers' pre- and post-intervention understanding of prostate and testicular cancers, as well as respondents' satisfaction with the video, exposure to and use of early detection services, and sources of cancer information. Results From baseline to immediately post-intervention, participants' overall knowledge increased significantly, and this gain was maintained at the two-month follow-up. Men of diverse ages were successfully recruited, and this worked effectively as a support group. However, combining two complex cancer topics, in depth, in one video appeared to make it more difficult for participants to retain as many relevant details specific to each cancer. Participants related that there was so much information that they would need to watch the video more than once to understand each topic fully. When surveyed about their best sources of health information, participants ranked doctors first and showed a preference for active rather than passive methods of learning. Conclusion After viewing this ASL video, participants

  9. TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHANOL (NONCANCER) (CAS No. 67-56-1) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the final IRIS health assessment for methanol (focused on non-cancer health effects only). Methanol is a high production volume chemical with many commercial uses and is a basic building block for the production of numerous chemicals. Diet can contribute to backg...

  10. Developing common information elements for renewable energy systems: summary and proceedings of the SERI/AID workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, J.H.; Neuendorffer, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the Workshop on Evaluation Systems for Renewable Energy Systems sponsored by the Agency for International Development and SERI, held 20-22 February 1980 in Golden, Colorado. The primary objectives of the workshop was to explore whether it was possible to establish common information elements that would describe the operation and impact of renewable energy projects in developing countries. The workshop provided a forum for development program managers to discuss the information they would like to receive about renewable energy projects and to determine whether common data could be agreed on to facilitate information exchange among development organizations. Such information could be shared among institutions and used to make informed judyments on the economic, technical, and social feasibility of the technologies. Because developing countries and foreign assistance agencies will be financing an increasing number of renewable energy projects, these organizations need information on the field experience of renewable energy technologies. The report describes the substance of the workshop discussions and includes the papers presented on information systems and technology evaluation and provides lists of important information elements generated by both the plenary sessions and the small working groups.

  11. Information management system: A summary discussion. [for use in the space shuttle sortie, modular space station and TDR satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    An information management system is proposed for use in the space shuttle sortie, the modular space station, the tracking data relay satellite and associated ground support systems. Several different information management functions, including data acquisition, transfer, storage, processing, control and display are integrated in the system.

  12. 76 FR 54227 - Draft Toxicological Review of n-Butanol: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ...) within the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD). EPA is releasing this draft assessment solely..., contact information, any sponsorship information, whether you will be a speaker or an observer, and if you... Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC...

  13. Head and neck cancer information on the internet: type, accuracy and content.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Riordain, Richeal

    2009-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the type, accuracy and content of information available on the internet regarding head and neck cancer. The search engine Google was used to generate a list of the top 100 websites about head and neck cancer. The websites were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument and the JAMA benchmarks and whether the site displayed the Health on the Net seal was also recorded. The search yielded 1,650,000 sites on the Google website. Of the top 100 sites, a total of 33 sites were suitable for analysis due to duplicate links, non-functioning links and irrelevant website. 45% achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and 18% achieved only 1 benchmark. No website receiving the maximum mark on the overall score and four websites received the lowest overall score regarding the DISCERN instrument. The question with the poorest response score was \\'Does it describe how the treatment choices affect overall quality of life?\\' 39% of the websites displayed the Health on the Net (HON) seal. A wide variety of types of information are available on the internet regarding head and neck cancer with variable accuracy levels based on both Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmarks and DISCERN. The onus lies with the practitioner to guide the patient regarding scientific reliability of information and to direct the patient in filtering the information sourced. The inclusion of quality of life related information is currently lacking and should be addressed to ensure a more comprehensive understanding for patients of treatment options.

  14. Follow-up Care Education and Information: Identifying Cancer Survivors in Need of More Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Denalee M; Hudson, Shawna V; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Bator, Alicja; Lee, Heather S; Gundersen, Daniel A; Miller, Suzanne M

    2016-03-01

    Cancer survivors engage in cancer screenings and protective health behaviors at suboptimal rates despite their increased risk for future illness. Survivorship care plans and other educational strategies to prepare cancer survivors to adopt engaged roles in managing long-term follow-up care and health risks are needed. In a sample of cancer survivors, we identified patient characteristics and psychosocial predictors associated with increased follow-up care informational needs. Cross-sectional surveys were administered to early-stage breast and prostate survivors (N = 278; 68 % breast) at least 2 years post treatment from four community hospital programs in New Jersey between May 2012 and July 2013. Patient demographics, medical history, psychosocial characteristics (i.e., worries about the future, fear of disease recurrence, and patient activation), and perceptions of oncology and primary care were assessed. African-American survivors (AOR = 2.69, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.68) and survivors with higher comorbidity (AOR =1.16, CI 1.01-1.33) were more likely to want additional information to guide follow-up care. Adjusting for race and comorbidities, survivors who wanted more information to guide their follow-up care reported greater worries about the future (p educational strategies that are both responsive to the needs of specific populations (e.g., African-American survivors and patients with multiple comorbidities) and the psychosocial profiles that motivate requests for more extensive follow-up guidance. PMID:25524391

  15. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  16. What physicians think about the need for informed consent for communicating the risk of cancer from low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, a subsidiary of the Food and Drug Administration, has declared that X-ray radiation at low doses is a human carcinogen. The purpose of our study was to determine if informed consent should be obtained for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiation-based imaging. Institutional review board approval was obtained for the prospective survey of 456 physicians affiliated with three tertiary hospitals by means of a written questionnaire. Physicians were asked to state their subspecialty, number of years in practice, frequency of referral for CT scanning, level of awareness about the risk of radiation-induced cancer associated with CT, knowledge of whether such information is provided to patients undergoing CT, and opinions about the need for obtaining informed consent as well as who should provide information about the radiation-induced cancer risk to patients. Physicians were also asked to specify their preference among different formats of informed consent for communicating the potential risk of radiation-induced cancer. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-squared test. Most physicians stated that informed consent should be obtained from patients undergoing radiation-based imaging (71.3%, 325/456) and the radiology department should provide information about the risk of radiation-induced cancer to these patients (54.6%, 249/456). The informed consent format that most physicians agreed with included modifications to the National Institute of Environmental Health Services report on cancer risk from low-dose radiation (20.2%, 92/456) or included information on the risk of cancer from background radiation compared to that from low-dose radiation (39.5%, 180/456). Most physicians do not know if patients are informed about cancer risk from radiation-based imaging in their institutions. However, they believe that informed consent for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer

  17. Use and Value of Geographic Information: Initiative 4 Specialist Meeting Summary Report and Proceedings (89-7)

    OpenAIRE

    Calkins, Hugh W.; Onsrud, Harlan; Obermeyer, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    The Specialist Meeting for Initiative 4, "the use and value of geographic information," was held in Tenants Harbor, Maine from May 6 through May 10, 1989. The meeting brought together a group of roughly thirty academics, government officials, andrepresentatives of private firms along with NCGIA researchers to develop an agenda for research on the use and value of geographic information. The meeting participants represented a variety of disciplines, including geography, surveying engineering, ...

  18. Tailored information increases patient/physician discussion of colon cancer risk and testing: The Cancer Risk Intake System trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Celette Sugg; Gupta, Samir; Bishop, Wendy Pechero; Ahn, Chul; Tiro, Jasmin A; Halm, Ethan A; Farrell, David; Marks, Emily; Morrow, Jay; Julka, Manjula; McCallister, Katharine; Sanders, Joanne M; Rawl, Susan M

    2016-12-01

    Assess whether receipt of tailored printouts generated by the Cancer Risk Intake System (CRIS) - a touch-screen computer program that collects data from patients and generates printouts for patients and physicians - results in more reported patient-provider discussions about colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and screening than receipt of non-tailored information. Cluster-randomized trial, randomized by physician, with data collected via CRIS prior to visit and 2-week follow-up telephone survey among 623 patients. Patients aged 25-75 with upcoming primary-care visits and eligible for, but currently non-adherent to CRC screening guidelines. Patient-reported discussions with providers about CRC risk and testing. Tailored recipients were more likely to report patient-physician discussions about personal and familial risk, stool testing, and colonoscopy (all p cancer (+ 10%); family history (+ 15%); stool testing (+ 9%); and colonoscopy (+ 8%) (all p < 0.05). CRIS is a promising strategy for facilitating discussions about testing in primary-care settings. PMID:27413654

  19. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Information on Prostate Cancer What is prostate cancer? Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American ... of page Additional Resources of Information on Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Medical ...

  20. The role of helplines in cancer care: intertwining emotional support with information or advice-seeking needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Katie; McDermott, Joanne; Moynihan, Clare; Brindle, Lucy; Little, Paul; Leydon, Geraldine M

    2014-01-01

    Helplines are core feature of the contemporary U.K. health care system, however little is known about callers' experiences of seeking cancer-related telephone help. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 32 cancer helpline callers. The findings suggest cancer helplines offer callers (1) time to discuss their issues, (2) anonymity, (3) convenience, and (4) an open outlet for anyone affected by cancer including family/friends. Further, the findings highlighted that callers' help-seeking behavior was multifaceted, with their psychosocial needs being intrinsically intertwined with their information or advice-seeking needs. The implications are discussed in relation to the role of cancer helplines in the healthcare system. PMID:24611530

  1. My Cancer Genome: Evaluating an Educational Model to Introduce Patients and Caregivers to Precision Medicine Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnoor, Sheila V; Koonce, Taneya Y; Levy, Mia A; Lovly, Christine M; Naylor, Helen M; Anderson, Ingrid A; Micheel, Christine M; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Ye, Fei; Giuse, Nunzia B

    2016-01-01

    This study tested an innovative model for creating consumer-level content about precision medicine based on health literacy and learning style principles. "Knowledge pearl" videos, incorporating multiple learning modalities, were created to explain genetic and cancer medicine concepts. Cancer patients and caregivers (n=117) were randomized to view professional-level content directly from the My Cancer Genome (MCG) website (Group A; control), content from MCG with knowledge pearls embedded (Group B), or a consumer translation, targeted at the sixth grade level, with knowledge pearls embedded (Group C). A multivariate analysis showed that Group C, but not Group B, showed greater knowledge gains immediately after viewing the educational material than Group A. Statistically significant group differences in test performance were no longer observed three weeks later. These findings suggest that adherence to health literacy and learning style principles facilitates comprehension of precision medicine concepts and that ongoing review of the educational information is necessary. PMID:27570660

  2. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  3. An Informal Summary of a New Formalism for Classifying Spin-Orbit Systems Using Tools Distilled from the Theory of Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemann, Klaus; Ellison, James A; Vogt, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    We give an informal summary of ongoing work which uses tools distilled from the theory of fibre bundles to classify and connect invariant fields associated with spin motion in storage rings. We mention four major theorems. One ties invariant fields with the notion of normal form, the second allows comparison of different invariant fields and the two others tie the existence of invariant fields to the existence of certain invariant sets. We explain how the theorems apply to the spin dynamics of spin-$1/2$ and spin-$1$ particles. Our approach elegantly unifies the spin-vector dynamics from the T-BMT equation with the spin-tensor dynamics and other dynamics and suggests an avenue for addressing the question of the existence of the invariant spin field.

  4. A systematic review and thematic synthesis of quality of life in the informal carers of cancer patients with cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Darlington, Anne-Sophie; Hopkinson, J.B.; Fitzsimmons, D.; Johnson, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: informal carers of cancer patients with cachexia face additional challenges to those encountered by informal carers in general because of the central role food and eating play in everyday life. Patient weight loss and anorexia, core features of cancer cachexia, are frequent causes of distress in caregivers. Identification of quality of life (QOL) issues can inform the development of interventions for both caregivers and patients, and facilitate communication with healthcare profes...

  5. Information Sciences--1968; Being a Summary Report of the Contracts and Grants of the Directorate of Information Sciences Active during All or a Part of 1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Aerospace Research (Air Force), Arlington, VA.

    The progress made on 65 contracts and grants active during 1968 in the four areas designated by the COSATI subject headings: (1) documentation and information technology, (2) language and linguistics, (3) bionics and (4) information theory are presented. Selected highlights of the program are given in the introductory chapter. This is followed by…

  6. What Causes Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this section you can get information on cigarette, cigar, and smokeless tobacco use, and learn how it ... Basics What Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer ...

  7. Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Screening ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  8. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Cancer ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  9. Assessing Technologies for Information-Seeking on Prostate Cancer Screening by Low-Income Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan W. McRoy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents a multipart investigation of the benefits and challenges in deploying automated question-answering as an alternative to web-based searching to provide information about prostate cancer screening for low-income men age 40 years and older. Methods: The study comprised: 1 a survey assessing current use of the Internet, mobile phones and texting; 2 a controlled observational study of both web-based searching and automated question-answering for information about prostate cancer; and 3 a formative field study in which subjects interacted with a health department nurse using text messages. Results: Survey results suggest the target population has greater access to, and familiarity with, cell phones and text messaging compared to the Internet and web-based searching. Participants were significantly more confident using a cell phone and preferred to get health information through text messaging. Participants in the controlled observational study accepted the text messaging system, with most indicating it answered their questions, was easy to use and was a favorable tool for information-seeking. The field study also demonstrated potential for automated question-answering and text messaging to help the target population access health information. Conclusions: A two-way text messaging system has great potential to promote health communication and health information distribution. Participant interest in this system was high and did not seem to be specific to prostate cancer screening, suggesting that information about other topics, such as high blood pressure screening, could be provided similarly. We believe more investigations should be focused on this area, especially on benefits for the low-income community.

  10. A social media approach to inform youth about breast cancer and smoking: an exploratory descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; Struik, Laura L; Bissell, Laura J L; Graham, Raquel; Stevens, Jodie; Richardson, Chris G

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco exposure during periods of breast development has been shown to increase risk of premenopausal breast cancer. An urgent need exists, therefore, to raise awareness among adolescent girls about this new evidence, and for adolescent girls and boys who smoke to understand how their smoking puts their female peers at risk for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to develop two youth-informed, gender specific YouTube-style videos designed to raise awareness among adolescent girls and boys about tobacco exposure as a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer and to assess youths' responses to the videos and their potential for inclusion on social media platforms. Both videos consisted of a combination of moving text, novel images, animations, and youth-friendly music. A brief questionnaire was used to gather feedback on two videos using a convenience sample of 135 youth in British Columbia, Canada. The overall positive responses by girls and boys to their respective videos and their reported interest in sharing these videos via social networking suggests that this approach holds potential for other types of health promotion messaging targeting youth. The videos offer a promising messaging strategy for raising awareness about tobacco exposure as a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Tailored, gender-specific messages for use on social media hold the potential for cost-effective, health promotion and cancer prevention initiatives targeting youth. PMID:25109215

  11. 75 FR 1617 - Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol: In Support of the Summary Information in the Integrated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Office of Research and Development (ORD). The public comment period and the EPA Science Advisory Board... peer review under applicable information quality guidelines. This document has not been formally... separate processes that provide opportunities for all interested parties to comment on the document....

  12. Heart Disease and Colon Cancer Prevention Beliefs and Their Association With Information Seeking and Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovick, Shelly R; Bigsby, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Despite their understanding of the links between (a) information seeking and scanning and (b) health outcomes, researchers still know relatively little about the impact of information behaviors on people's disease-related beliefs and attitudes. The goal of this study was to validate findings linking information and health behaviors and to assess whether information seeking and scanning are associated with beliefs about the effectiveness of heart disease and colon cancer risk prevention behaviors (in regard to exercise, controlling one's diet to prevent overweight/obesity, and daily fruit and vegetable intake), as well as determine whether the effects of seeking versus scanning on these beliefs differ. Data from the Annenberg National Health Communication Survey were analyzed (N = 3,212). For colon cancer, significant main effects were detected for information scanning for each of the 3 beliefs assessed (p .05). Our results suggest that disease-related cognitions and beliefs, which ultimately impact decisions to engage in prevention behaviors, may be influenced most by less purposeful forms of information acquisition. PMID:26444664

  13. The TRAIN-project: railway safety and the train driver information environment and work situation. A summary of the main results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecklund, L. [MTO Psychology and Swedish National Rail Administration (Sweden); Ingre, M.; Kecklund, G.; Soederstroem, M.; Aakerstedt, T. [National Inst. for Psychosocial Factors and Health (Sweden); Lindberg, E. [Swedish National Rail Administration (Sweden); Jansson, A.; Olsson, E.; Sandblad, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Human-Computer Interaction; Almqvist, P. [Swedish State Railways (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    The TRAIN project investigates traffic safety related risks, focusing in particular on the train driver work situation, use of information but also on the supporting safety organisation. It is an on-going project funded and managed by Swedish National Rail Administration and carried out by independent researchers. The project provides a multi-disciplinary investigation by use of a man-technology-organisation (MTO) perspective. Activities performed are task analysis, evaluation of the drivers use of information and interaction with the ATP system as well as analyses of stress, mental workload and work hours. Several methods are being used such as interviews, questionnaires, diaries, activity monitoring and videotapes. This paper gives an overview of the project as well as a short summary of the main results. Detailed results are presented in separate reports as started in the reference list. Some of the main results are that the drivers report severe problems concerning sleepiness on early morning shifts, problems with maintenance on vehicles, lack of information supporting the planning task as well as problems in understanding ATP functions. Two groups of drivers having a feed-back related as opposed to a feed-forward driving style could be identified. In conclusion there is a great need to perform more scientific studies of human factors and railway safety as well as to implement safety management programs including professional human factors competence in the railway industries. (orig.)

  14. Sources of Information that Promote Breast and Cervical Cancer Knowledge and Screening Among Native Hawaiians in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouttapa, Michele; Ichinose, Travers Y.; Pang, Jane Ka'ala; Ueda, Dawn; Tanjasiri, Sora Park

    2013-01-01

    Breast and cervical cancers are the second and fourth leading causes of cancer death among Asian and Pacific Islander women. Despite screening exams that can detect these cancers early and increase survival, racial and ethnic populations continue to be disproportionately affected. This study examined the sources of information and their impacts on cancer screening compliance among native Hawaiians in Orange County, California. A community-based participatory research approach was used to conceive, design, implement, and analyze data. A relatively small proportion of the study's native Hawaiian women were compliant with recommended breast and cervical cancer screenings, and their screening rates were below the national Healthy People 2010 standards. Knowledge of screening procedures, seeking advice from a doctor, and obtaining information from internet medical sites were associated with higher rates of compliance with cancer-screening procedures. PMID:20237883

  15. Between personal and relational privacy: understanding the work of informed consent in cancer genetics in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Goldim, J. R.; Gibbon, S.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from perspectives of both bioethics and anthropology, this article explores how the boundaries between personal and relational privacy are negotiated by patients and practitioners in the context of an emerging domain of cancer genetics in Brazil. It reflects on the place of informed consent in the history of bioethics in North America in contrast to the development of bioethics in Brazil and the particular social cultural context in which consent is sought in Brazilian public health c...

  16. Improving the Deaf community's access to prostate and testicular cancer information: a survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Sadler Georgia; Folkins Ann; Ko Celine; Branz Patricia; Marsh Shane; Bovee Michael

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the Deaf community face communication barriers to accessing health information. To resolve these inequalities, educational programs must be designed in the appropriate format and language to meet their needs. Methods Deaf men (102) were surveyed before, immediately following, and two months after viewing a 52-minute prostate and testicular cancer video in American Sign Language (ASL) with open text captioning and voice overlay. To provide the Deaf community with...

  17. Integrative Analysis of Response to Tamoxifen Treatment in ER-Positive Breast Cancer Using GWAS Information and Transcription Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Chindo Hicks; Ranjit Kumar; Antonio Pannuti; Lucio Miele

    2012-01-01

    Variable response and resistance to tamoxifen treatment in breast cancer patients remains a major clinical problem. To determine whether genes and biological pathways containing SNPs associated with risk for breast cancer are dysregulated in response to tamoxifen treatment, we performed analysis combining information from 43 genome-wide association studies with gene expression data from 298 ER+ breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen and 125 ER+ controls. We identified 95 genes which di...

  18. Factors Associated with Use of Interactive Cancer Communication System: An Application of the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jeong Yeob; Wise, Meg; Kim, Eunkyung; Pingree, Ray; Hawkins, Robert P.; Pingree, Suzanne; McTAVISH, FIONA; Gustafson, David H.

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide insights about cancer patients’ online information seeking behaviors, the present study analyzes individuals’ transaction log data and reports on how demographics, disease-related factors, and psychosocial needs predict patterns of service use within a particular Interactive Cancer Communication System (ICCS). Study sample included 294 recently diagnosed breast cancer patients. Data included pretest survey scores of demographic, disease-related, and psychosocial factors an...

  19. Perceptions of burden of caregiving by informal caregivers of cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Akpan-Idiok, Paulina Ackley; Anarado, Agnes Nonye

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer care is devastating to families. This research studied the informal caregivers’ perceptions of burden of caregiving to cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Methods The research adopted a cross-sectioned descriptive design and 210 caregivers providing care to advanced cancer patients were purposively selected. Data were collected using a researcher developed questionnaire and standardized Zarit Burden Interview scale (ZBIS). Data colle...

  20. Assessment of the contents related to screening on Portuguese language websites providing information on breast and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ferreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the quality of the contents related to screening in a sample of websites providing information on breast and prostate cancer in the Portuguese language. The first 200 results of each cancer-specific Google search were considered. The accuracy of the screening contents was defined in accordance with the state of the art, and its readability was assessed. Most websites mentioned mammography as a method for breast cancer screening (80%, although only 28% referred to it as the only recommended method. Almost all websites mentioned PSA evaluation as a possible screening test, but correct information regarding its effectiveness was given in less than 10%. For both breast and prostate cancer screening contents, the potential for overdiagnosis and false positive results was seldom addressed, and the median readability index was approximately 70. There is ample margin for improving the quality of websites providing information on breast and prostate cancer in Portuguese.

  1. Informal work and formal plans: Articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, R.; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kousgaard, MB; Andersen, John Sahl

    2013-01-01

    Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories....... participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed....... patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients' active...

  2. Finding out about sperm banking: what information is available online for men diagnosed with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, H; Wright, E; Pacey, A A; Eiser, C

    2012-09-01

    Sperm banking is routinely offered to men where there is a risk of infertility following cancer treatment but uptake is lower than expected. Since these men may turn to the internet for information, we used the search engine www.google.com to identify the material available about sperm banking and fertility preservation options. Sixty-six resources (NHS/Private Clinic, Charity, Press Releases, General and Forums/Blogs) fulfilled the criteria for inclusion and were examined for quality including readability, layout and content. The most frequently reported information related to: (1) effects of cancer treatment on fertility (77.3%); (2) reasons to bank sperm (69.7%); and (3) fertility recovery after treatment (57.6%). Information about maintaining contact with the sperm bank (18.2%) and disposal of banked samples (10.6%) was less often included. The quality of information available on the Internet about sperm banking was variable. The readability of all resources was assessed as 'fairly difficult', i.e. reading skills required were too complex for the average member of the public to understand. Furthermore, visual presentation of material (e.g. lay out) did not facilitate easy reading. More attention should be given to information about longer-term issues, such as fertility recovery and the use or disposal of banked sperm. PMID:22746362

  3. Geographic Information Systems-Transportation ISTEA management systems server-net prototype pooled fund study: Phase B summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, J. Jr.; Dean, C.D.; Armstrong, H.M. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The Geographic Information System-Transportation (GIS-T) ISTEA Management Systems Server Net Prototype Pooled Fund Study represents the first national cooperative effort in the transportation industry to address the management and monitoring systems as well as the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). The Study was initiated in November 1993 through the Alliance for Transportation Research and under the leadership of the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department. Sandia National Laboratories, an Alliance partner, and Geographic Paradigm Computing. Inc. provided technical leadership for the project. In 1992, the Alliance for Transportation Research, the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department, Sandia National Laboratories, and Geographic Paradigm Computing, Inc., proposed a comprehensive research agenda for GIS-T. That program outlined a national effort to synthesize new transportation policy initiatives (e.g., management systems and Intelligent Transportation Systems) with the GIS-T server net ideas contained in the NCHRP project {open_quotes}Adaptation of GIS to Transportation{close_quotes}. After much consultation with state, federal, and private interests, a project proposal based on this agenda was prepared and resulted in this Study. The general objective of the Study was to develop GIS-T server net prototypes supporting the ISTEA requirements for transportation planning and management and monitoring systems. This objective can be further qualified to: (1) Create integrated information system architectures and design requirements encompassing transportation planning activities and data. (2) Encourage the development of functional GIS-T server net prototypes. (3) Demonstrate multiple information systems implemented in a server net environment.

  4. A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  5. Summary of the contractor information exchange meeting for improving the safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants, February 19, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes a meeting held on February 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. The meeting was held primarily to exchange information among the contractors involved in the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to improve the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Previous meetings have been held on December 5-6, 1995, and May 22, 1996. The meetings are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy works with countries to increase the level of safety at 63 Soviet-designed nuclear reactors operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The work is implemented largely by commercial companies and individuals who provide technologies and services to the countries with Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Attending the meeting were 71 representatives of commercial contractors, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, national laboratories, and other federal agencies. The presentations and discussions that occurred during the exchange are summarized in this report. While this report captures the general presentation and discussion points covered at the meeting, it is not a verbatim, inclusive record. To make the report useful, information presented at the meeting has been expanded to clarify issues, respond to attendees' requests, or place discussion points in a broader programmatic context. Appendixes A through F contain the meeting agenda, list of attendees, copies of presentation visuals and handouts, the Strategy Document discussed at the meeting, and a summary of attendees' post-meeting evaluation comments. As with past information exchanges, the participants found this meeting valuable and useful. In response to the participant's requests, a fourth information exchange will be held later in 1997

  6. Summary of the contractor information exchange meeting for improving the safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants, February 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes a meeting held on February 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. The meeting was held primarily to exchange information among the contractors involved in the U.S. Department of Energy`s efforts to improve the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Previous meetings have been held on December 5-6, 1995, and May 22, 1996. The meetings are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy works with countries to increase the level of safety at 63 Soviet-designed nuclear reactors operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The work is implemented largely by commercial companies and individuals who provide technologies and services to the countries with Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Attending the meeting were 71 representatives of commercial contractors, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, national laboratories, and other federal agencies. The presentations and discussions that occurred during the exchange are summarized in this report. While this report captures the general presentation and discussion points covered at the meeting, it is not a verbatim, inclusive record. To make the report useful, information presented at the meeting has been expanded to clarify issues, respond to attendees` requests, or place discussion points in a broader programmatic context. Appendixes A through F contain the meeting agenda, list of attendees, copies of presentation visuals and handouts, the Strategy Document discussed at the meeting, and a summary of attendees` post-meeting evaluation comments. As with past information exchanges, the participants found this meeting valuable and useful. In response to the participant`s requests, a fourth information exchange will be held later in 1997.

  7. Information and rehabilitation needs of Indian breast cancer patients: Report of a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer causes significant disruption to the quality of life (QOL of its patients, which is compounded further by lack of information and adequate facilities for rehabilitation. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in women who had completed their Primary treatment of breast cancer. The QOL was assessed by Functional assessment of cancer therapy-breast (FACT-B version 4, and information and rehabilitation needs were enquired about in a semi-structured interview. Results: A total of 154 patients were enrolled and divided into three groups according to the time elapsed after initial treatment; Group I: 1-2 years, Group II: 2-5 years, Group III: >5 years The FACT-B mean scores were; Group I (n = 64: 79.06 ± 14.60; Group II (n = 48: 85.75 ± 20.15; and Group III (n = 42: 89.83 ± 12.80. Patients in Group I scored lowest on physical well-being subscale, Group II on breast specific subscale and Group III on Social well-being subscale. Pain, lack of energy, inability to meet the needs of the family, fear that the condition will get worse and loss of body image were significant factors contributing to poor QOL. Analysis of interviewshowed many unmet information needs. Main rehabilitation needs were effective treatment of physical symptoms and counselling about body image issues and sexual dysfunctions. Easy availability of clinical and social support services were major felt needs in the long-term follow-up. Conclusions: Targeted Interventions are needed to address issues relating to QOL and rehabilitation needs of breast cancer patients.

  8. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of four recent crisis management publications: (1) "Crisis Intervention for Children/Caregivers Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence," summarized by Donna DeVaughn Kreskey; (2) "Predictors of Trauma Reactions Following the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks," summarized by Kelly O'Connor; (3) "Cognitive Coping Styles and PTSD…

  9. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this column, members of the NASP Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group provide summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among rescue workers. The second article explored the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention, which is…

  10. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  11. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "The Impact of School Violence on School Personnel," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux; (2) "Children Exposed to War/Terrorism," summarized by Jennifer DeFago; and (3) "Suicide Survivors Seeking Mental Health Services," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux. The first…

  12. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations.

  13. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations

  14. The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA): maintaining and operating a public information repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kenneth; Vendt, Bruce; Smith, Kirk; Freymann, John; Kirby, Justin; Koppel, Paul; Moore, Stephen; Phillips, Stanley; Maffitt, David; Pringle, Michael; Tarbox, Lawrence; Prior, Fred

    2013-12-01

    The National Institutes of Health have placed significant emphasis on sharing of research data to support secondary research. Investigators have been encouraged to publish their clinical and imaging data as part of fulfilling their grant obligations. Realizing it was not sufficient to merely ask investigators to publish their collection of imaging and clinical data, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) created the open source National Biomedical Image Archive software package as a mechanism for centralized hosting of cancer related imaging. NCI has contracted with Washington University in Saint Louis to create The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA)-an open-source, open-access information resource to support research, development, and educational initiatives utilizing advanced medical imaging of cancer. In its first year of operation, TCIA accumulated 23 collections (3.3 million images). Operating and maintaining a high-availability image archive is a complex challenge involving varied archive-specific resources and driven by the needs of both image submitters and image consumers. Quality archives of any type (traditional library, PubMed, refereed journals) require management and customer service. This paper describes the management tasks and user support model for TCIA. PMID:23884657

  15. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions

  16. Informing cancer patient in relation to his type of personality: the emotional-hyperthymic (dramatizing) patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergis, G

    2011-01-01

    Informing a cancer patient has been an issue of particular interest to the scientific community over the last 50 years. Since 1989 we have been studying the characters or personality types based on the Kahana and Bibring's approach as part of Consultation-Liaison (C-L) Psychiatry. The question posed was how these characters or personality types could be useful in the process of informing the cancer patient. The aim of this paper was to describe the emotional-hyperthymic character or type of personality thoroughly, so that any physician can make a diagnosis and tailor the information strategy to the patient's needs. The qualitative method of research through groups with doctors and nurses was used, while the research within groups lasted for 5 years. The degree of patients' denial varied between "large" and "very large" and sometimes was "medium". Initially, the degree of information was "minimal", then "small" until it reached "medium". A discordance was evident between what the patient showed and what the family reported about him. The patient presented himself as courageous and extrovert, but the relatives considered him as faint-hearted. PMID:22331735

  17. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand, E-mail: as4351@columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions.

  18. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6 %), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4 %), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0 % of pre-roll video views and 44.4 % of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost. PMID:25877466

  19. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Chu, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6%), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4%), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0% of pre-roll video views and 44.4% of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost. PMID:25877466

  20. Information on the Internet about colorectal cancer: patient attitude and potential toward Web browsing. A prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad S.; Shakir, Ali J.; Baig, Mirza K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer who seek to improve their knowledge of health and treatment options can now access in a few seconds data that would previously have required hours of research. Our aim was to evaluate the attitudes of patients toward Web browsing for information on colorectal cancer. Methods We surveyed all patients attending a colorectal cancer follow-up clinic between January and August 2007 on their use of the Internet to obtain information on colorectal cancer. Results In all, 439 patients with mean age of 68.6 years participated in the study. Of these, 24% reported using the Internet to obtain colorectal cancer information. Most participants used the Google search engine. Only 13% of participants confirmed that colorectal cancer information on the Internet was helpful in decision-making. Patients under the age of 65 years were more likely to have Internet access (p < 0.001), more likely to use the Internet to find colorectal cancer information (p = 0.005) and more likely to access a site recommended by a colorectal specialist (p = 0.002). Among Internet users, men were slightly more likely than women to use the Internet, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.20). Conclusion The Internet is a useful tool for disseminating information about colorectal cancer. The best sites are still difficult for patients to distinguish from the thousands of sites returned by search engines. This study demonstrates that the level of potential interest is sufficient to justify the development of a departmental or regional colorectal cancer network of websites and indicates areas of interest for patients. PMID:21933528

  1. Information about oral cancer on the Internet: our patients cannot understand it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Centelles, P; Ledesma-Ludi, Y; Seoane-Romero, J M; Seoane, J

    2015-04-01

    Although information about cancer on the Internet can be beneficial to patients and physicians, to our knowledge, comprehension by patients has not been investigated. We used 3 search engines to select websites on oral cancer then assessed their readability using the Flesch-Kinkaid Reading Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease Score, Gunning Fog Index, Coleman-Liau Index, Automated Readability Index, and the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook Index (SMOG). The mean scores for readability were within the range of "difficult to read" (FRES=36.04 (14.87)) with high educational requirements (FKRGL=11.44 (3.27)). This could hamper comprehension and is particularly worrying given the high percentage of people who have poor levels of literacy. PMID:25703184

  2. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  3. Selective information seeking: can consumers' avoidance of evidence-based information on colorectal cancer screening be explained by the theory of cognitive dissonance?

    OpenAIRE

    Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Kasper, Jürgen; Steckelberg, Anke

    2007-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based patient information (EBPI) is a prerequisite for informed decision-making. However, presentation of EBPI may lead to irrational reactions causing avoidance, minimisation and devaluation of the information. Objective: To explore whether the theory of cognitive dissonance is applicable to medical decision-making and useful to explain these phenomena. Setting and participants: 261 volunteers from Hamburg (157 women), ≥50 years old without diagnosis of colorectal cancer...

  4. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  5. Attitudes of Saudi medical students toward the disclosure of information on cancer in eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M Al-Amri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the attitude of future physicians regarding the disclosure of diagnosis, prognosis, benefits, and adverse effects of therapeutic intervention if they happen to have cancer. It also examined the differences if any between regions or gender. Materials and Methods: A total of 332 medical students from University of Dammam, in the Eastern Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of nine questions on the attitudes to disclosure of information on cancer. This self-administered questionnaire was completed by the students in the presence of an investigator. Results: The vast majority of Saudi medical students stated that they would like to know about diagnosis of cancer (92.8% and only 7.2% wanted information withheld from them. Further, 67% of the males and 74.1% of the females wanted family members to know (P = 0.01, but one-third (33% did not want their family to know. Only 24.1% of the male and 21.1% of female students wanted their friends to know. In addition, -97% of the males and 98.8% of the females wanted to know the diagnosis, and 97% and 95.8% of females and males, respectively, would like to know the side effects of the therapy. Almost 95% of male and 93.4% of female students wanted to know the prognosis. Also, 98% of medical students from the Eastern Region would want the diagnosis of cancer to be disclosed compared to 73.6% of those from other regions (P = 0.01. There is no difference between the genders in attitudes toward the disclosure of the diagnosis, 94.6% and 92.2% (P = 0.38. Conclusions: There was a consensus among Saudi medical students on the knowledge of the benefits of treatment, adverse effects of therapy, and prognosis. Female students significantly more than males would like their families to be informed. Significantly more medical students from the Eastern Region than those from other regions would like the diagnosis of

  6. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O;

    2011-01-01

    for improvements, 21 key issues were defined and validated through a questionnaire in an independent group of breast cancer patient advocates. Clear messages, emotionally neutral expressions, careful descriptions of side effects, clear comparisons between different treatment alternatives and information about......Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used...... the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials....

  7. Between personal and relational privacy: understanding the work of informed consent in cancer genetics in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldim, José Roberto; Gibbon, Sahra

    2015-07-01

    Drawing from perspectives of both bioethics and anthropology, this article explores how the boundaries between personal and relational privacy are negotiated by patients and practitioners in the context of an emerging domain of cancer genetics in Brazil. It reflects on the place of informed consent in the history of bioethics in North America in contrast to the development of bioethics in Brazil and the particular social cultural context in which consent is sought in Brazilian public health care. Making use of empirical research with families and individuals receiving genetic counselling related to increased genetic risk for cancer, in genetic clinics in southern Brazil, it examines how informed consent is linked to the necessary movement between personal and relational privacy. The paper illustrates the value of a particular tool known as a 'sociogram' to examine the complex interpersonal dynamics that arise in negotiating informed consent at the interface between the family and the individual in Brazil. The paper, therefore, points to the scope of further interdisciplinary exchanges between anthropology and bioethics, confronting the new challenges that arise in the context of medical genetics in developing country. PMID:25998783

  8. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Stomach Cancer Key Points Stomach (gastric) cancer is a ...

  10. Oral Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quit General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer are diseases in ... about how you might lower your risk of cancer. Oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer are two different ...

  11. Older cancer patients' information and support needs surrounding treatment: An evaluation through the eyes of patients, relatives and professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Weert Julia CM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing cancer patients with adequate treatment information is important for patients' health, well-being and satisfaction. Nurses play an important role in patient education. So far, few studies focused on the specific information needs of older cancer patients surrounding chemotherapy treatment. Given the growing incidence of cancer among older individuals, insight in these needs is crucial. This article describes the views of older cancer patients, their relatives and professionals on older patients' specific communication needs regarding chemotherapy treatment. Methods A qualitative design was used. Five focus group interviews were held with older cancer patients and their partners (two groups and professionals with a background in nursing, oncology, gerontology and/or patient-provider communication (three groups. In addition, face to face in-depth interviews were conducted with older cancer patients. A total number of 38 patients and relatives participated, with a mean age of 67.6 years. The focus groups and interviews were audio-recorded for subsequent transcription and analysis. Results Older people have more difficulties processing and remembering information than younger ones. A trustful environment appears to be a prerequisite for reflection of older patients on the information provided and individualized information is essential to enhance memory of information. However, the results show that both patients and professionals experienced insufficient exploration of the patients' personal situation and individual information needs. Patients also strengthened the importance of sensitive communication, e.g. showing empathy en emotional support, throughout the continuum of cancer care. Moreover, potential areas of improvement were identified, including engaging the patients' relatives and encouraging patients and relatives to ask questions. Conclusion Patient education should be more tailored to older cancer patients

  12. Managing symptoms during cancer treatments: evaluating the implementation of evidence-informed remote support protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Dawn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of cancer treatment-related symptoms is an important safety issue given that symptoms can become life-threatening and often occur when patients are at home. With funding from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, a pan-Canadian steering committee was established with representation from eight provinces to develop symptom protocols using a rigorous methodology (CAN-IMPLEMENT©. Each protocol is based on a systematic review of the literature to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines. Protocols were validated by cancer nurses from across Canada. The aim of this study is to build an effective and sustainable approach for implementing evidence-informed protocols for nurses to use when providing remote symptom assessment, triage, and guidance in self-management for patients experiencing symptoms while undergoing cancer treatments. Methods A prospective mixed-methods study design will be used. Guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework, the study will involve (a establishing an advisory knowledge user team in each of three targeted settings; (b assessing factors influencing nurses’ use of protocols using interviews/focus groups and a standardized survey instrument; (c adapting protocols for local use, ensuring fidelity of the content; (d selecting intervention strategies to overcome known barriers and implementing the protocols; (e conducting think-aloud usability testing; (f evaluating protocol use and outcomes by conducting an audit of 100 randomly selected charts at each of the three settings; and (g assessing satisfaction with remote support using symptom protocols and change in nurses’ barriers to use using survey instruments. The primary outcome is sustained use of the protocols, defined as use in 75% of the calls. Descriptive analysis will be conducted for the barriers, use of protocols, and chart audit outcomes. Content analysis will be conducted on interviews/focus groups and usability testing

  13. Verbal versus Numerical Probabilities: Does Format Presentation of Probabilistic Information regarding Breast Cancer Screening Affect Women's Comprehension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Mandana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the format in which women receive probabilistic information about breast cancer and mammography affects their comprehension. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women received pre-assembled randomized packages containing a breast health information brochure, with probabilities presented in either verbal or numeric…

  14. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 18 May 2001, the Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, within the municipality of Eurajoki. The Municipality Council and the government has made positive decisions earlier, at the end of 2000, and in compliance with the Nuclear Energy Act, Parliament's ratification was then required. The decision is valid for the spent fuel generated by the existing Finnish nuclear power plants and means that the construction of the final disposal facility is considered to be in line with the overall good of society. Earlier steps included, amongst others, the approval of the technical project by the Safety Authority. Future steps include construction of an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO (2003-2004), and application for separate construction and operating licences for the final disposal facility (from about 2010). How did this political and societal decision come about? The FSC Workshop provided the opportunity to present the history leading up to the Decision in Principle (DiP), and to examine future perspectives with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It presents, for the most part, a factual account of the individual presentations and of the discussions that took place. It relies importantly on the notes that were taken at the meeting. Most materials are elaborated upon in a fuller way in the texts that the various speakers and session moderators contributed for these proceedings. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's perspective aiming to place the results of all discussions, feedback and site visit into an international perspective. (authors)

  15. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  16. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  17. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2000-09-01

    This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed by some personal reminiscences that go back a significant fraction of the century. I conclude in the form of a poem about this memorable conference in honor of the centennial anniversary of the Kodaikanal Observatory.

  18. An Assessment to Inform Pediatric Cancer Provider Development and Delivery of Survivor Care Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Echo L; Wu, Yelena P; Hacking, Claire C; Wright, Jennifer; Spraker-Perlman, Holly L; Gardner, Emmie; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2015-12-01

    Current guidelines recommend all pediatric cancer survivors receive a survivor care plan (SCP) for optimal health management, yet clinical delivery of SCPs varies. We evaluated oncology providers' familiarity with and preferences for delivering SCPs to inform the implementation of a future SCP program at our institution. From November 2013 to April 2014, oncology providers from the Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City, UT, completed a survey (n=41) and a 45-min focus group (n=18). Participants reported their familiarity with and training in SCP guidelines, opinions on SCPs, and barriers to delivering SCPs. As a secondary analysis, we examined differences in survey responses between physicians and nurses with Fisher's exact tests. Focus group transcripts and open-ended survey responses were content analyzed. Participants reported high familiarity with late effects of cancer treatment (87.8%) and follow-up care that cancer survivors should receive (82.5%). Few providers had delivered an SCP (oncologists 35.3% and nurses 5.0%; p=0.03). Barriers to providing SCPs included lack of knowledge (66.7%), SCP delivery is not expected in their clinic (53.9%), and no champion (48.7%). In qualitative comments, providers expressed that patient age variation complicated SCP delivery. Participants supported testing an SCP intervention program (95.1%) and felt this should be a team-based approach. Strategies for optimal delivery of SCPs are needed. Participants supported testing an SCP program to improve the quality of patient care. Team-based approaches, including nurses and physicians, that incorporate provider training on and support for SCP delivery are needed to improve pediatric cancer care. PMID:25893925

  19. Identification of Breast Cancer Using Integrated Information from MRI and Mammography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Neng Yang

    Full Text Available Integration of information from corresponding regions between the breast MRI and an X-ray mammogram could benefit the detection of breast cancer in clinical diagnosis. We aimed to provide a framework of registration from breast MRI to mammography and to evaluate the diagnosis using the combined information.43 patients with 46 lesions underwent both MRI and mammography scans, and the interval between the two examinations was around one month. The distribution of malignant to benign lesions was 31/46 based on histological results. Maximum intensity projection and thin-plate spline methods were applied for image registration for MRI to mammography. The diagnosis using integrated information was evaluated using results of histology as the reference. The assessment of annotations and statistical analysis were performed by the two radiologists.For the cranio-caudal view, the mean post-registration error between MRI and mammography was 2.2±1.9 mm. For the medio-lateral oblique view, the proposed approach performed even better with a mean error of 3.0±2.4 mm. In the diagnosis using MRI assessment with information of mammography, the sensitivity was 91.9±2.3% (29/31, 28/31, specificity 70.0±4.7% (11/15, 10/15, accuracy 84.8±3.1% (40/46, 38/46, positive predictive value 86.4±2.1% (29/33, 28/33 and negative predictive value 80.8±5.4% (11/13, 10/13.MRI with the aid of mammography shows potential improvements of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV in clinical breast cancer diagnosis compared to the use of MRI alone.

  20. Older Cancer Patients’ User Experiences With Web-Based Health Information Tools: A Think-Aloud Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romijn, Geke; Smets, Ellen M A; Loos, Eugene F; Kunneman, Marleen; van Weert, Julia C M

    2016-01-01

    Background Health information is increasingly presented on the Internet. Several Web design guidelines for older Web users have been proposed; however, these guidelines are often not applied in website development. Furthermore, although we know that older individuals use the Internet to search for health information, we lack knowledge on how they use and evaluate Web-based health information. Objective This study evaluates user experiences with existing Web-based health information tools among older (≥ 65 years) cancer patients and survivors and their partners. The aim was to gain insight into usability issues and the perceived usefulness of cancer-related Web-based health information tools. Methods We conducted video-recorded think-aloud observations for 7 Web-based health information tools, specifically 3 websites providing cancer-related information, 3 Web-based question prompt lists (QPLs), and 1 values clarification tool, with colorectal cancer patients or survivors (n=15) and their partners (n=8) (median age: 73; interquartile range 70-79). Participants were asked to think aloud while performing search, evaluation, and application tasks using the Web-based health information tools. Results Overall, participants perceived Web-based health information tools as highly useful and indicated a willingness to use such tools. However, they experienced problems in terms of usability and perceived usefulness due to difficulties in using navigational elements, shortcomings in the layout, a lack of instructions on how to use the tools, difficulties with comprehensibility, and a large amount of variety in terms of the preferred amount of information. Although participants frequently commented that it was easy for them to find requested information, we observed that the large majority of the participants were not able to find it. Conclusions Overall, older cancer patients appreciate and are able to use cancer information websites. However, this study shows the importance

  1. Information Needs of Cancer Patients are Influenced by Time Since Diagnosis, Stage of Cancer, Patients’ Age, and Preferred Role in Treatment‐related Decisions. A review of: Kalyani, Ankem. “Factors Influencing Information Needs Among Cancer Patients: A Meta‐Analysis.” Library & Information Science Research; 28.1 (2006 7-23.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Loy

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The author aims to study the aggregate influence of demographic and situational variables on the information needs of cancer patients, in order to inform the provision of information to those patients. Design – Meta-analysis. Setting – Research articles published in the MEDLINE and CINAHL databases. Subjects – English language studies published between 1993 and 2003. An initial search set of 196 studies from MEDLINE and 283 studies from CINAHL were identified. Following rigorous assessment, 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methods – A comprehensive search of the databases was conducted, initially combining “neoplasm” with “cancer patients” using the Boolean “or”. These results were then combined with five separate searches using the following terms; information need(s, information seeking, information seeking behaviour, information source(s and information resource(s. This identified in total 479 English language articles. Based on a review of titles and abstracts, 110 articles were found covering information resources or the information needs of cancer patients. These articles were then subjected to the further inclusion criteria and limited to studies which included: analysis of information needs and/or information sources of cancer patients; adults as subjects of the research; and application of quantitative research methods and relevant statistics. This eliminated a further 35 papers. Twelve of the remaining 75 studies were selected for meta‐analysis based on their use of the same variables measured consistently in comparable units. The final 12 studies included various forms of cancer, and no distinction was made among them. All 12 studies appeared in peer‐reviewed journals. Main results – The meta‐analysis found there was consistently no difference between the information needs of men and women. Five subsets were identified within the meta‐analysis, and findings for each can be stated as

  2. Development and application of a permit information system for shale oil (PERMISSO). Final report appendix: summary sheets of regulations required for oil shale development, June 1978--May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This appendix is comprised of summaries of various governmental permits, licenses and other approvals required for oil shale development. The summaries were completed during the period June--October 1978, and are current as of July 1, 1978, although more recent authority was cited in some cases. One of the major purposes of Phase II of the project will be to update these summaries as statutes and regulations are added, changed or eliminated. This updating will be particularly important in the case of environmental permits and approvals. Many legislative and regulatory changes affecting environmental requirements are pending at this time and will alter many of the summaries herein. In addition, many regulatory proposals have been or likely will be challenged in the courts. When such conflicts are resolved further changes may be in order.

  3. Feasibility and Implementation of a Literature Information Management System for Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancers with Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  4. Program summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides summary information on all phases of nuclear regulation, and is intended as an information and decision-making tool for mid and upper level management of the nuclear regulatory commission. The report is divided functionally into ten sections: (1) Nuclear Power Plants in the United States, (2) Operating Nuclear Power Plants, (3) Reactors Under Construction, (4) Operating License Applications Under NRC Review, (5) Construction Permit Applications and Special Projects Under NRC Review, (6) ACRS and ASLBP, (7) Nuclear Materials, (8) Standards and Regulations, (9) Research Projects, and (10) Foreign Reactors

  5. Program summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides summary information on all phases of nuclear regulation, and is intended as an information and decision-making tool for mid and upper level management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is divided functionally into ten sections: (1) nuclear power plants in the United States; (2) operating nuclear power plants; (3) reactors under construction; (4) operating license applications under NRC review; (5) construction permit applications and special projects under NRC review; (6) ACRS and ASLBP; (7) nuclear materials; (8) standards and regulations; (9) research projects; and (10) foreign reactors

  6. Information needs of early-stage prostate cancer patients: A comparison of nine countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Providing information to patients can improve their medical and psychological outcomes. We sought to identify core information needs common to most early-stage prostate cancer patients in participating countries. Material and methods: Convenience samples of patients treated 3-24 months earlier were surveyed in Canada, England, Italy, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Netherlands, Spain, and Turkey. Each participant rated the importance of addressing each of 92 questions in the diagnosis-to-treatment decision interval (essential/desired/no opinion/avoid). Multivariate modelling determined the extent of variance accounted by covariates, and produced an unbiased prediction of the proportion of essential responses for each question. Results: Six hundred and fifty-nine patients responded (response rates 45-77%). On average, 35-53 questions were essential within each country; similar questions were essential to most patients in most countries. Beyond cross-country similarities, each country showed wide variability in the number and which questions were essential. Multivariate modelling showed an adjusted R-squared with predictors country, age, education, and treatment group of only 6% of the variance. A core of 20 questions were predicted to be essential to >2/3 of patients. Conclusions: Core information can be identified across countries. However, providing the core should only be a first step; each country should then provide information tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  7. Equity of access to NHS cancer services for members of minority ethnic groups. Report of findings of surveys of hospital medical and nursing staff at the Royal Marsden Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Aspinall, Peter J; Ward, Ann; Anionwu, Elizabeth N.

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary 1. The NHS Cancer Plan draws attention to the inequity of access to cancer services for members of minority ethnic groups, according importance to such matters as culturally-sensitive information and different approaches to giving information. The Department of Health's latest Cancer Services: Update states that 'to improve the experience of patients from an ethnic background' is a significant area of risk within the development of cancer services. Again, improving access an...

  8. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  9. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  10. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  11. Consenting of the vulnerable: the informed consent procedure in advanced cancer patients in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verástegui Emma L

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A topic of great concern in bioethics is the medical research conducted in poor countries sponsored by wealthy nations. Western drug companies increasingly view Latin America as a proper place for clinical research trials. The region combines a large population, modern medical facilities, and low per capita incomes. Participants from developing countries may have little or non alternative means of treatment other than that offered through clinical trials. Therefore, the provision of a valid informed consent is important. Methods To gain insight about some aspects of the informed consent procedure in a major cancer centre in Mexico, we conducted a three-step evaluation process: 1 a ten point multiple choice survey questionnaires, was used to explore some aspects of the patients' experiences during the informed consent process, 2 researchers' knowledge about specific aspects of the informed consent was evaluated in this study using survey questionnaires; and 3 the comprehensibility, readability and number of pages of the consent forms were analysed. The socioeconomic and educational level of the patients, were also considered. Results were reported using a numerical scale. Results Thirty five patients, 20 doctors, and 10 individuals working at the hospital agreed to participate in the study. Eighty three percent of the patients in the study were classified as living in poverty; education level was poor or non existent, and 31% of the patients were illiterate. The consent forms were difficult to understand according to 49% of the patients, most doctors agreed that the forms were not comprehensible to the patients. The average length of the IC documents analysed was 14 pages, and the readability average score was equivalent to 8TH Grade. Conclusion The results presented in this work describe some relevant characteristics of the population seen at public health care institutions in Mexico. Poverty, limited or no education, and the

  12. Statistic analysis of 6891 cancer-paining patients' information from Gansu Province Tumour Hospital, China%6891例癌痛患者信息统计分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhong Jin; Yandong Chai; Hua Yang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze and gain the interlinking degree of the cancer pain with patients' cancer-species, sexual-ity and age etc. Methods: The information of narcotic drugs used for cancer pain patients in our hospital (Gansu Province Tumour Hospital, China) during 2002-2007 were typed in designed EXCEL form, then counted and analyzed. Results: The total number of cancer pain patients used narcotic drugs during 2002-2007 was 6891 (n = 6691), among them, 4164 (60.44%) were males, and 2727 (39.56%) females. The top-range of cancer-species in those patients was as follows: lung cancer (20.39%), gastric cancer (14.85%), esophageal cancer (9.71%), hysterecarcinoma (6.79%), liver cancer (6.70%) and breast cancer (6.31%). Conclusion: (a) The male number of cancer pain patients using narcotic drugs is higher than the female number (1.53:1). (b) In the cases of lung cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer and kidney cancer, the male numbers are twice more than the female numbers, and the difference between the two groups are significant. (c) Most of the cancer pain patients (over 87%) are over 40 years old.

  13. Information on 'Overdiagnosis' in Breast Cancer Screening on Prominent United Kingdom- and Australia-Oriented Health Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanouni, Alex; Meisel, Susanne F.; Hersch, Jolyn; Waller, Jo; Renzi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Health-related websites are an important source of information for the public. Increasing public awareness of overdiagnosis and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in breast cancer screening may facilitate more informed decision-making. This study assessed the extent to which such information was included on prominent health websites oriented towards the general public, and evaluated how it was explained. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Websites identified through Google searches in England (United Kingdom) and New South Wales (Australia) for “breast cancer screening” and further websites included based on our prior knowledge of relevant organisations. Main Outcomes Content analysis was used to determine whether information on overdiagnosis or DCIS existed on each site, how the concepts were described, and what statistics were used to quantify overdiagnosis. Results After exclusions, ten UK websites and eight Australian websites were considered relevant and evaluated. They originated from charities, health service providers, government agencies, and an independent health organisation. Most contained some information on overdiagnosis (and/or DCIS). Descriptive information was similar across websites. Among UK websites, statistical information was often based on estimates from the Independent UK Panel on Breast Cancer Screening; the most commonly provided statistic was the ratio of breast cancer deaths prevented to overdiagnosed cases (1:3). A range of other statistics was included, such as the yearly number of overdiagnosed cases and the proportion of women screened who would be overdiagnosed. Information on DCIS and statistical information was less common on the Australian websites. Conclusions Online information about overdiagnosis has become more widely available in 2015–16 compared with the limited accessibility indicated by older research. However, there may be scope to offer more information on DCIS and overdiagnosis statistics on Australian

  14. 49 CFR 1313.6 - Contract summary for agricultural commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract summary for agricultural commodities... FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS § 1313.6 Contract summary for agricultural commodities. (a) Summary information. The summary of a contract for the transportation of agricultural...

  15. Health-related Quality of Life and Informed Decision-making in Lung Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Bergh, Karien

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is worldwide the most common form of cancer and the most common cause of death from cancer. It accounts for approximately 28% of all cancer deaths. World-wide 1.2 million people die from lung cancer each year. In the Netherlands, 9,918 people died from lung cancer in 2008. Lung cancer is often diagnosed in an advanced incurable stage. Despites advances in treatment, 85% or more patients will die within 5 years after diagnosis. In the Netherlands, the mortality-incidenc...

  16. Selective information seeking: can consumers' avoidance of evidence-based information on colorectal cancer screening be explained by the theory of cognitive dissonance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence-based patient information (EBPI is a prerequisite for informed decision-making. However, presentation of EBPI may lead to irrational reactions causing avoidance, minimisation and devaluation of the information. Objective: To explore whether the theory of cognitive dissonance is applicable to medical decision-making and useful to explain these phenomena. Setting and participants: 261 volunteers from Hamburg (157 women, ≥50 years old without diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Design and variables: Within an experiment we simulated information seeking on colorectal cancer screening. Consumers’ attitudes towards screening were surveyed using a rating scale from -5 (participate in no way to +5 (participate unconditionally (independent variable. Using a cover story, participants were asked to sort 5 article headlines according to their reading preferences. The headlines simulated the pro to contra variety of contents to be found in print media about colorectal cancer screening. The dependent variable was the sequence of article headlines. Results: Participants were very much in favour of screening with scores for faecal occult blood test of 4.0 (0.1 and for colonoscopy 3.3 (0.1. According to our hypothesis we found statistically significant positive correlations between the stimuli in favour of screening and attitudes and significant negative correlations between the stimuli against screening and attitudes. Conclusion: The theory of cognitive dissonance is applicable to medical decision-making. It may explain some phenomena of irrational reactions to evidence-based patient information.

  17. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of disposal facilities is controversial and more important

  18. Accessibility and Quality of Online Cancer-Related Clinical Trial Information for Naïve Searchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Earles, Kristofer; Gray, Stacy W

    2015-10-01

    Although the Internet may help to increase cancer patients' awareness of clinical trials, little is known about the accessibility and quality of online clinical trial information. We simulated the experience of a naïve cancer patient without clinical trial knowledge by searching three popular search engines for treatment information for breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two coders independently evaluated website content for accessibility and quality. We screened 120 websites and identified 40 unique sites for analysis. Overall, 85% [95% confidence interval (CI), 70%-94%] of sites mentioned clinical trials on the landing page and 68% (51%-81%) included links to specific trials. Overall readability was poor. Approximately half of websites (36%-68%) included information on the potential benefits and risks of clinical trials and 40% provided information about when the site had been updated (25%-57%). Among sites with links to specific clinical trials, only 44% (25%-65%) provided an interactive interface that would allow patients to customize search results; breast (100%) and prostate (50%) sites were more interactive than lung (25%) and MDS (14%; P = 0.007). Although cancer clinical trial information is widely available on the Internet, its quality is highly variable. Given the fact that many emerging cancer therapeutics are personalized based on disease or genomic characteristics, interactive web-based interfaces could serve as powerful vehicles to help patients locate appropriate clinical trials. Without enhanced efforts to ensure greater interactivity of cancer treatment websites, patient awareness of relevant clinical trials may remain low. PMID:26265204

  19. Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dungee, Ryan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Telescope surveys have given us a great deal of information about our universe, but the images they capture carry with them an inherent limitation. The question then is how do we take this information to the next level? The answer: the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). DESI is an instrument that will measure the distance to tens of millions of galaxies in our night sky. This information can be combined with already existing images to construct a three dimensional map of our universe providing a great deal of new opportunities for cosmological research.

  20. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  1. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  2. Theory summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a summary of the advances in magnetic fusion energy theory research presented at the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference from 19 24 October, 1998 in Yokohama, Japan. Theory and simulation results from this conference provided encouraging evidence of significant progress in understanding the physics of thermonuclear plasmas. Indeed, the grand challenge for this field is to acquire the basic understanding that can readily enable the innovations which would make fusion energy practical. In this sense, research in fusion energy is increasingly able to be categorized as fitting well the 'Pasteur's Quadrant' paradigm, where the research strongly couples basic science ('Bohr's Quadrant') to technological impact ('Edison's Quadrant'). As supported by some of the work presented at this conference, this trend will be further enhanced by advanced simulations. Eventually, realistic three-dimensional modeling capabilities, when properly combined with rapid and complete data interpretation of results from both experiments and simulations, can contribute to a greatly enhanced cycle of understanding and innovation. Plasma science theory and simulation have provided reliable foundations for this improved modeling capability, and the exciting advances in high-performance computational resources have further accelerated progress. There were 68 papers presented at this conference in the area of magnetic fusion energy theory

  3. Toward a greater understanding of breast cancer patients’ decisions to discuss cancer related internet information with their doctors: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Agostino, Thomas A.; Ostroff, Jamie S.; Heerdt, Alexandra; Dickler, Maura; Li, Yuelin; Bylund, Carma L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences between breast cancer patients who do and do not discuss cancer-related internet information (CRII) with their doctors. Methods 70 breast cancer patients completed questionnaires regarding internet use, discussions about CRII, and the doctor-patient relationship. Results No significant differences were noted across patient, disease, or visit characteristics, or physician reliance between those who intended to discuss CRII and those who did not. Patients who intended to discuss CRII rated significantly higher pre-consultation anxiety levels. No significant differences in satisfaction, anxiety reduction, or trust in physician were found between patients who had discussed and those who had not. Patients’ reasons for discussing or not discussing are detailed. Conclusion Factors influencing patients’ decisions to discuss CRII are complex and differ from those identified as leading patients to seek internet information. Future research about internet discussions should investigate the impact of patients’ preferred role in treatment, the doctor-patient relationship, anxiety level, attributes of CRII, and physician trust. Practice Implications Understanding the characteristics of patients who do and do not discuss internet information is important given the impact internet information has on healthcare communication and the doctor-patient relationship, including the development of interventions aimed at improving such interactions. PMID:22722063

  4. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  5. Cancer Data and Statistics Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Cancer Data and Statistics Tools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir United States Cancer Statistics The United States Cancer Statistics (USCS): Incidence and ...

  6. What Is Bone Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our document called Osteosarcoma . Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma (KON-droh-sar-KOH-muh) is a cancer of cartilage cells. ... AdditionalResources Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & ...

  7. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Causes ... Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home About Cancer Diagnosis and Staging Diagnosis ...

  9. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease in ...

  10. Predictors of Online Health Information Seeking Among Women with Breast Cancer: The Role of Social Support Perception and Emotional Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sojung Claire; Shah, Dhavan V.; Namkoong, Kang; McTavish, Fiona M.; Gustafson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the role of social support perception and emotional well-being on online information seeking among cancer patients within the context of CHESS, a well-established Interactive Cancer Communication System (ICCS). Factor and regression analyses conducted among 231 breast cancer patients revealed that social support perception and emotional well-being interacted with each other to influence online health information seeking. Patients with low social support percepti...

  11. How do radiation oncology health professionals inform breast cancer patients about the medical and technical aspects of their treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiation therapy patients need information to make treatment decisions, understand treatment and manage side effects. The purpose of this study was to (1) Identify information about radiation therapy routinely provided to breast cancer patients; (2) Determine which health professionals provide information; (3) Examine whether information is routinely provided at the same time points; and (4) Determine whether health professionals and patients place similar importance on specific information. Materials and methods: Health professionals in radiation therapy departments in Australia and New Zealand completed self-administered questionnaires. Results were analysed and compared to patient responses from a previous study. Results: Forty-one of 52 departments participated in this survey. Information provision was inconsistent between departments in terms of how and when information was given. Although the types of information provided to patients appeared to align with patients' needs, health professionals and patients placed different levels of importance on specific information. Conclusions: A wide range of information are provided to patients. However, the priority given to different information needs and the focus of information provision may not be optimal from the perspectives of patients. Further research needs to be conducted to determine patients' information needs and to develop specific information resources tailored to meet these needs

  12. Validation of the National Lung Cancer Audit database and analysis of the information it contains

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer related death in men and women in England. In 2004 the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) was created, as a national non-mandatory contemporary dataset of clinical features of individuals with lung cancer in part to identify variations in clinical practice and outcomes. The main aims of this dissertation are to determine the validity and representativeness of this dataset and then to investigate what factors influence access to surg...

  13. 78 FR 24750 - Scientific Information Request Therapies for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... of the evidence for Therapies for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: An Update of a 2008... effectiveness of treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer. Although these key questions were reviewed... safety of treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer. The key questions we will...

  14. General Information about Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  15. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as a major etiologic factor in the development of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in adults and children. The infection has been linked to the development of gastric cancer, and in 1994 was classified as a group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is inversely correlated to the socio-economic development and to unsatisfactory prevailing sanitary conditions. In developing countries, up to 90% of the adult population is colonized with this agent. In contrast, its prevalence in developed countries is lower, ranging from 25 to 50%. H. pylori colonization has been considered a public health problem, since its highest incidence occurs during the first few years of life, when children are growing and developing rapidly. The acquisition of the infection occurs mainly in early childhood, especially in developing countries, but the age at which it is acquired remains unknown. Infection with H. pylori during early infancy could be the initial step of a reaction which facilitates enteric infection in childhood leading to recurrent diarrhoea, malnutrition and growth failure. Micronutrient deficiencies resulting from these conditions may in turn facilitate malnutrition, immunological dysfunction and the persistence of infection. The 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT), which has been used extensively in developed countries, is a technique that is non invasive, reliable, comparatively cheap and without risk to patients. It is also convenient for use in field-based settings; it is currently considered the 'gold standard' against which all other techniques are compared. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), initiated the current Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with the principal objective of promoting the use of the 13C-urea breath test technique in the participating countries to study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its impact on health and

  16. Perceptions of Radiation Oncologists and Urologists on Sources and Type of Evidence to Inform Prostate Cancer Treatment Decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a national survey of radiation oncologists and urologists about the type of resources used and the level of evidence needed to change clinical practice in localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a random sample, 1422 physicians were mailed a survey assessing the types of information used and what level of evidence could alter their clinical practice in prostate cancer. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify differences in physician characteristics for each outcome. Results: Survey response rates were similar for radiation oncologists and urologists (44% vs 46%; P=.46). Specialty-specific journals represented the most commonly used resource for informing the clinical practice for radiation oncologists (65%) and urologists (70%). Relative to radiation oncologists, urologists were less likely to report utilizing top-tier medical journals (25% vs 39%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.50; P=.01) or cancer journals (22% vs 51%; adjusted OR 0.50; P<.001) but more likely to rely on clinical guidelines (46% vs 38%; adjusted OR 1.6; P=.006). Both radiation oncologists and urologists most commonly reported large randomized, clinical trials as the level of evidence to change treatment recommendations for localized prostate cancer (85% vs 77%; P=.009). Conclusions: Both specialties rely on their own specialty-specific journals and view randomized, clinical trials as the level of evidence needed to change clinical practice. Our study provides a context on meaningful ways of disseminating evidence for localized prostate cancer

  17. Breast cancer - background and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summary is to provide the reader with a brief overview of the key concepts relating to epidemiology and etiology; clinical presentation and patterns of spread; Canadian guidelines for management; prognosis; and current Canadian screening recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. This information will enable the reader to have the appropriate background knowledge before delving into the subsequent articles in this special CJMRT breast cancer edition. A variety of references have been provided for readers who are interested in more than a skeleton version of the current literature. (author)

  18. Effects of Interval between diagnosis and time of survey upon preferred information format for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Previous data indicate that receiving adequate information about their cancer can assist patients to cope with treatment and comply with treatment regimes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether time since diagnosis affected patients evaluations of the information they had received at the time of their diagnosis. Two hundred and thirty-seven patients who had received a diagnosis and treatment for prostate cancer 4 months earlier completed a questionnaire about their ratings of, and preferences for, various types of information, their anxiety and depression levels and some background data. The most common and preferred form of information that the patients in the current study received was verbal information during an interview with their oncologist. Demographic factors and levels of anxiety and depression did not influence patient information preferences. Time since diagnosis was associated with elevated anxiety and depression, and consequent lower recall of having received information, but also with positive inflation of the value of the material that they did recall having received. Patients may not recall information given to them early after diagnosis and may make unreliable evaluations of its value to them due to psychological state.

  19. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  20. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (II-3) - Uncertainty analysis of the steady state benchmark. It should be recognized that the purpose of this benchmark is not only to compare currently available macroscopic approaches but above-all to encourage the development of novel next-generation approaches that focus on more microscopic processes. Thus, the benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitized computer graphic images are the microscopic data. The technical topics to be addressed at the workshop include: - Review of the benchmark activities after the 4. Workshop; - Presentation and discussion of summary of comparisons of final submitted results for Exercise 1 of Phase I (I-1); for Exercise 0 of Phase II (II-0); and for Exercise 1 of Phase II (II-1); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase I (I-2); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 3 of Phase I (I-3); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase II (II-2); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 4 of Phase I (I-4); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 3 of Phase II (II-3); - Preparing a special issue in a journal with participants' BFBT papers; - Defining a work plan and schedule outlining actions to advance the two phases of the benchmark activities

  1. An audit of patient inclusion in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening and whether discharge summaries contained ROP information with suggestions for improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Harding,

    2013-01-01

    Samantha A Harding,1 Mohamad Abdullah,1,2 Gillian Adams1,21Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, 2Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UKAbstract: In a busy neonatal unit with a number of very sick children it can be difficult to highlight those children requiring retinopathy of prematurity screening and to include this in the patient's discharge summary to ensure continuity of care. This audit looks at how efficiently children are included in the retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) scr...

  2. Summaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site ecological studies information meeting held at Idaho Falls, July 10--11, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief summaries are presented for 30 papers that discuss the ecology of plants, wild animals, and birds on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site. Eleven of the papers report the results of studies on the diffusion of radioactive wastes in the environment and measurements of the content of various radionuclides in the tissues of animals and plants, soil, waste water leaching ponds, and aquifers. Two papers discuss the diffusion of chemical effluents in the environment

  3. Symposium summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purposes of the symposium, the Great Plains area was defined as the three Canadian Prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and eight north central states including North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Montana, Minnesota, Wyoming, Colorado and Kansas, covering over 3.5 million square kilometers. The presentations during the plenary sessions provided a comprehensive overview of the climate change subject and uncertainties, and the resource base and socio-economic structure which it will impact. There was a high degree of unanimity concerning research needs, which fell into seven areas: lack of understanding and models of linkages between climate, the resource base, and socio-economic structures; need for better regional climate change scenarios for use in impact studies; inadequate understanding of natural processes, particularly where physical, biophysical and biogeochemical parameters are operating; need for policy research to enable change of policies and informed decisions; readily available common databases for use in joint U.S./Canada climate studies; an information base and mechanisms to enable more effective communications; and networks to monitor the progress of global warming and its impact on resources

  4. Quantitative study on tongue color in primary liver cancer patients by analysis system for comprehensive information of tongue diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Qing

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the characteristics of tongue color in patients with primary liver cancer (PLC. Methods: Tongue color and its RGB value were analyzed quantitatively for PLC patients in different clinical periods and other cancer patients by analysis system for comprehensive information of tongue diagnosis. Results: The rate of blue and purple tongue was higher (P <0.05 and all the values of RGB were lower (P <0.01 in PLC patients compared with other cancer patients. In different clinical periods, the rate of blue and purple tongue in stage Ⅲ was the highest (P <0.05. Conclusion: The blue and purple tongue is one of the most important tongue characteristics of PLC patients.

  5. Medical Communication-related Informational Need and Resource Preferences Among Family Caregivers for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longacre, Margaret L; Galloway, Thomas J; Parvanta, Claudia F; Fang, Carolyn Y

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in treatment, head and neck cancer (HNC) patients often experience considerable functional impairment during and following treatment. As a result, family caregivers are essential in a patient's recovery; however, few caregivers are well-prepared to handle the extensive caregiving needs of this patient population. To date, little is known about HNC caregivers' informational needs in this role. Thus, we surveyed a sample of HNC caregivers about their informational needs including those related to interacting in the medical context as a caregiver and meeting patient needs. We also asked these caregivers their preferences for obtaining caregiving information. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 59 family caregivers for HNC patients who had completed radiation therapy at a comprehensive cancer center. The majority of caregivers (74.6%) reported having high informational need at diagnosis related to interacting as a caregiver. Although the need for such information decreased over time, over half still had a high need for information at treatment end. Importantly, caregivers who desired information about reducing patient pain and distress also reported having greater informational needs on issues related to interacting in the medical context. Further, the caregivers most often preferred to receive information from health-care professionals as a first source. However, preferring an informal (e.g., Internet) resource at first was significantly associated with needing information on how to talk to a doctor or nurse. The development of evidence-based resources and tools for HNC caregivers as well as clinicians may help caregivers more effectively manage patient symptoms and warrants further attention. Further, Internet resources may represent an effective resource for providing caregivers with strategies toward enhancing communication with healthcare professionals. PMID:25893922

  6. Head and neck cancers in France: an analysis of the hospital medical information system (PMSI) database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background With 16,005 new cases and 5,406 related deaths in 2005, France is particularly concerned by Head and Neck (H&N) cancers. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been reported as a risk factor for H&N cancers. The literature on the burden of these cancers in Europe is scarce. This study was performed to assess the medical and economical burden of hospitalisations for H&N cancers in France. Methods The French national hospital database (PMSI), in which admissions to public and private hospitals are recorded, was retrospectively analysed to assess the annual number of patients hospitalised for H&N cancers and associated hospital costs from the healthcare payer perspective. ICD-10 codes (16 codes classified as oral cavity, oropharynx, pharynx, salivary glands and larynx) were used to extract admissions for these cancers. Hospital stays, chemotherapy and radiotherapy sessions were extracted to assess patients' management. Costs of admissions were obtained from French official tariffs. Results In 2007, there were 36 268 patients hospitalised for H&N cancers, of whom 81% were men, corresponding to 60 200 hospital stays and 287 846 sessions of chemo- or radio-therapy. Oropharynx cancer was the most frequent (28% of patients), followed by oral cavity cancer (25% of patients). The peak of frequency was observed in the 55-59 years age group. Patients were mainly treated in medicine (48%) and surgery (23%) units. Mean annual cost per patient ranged from €2 764 to €7 673 leading to a total hospital cost of €323 millions in 2007 (including hospitalization and expensive drugs). With 26% of H&N cancers attributable to HPV infections, 9 430 patients were hospitalized due to HPV-related H&N cancers, representing €138 million in 2007. Conclusion Even without taking into account the rehabilitation costs, the hospital burden of H&N cancers is considerable. PMID:20809978

  7. How Darwinian models inform therapeutic failure initiated by clonal heterogeneity in cancer medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlinger, M; Swanton, C.

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is an evolutionary process that establishes the ‘hallmarks of cancer' by natural selection of cell clones that have acquired advantageous heritable characteristics. Evolutionary adaptation has also been proposed as a mechanism that promotes drug resistance during systemic cancer therapy. This review summarises the evidence for the evolution of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted anti-cancer drugs according to Darwinian models and highlights the roles of genomic instability and...

  8. An Integrative Genomics Approach for Associating GWAS Information with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chindo Hicks; Ranjit Kumar; Antonio Pannuti; Kandis Backus; Alexandra Brown; Jesus Monico; Lucio Miele

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer. However, the association of genetic variants and their associated genes with the most aggressive subset of breast cancer, the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), remains a central puzzle in molecular epidemiology. The objective of this study was to determine whether genes containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with an increased risk of ...

  9. Partitioned prostate cancer prevalence estimates: an informative measure of the disease burden

    OpenAIRE

    Merrill, R

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES—Public health burden of disease is often measured using prevalence statistics. Prevalence of invasive prostate cancer in the United States is presented according to age at diagnosis, time from diagnosis, geographical area, and two races (white and black).
DESIGN—Invasive prostate cancer data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute is used for obtaining prevalence estimates.
MAIN RESULTS—Despite falling prostate canc...

  10. Assessment of Information to Substantiate a Health Claim on the Prevention of Prostate Cancer by Lignans

    OpenAIRE

    Juhani Tuominen; Niina M. Saarinen; Liisa Pylkkänen; Risto Santti

    2010-01-01

    Lignans and their in vivo metabolites, especially enterolactone (ENL), have attracted substantial interest as potential chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer. Preclinical and clinical interventions performed with lignan-rich flaxseed that use surrogate biomarkers as endpoints suggest that lignans may attenuate prostate carcinogenesis in individuals with increased risk or with diagnosed cancer. No unequivocal prostate cancer risk reduction has been found for lignans in epidemiological stu...

  11. An alarming prognosis: how people affected by pancreatic cancer use (and avoid) Internet information

    OpenAIRE

    Chapple, A; Evans, JV; Ziebland, S; McPherson, A.; Hugh Grant

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at how patients with pancreatic cancer use the Internet, and considers its potential negative effects for people with a life threatening illness. We designed a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews collected by maximum variation sampling. Respondents were recruited from all over the UK in 2009/10. We interviewed 32 people with pancreatic cancer and eight relatives/carers of people who had recently died of pancreatic cancer. In contrast to a similar study we und...

  12. Social Networks and Physical Activity Behaviors Among Cancer Survivors: Data From the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, BANG HYUN; WALLINGTON, SHERRIE F.; MAKAMBI, KEPHER H.; ADAMS-CAMPBELL, LUCILE L.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the relation between social networks and physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors. The authors examined 873 cancer survivors (596 women, 277 men) 50 years of age or older who participated in the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that survivors who talked about health with friends/family were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity recommendations (OR = 2.89, CI [1.01, 8.33]). Female survivors were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity recommendations (OR = 2.65, CI [1.55, 4.53]) and more likely to have seen, heard, or read physical activity/exercise and cancer information within the past 12 months (OR = 2.09, CI [1.13, 3.85]) compared with their male counterparts. For male survivors, those who were a member of at least one community organization were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity/exercise recommendations (OR = 5.31, CI [1.32, 21.22]) than the men who were not members. Overall, cancer survivors with a social network (i.e., talking to family/friends about health) were more likely to pay attention to new exercise recommendations compared with those who did not have a social network. Significant differences were also observed by gender with physical activity levels, knowledge, and attitudes. Social networking is an important component in cancer survivorship and further research is needed to encourage social networking strategies that might facilitate in increasing physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors. PMID:25978562

  13. Head and neck cancers in France: an analysis of the hospital medical information system (PMSI) database

    OpenAIRE

    Lacau St Guily, Jean; Borget, Isabelle; Vainchtock, Alexandre; Rémy, Vanessa; Takizawa, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Background With 16,005 new cases and 5,406 related deaths in 2005, France is particularly concerned by Head and Neck (H&N) cancers. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been reported as a risk factor for H&N cancers. The literature on the burden of these cancers in Europe is scarce. This study was performed to assess the medical and economical burden of hospitalisations for H&N cancers in France. Methods The French national hospital database (PMSI), in which admi...

  14. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List provides brief summaries of hundreds of safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Events are described under the categories: Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing/Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms-related, Radiological Sabotage, Non-radiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. Because of the public interest, the Miscellaneous category also includes events reported involving source material, byproduct material, and natural uranium, which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Information in the event descriptions was obtained from official NRC sources

  15. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  16. Safeguards summary event list (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of public interest, also included are events reported involving byproduct material which is exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage, nonradiological sabotage, alcohol and drugs, and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  17. [Sample Quality Control through the Depository and Distribution of Cancer-Related Human Materials: Experience of Kanagawa Cancer Research & Information Association (KCRIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Kanagawa Prefecture and its department of hospital business established the Kanagawa Cancer Research and Information Association (KCRIA) in 2006, and the Kanagawa Cancer Center (KCC) and related institutes have started to collect and distribute patient-derived cancer-related biomaterials to researchers. The tumor tissue center of KCC is collecting frozen tumor tissues, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues, serum of patients before treatment, and genomic DNA of peripheral white blood cells. Corresponding normal tissues are also collected if possible. Clinical information on patients is annotated in each sample as accurately as possible under linkable anonymization to follow the prognosis. We are evaluating the quality of tumor samples with two indices: the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) of extracted total RNAs from randomly chosen frozen tissues examined with the 2100 Bioanalyzer (Agilent Technologies, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA), and the histopathological examination of parts of all frozen tissues prepared in the Optimal Cutting Temperature (OTC) compound and evaluation of the contents of tumor cells. Management of the sample quality is an important issue for any biomaterial repository. The quality of samples is influenced by the procedures of sample collection and storage, and also by the storage duration. The quality could be periodically examined by monitoring analyte stability and integrity, such as RIN of frozen cancer tissues. However, the best way to collect and store RNA might not always be the same for different analytes. Therefore, sample quality control at biomaterial repositories that are preparing samples for future studies on undefined analytes is a very difficult problem. At least the standard sample operation procedure (SOP) should be available for users. PMID:26524887

  18. [Sharing information of urological cancer patient in terminal stage using Cybozulive® for home medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Yusuke; Gobara, Ayako; Takamoto, Daiji; Yasuda, Kengo; Nakamura, Masafumi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Asahina, Kan; Kamijo, Takeo

    2014-09-01

    It is very important to share patient information because home patient care involves several different specialties of care. We introduced Cybozulive ® , a cloud-based free groupware, for 14 terminal-stage patients with urological cancer to share information among doctors and co-medical staff. This system enables access to patient information regardless of time and place. Of the 14 patients (mean age 74.4 years), 11 died of cancer. The average period in which Cybozulive® was used for the patients was 210 days. The average number of entries to the electronic bulletin board in this period was 88.4. We were able to obtain more information about the patients from the website. There was no difference in the average number of times that the patient consulted the out patient clinic before and after the introduction of Cybozulive® (before 7.0 ; after 6.3). After introduction of this system, eleven patients were hospitalized in our department 21 times. Eighteen of these 21 times, since we had acquired patient information from the website beforehand, there was a quick response for management of the emergency admission. This system could be used to construct a network for home care and may be helpful for sharing patient information in homecare. PMID:25293794

  19. Southern cone energy network coal gasification for SNG production and pipeline system. Feasibility study. Volume 1. Executive summary. Export trade information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Executive Summary document summarizes the study report on the economic and technical feasibility of gasifying coal to produce a substitute natural gas (SNG) for distribution to the industrial areas of Southern Brazil. The report includes data surveys, technology assessments, process evaluations, and conceptual designs and analyses. The study contributes to the Brazilian Government efforts to investigate feasible crude oil substitution programs that will meet the nation's energy needs by utilizing domestic resources, thereby reducing the severe negative impact of foreign crude oil importation on Brazil's balance of payments

  20. 77 FR 11123 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases to the Liver AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research... Metastases to the Liver, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence-based Practice Centers for the... unresectable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as...

  1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the macro-scale, the lower scale representations inform models that reproduce observed fuel behaviour. Significant challenges do remain in both improving the models and in their multi-scale integration, and thus there is still much to be done. However, it is the expectation that as the problems of fuel modelling and simulation are solved, predictive models will increasingly find their way into advanced fuel performance codes and allow the eventual realistic simulation of nuclear fuel behaviour under normal and accident conditions that goes beyond empirical correlations. (author)

  2. Identifying Geographic Disparities in the Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using a Geographic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxme Hariharan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIdentifying communities with lower rates of mammography screening is a critical step to providing targeted screening programs; however, population-based data necessary for identifying these geographic areas are limited. This study presents methods to identify geographic disparities in the early detection of breast cancer.MethodsData for all women residing in Dane County, Wisconsin, at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis from 1981 through 2000 (N = 4769 were obtained from the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System (Wisconsin’s tumor registry by ZIP code of residence. Hierarchical logistic regression models for disease mapping were used to identify geographic differences in the early detection of breast cancer.ResultsThe percentage of breast cancer cases diagnosed in situ (excluding lobular carcinoma in situ increased from 1.3% in 1981 to 11.9% in 2000. This increase, reflecting increasing mammography use, occurred sooner in Dane County than in Wisconsin as a whole. From 1981 through 1985, the proportion of breast cancer diagnosed in situ in Dane county was universally low (2%–3%. From 1986 through 1990, urban and suburban ZIP codes had significantly higher rates (10% compared with rural ZIP codes (5%. From 1991 through 1995, mammography screening had increased in rural ZIP codes (7% of breast cancer diagnosed in situ. From 1996 through 2000, mammography use was fairly homogeneous across the entire county (13%–14% of breast cancer diagnosed in situ.ConclusionThe percentage of breast cancer cases diagnosed in situ increased in the state and in all areas of Dane County from 1981 through 2000. Visual display of the geographic differences in the early detection of breast cancer demonstrates the diffusion of mammography use across the county over the 20-year period.

  3. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. Fro...

  4. Response to an Abnormal Ovarian Cancer Screening Test Result: Test of the Social Cognitive Processing and Cognitive Social Health Information Processing Models

    OpenAIRE

    Andrykowski, Michael A.; Pavlik, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    All cancer screening tests produce a proportion of abnormal results requiring follow-up. Consequently, the cancer screening setting is a natural laboratory for examining psychological and behavioral response to a threatening health-related event. This study tested hypotheses derived from the Social Cognitive Processing and Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing models in trying to understand response to an abnormal ovarian cancer (OC) screening test result. Women (n=278) receiving an ...

  5. Training Activity Summary Page (TASP) Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Training Activity Summary Page (formerly the Training Exit Survey Cover Page) dataset contains data about each training event. This dataset includes information...

  6. Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness study summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a summary of a wilderness study done of Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge pursuant to the Wilderness Act of 1964. It provides information as to the...

  7. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness study summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a summary of a wilderness study done of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge pursuant to the Wilderness Act of 1964. It provides information as to...

  8. Desert National Wildlife Range Wilderness study summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a summary of a wilderness study done of the Desert National Wildlife Range pursuant to the Wilderness Act of 1964. It provides information as to...

  9. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness study summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a summary of a wilderness study done of Horicon National Wildlife Refuge pursuant to the Wilderness Act of 1964. It provides information as to the...

  10. [Summary of the Israeli Endocrine Society's consensus statement on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of well-differentiated thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelle, Jonathan E; Shalom, Sophia Ish; Benbassat, Carlos; Dickstein, Gabriel; Glasser, Benjamin; Liel, Yair

    2008-10-01

    Well differentiated epithelial cell thyroid cancer is not classified amongst the most aggressive diseases. Notwithstanding, it can potentially both impair quality of life and affect life expectancy. Appropriate treatment has been shown to be crucial in obtaining optimal outcomes on the course of the disease. Successful treatment rests upon strict adherence to confirmed principles of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. The aim of the position paper is to present the Israeli medical community with a set of commonly accepted principles for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with well differentiated epithelial thyroid cancer and in addition to highlight areas of legitimate differences in approach where those differences occur. We have attempted to provide a link between the various medical disciplines involved in care of these patients: family physicians, surgeons, nuclear medicine specialists, oncologists, pathologists, radiologists and endocrinologists; and have attempted to decrease to a minimum areas of uncertainty and to offer a common approach for the best possible care of thyroid cancer patients in Israel. In addition, we find it our duty to point out those areas and resources which, in our opinion, need to be upgraded in Israel and even included in the Israeli official "health basket". PMID:19039917

  11. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes. PMID:25561069

  12. Interest and Informational Preferences Regarding Genomic Testing for Modest Increases in Colorectal Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Allison E.; Flores, Kristina G.; Boonyasiriwat, Watcharaporn; Gammon, Amanda; Kohlmann, Wendy; Birmingham, Wendy C.; Schwartz, Marc D.; Samadder, Jewel; Boucher, Ken; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To explore interest in genomic testing for modest changes in colorectal cancer risk and preferences for receiving genomic risk communications among individuals with intermediate disease risk due to a family history of colorectal cancer. Methods Surveys were conducted on 278 men and women at intermediate risk for colorectal cancer enrolled in a randomized trial comparing a remote personalized risk communication intervention (TeleCARE) aimed at promoting colonoscopy to a generic print control condition. Guided by Leventhal’s Common Sense Model of Self-regulation, we examined demographic and psychosocial factors possibly associated with interest in SNP testing. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with testing interest and preferences for receiving genomic risk communications. Results Three-fourths of participants expressed interest in SNP testing for colorectal cancer risk. Testing interest did not markedly change across behavior modifier scenarios. Participants preferred to receive genomic risk communications from a variety of sources: printed materials, (69.1%), oncologists (59.5%), primary-care physicians (58.1%), and the web (57.9%). Overall, persons who were unmarried (p=0.029), younger (p=0.003), and with greater cancer-related fear (p=0.019) were more likely to express interest in predictive genomic testing for colorectal cancer risk. In a stratified analysis, cancer related fear was associated with interest in predictive genomic testing in the intervention group (p=0.017) but not the control group. Conclusions Individuals with intermediate familial risk for colorectal cancer are highly interested in genomic testing for modest increases in disease risk, specifically unmarried persons, younger age groups, and those with greater cancer fear. PMID:24435063

  13. What does the informal caregiver of a terminally ill cancer patient need? A study from a cancer centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjum S Khan Joad

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: informal caregivers provide most of the nursing and psychological support to the patient. However, palliative care services need to recognize that the caregiver too may need psychological and technical support.

  14. More Fact Sheets - SEER Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  15. Quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer: are we improving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, James; Muzaffar, Jameel; Mitchell-Innes, Alistair

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the type, content, accessibility and quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer. The Google search engine was used to generate lists of the first 100 websites for general head and neck cancer and the first ten for head and neck cancers by anatomical location (160 total). Websites were evaluated with the validated DISCERN and LIDA instruments, the SMOG (Simple measure of gobbledygook) readability score and against the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) criteria. 40 of the 160 websites ranked by Google were suitable for analysis. Seven websites (17.5%) partially or fully achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and only one (2.5%) site achieved none. 28 (70%) included reference to quality of life factors. Correlations were identified between Google site rank and all four of our appraisal tools; LIDA (-0.966, p = 0.006), JAMA (-5.93, p = 0.028), DISCERN (-0.568, p = 0.037) and SMOG (4.678, p = 0.04). Google site rank and both government run sites (-35.38, p = 0.034) and sites run by universities or hospitals (-27.32, p = 0.016) also showed an association. Comparing our observations with those of Riordain in 2008, there has been little improvement in the quality of head and neck cancer information available online over this time. Given the variability in quality of information online, patients would benefit from being directed to reliable websites by clinicians. PMID:25370600

  16. Assessment of Information to Substantiate a Health Claim on the Prevention of Prostate Cancer by Lignans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhani Tuominen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignans and their in vivo metabolites, especially enterolactone (ENL, have attracted substantial interest as potential chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer. Preclinical and clinical interventions performed with lignan-rich flaxseed that use surrogate biomarkers as endpoints suggest that lignans may attenuate prostate carcinogenesis in individuals with increased risk or with diagnosed cancer. No unequivocal prostate cancer risk reduction has been found for lignans in epidemiological studies, suggesting that lignan concentrations found in populations consuming a regular non-supplemented diet are not chemopreventive in prostate cancer. Presumably, the main obstacles in assessing the efficacy of food lignans is limited knowledge of the serum and tissue lignan concentrations required for the putative prevention. Further clinical studies performed with the purified compounds are required to substantiate a health claim.

  17. Identifying Geographic Disparities in the Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using a Geographic Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Luxme Hariharan; Ronald E. Gangnon, PhD; Patrick L. Remington, MD, MPH; Jane A. McElroy, PhD; LeAnn D. Andersen, MS

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Identifying communities with lower rates of mammography screening is a critical step to providing targeted screening programs; however, population-based data necessary for identifying these geographic areas are limited. This study presents methods to identify geographic disparities in the early detection of breast cancer. Methods Data for all women residing in Dane County, Wisconsin, at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis from 1981 through 2000 (N = 4769) were obtained from...

  18. Cancer Metabolomics and the Human Metabolome Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Wishart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of metabolomics towards cancer research has led to a renewed appreciation of metabolism in cancer development and progression. It has also led to the discovery of metabolite cancer biomarkers and the identification of a number of novel cancer causing metabolites. The rapid growth of metabolomics in cancer research is also leading to challenges. In particular, with so many cancer-associate metabolites being identified, it is often difficult to keep track of which compounds are associated with which cancers. It is also challenging to track down information on the specific pathways that particular metabolites, drugs or drug metabolites may be affecting. Even more frustrating are the difficulties associated with identifying metabolites from NMR or MS spectra. Fortunately, a number of metabolomics databases are emerging that are designed to address these challenges. One such database is the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB. The HMDB is currently the world’s largest and most comprehensive, organism-specific metabolomics database. It contains more than 40,000 metabolite entries, thousands of metabolite concentrations, >700 metabolic and disease-associated pathways, as well as information on dozens of cancer biomarkers. This review is intended to provide a brief summary of the HMDB and to offer some guidance on how it can be used in metabolomic studies of cancer.

  19. Efficient summary statistical representation when change localization fails

    OpenAIRE

    Haberman, Jason; Whitney, David

    2011-01-01

    People are sensitive to the summary statistics of the visual world (e.g., average orientation/speed/facial expression). We readily derive this information from complex scenes, often without explicit awareness. Given the fundamental and ubiquitous nature of summary statistical representation, we tested whether this kind of information is subject to the attentional constraints imposed by change blindness. We show that information regarding the summary statistics of a scene is available despite ...

  20. The effect of information about overdetection of breast cancer on women's decision-making about mammography screening: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hersch, Jolyn; Barratt, Alexandra; Jansen, Jesse; Houssami, Nehmat; Irwig, Les; Jacklyn, Gemma; Dhillon, Haryana; Thornton, Hazel; McGeechan, Kevin; Howard, Kirsten; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Women are largely unaware that mammography screening can cause overdetection of inconsequential disease, leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment of breast cancer. Evidence is lacking about how information on overdetection affects women's breast screening decisions and experiences. This study investigates the consequences of providing information about overdetection of breast cancer to women approaching the age of invitation to mammography screening. Methods and analysis This i...

  1. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2008 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2007 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. National reserves and reserve base information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves and reserve base estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves and reserve base information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, common business practice, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves and reserve base information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves and reserve base information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves and reserve base reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the International Strategic Minerals

  2. Does homeobox-related "positional" genomic information contribute to implantation of metastatic cancer cells at non-random sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K M; Darweesh, M; Jajah, A; Tsui, P; Guinan, P; Rubenstein, M

    2007-01-01

    Reasons for the lodgment of metastases from several types of solid cancer at apparently non-random sites have not been established. Recently, a group of genes expressed in human fibroblasts obtained from different anatomic locations was implicated in "positional" genomic information. Essentially, a Cartesian coordinate system identifying fibroblasts originally resident at anterior or more posterior, proximal or distal and dermal or non-dermal (heart, lung, etc.) locations was proposed. The determinants used for these identifications included HOX genes, central to embryonic segmental development, some of which are expressed in differentiated, post-embryonic cells. To the extent that HOX or other homeobox genes are expressed in ectodermal, mesodermal or endodermally-derived, malignantly transformed cells, they might contribute "positional" information to nidation of specific malignant clones at non-random sites. As understood in the past, interdiction of HOX or homeobox-related gene expression might reduce the probability of cancer cell implantation or alter their destinations in complex ways. Ideally, by interfering with HOX or other homeobox gene-related expression of antigenic determinants potentially contributing to their "homing" and nidation, reduced implantation of circulating cancer cells could render them more susceptible to systemic chemotherapy or immunotherapy, as demonstrated in mice. Furthermore, HOX or other homeobox genes or their products could provide novel intra- or extracellular targets for therapy. PMID:17695497

  3. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  4. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  5. HIRENASD analysis Information Package

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Updated November 2, 2011 Contains summary information and analysis condition details for the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop Information plotted in this package is...

  6. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  7. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  8. What Is Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unneeded cells. Cancer cells may be able to influence the normal cells, molecules, and blood vessels that ... Cancers . We also have collections of information on childhood cancers and cancers in adolescents and young adults . ...

  9. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these ...

  10. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  11. Hazmat Yearly Incident Summary Reports - Data Mining Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  12. Hazmat 10 Year Incident Summary Reports - Data Mining Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  13. Hazmat 10 Year Incident Summary Reports: Data Mining Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  14. Hazmat Yearly Incident Summary Reports: Data Mining Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  15. Meeting the Information Needs of Lower Income Cancer Survivors: Results of a Randomized Control Trial Evaluating the American Cancer Society’s “I Can Cope”

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Michelle Y.; Evans, Mary B; KRATT, POLLY; Pollack, Lori A.; Smith, Judith Lee; Oster, Robert; Dignan, Mark; Prayor-Patterson, Heather; Watson, Christopher; HOUSTON, PETER; ANDREWS, SHIQUINA; LIWO, AMANDIY; TSENG, TUNG SUNG; HULLETT, SANDRAL; OLIVER, JOANN

    2014-01-01

    The American Cancer Society is a leader in the development of cancer survivorship resources. One resource of the American Cancer Society is the I Can Cope program, an educational program for cancer survivors and their families. Evaluations of this program indicate that cancer patients highly rate its objectives. Yet, there are gaps in the understanding of the full impact of the program on diverse cancer survivors. In this study, the authors used a randomized trial to evaluate the program. Par...

  16. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946-1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  17. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women

  18. Re: Using Space-Based Investigations to Inform Cancer Research on Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Becker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Universe, four main forces are effective. These are weak nuclear force, strong nuclear force, electromagnetic force and gravitational force. Gravity is the attractive force between all matter. In space, the force of gravity is diminished, resulting in microgravity. Currently, there are various studies about microgravity and its effect on biological functions in the literature. In this review, the authors reported effects of microgravity on cancer culture studies. In these studies, some devices are used such as rotating wall vessel (RWV bioreactor, clinostat, random positioning machine (RPM (3D clinostat, and magnetic levitation. These 3D cell culture studies are focused on oncology. We can find some studies that especially focused on culture or co-culture of prostate cancer in the microgravity conditions. These authors suggested that effects of microgravity on the oncological cultures in the space station (10-4 and 10-6 g were immune cell changes, alterations in gene expression, effects on cell signaling, effects on apoptosis, cytoskeletal changes, and alterations in cell shape. Microgravity environment of space includes lack of sedimentation, reduced fluid shear, cellular co-location and 3D multicellular growth. Microencapsulation technology was developed in like these conditions using a xenograft model of prostate cancer. Space presents an unlimited horizon for discovery. Microgravity can further our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in cancer cell growth and function. These studies will expand our knowledge necessary for improving treatment options and exploring the etiopathogenesis of cancer.

  19. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. PMID:27422504

  20. Benefit-Risk Summary of Crizotinib for the Treatment of Patients With ROS1 Alteration-Positive, Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Luo, Lola; He, Kun; Fran, Ingrid; Lemery, Steven; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On March 11, 2016, after an expedited 5-month review, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded the crizotinib metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) indication to include the treatment of patients whose tumors harbor a ROS1 rearrangement. The approval was based on a clinically meaningful, durable objective response rate (ORR) in a multicenter, single-arm clinical trial (ROS1 cohort of Trial PROFILE 1001) in patients with ROS1-positive mNSCLC. The trial enrolled 50 patients (age range: 25–77 years) whose tumors were prospectively determined to have a ROS1 gene rearrangement by break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (96%) or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (4%) clinical trial assays. Crizotinib demonstrated an ORR of 66% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51%–79%) with a median duration of response of 18.3 months by independent radiology review and 72% (95% CI: 58%–84%) by investigator review. Patients received crizotinib 250 mg twice daily and had a median duration of exposure of 34.4 months. The toxicity profile in ROS1-positive patients was generally consistent with the randomized safety data in the U.S. Product Insert from two ALK-positive mNSCLC trials. The most common (≥25%) adverse reactions and laboratory test abnormalities included vision disorders, elevation of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, nausea, hypophosphatemia, diarrhea, edema, vomiting, constipation, neutropenia, and fatigue. There were no treatment-related deaths. A favorable benefit-to-risk evaluation led to the traditional approval of crizotinib for this new supplemental indication. Implications for Practice: Given the results from the ROS1 cohort of the clinical trial PROFILE 1001, crizotinib represents a new treatment option and the first approved therapy for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer whose tumors are ROS1 positive. Crizotinib demonstrated efficacy irrespective of prior treatment status. PMID:27328934

  1. Visualizing Summary Statistics and Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Potter, K.

    2010-08-12

    The graphical depiction of uncertainty information is emerging as a problem of great importance. Scientific data sets are not considered complete without indications of error, accuracy, or levels of confidence. The visual portrayal of this information is a challenging task. This work takes inspiration from graphical data analysis to create visual representations that show not only the data value, but also important characteristics of the data including uncertainty. The canonical box plot is reexamined and a new hybrid summary plot is presented that incorporates a collection of descriptive statistics to highlight salient features of the data. Additionally, we present an extension of the summary plot to two dimensional distributions. Finally, a use-case of these new plots is presented, demonstrating their ability to present high-level overviews as well as detailed insight into the salient features of the underlying data distribution. © 2010 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The legacy of the F344 rat as a cancer bioassay model (a retrospective summary of three common F344 rat neoplasms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronpot, Robert R; Nyska, Abraham; Foreman, Jennifer E; Ramot, Yuval

    2016-09-01

    The Fischer 344 (F344) rat was used by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) for over 5 decades for toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. However, in 2006, the NTP decided to switch to a different rat stock due largely to high background control incidences of Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) and mononuclear cell leukemia (MNCL), also known as large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia. In the current review, we aim (1) to provide a summary of NTP bioassays with treatment-associated effects involving MNCL and LCTs in addition to male F344-specific tunica vaginalis mesothelioma (TVM); (2) to describe important pathobiological differences between these F344 rat tumor responses and similar target tissue-tumor response in humans; and (3) to present the NTP reasons for switching away from the F344 rat. We show that due to the highly variable background incidence of F344 MNCL, more reliance on historical control data than is usual for most tumor responses is warranted to evaluate potential effect of any chemical treatment in this rat strain. The high spontaneous incidence of LCTs in the testes of male F344 rats has made this tumor endpoint of little practical use in identifying potential testicular carcinogenic responses. TVM responses in F344 rats have a biological plausible relationship to LCTs unlike TVM in humans. Given their high spontaneous background incidence and species-specific biology, we contend that MNCL and LCT, along with TVM responses, in F344 rat carcinogenicity studies are inappropriate tumor types for human health risk assessment and lack relevance in predicting human carcinogenicity. PMID:27278595

  3. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Screening ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Cervical Cancer Key Points Cervical cancer is a disease in ...

  4. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease in ...

  5. Using space-based investigations to inform cancer research on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-05-01

    Experiments conducted in the microgravity environment of space are not typically at the forefront of the mind of a cancer biologist. However, space provides physical conditions that are not achievable on Earth, as well as conditions that can be exploited to study mechanisms and pathways that control cell growth and function. Over the past four decades, studies have shown how exposure to microgravity alters biological processes that may be relevant to cancer. In this Review, we explore the influence of microgravity on cell biology, focusing on tumour cells grown in space together with work carried out using models in ground-based investigations. PMID:23584334

  6. [Are German information materials on colorectal cancer screening understandable or do they fail? Rating of health information by users with different educational backgrounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, G; Münch, I; Dreier, M; Borutta, B; Walter, U; Dierks, M-L

    2014-03-01

    Evidence-based patient information is an essential part of decision making in health issues. A qualitative study was conducted to examine whether consumers consider the health information on colorectal cancer screening in Germany helpful in supporting their decision making. In this study, eight texts from different German authors about colorectal cancer screening were evaluated with a criteria-based selection. The texts were tested for understandability, structure, design, and effect on readers. Thirteen semi-structured focus groups were formed including 59 higher-educated and 15 lower-educated testers, 46 % of them being male with a mean age of 62.9 years. The transcripts were analyzed by content-analytic assessment. The testers provided detailed comments on the content and design of the texts. They revealed inaccuracies and suggested improvements of the texts. The testers differed from each other in terms of the intensity of their participation in the discussions and comprehension of the material. The reception of the flyers and brochures varied according to the educational level of the testers. Lower-educated testers often skipped passages of texts about risks as well as passages containing numbers and graphics. The texts had different effects on the testers, regardless of the level of education. If adverse effects were presented, some testers became scared while others were reassured because they felt informed. Most of the testers appreciated a call for participation as a central message of the text. Sometimes, if there was no clear appeal to attend the screening, the testers even asked for it. The recently introduced political strategy of promoting an informed choice is applied to an unprepared population who was used to getting a clear yes-or-no recommendation. Thus, at first, the population has to learn how to make an informed choice. This topic must be addressed and taken into account in the process of developing health information. Since this is not

  7. Comparing written and oral measures of comprehension of cancer information by English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer; Todd, Laura; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2011-09-01

    The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy for Adults (S-TOFHLA) and Cloze test are commonly used tools to measure comprehension of health information (i.e., health literacy); however, little is known about their use in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) populations. In this study, we compared written (Cloze test) and oral (Teach Back) measures of colon cancer information comprehension among ESL Chinese immigrant women to Canada. Performances on colon cancer-specific measures were compared to a general measure of health literacy (S-TOFHLA). On the S-TOFHLA, Cloze, and Teach Back, respectively, the following percentage of participants had adequate comprehension: 62.1%, 14.8%, and 89.7%. Correlation between performance on the Cloze and Teach Back was significant albeit weakly so (r = 0.38, p = 0.04); performances on the S-TOFHLA and Teach Back were not correlated. Measures of health literacy skill that require written English language skills may not be appropriate for measuring understanding of health information for ESL populations. PMID:21445682

  8. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report

  9. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  10. Nomogram using transrectal ultrasound-derived information predicting the detection of high grade prostate cancer on initial biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, In Gab; Lim, Ju Hyun; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kim, Sung Cheol; You, Dalsan; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a nomogram using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-derived information for predicting high grade (HG) prostate cancer (PCa) on initial biopsy. Methods: Data were collected on 1,048 men with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels 4.0 to 9.9 ng/mL who underwent an initial prostate biopsy. Two logistic regression-based nomograms were constructed to predict the detection of PCa. Nomogram-1 incorporated age, digital rectal examination, PSA and percent free PSA data, whereas n...

  11. A Pleiotropy-Informed Bayesian False Discovery Rate Adapted to a Shared Control Design Finds New Disease Associations From GWAS Summary Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, James; Wallace, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with many traits and diseases. However, at existing sample sizes, these variants explain only part of the estimated heritability. Leverage of GWAS results from related phenotypes may improve detection without the need for larger datasets. The Bayesian conditional false discovery rate (cFDR) constitutes an upper bound on the expected false discovery rate (FDR) across a set of SNPs whose p values for two diseases are both less than two disease-specific thresholds. Calculation of the cFDR requires only summary statistics and have several advantages over traditional GWAS analysis. However, existing methods require distinct control samples between studies. Here, we extend the technique to allow for some or all controls to be shared, increasing applicability. Several different SNP sets can be defined with the same cFDR value, and we show that the expected FDR across the union of these sets may exceed expected FDR in any single set. We describe a procedure to establish an upper bound for the expected FDR among the union of such sets of SNPs. We apply our technique to pairwise analysis of p values from ten autoimmune diseases with variable sharing of controls, enabling discovery of 59 SNP-disease associations which do not reach GWAS significance after genomic control in individual datasets. Most of the SNPs we highlight have previously been confirmed using replication studies or larger GWAS, a useful validation of our technique; we report eight SNP-disease associations across five diseases not previously declared. Our technique extends and strengthens the previous algorithm, and establishes robust limits on the expected FDR. This approach can improve SNP detection in GWAS, and give insight into shared aetiology between phenotypically related conditions. PMID:25658688

  12. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a system to prevent and control Cervical Cancer. This systemruns on a handheld using infrared technology from a service point to make the current process moreefficient for the staff responsible for carrying out diagnostic tests, as well as for doctors from healthclinics in communities belonging to the city of Tizimín, Yucatan, Mexico.

  13. Use of a clinical information system to support the cancer pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukai, Thomas; Vedsted, Peter; Bro, Flemming;

    the effect of inserting URL links based on the ICD10 codes of the discharge letter. The cohort will consist of about 2000 patients enrolled in a mammography screening programme in two of five Danish regions. In the second study, we plan to enroll about 12000 cancer patients to measure the effect using...

  14. Information Seeking and Intentions to Have Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancers in Rural and Appalachian Kentuckians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Andrews, James E; Case, Donald O.; Allard, Suzanne L.; Johnson, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Research is limited regarding the potential of genetic testing for cancer risk in rural Appalachia. Purpose: This study examined perceptions of genetic testing in a population sample of Kentuckians, with a focus on Appalachian and rural differences. The goals were to examine cultural and psychosocial factors that may predict intentions to…

  15. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  16. Women's satisfaction with information at breast biopsy in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehnberg, G; Absetz, P; Aro, A R

    2001-01-01

    Information needs, satisfaction with information and information sources of women referred for surgical biopsy in mammography screening were explored. Forty-five Finnish women (23 benign and 22 malignant finding) replied to a mailed questionnaire containing fixed-choice and open-ended questions 1...

  17. FDA Approval Summary: Nivolumab for the Treatment of Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Progression On or After Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Blumenthal, Gideon; Mushti, Sirisha; He, Kun; Libeg, Meredith; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On October 9, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded the nivolumab metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indication to include patients with nonsquamous NSCLC after a 3.25-month review timeline. Approval was based on demonstration of an improvement in overall survival (OS) in an international, multicenter, open-label, randomized trial comparing nivolumab to docetaxel in patients with metastatic nonsquamous NSCLC with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. The CheckMate 057 trial enrolled 582 patients who were randomized (1:1) to receive nivolumab or docetaxel. Nivolumab demonstrated improved OS compared with docetaxel at the prespecified interim analysis with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.73 (p = .0015), and a median OS of 12.2 months (95% CI: 9.7–15.0 months) in patients treated with nivolumab compared with 9.4 months (95% CI: 8.0–10.7 months) in patients treated with docetaxel. A statistically significant improvement in objective response rate (ORR) was also observed, with an ORR of 19% (95% CI: 15%–24%) in the nivolumab arm and 12% (95% CI: 9%–17%) in the docetaxel arm. The median duration of response was 17 months in the nivolumab arm and 6 months in the docetaxel arm. Progression-free survival was not statistically different between arms. A prespecified retrospective subgroup analysis suggested that patients with programmed cell death ligand 1-negative tumors treated with nivolumab had similar OS to those treated with docetaxel. The toxicity profile of nivolumab was consistent with the known immune-mediated adverse event profile except for 1 case of grade 5 limbic encephalitis, which led to a postmarketing requirement study to better characterize immune-mediated encephalitis. Implications for Practice: Based on the results from the CheckMate 057 clinical trial, nivolumab represents a new treatment option for patients requiring second-line treatment for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. The role of nivolumab in

  18. FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary is a summarized dataset describing all federally declared disasters, starting with the first disaster declaration in 1953,...

  19. Automatic summary evaluation based on text grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Branny, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I describe a method for evaluating automatically generated text summaries. The method is inspired by research in text grammars by Teun Van Dijk. It addresses a text as a complex structure, the elements of which are interconnected both on the level of form and meaning, and the well-formedness of which should be described on both of these levels. The method addresses current problems of summary evaluation methods, especially the problem of quantifying informativity, as well as th...

  20. Self-reported physical activity behaviour; exercise motivation and information among Danish adult cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, J.; Baadsgaard, M.T.; Moller, T.;

    2009-01-01

    . PURPOSE: The current study aimed at investigating self-reported physical activity behaviour, exercise motivation and information in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. METHODS AND SAMPLE: Using a cross-sectional design, 451 patients (18-65 years) completed a questionnaire assessing pre-illness and...... present physical activity; motivation and information received. RESULTS: Patients reported a significant decline in physical activity from pre-illness to the time in active treatment (p<0.001). Amongst the respondents, 68% answered that they believed exercise to be beneficial; and 78% claimed not...... exercising as much as desired. Exercise barriers included fatigue (74%) and physical discomfort (45%). Present physical activity behaviour was associated with pre-illness physical activity behaviour (p<0.001), exercise belief (p<0.001), and diagnosis (p<0.001). More patients <40 years than patients >40 years...

  1. 1985 Cancer Facts and Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information and statistical data about cancer are provided in seven categories. They include: (1) basic cancer data (considering how cancer works, trends in diagnosis and treatment, new cancer cases and deaths for 1985, and other areas); (2) major cancer sites (discussing lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, 5-year survival rates/trends…

  2. Re: Using Space-Based Investigations to Inform Cancer Research on Earth

    OpenAIRE

    J.L. Becker; Souza, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    In the Universe, four main forces are effective. These are weak nuclear force, strong nuclear force, electromagnetic force and gravitational force. Gravity is the attractive force between all matter. In space, the force of gravity is diminished, resulting in microgravity. Currently, there are various studies about microgravity and its effect on biological functions in the literature. In this review, the authors reported effects of microgravity on cancer culture studies. In these studies...

  3. EBUS-TBNA gives adequate tissue information on cell type in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, MKY; Lam, D; IP, M; Ho, J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In formulating systemic treatment in patients with advanced stage lung cancer, it is now considered imperative to know the cell type such as squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma as chemotherapeutic agents would be tailored to treat different cell types. In the authors’ centre, the adoption of using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) as the firstline treatment has been the treatment of choice in patients shown to have a...

  4. Detección del cáncer de mama en México: síntesis de los resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud Reproductiva Breast cancer examination in Mexico: summary of the results from the National Survey of Reproductive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth López-Carrillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Presentar una síntesis de los resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud Reproductiva 2003 sobre la práctica de revisión y examen clínico de los senos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Por medio de estadísticas descriptivas y modelos de regresión múltiple se identificaron las principales características sociodemográficas y sitios de información sobre la práctica de revisión y el examen clínico de los senos en cerca de 20 000 mujeres, de 15 a 49 años, residentes en áreas rurales y urbanas del país. RESULTADOS: Las mujeres jóvenes con menor escolaridad y estrato socioeconómico, residentes de áreas urbanas, informaron un práctica significativamente baja tanto de la revisión como del examen clínico de los senos. La frecuencia de mujeres con cáncer de mama (CaMa fue mayor en el área rural respecto de la urbana. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario establecer medidas para la estandarización y control de la calidad del examen clínico de los senos y coadyuvar a la prevención y control del CaMa en México.OBJECTIVE: To present a summary of the results of the National Survey of Reproductive Health 2003 regarding the practice of self and clinical breast examination. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The main sociodemographic characteristics and site of information about self and clinical breast examination, in 20 000 women 15 to 49 years of age residing in rural and urban areas, were identified by simple statistics and logistic regression models. RESULTS: Younger women with lower scholarity and socioeconomical status residing in rural areas informed a statistically lower self and clinical breast examination. A higher frequency of breast cancer was found in rural vs. urban area. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies for standardization and quality control for the clinical breast examination are needed to contribute in the prevention and control of breast cancer in Mexico.

  5. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage, nonradiological sabotage, pre-1990 alcohol and drugs (involving reactor operators, security force members, or management persons), and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  6. ENDF/B summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides a localized source of descriptions for the evaluations contained in the ENDF/B Library. The summary documentation presented is intended to be a more detailed description than the (File 1) comments contained in the computer readable data files, but not so detailed as the formal reports describing each ENDF/B evaluation. The summary documentations were written by the CSEWB (Cross Section Evaluation Working Group) evaluators and compiled by NNDC (National Nuclear Data Center). This edition includes documentation for materials found on ENDF/B Version V tapes 501 to 516 (General Purpose File) excluding tape 504. ENDF/B-V also includes tapes containing partial evaluations for the Special Purpose Actinide (521, 522), Dosimetry (531), Activation (532), Gas Production (533), and Fission Product (541-546) files. The materials found on these tapes are documented elsewhere. Some of the evaluation descriptions in this report contain cross sections or energy level information

  7. Summary of the Geographic Information System workshop, held in Chicago, Illinois, May 29--30, 1991. Final report, December 1989--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P J; Sullivan, R G; Sundell, R C; Messersmith, J [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute, in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored a workshop on May 29--30, 1991, in Chicago, Illinois, to give gas utilities the opportunity to learn about the availability, applications, and benefits of Geographic Information Systems (GISs). This report is a synopsis of that workshop and contains brief discussions, followed by copies of the viewgraphs shown at the workshop, for the following GIS topics: (1) introduction to GIS, (2) data development, (3) analytical functions, (4) use for gas pipeline right-of-way applications, and (5)video imaging and simulation.

  8. Advanced Analysis Environments - Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a summary of the panel discussion on Advanced Analysis Environments. Rene Brun, Tony Johnson, and Lassi Tuura shared their insights about the trends and challenges in analysis environments. This paper contains the initial questions, a summary of the speakers' presentation, and the questions asked by the audience

  9. Breast Cancer Risk Perceptions among Relatives of Women with Uninformative Negative BRCA1/2 Test Results: The Moderating Effect of the Amount of Shared Information

    OpenAIRE

    Himes, Deborah O.; Clayton, Margaret F.; Gary W. Donaldson; Ellington, Lee; Buys, Saundra S.; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2015-01-01

    The most common result of BRCA1/2 mutation testing when performed in a family without a previously identified mutation is an uninformative negative test result. Women in these families may have an increased risk for breast cancer because of mutations in non-BRCA breast cancer predisposition genes, including moderate- or low-risk genes, or shared environmental factors. Genetic counselors often encourage counselees to share information with family members, however it is unclear how much informa...

  10. Radium-223 Improves Survival in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and data sets for researchers Research by Cancer Type Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report ... Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Prostate Cancer Research Prostate Cancer Patient Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer ...

  11. The Effects of Experienced Uncertainty and Patients' Assessments of Cancer-Related Information-Seeking Experiences on Fatalistic Beliefs and Trust in Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo Jung; You, Kyung Han

    2016-12-01

    Using the 2013 HINTS 4 Cycle 2 data representing a general population sample, this study investigates the effects of patients' experiences of uncertainty about prostate cancer during doctor-patient communication, as well as patients' positive assessments of their cancer-related information-seeking experiences, on their fatalistic beliefs regarding cancer and their trust in physicians. Our tests show significant differences in trust in physicians among men who do and do not experience uncertainty about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test during doctor-patient communication. The analysis also indicates that individuals with experiences of uncertainty about the PSA test are more likely than those without such experiences of uncertainty to place their trust in doctors. However, no apparent difference or association exists when there are uncertainties relating to treatment choices regarding slow-growing cancer or treatment side effects. Nevertheless, as hypothesized, individuals who positively evaluate their cancer-related information-seeking experiences are less likely to have fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Furthermore, patients' positive assessments are highly predictive of their levels of trust in their physicians. Additionally, tests of interaction effects show that individuals' levels of education moderate the association between uncertainty experiences about the PSA test and both cancer fatalism and trust in physicians. Further implications and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:27092867

  12. Guidelines for information about therapy experiments: a proposal on best practice for recording experimental data on cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Beltrán Alejandra N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biology, biomedicine and healthcare have become data-driven enterprises, where scientists and clinicians need to generate, access, validate, interpret and integrate different kinds of experimental and patient-related data. Thus, recording and reporting of data in a systematic and unambiguous fashion is crucial to allow aggregation and re-use of data. This paper reviews the benefits of existing biomedical data standards and focuses on key elements to record experiments for therapy development. Specifically, we describe the experiments performed in molecular, cellular, animal and clinical models. We also provide an example set of elements for a therapy tested in a phase I clinical trial. Findings We introduce the Guidelines for Information About Therapy Experiments (GIATE, a minimum information checklist creating a consistent framework to transparently report the purpose, methods and results of the therapeutic experiments. A discussion on the scope, design and structure of the guidelines is presented, together with a description of the intended audience. We also present complementary resources such as a classification scheme, and two alternative ways of creating GIATE information: an electronic lab notebook and a simple spreadsheet-based format. Finally, we use GIATE to record the details of the phase I clinical trial of CHT-25 for patients with refractory lymphomas. The benefits of using GIATE for this experiment are discussed. Conclusions While data standards are being developed to facilitate data sharing and integration in various aspects of experimental medicine, such as genomics and clinical data, no previous work focused on therapy development. We propose a checklist for therapy experiments and demonstrate its use in the 131Iodine labeled CHT-25 chimeric antibody cancer therapy. As future work, we will expand the set of GIATE tools to continue to encourage its use by cancer researchers, and we will engineer an ontology to

  13. Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer: Low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, L.E.; Schull, W.J.; Davis, B.R. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center; Buffler, P.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

    1994-04-01

    Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error ({sigma}=0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V Report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from {minus}15% to {minus}30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative project model was {minus}37.1% for males and {minus}23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased {minus}27.1% for males and {minus}43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 65 (DRREF=2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.92%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risk increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for US nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors.

  14. Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer: Low LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error (σ=0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V Report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from -15% to -30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative project model was -37.1% for males and -23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased -27.1% for males and -43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 65 (DRREF=2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.92%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risk increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for US nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors

  15. Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error (σ = 0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with covariates for age at-time-of-bombing, age at-time-of-death and gender. Excess risks were in good agreement with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from -15% to -30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative projection model was -37.1% for males and -23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased -27.1% for males and -43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 85 (DRREF = 2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.02%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risks increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10%/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04%/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for U.S. nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors

  16. Les patients et l'information : le cancer au risque d'internet.

    OpenAIRE

    Akrich, Madeleine; Méadel, Cécile; Rémy, Catherine; Vergnaud, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    L'objectif de cette recherche est de faire une exploration comparative des ressources disponibles sur l'internet francophone en matière de cancer et à destination des patients, afin de comprendre comment sont structurés ces contenus et de quels garants ils s'entourent, quels objectifs ils se donnent par rapport aux patients, comment ils se situent par rapport aux professionnels, à quels types de comportements ils incitent ou peuvent conduire... La recherche prend en compte la spécificité des ...

  17. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  18. Analysis of cancer risk related to longitudinal information on smoking habits.

    OpenAIRE

    Akiba, S

    1994-01-01

    Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) has followed the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) cohort consisting of atomic bomb survivors and unexposed subjects for more than 40 years. The information on their lifestyles, including smoking habits, has been collected in the past 25 years through two mail surveys of the entire LSS cohort and three interview surveys of a subcohort for the biennial medical examination program. In the present study an attempt was made to consolidate the information of s...

  19. The Path(way) Less Traveled: A Pathway-Oriented Approach to Providing Information about Precision Cancer Medicine on My Cancer Genome12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexandria D.; Micheel, Christine M.; Anderson, Ingrid A.; Levy, Mia A.; Lovly, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    This perspective describes the motivation, development, and implementation of pathway-based content for My Cancer Genome, an online precision medicine knowledge resource describing clinical implications of genetic alterations in cancer. As researchers uncover more about cancer pathogenesis, we are learning more not only about the specific genes and proteins involved but also about how those genes and proteins interact with others along cell signaling pathways. This knowledge has led researchers and clinicians to begin to think about cancer therapy using a pathway-based approach. To facilitate this approach, My Cancer Genome used a list of more than 800 cancer-related genes to identify 20 cancer-relevant pathways and then created content focused on demonstrating the therapeutic relevance of these pathways. PMID:27084433

  20. The Path(way Less Traveled: A Pathway-Oriented Approach to Providing Information about Precision Cancer Medicine on My Cancer Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria D. Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This perspective describes the motivation, development, and implementation of pathway-based content for My Cancer Genome, an online precision medicine knowledge resource describing clinical implications of genetic alterations in cancer. As researchers uncover more about cancer pathogenesis, we are learning more not only about the specific genes and proteins involved but also about how those genes and proteins interact with others along cell signaling pathways. This knowledge has led researchers and clinicians to begin to think about cancer therapy using a pathway-based approach. To facilitate this approach, My Cancer Genome used a list of more than 800 cancer-related genes to identify 20 cancer-relevant pathways and then created content focused on demonstrating the therapeutic relevance of these pathways.

  1. Summary big data

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of Cukier the book: "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How we Live, Work, and Think" by Viktor Mayer-Schonberg and Kenneth. Summary of the ideas in Viktor Mayer-Schonberg's and Kenneth Cukier's book: " Big Data " explains that big data is where we use huge quantities of data to make better predictions based on the fact we identify patters in the data rather than trying to understand the underlying causes in more detail. This summary highlights that big data will be a source of new economic value and innovation in the future. Moreover, it shows that it will

  2. Biofuels: Project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  3. 76 FR 24889 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid® (caBIG®) Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on February 11, 2011 (76 FR 7867) and... Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG ) Support Service Provider (SSP) Program (NCI) Summary: Under the... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG ) Support...

  4. Compact Visualisation of Video Summaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćalić Janko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system for compact and intuitive video summarisation aimed at both high-end professional production environments and small-screen portable devices. To represent large amounts of information in the form of a video key-frame summary, this paper studies the narrative grammar of comics, and using its universal and intuitive rules, lays out visual summaries in an efficient and user-centered way. In addition, the system exploits visual attention modelling and rapid serial visual presentation to generate highly compact summaries on mobile devices. A robust real-time algorithm for key-frame extraction is presented. The system ranks importance of key-frame sizes in the final layout by balancing the dominant visual representability and discovery of unanticipated content utilising a specific cost function and an unsupervised robust spectral clustering technique. A final layout is created using an optimisation algorithm based on dynamic programming. Algorithm efficiency and robustness are demonstrated by comparing the results with a manually labelled ground truth and with optimal panelling solutions.

  5. Randomised comparison of procedures for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials of treatment for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simes, R J; Tattersall, M H; Coates, A S; Raghavan, D; Solomon, H J; Smartt, H

    1986-10-25

    Methods of obtaining informed consent have evolved differently in Western countries without substantive information on the impact of these different practices on the patients. A randomised study was performed to compare two commonly adopted methods of seeking consent to randomised treatment: an individual approach at the discretion of each doctor and a uniform policy of total disclosure of all relevant information. The impact of both consent procedures on the patient's understanding and anxiety levels and on the doctor-patient relationship was assessed by means of a questionnaire given soon after the consent interview. Fifty seven patients were assigned at random to two groups: to 29 patients an individual approach to seeking consent was adopted and to 28 patients all relevant information was given. Seven patients refused consent to randomised treatment, with slightly more refusals by patients in the total disclosure group (5 v 2, p = 0.25). The main effects of total disclosure of all information compared with an individual approach to seeking consent were: a better understanding of treatment and side effects and of research aspects of the treatments; less willingness to agree to randomised treatment; and increased anxiety. No significant differences were found in patients' perceptions of the doctor-patient relationship. A repeat questionnaire given three to four weeks later no longer showed significant differences between the two groups. PMID:3094776

  6. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac

  7. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  8. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented of the topics covered during the period, from 1960 to 1978, of the contract. The general area of the research has been theoretical solid state physics. A list of publications produced during the contract is given

  9. MSIS State Summary Datamarts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page provides background needed to take advantage of the capabilities of the MSIS State Summary Datamart. This mart allows the user to develop high-level...

  10. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  11. HMS Summary of Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data set of summary results from a Hydrologic Modeling System run for Two Ponds NWR. Data includes peak discharge, total precipitation, total loss, total excess,...

  12. Conference summary: Experimnetal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is the 1995 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems. The summary highlights research on the ''extended'' Doniach model, Kondo insulators, borocarbide superconductors, oxides (including cuprates), other phase transitions, and new materials

  13. Global Climate Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Hourly Summaries are simple indicators of observational normals which include climatic data summarizations and frequency distributions. These typically...

  14. Annual Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Single-year summaries of observations at Weather Bureau and cooperative stations across the United States. Predominantly the single page Form 1066, which includes...

  15. The general practitioner’s informative and supportive role in Danish cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henry; Vinter, Mette Marianne; Lehmann Knudsen, Janne; Vedsted, Peter

    informed about their treatment and care. No differences were observed between different diagnosis regarding information from the GP and to the GP about treatment. Overall 83.2% (81.9;84.5) found, that the GP’s communicative skills were to some or greater extent good with a statistically significant...... difference between men and women (p<0.002). Regarding listening to their anxiety, 77.7% (76.1;79.2) found the GP good or better, again with a statistically significant difference between men and women (p<0.003)....

  16. Changes Over Time in the Utilization of Disease-Related Internet Information in Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients 2007 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, Eva; Kuhr, Kathrin; Ansmann, Lena; Pfaff, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background As the number of people with Internet access rises, so does the use of the Internet as a potentially valuable source for health information. Insight into patient use of this information and its correlates over time may reveal changes in the digital divide based on patient age and education. Existing research has focused on patient characteristics that predict Internet information use and research on treatment context is rare. Objective This study aims to (1) present data on the proportion of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients treated in German breast centers from 2007 to 2013 who used the Internet for information on their disease, (2) look into correlations between Internet utilization and sociodemographic characteristics and if these change over time, and (3) determine if use of Internet information varies with the hospitals in which the patients were initially treated. Methods Data about utilization of the Internet for breast cancer–specific health information was obtained in a postal survey of breast cancer patients that is conducted annually in Germany with a steady response rate of 87% of consenting patients. Data from the survey were combined with data obtained by hospital personnel (eg, cancer stage and type of surgery). Data from 27,491 patients from 7 consecutive annual surveys were analyzed for this paper using multilevel regression modeling to account for clustering of patients in specific hospitals. Results Breast cancer patients seeking disease-specific information on the Internet increased significantly from 26.96% (853/3164) in 2007 to 37.21% (1485/3991) in 2013. Similar patterns of demographic correlates were found for all 7 cohorts. Older patients (≥70 years) and patients with <10 years of formal education were less likely to use the Internet for information on topics related to their disease. Internet use was significantly higher among privately insured patients and patients living with a partner. Higher cancer stage and a

  17. Site environmental report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment

  18. How Are Cervical Cancers and Pre-Cancers Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some find disturbing. Some places provide headphones with music to block this noise out. A mild sedative ... in Cervical Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

  19. Preconceptions influence women’s perceptions of information on breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mikael Johannes Vuokko; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Brodersen, John

    2015-01-01

    first invitation toparticipate in the breast screening programme in Denmark. The selected women received a copy of the official information leaflet 1 week before we interviewed them. The six women were interviewed individually using an interviewguide based on the theory of planned behaviour. We used...

  20. 78 FR 38716 - Scientific Information Request on Imaging Tests for the Staging of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    .... In order to do so, we are supplementing the usual manual and electronic database searches of the... materials that can be made public. Materials that are considered confidential; marketing materials... information from the list to upload your documents. Email submissions: SIPS@EPC-SRC.ORG . Print...