WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer information summaries

  1. Cancer Information Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer-reviewed, evidence-based summaries on topics including adult and pediatric cancer treatment, supportive and palliative care, screening, prevention, genetics, and complementary and alternative medicine. References to published literature are included.

  2. 78 FR 26029 - Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information... and peer review on the draft non-cancer toxicological review of methanol. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing a... Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information...

  3. 76 FR 36534 - Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information... review draft human health assessment titled ``Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non- Cancer): In Support... Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer) and announcing a 14-day public comment period for the addendum...

  4. Summary information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Summary Information Report (SIR) provides summary data concerning NRC and its licensees for general use by the Chairman, other Commissioners and Commission staff offices, the Executive Director for Operations, and the Office Directors. SIR is published quarterly by the Management Information Branch (49-27834) of the Office of Resource Management

  5. Information applications: Rapporteur summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, S. [National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1990-12-31

    An increased level of mathematical sophistication will be needed in the future to be able to handle the spectrum of information as it comes from a broad array of biological systems and other sources. Classification will be an increasingly complex and difficult issue. Several projects that are discussed are being developed by the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), including a directory of risk assessment projects and a directory of exposure information resources.

  6. 49 CFR 194.113 - Information summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information summary. 194.113 Section 194.113... Response Plans § 194.113 Information summary. (a) The information summary for the core plan, required by... state(s). (b) The information summary for the response zone appendix, required in § 194.107, must...

  7. Summary Information report. Vol. 2, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    The Summary Information Report (SIR) provides summary data concerning NRC and its licensees for general use by the Chairman, other Commissioners and Commission staff offices, the Executive Director for Operations, and the Office Directors. SIR is published quarterly by the Management Information Branch (49-27834) of the Office of Resource Management

  8. PU-ICE Summary Information.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Generator Knowledge Report for the Plutonium Isentropic Compression Experiment Containment Systems (GK Report) provides information for the Plutonium Isentropic Compression Experiment (Pu- ICE) program to support waste management and characterization efforts. Attachment 3-18 presents generator knowledge (GK) information specific to the eighteenth Pu-ICE conducted in August 2015, also known as ‘Shot 18 (Aug 2015) and Pu-ICE Z-2841 (1).’ Shot 18 (Aug 2015) was generated on August 28, 2015 (1). Calculations based on the isotopic content of Shot 18 (Aug 2015) and the measured mass of the containment system demonstrate the post-shot containment system is low-level waste (LLW). Therefore, this containment system will be managed at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico (SNL/NM) as LLW. Attachment 3-18 provides documentation of the TRU concentration and documents the concentration of any hazardous constituents.

  9. PDQ® Cancer Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI database that contains the latest information about cancer treatment, screening, prevention, genetics, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine, plus drug information and a dictionary of cancer terms.

  10. 19 CFR 151.41 - Information on entry summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information on entry summary. 151.41 Section 151... Products § 151.41 Information on entry summary. On the entry summary for petroleum or petroleum products in.... If the exact volumetric quantity cannot be determined in advance, the entry summary may be made for...

  11. 19 CFR 151.63 - Information on entry summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information on entry summary. 151.63 Section 151.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Information on entry summary. Each entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean...

  12. Information, Physics, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Chris

    Many researchers have doubts that a ''theory of cancer'' can exist, given the fact that there are so many different cancer phenotypes. However, such a situation-many significantly different manifestations of an underlying law-is not at all uncommon in physics. I argue that a unified cause for all forms of cancer is possible, but that such a theory must be cast in terms of information and communication theory. I briefly revisit key concepts of that theory, then discuss possible applications to communication in game theory that could lead us to view cancer as a disease that, at its root, is a cellular failure to properly communicate.

  13. Annotated Bibliography; Freedom of Information Center Reports and Summary Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedom of Information Center, Columbia, MO.

    This bibliography lists and annotates almost 400 information reports, opinion papers, and summary papers dealing with freedom of information. Topics covered include the nature of press freedom and increased press efforts toward more open access to information; the press situation in many foreign countries, including France, Sweden, Communist…

  14. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Screening Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  15. Coffee and cancer risk: a summary overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicandro, Gianfranco; Tavani, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    We reviewed available evidence on coffee drinking and the risk of all cancers and selected cancers updated to May 2016. Coffee consumption is not associated with overall cancer risk. A meta-analysis reported a pooled relative risk (RR) for an increment of 1 cup of coffee/day of 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-1.01] for all cancers. Coffee drinking is associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer. A meta-analysis of cohort studies found an RR for an increment of consumption of 1 cup/day of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.81-0.90) for liver cancer and a favorable effect on liver enzymes and cirrhosis. Another meta-analysis showed an inverse relation for endometrial cancer risk, with an RR of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.88-0.96) for an increment of 1 cup/day. A possible decreased risk was found in some studies for oral/pharyngeal cancer and for advanced prostate cancer. Although data are mixed, overall, there seems to be some favorable effect of coffee drinking on colorectal cancer in case-control studies, in the absence of a consistent relation in cohort studies. For bladder cancer, the results are not consistent; however, any possible direct association is not dose and duration related, and might depend on a residual confounding effect of smoking. A few studies suggest an increased risk of childhood leukemia after maternal coffee drinking during pregnancy, but data are limited and inconsistent. Although the results of studies are mixed, the overall evidence suggests no association of coffee intake with cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung, breast, ovary, and prostate overall. Data are limited, with RR close to unity for other neoplasms, including those of the esophagus, small intestine, gallbladder and biliary tract, skin, kidney, brain, thyroid, as well as for soft tissue sarcoma and lymphohematopoietic cancer.

  16. Facilitating the Information Exchange Using a Modular Electronic Discharge Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin; Dittli, Pascal A; Kanagarasa, Niveadha; Nüssli, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    Discharge summaries are a standard communication tool delivering important clinical information from inpatient to ambulatory care. To ensure a high quality, correctness and completeness, the generation process is time consuming. It requires also contributions of multiple persons. This is problematic since the primary care provider needs the information from the discharge summary for continuing the intended treatment. To address this challenge, we developed a concept for exchanging a modular electronic discharge summary. Through a literature review and interviews with multiple stakeholders, we analysed existing processes and derived requirements for an improved communication of the discharge summary. In this paper, we suggest a concept of a modular electronic discharge summary that is exchanged through the electronic patient dossier in CDA CH level 2 documents. Until 2020, all Swiss hospitals are obliged to connect to the electronic patient dossier. Our concept allows to access already completed modules of the discharge summary from the primary care side, before the entire report is entirely finalised. The data is automatically merged with the local patient record on the physician side and prepared for data integration into the practice information system. Our concept offers the opportunity not only to improve the information exchange between hospital and primary care, but it also provides a potential use case and demonstrates a benefit of the electronic patient dossier for primary care providers who are so far not obliged to connect to the patient dossier in Switzerland.

  17. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria SUMMARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    24 patients who needed blood transfusion were adequately transfused and only 21.74% of all patients had complete treatment). ... cancer management in this centre with a view to finding ways to improve its management. Methods. All case notes for patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching ...

  18. Final Summary: Genre Theory in Information Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This chapter offers a re-description of knowledge organization in light of genre and activity theory. Knowledge organization needs a new description in order to account for those activities and practices constituting and causing concrete knowledge organization activity. Genre and activity...... informing and shaping concrete forms of knowledge organization activity. With this, we are able to understand how knowledge organization activity also contributes to construct genre and activity systems and not only aid them....

  19. Photovoltaics Innovation Roadmap Request for Information Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2018-03-28

    On June 28, 2017, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) released the Photovoltaics (PV) Innovation Roadmap Request for Information (RFI) for public response and comment. The RFI sought feedback from PV stakeholders, including research and commercial communities, about the most important research and development (R&D) pathways to improve PV cell and module technology to reach the SETO’s SunShot 2030 cost targets of $0.03/W for utility PV installations, $0.04/W for commercial scale installations, and $0.05/W for residential PV installations.

  20. Informal workshop on intense polarized ion sources: a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    An Informal Workshop on Intense Polarized Ion Sources was held on March 6, 1980, at the O'Hare Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the Workshop was to discuss problems in developing higher-intensity polarized proton sources, particularly the optically-pumped source recently proposed by L.W. Anderson of the University of Wisconsin. A summary of the discussions is reported

  1. Cervical cancer: summary of the NIH consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de examinar algunos aspectos aún no definidos del tratamiento del cáncer de cuello uterino y de la calidad de la vida de los pacientes, el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (EUA y la Oficina de Aplicaciones Médicas de la Investigación, pertenecientes a los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH, convocaron una Conferencia para el Desarrollo de Consenso sobre el Cáncer de Cuello de Útero. El panel de expertos, que se compuso de 13 miembros, se concentró en los siguientes interrogantes: 1 ¿Cómo se pueden fortalecer las iniciativas para prevenir el cáncer cervico-uterino? 2 ¿Cuál es el tratamiento apropiado del cáncer de cuello de útero en estadio temprano? 3 ¿Cuál es el tratamiento adecuado del cáncer cervicouterino recurrente o en estadio avanzado? 4 ¿Qué nuevos rumbos seguirán las investigaciones sobre el cáncer de cuello de útero? En este informe se resumen las conclusiones a las que se llegó en la Conferencia sobre estas cuestiones. La declaración de consenso se puede pedir gratuitamente a los NIH.

  2. Effluent Information System (EIS) / Onsite Discharge Information System (ODIS): 1986 executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.

    1987-09-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) data base systems aid DOE-Headquarters and Field Offices in managing the radioactive air and liquid effluents from DOE facilities. Data on effluents released offsite are entered into effluent information system (EIS) and data on effluents discharged onsite and retained onsite are entered into Onsite Discharge Information System (ODIS). This document is a summary of information obtained from the CY 1986 effluent data received from all DOE and DOE contractor facilities and entered in the data bases. Data from previous years are also included. The summary consists of information for effluents released offsite, and information for effluents retained onsite

  3. Information architecture. Volume 2, Part 1: Baseline analysis summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture, Volume 2, Baseline Analysis, is a collaborative and logical next-step effort in the processes required to produce a Departmentwide information architecture. The baseline analysis serves a diverse audience of program management and technical personnel and provides an organized way to examine the Department`s existing or de facto information architecture. A companion document to Volume 1, The Foundations, it furnishes the rationale for establishing a Departmentwide information architecture. This volume, consisting of the Baseline Analysis Summary (part 1), Baseline Analysis (part 2), and Reference Data (part 3), is of interest to readers who wish to understand how the Department`s current information architecture technologies are employed. The analysis identifies how and where current technologies support business areas, programs, sites, and corporate systems.

  4. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  5. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  6. General Information About Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  7. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  8. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  9. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  10. Automatic summary generating technology of vegetable traceability for information sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenxuan, Zhang; Minjing, Peng

    2017-06-01

    In order to solve problems of excessive data entries and consequent high costs for data collection in vegetable traceablility for farmers in traceability applications, the automatic summary generating technology of vegetable traceability for information sharing was proposed. The proposed technology is an effective way for farmers to share real-time vegetable planting information in social networking platforms to enhance their brands and obtain more customers. In this research, the influencing factors in the vegetable traceablility for customers were analyzed to establish the sub-indicators and target indicators and propose a computing model based on the collected parameter values of the planted vegetables and standard legal systems on food safety. The proposed standard parameter model involves five steps: accessing database, establishing target indicators, establishing sub-indicators, establishing standard reference model and computing scores of indicators. On the basis of establishing and optimizing the standards of food safety and traceability system, this proposed technology could be accepted by more and more farmers and customers.

  11. Effluent information system (EIS)/onsite discharge information system (ODIS) 1985 executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.

    1986-09-01

    The Effluent Information System (EIS) and Onsite Discharge Information System (ODIS) are Department of Energy (DOE) data base systems that aid DOE-Headquarters and Field Offices in managing the radioactive air and liquid effluents from DOE facilities. Data on effluents released offsite are entered into EIS and data on effluents discharged onsite and retained onsite are entered into ODIS. This document is a summary of information obtained from the CY 1985 effluent data received from all DOE and DOE contractor facilities and entered in the data bases. Data from previous years are also included. The summary consists of two parts. The first part summarizes information for effluents released offsite, and the second part summarizes information for effluents retained onsite. These summaries are taken from the routine annual reports sent to each DOE Operations Office. Special tabulations or specific data can be supplied upon request. Explanations of the significant changes are included in the EIS and ODIS graphic sections. Only those changes in activity greater than a factor of two and having a magnitude greater than 0.1 Ci are considered significant and are addressed in the explanation

  12. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Prevention Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  13. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analyses , for information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-01

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL and Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project

  14. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The fourth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste Management and enriched fissile materials. The central theme of the workshop was ''Dealing with interests, values and knowledge in managing risk''within the Belgian context of local partnerships for the long term management of low-level, short-lived radioactive waste. The four-day workshop started with a half-day session in Brussels giving a general introduction on the Belgian context and the local partnership methodology. This was followed by community visits to three local partnerships, PaLoFF in Fleurus-Farciennes, MONA in Mol, and STOLA in Dessel. After the visits, the workshop continued with two full-day sessions in Brussels. One hundred and nineteen registered participants, representing 13 countries, attended the workshop or participated in the community visits. About two thirds were Belgian stakeholders; the remainder came from FSC member organisations. The participants included representatives of municipal governments, civil society organisations, government agencies, industrial companies, the media, and international organisations as well as private citizens, consultants and academics. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop and the community visits. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Executive Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's reflection aiming to place the main lessons of the workshop into an international perspective. (author)

  15. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  16. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of skin cancer. Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about skin cancer: Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Genetics ...

  17. Summaries of completed Access to Information requests in 2013 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Provide a list of all projects funded by the IDRC and deal with any of the following issues since January 1, 2010: Kyoto Protocol, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Carbon Taxes/Pricing, Oilsands, Pipelines or Tankers. Disposition: Total Disclosure Number of Pages Disclosed: 84. Request Number: A-2013-06

  18. Cancer Patients' Informational Needs: Qualitative Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Haydeh; Mardani-Hamooleh, Marjan

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the informational needs of cancer patients is a requirement to plan any educative care program for them. The aim of this study was to identify Iranian cancer patients' perceptions of informational needs. The study took a qualitative approach. Semi-structured interviews were held with 25 cancer patients in two teaching hospitals in Iran. Transcripts of the interviews underwent conventional content analysis, and categories were extracted. The results came under two main categories: disease-related informational needs and information needs related to daily life. Disease-related informational needs had two subcategories: obtaining information about the nature of disease and obtaining information about disease prognosis. Information needs related to daily life also had two subcategories: obtaining information about healthy lifestyle and obtaining information about regular activities of daily life. The findings provide deep understanding of cancer patients' informational needs in Iran.

  19. Investigating the genetic relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and cancer using GWAS summary statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Yen Chen Anne; Cho, Kelly; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Cormack, Jean; Blalock, Kendra; Campbell, Peter T.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Figueiredo, Jane; James Gauderman, W.; Gong, Jian; Green, Roger C.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Harju, John F.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Li, Li; Lin, Yi; Manion, Frank J.; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Peters, Ulrike; Raskin, Leon; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hunter, David J.; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Ahsan, Habib; Whittemore, Alice S.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Crisponi, Laura; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Easton, Douglas F.; Turnbull, Clare A.; Rahman, Nazneen; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fred; Travis, Ruth C.; Riboli, Elio; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Christiani, David C.; Amos, Christopher I; Liang, Liming; Driver, Jane A.; IGAP Consortium, Colorectal Transdisciplinary Study (CORECT); Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE)

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence from both epidemiology and basic science suggest an inverse association between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer. We examined the genetic relationship between AD and various cancer types using GWAS summary statistics from the IGAP and GAME-ON consortia. Sample size ranged from

  20. Childhood Cancer Genomics Gaps and Opportunities - Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI convened a workshop of representative research teams that have been leaders in defining the genomic landscape of childhood cancers to discuss the influence of genomic discoveries on the future of childhood cancer research.

  1. General Information about Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer . Ethnic background and being exposed to the Epstein-Barr virus can affect the risk of nasopharyngeal cancer. Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor . Having a risk ...

  2. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb. The cancer may occur as soon as 5 years ... thyroid cancer, drugs may be given to prevent the body from making thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone that can ...

  3. Financial Burden of Cancer Care - Life After Cancer Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled 'Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification' that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included

  5. Quality of medication information in discharge summaries from hospitals: an audit of electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Beate Hennie; Djønne, Berit Svendsen; Skjold, Frode; Mellingen, Ellen Marie; Aag, Trine Iversen

    2017-12-01

    Background Low quality of medication information in discharge summaries from hospitals may jeopardize optimal therapy and put the patient at risk for medication errors and adverse drug events. Objective To audit the quality of medication information in discharge summaries and explore factors associated with the quality. Setting Helgelandssykehuset Mo i Rana, a rural hospital in central Norway. Method For each month in 2013, we randomly selected 60 discharge summaries from the Department of Medicine and Surgery (totally 720) and evaluated the medication information using eight Norwegian quality criteria. Main outcome measure Mean score per discharge summary ranging from 0 (lowest quality) to 16 (highest quality). Results Mean score per discharge summary was 7.4 (SD 2.8; range 0-14), significantly higher when evaluating medications used regularly compared to mediations used as needed (7.80 vs. 6.52; p < 0.001). Lowest score was achieved for quality criteria concerning generic names, indications for medication use, reasons why changes had been made and information about the source for information. Factors associated with increased quality scores are increasing numbers of medications and male patients. Increasing age seemed to be associated with a reduced score, while type of department was not associated with the quality. Conclusion In discharge summaries from 2013, we identified a low quality of medication information in accordance with the Norwegian quality criteria. Actions for improvement are necessary and follow-up studies to monitor quality are needed.

  6. Historical Perspective on Familial Gastric CancerSummary

    OpenAIRE

    C. Richard Boland; Matthew B. Yurgelun

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease worldwide, typically associated with acquired chronic inflammation in the stomach, related in most instances to infection by Helicobacter pylori. A small percentage of cases occurs in familial clusters, and some of these can be linked to specific germline mutations. This article reviews the historical background to the current understanding of familial gastric cancer, focuses on the entity of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, and also reviews the risks for ...

  7. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers.

  8. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers.

  9. General Information about Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor markers are used to detect testicular cancer: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Tumor ... tumor markers are used in staging testicular cancer : Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Lactate ...

  10. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... larynx such as the neck, trachea , thyroid, or esophagus . Cancer may have spread to one lymph node on ... the neck with none larger than 6 centimeters. Cancer may have spread to tissues beyond the larynx, such as the neck, trachea, thyroid, or esophagus. The vocal cords may not move normally. In ...

  11. General Information about Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope . Stage II In stage II , cancer has spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ... spread to one lymph node in the groin . Cancer has also spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ...

  12. Ways Youth Receive Information about Marihuana. Final Report Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitz, Albert C.; Clark, Richard E.

    A description was sought of the types of sources of information about marijuana used by 300 middle class fifth, seventh, and eleventh grade students. During individual meetings with experienced female interviewers, students were asked to relate sources which were most influential in providing information about marihuana at the following stages:…

  13. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, George

    1997-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has pushed many countries in analyzing critically their radiological emergency plans in order to identify the fields requiring amelioration or reinforcement. A common topic was the necessity of informing and drilling efficiently the civil population as well as different intervening agents against effects of nuclear accidents. It was stressed that the health and safety of populations, potentially most exposed, constitute a top priority, followed by the protection of food storage. The majority of the countries, were the management of public affairs is effected at two or more echelons, is confronted with the difficulty of developing plans clearly defining the missions and responsibilities of different administration levels as well as the interactions between them in case of emergency. Emphasized are also the requirements of information tools able of computing the contamination of foods or forages taking into account of factors like annual season, the phase of crop growth and the meteorological conditions. Obviously, such programs permit forecasting, surveying and evaluating the contamination and consequently, establishing the proper level of intervention. Also, the question of intervention thresholds was approached as well as the necessity of harmonizing intervention on international scale. A number of topics were mentioned to be under current study among which the relations between soil contamination and radionuclide concentration in milk and forage as well as the methods of managing the highly cesium-contaminated milk. Finally, it was argued for the necessity of ensuring the population confidence in the measures of intervention as well as in the indications of competent officials in charge with emergency actions

  14. A novel summary report of colonoscopy: timeline visualization providing meaningful colonoscopy video information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minwoo; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kong, Hyoun Joong; Hong, Kyoung Sup; Kim, Sungwan

    2018-05-01

    The colonoscopy adenoma detection rate depends largely on physician experience and skill, and overlooked colorectal adenomas could develop into cancer. This study assessed a system that detects polyps and summarizes meaningful information from colonoscopy videos. One hundred thirteen consecutive patients had colonoscopy videos prospectively recorded at the Seoul National University Hospital. Informative video frames were extracted using a MATLAB support vector machine (SVM) model and classified as bleeding, polypectomy, tool, residue, thin wrinkle, folded wrinkle, or common. Thin wrinkle, folded wrinkle, and common frames were reanalyzed using SVM for polyp detection. The SVM model was applied hierarchically for effective classification and optimization of the SVM. The mean classification accuracy according to type was over 93%; sensitivity was over 87%. The mean sensitivity for polyp detection was 82.1%, and the positive predicted value (PPV) was 39.3%. Polyps detected using the system were larger (6.3 ± 6.4 vs. 4.9 ± 2.5 mm; P = 0.003) with a more pedunculated morphology (Yamada type III, 10.2 vs. 0%; P < 0.001; Yamada type IV, 2.8 vs. 0%; P < 0.001) than polyps missed by the system. There were no statistically significant differences in polyp distribution or histology between the groups. Informative frames and suspected polyps were presented on a timeline. This summary was evaluated using the system usability scale questionnaire; 89.3% of participants expressed positive opinions. We developed and verified a system to extract meaningful information from colonoscopy videos. Although further improvement and validation of the system is needed, the proposed system is useful for physicians and patients.

  15. An annotated summary of the Information Model Design Procedure (IMDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.D.

    1994-05-01

    This presentation documents the essential elements of the IMDP as applied at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The IMDP is an adaptation of the Natural-Language Information Analysis Methodology (NIAM) of G. M. Nijssen. The underlying purpose of both of these methodologies is to provide a formal, reproducible, and verifiable approach to specifying the information requirements of an information system. The IMDP spans the specification process from initial scoping; through verbalization of problem-domain facts, specification of constraints, and subtype analysis; and finally to application of a formal algorithm for developing a fifth-normal-form relational database design.

  16. Intention to seek information on cancer genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Andrews

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The public has a high interest in seeking personal genetic information, which holds implications for health information seeking research and health care policy. Rapid advances in cancer genetics research promise early detection, prevention and treatment, yet consumers may have greater difficulty finding and using the information they may need to make informed decisions regarding their personal health and the future of their families. Design. A statewide telephone survey was conducted of non-institutionalized Kentucky residents 18 years of age or older to investigate factors associated with the intention to seek cancer genetics information, including the need for such information seeking help. Results. The results show that intention to seek cancer genetics information, if testing were readily available, is moderately high (62.5% of those responding; n=835, and that status as a racial minority, the perception that cancer runs in one's family, and frequent worrying about cancer risk are statistically significant predictors of intent to seek genetics information. Conclusion. . We argue that an already complex health information environment will be even more difficult for individuals to navigate as genetic research becomes more ubiquitous in health care. An increase in demand for genetics information in various forms, as suggested by these results and those of other studies, implies that enduring intervention strategies are needed to help individuals acquire necessary health information literacy skills, with special attention given to racial minorities.

  17. Human thyroid cancer induction by ionizing radiation: summary of studies based on external irradiation and radioactive iodines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    To provide a context for the Chernobyl thyroid cancer experience, a summary of the findings from other studies is given. The data on external radiation and thyroid cancer come primarily from studies of children irradiated for a variety of benign medical conditions and the Japanese atomic bomb cohort. Unfortunately, only small amounts of data are currently available on thyroid cancer following radioactive iodine exposure in childhood. In order to predict the risk of thyroid cancer in the Chernobyl experience, a number of radiation-related factors need to be considered: the magnitude of radiation risk from available studies; shape of the dose-response curve; variations in risk by gender, time since irradiation, and age at irradiation; the effects of dose fractionation or dose protraction. Other considerations pertaining to the frequency of thyroid cancer and its outcome are thyroid-tumor surveillance effects and background iodine intake. The data to date suggest that 131 I produces less thyroid cancer than a comparable dose of external radiation, but the Chernobyl experience will provide extensive new information on this issue. Principles are discussed as to how to maximize the scientific validity and informativeness of Chernobyl thyroid studies

  18. Summary of avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J H; Andersen, A; Dreyer, L

    1997-01-01

    An overview is given of the most important known causes of cancer in the five Nordic countries and the resulting number of cancers that are potentially avoidable. The main causes include active and passive smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to asbestos and other occupational carcinogens, solar...... and ionizing radiation, obesity, human papillomavirus infection in the female genital tract and infection with Helicobacter pylori. The organs most commonly affected are those of the respiratory system, the upper digestive tract and stomach, skin, the lower urinary tract and the uterine cervix. Annually, more...... than 18,000 cancers in men and 11,000 in women in the Nordic populations could be avoided by eliminating exposure to known carcinogens which is equivalent to 33% and 20% of all cancers arising in men and women, respectively, around the year 2000. Smoking habits account for a little more than half...

  19. General Information about Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and x-rays ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. Certain factors ...

  20. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. When the esophagus and ...

  1. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  2. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text follows: During the five sessions of the workshop, much insight has been gained in a variety of issues and challenges that national programmes will encounter as they approach the construction phase of deep geologic repositories as well as their plans to address and resolve these issues. Due to the wide range of participating programmes and due to the different phases of repository development represented, the information presented at the workshop ranged from general and generic questions to specific technical, managerial, administrative, legal, regulatory and procedural issues. Although many issues still awaiting their resolutions, it can be observed that there were joint views amongst the participants with respect to the nature and specificities of these issues. These include: - the need for flexibility (within a so-called safety envelope) when projects evolve over time, - the need to address targets could be very difficult in nature and in some cases may compete with each other when developing and optimising repository systems, - the central role of management with regard to developing adequate professional attitudes and an appropriate safety culture, taking into account the various professional disciplines involved, - the need for integrating different legal and regulatory fields, often addressed by different authorities, and the question of a 'leading regulator'; - the technical challenge of conceptualising parallel processes such as excavation in parts of a repository and emplacement in others and the need to fulfil related safety requirements (mining and occupational, radiation protection etc.), - monitoring may have different roles in different phases of repository development, or - the outstanding role of the safety case prepared in advance to operation (waste emplacement) compared to the cases prepared at other stages of repository development, and the need to act accordingly in the regulatory

  3. Appendix B: Fisher, lynx, wolverine summary of distribution information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Maj

    1994-01-01

    We present maps depicting distributions of fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States since 1961. Comparison of past and current distributions of species can shed light on population persistence, periods of population isolation, meta-population structure, and important connecting landscapes. Information on the distribution of the American marten is not...

  4. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  5. A summary of available information on ferrocyanide tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Schulz, W.W.

    1991-10-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford site during the mid to late 1950s to make more tank space available for the storage of high level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed as a method of removing 137 Cs from existing waste solutions and from process solutions that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in waste tanks. During the coarse of the research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was discovered that ferrocyanide materials when mixed with NaNO 3 and/or NaNO 2 exploded. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s when the safety associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety associated with these wastes and the current research and waste management programs. Over the past three years, numerous explosive test have been carried out using milligram quantities of cyanide compounds. These tests provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions. On heating a mixture of ferrocyanide and nitrate or nitrite, an explosive reaction normally begins at about 240 degrees C, but may occur well below 200 degrees C in the presence of catalysts or organic compounds that may act as initiators. The energy released is highly dependent on the course of the reaction. Three attempts to model hot spots in local areas of the tanks indicate a very low probability of having a hot spot large enough and hot enough to be of concern. The main purpose of this document is to inform the members of the Tank Waste Science Panel of the background and issues associated with the ferrocyanide wastes. Hopefully, this document fulfills similar needs outside of the framework of the Tank Waste Science Panel. 50 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  6. National Information Infrastructure Education Forum: A summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.; Oliver, C.E.

    1994-05-01

    The National Information Infrastructure (NII) Education Forum was held on October 6-8, 1993, in Arlington, Virginia. The Forum was sponsored by the Office of Scientific Computing, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Its purpose was to discuss technology for K-12 education and what role DOE and its national laboratories could play in developing, disseminating, and using technology for K-12. The Forum brought together over 120 people from across the nation. Participants represented six groups: national laboratories; education research institutions; K-12 teachers and administrators; industry; federal agencies; and other institutions. The Forum consisted of a series of structured presentations from each of these six groups; technology demonstrations; and open, small group discussions. The presentations covered the following: important K-12 education and computing issues, national laboratory capabilities, other federal sector initiatives, and industry perspectives. The demonstration room had over 20 computers networked to the Internet. Workshop participants were shown (1) how to use the Internet to access resources anywhere in the world, (2) state-of-the-art network video teleconferencing technology, (3) multi-media technology, and (4) various other educational software systems.

  7. 75 FR 1617 - Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol: In Support of the Summary Information in the Integrated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Toxicological Review of Methanol: In Support of the Summary Information in the Integrated Risk Information... external review draft document titled ``Toxicological Review of Methanol: In Support of Summary Information... methanol will be held on February 23, 2010, beginning at 9 a.m. and ending at 4 p.m., Eastern Standard Time...

  8. Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary describes highlights from the report, "Building Management Information Systems to Coordinate Citywide Afterschool Programs: A Toolkit for Cities." City-led efforts to build coordinated systems of afterschool programming are an important strategy for improving the health, safety and academic preparedness of children…

  9. Reinforced soil structures. Volume II, Summary of research and systems information

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Volume II was essentially prepared as an Appendix of supporting information for Volume I. This volume contains much of the supporting theory and a summary of the research used to verify the design approach contained in Volume I, as well as general in...

  10. U.S. Department of Education FY 2010 Summary of Performance and Financial Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the U.S. Department of Education's Fiscal Year (FY) "2010 Summary of Performance and Financial Information." FY 2010 was a transition year for the Department as it moves to a new strategic plan. The Department is still firmly committed to its mission of promoting achievement and preparation for global competitiveness…

  11. Three Mile Island technical information and examination program instrumentation and electrical summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meininger, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes the investigations on instrumentation and electrical systems that were subjected to a loss-of-coolant accident environment during and following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) on March 28, 1979. The report is a summary of information previously published in GEND-INF reports, plus current knowledge of the investigators

  12. Measuring cancer patients' reasons for their information preference: construction of the Considerations Concerning Cancer Information (CCCI) questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Hoeven, Claartje L.; Zandbelt, Linda C.; Fransen, Sanne; de Haes, Hanneke; Oort, Frans; Geijsen, Debby; Koning, Caro; Smets, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This paper describes the further development and psychometric properties of an instrument to measure cancer patients' reasons to want complete or limited information: the Considerations Concerning Cancer Information questionnaire (CCCI). Understanding cancer patients' reasons to want

  13. Measuring cancer patients’ reasons for their information preference: construction of the Considerations Concerning Cancer Information (CCCI) questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Hoeven, C.L.; Zandbelt, L.C.; Fransen, S.; de Haes, H.; Oort, F.; Geijsen, D.; Koning, C.; Smets, E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This paper describes the further development and psychometric properties of an instrument to measure cancer patients' reasons to want complete or limited information: the Considerations Concerning Cancer Information questionnaire (CCCI). Understanding cancer patients' reasons to want

  14. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... back). Tests include the following: Estrogen and progesterone receptor test : A test to measure the amount of ...

  15. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng

    2013-01-01

    We study the mergeability of data summaries. Informally speaking, mergeability requires that, given two summaries on two datasets, there is a way to merge the two summaries into a single summary on the two datasets combined together, while preserving the error and size guarantees. This property m...

  16. Involving patients in a multidisciplinary European consensus process and in the development of a 'patient summary of the consensus document for colon and rectal cancer care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Petra G; Taylor, Claire; Henning, Geoffrey; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Espin, Eloy; Wiggers, Theo; Gore-Booth, Jola; Moss, Barbara; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-01-01

    High-quality cancer care should be accessible for patients and healthcare professionals. Involvement of patients as partners in guideline formation and consensus processes is still rarely found. EURECCA, short for European Registration of Cancer Care, is the platform to improve outcomes of cancer care by reducing variation in the diagnostic and treatment process. EURECCA acknowledges the important role of patients in implementation of consensus information in clinical practice. The aim of this article is to describe the process of involving patients in the consensus process and in developing the patient summary of the consensus for colon and rectal cancer care. The Delphi method for achieving consensus was used. Three online voting rounds and one tele-voting round were offered to an expert panel of oncology professionals and patient representatives. At four different stages, patients and/or patient representatives were involved in the process: (1) during the consensus process, (2) lecturing about the role of the patient, (3) development of the patient summary, and (4) testing the patient summary. Representatives were invited to the voting and commenting rounds of this process and given an equal vote. Although patients were not consulted during the planning stages of this process, patient involvement increased following the panel's discussion of the implementation of the consensus among the patient population. After the consensus meeting, the patient summary was written by patient representatives, oncologists and nurses. A selection of proactive patients reviewed the draft patient summary; responses were positive and several patient-reported outcomes were added. Questionnaires to evaluate the use and implementation of the patient summary in daily practice are currently being developed and tested. Patient consultation will be needed in future planning for selection of topics. The present study may function as a model for future consensus processes to involve patients

  17. Toward a patient-centered ambulatory after-visit summary: Identifying primary care patients' information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Martina A; Moore, Joi L; Steege, Linsey M; Koopman, Richelle J; Belden, Jeffery L; Canfield, Shannon M; Kim, Min S

    2018-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the information needs of primary care patients as they review clinic visit notes to inform information that should be contained in an after-visit summary (AVS). We collected data from 15 patients with an acute illness and 14 patients with a chronic disease using semi-structured interviews. The acute patients reviewed seven major sections, and chronic patients reviewed eight major sections of a simulated, but realistic visit note to identify relevant information needs for their AVS. Patients in the acute illness group identified the Plan, Assessment and History of Present Illness the most as important note sections, while patients in the chronic care group identified Significant Lab Data, Plan, and Assessment the most as important note sections. This study was able to identify primary care patients' information needs after clinic visit. Primary care patients have information needs pertaining to diagnosis and treatment, which may be the reason why both patient groups identified Plan and Assessment as important note sections. Future research should also develop and assess an AVS based on the information gathered in this study and evaluate its usefulness among primary care patients. The results of this study can be used to inform the development of an after-visit summary that assists patients to fully understand their treatment plan, which may improve treatment adherence.

  18. Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) data summary, fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.

    1983-06-01

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) information system for radioactive solid waste. This document is a summary of the FY 1982 data and the forecast data for FY 1983 reported by DOE sites. Detailed data are included in the appendices. The SWIMS data base contains data on the solid transuranic and solid low-level waste generated, buried, or stored at DOE sites. The burial and storage data include the period from site initiation through FY 1982

  19. Knowledge, information and communication among cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.; Saeed, N.; Pervaiz, K.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge, information and communication, within oncology, are a core clinical strength for the out-come of the disease and inadequate communication, can cause distress for the patient and their families. Design: A senior doctor conducted this study by filling in the performa after interviewing the subject of the study. Place and duration of study: This study was done in Oncology Department of Service Hospital, Lahore and was completed in four months. Subjects and Method: One hundred cancer patients were interviewed regarding their knowledge about their disease, its causes, prognosis, and information supplied by the health-care providers. They were also asked about their satisfaction regarding this information, deficiencies and pitfalls in this information, need for more information, which should supply the information from among the hospital team or their relative, attitude of the family and their communication regarding the disease. Results: Study revealed that the knowledge about the disease and its causes was present in 53% and 7% respectively. The patients (59%) wanted more information. Majority perceived that the information was not adequate and needed more information and 68% thought that more information would reduce their anxiety. The attitude of family was found encouraging in 87% of patients and 42% were communicating with other family members regarding their diseases. Conclusion: Knowledge about the disease and its cause should be increasingly supplied by the doctors, as it will reduce the anxiety and have a good effect on health. Communication among the family members needs to be improved. (author)

  20. Network information improves cancer outcome prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Janine; Winter, Christof; Isik, Zerrin; Schroeder, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Disease progression in cancer can vary substantially between patients. Yet, patients often receive the same treatment. Recently, there has been much work on predicting disease progression and patient outcome variables from gene expression in order to personalize treatment options. Despite first diagnostic kits in the market, there are open problems such as the choice of random gene signatures or noisy expression data. One approach to deal with these two problems employs protein-protein interaction networks and ranks genes using the random surfer model of Google's PageRank algorithm. In this work, we created a benchmark dataset collection comprising 25 cancer outcome prediction datasets from literature and systematically evaluated the use of networks and a PageRank derivative, NetRank, for signature identification. We show that the NetRank performs significantly better than classical methods such as fold change or t-test. Despite an order of magnitude difference in network size, a regulatory and protein-protein interaction network perform equally well. Experimental evaluation on cancer outcome prediction in all of the 25 underlying datasets suggests that the network-based methodology identifies highly overlapping signatures over all cancer types, in contrast to classical methods that fail to identify highly common gene sets across the same cancer types. Integration of network information into gene expression analysis allows the identification of more reliable and accurate biomarkers and provides a deeper understanding of processes occurring in cancer development and progression. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  2. Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). Data summary, Fiscal Year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelder, H.M.

    1980-07-01

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) maintains computerized records on a master data base. It provides a comprehensive system for cataloging and assembling data into output reports. The system summarizes the solid radioactive waste generation, disposal, and storage information throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). The SWIMS data base contains the information on the transuranic (TRU) and Low-Level Waste (LLW) generated, buried, or stored by DOE facilities. The generation data covers the period from the FY 1976 transition quarter through FY 1979. The burial and storage data includes the period from site initiation through FY 1979. This document includes the DOE Summary Reports from the SWIMS, presenting the FY 1979 data and the FY 1980 forecasts. Each report is detailed by nuclide category. The categorization allows the user to separate TRU data from LLW data, etc

  3. Quality and quantity of information in summary basis of decision documents issued by health Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Roojin; Lexchin, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Health Canada's Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) documents outline the clinical trial information that was considered in approving a new drug. We examined the ability of SBDs to inform clinician decision-making. We asked if SBDs answered three questions that clinicians might have prior to prescribing a new drug: 1) Do the characteristics of patients enrolled in trials match those of patients in their practice? 2) What are the details concerning the drug's risks and benefits? 3) What are the basic characteristics of trials? 14 items of clinical trial information were identified from all SBDs published on or before April 2012. Each item received a score of 2 (present), 1 (unclear) or 0 (absent). The unit of analysis was the individual SBD, and an overall SBD score was derived based on the sum of points for each item. Scores were expressed as a percentage of the maximum possible points, and then classified into five descriptive categories based on that score. Additionally, three overall 'component' scores were tallied for each SBD: "patient characteristics", "benefit/risk information" and "basic trial characteristics". 161 documents, spanning 456 trials, were analyzed. The majority (126/161) were rated as having information sometimes present (score of >33 to 66%). No SBDs had either no information on any item, or 100% of the information. Items in the patient characteristics component scored poorest (mean component score of 40.4%), while items corresponding to basic trial information were most frequently provided (mean component score of 71%). The significant omissions in the level of clinical trial information in SBDs provide little to aid clinicians in their decision-making. Clinicians' preferred source of information is scientific knowledge, but in Canada, access to such information is limited. Consequently, we believe that clinicians are being denied crucial tools for decision-making.

  4. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Providing written information increases patient satisfaction: a web-based questionnaire survey of Japanese cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hitomi; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Miyako

    2017-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the United States recommends that all cancer survivors be provided with a survivorship care plan (SCP), which includes a patient treatment summary and a follow-up care plan. However, SCPs have not been widely adopted in Japan. To provide basic data necessary for implementing SCPs in Japan, we aimed to investigate the forms of clinical and survivorship-related information that Japanese cancer survivors receive from their healthcare providers, and to examine whether written information increases their satisfaction. We performed a cross-sectional online survey of cancer survivors who underwent acute cancer treatment and had at least one follow-up with a physician in the past year. Cancer survivors provided the elements and forms (verbally and/or written) of information they received, as well as the degree of satisfaction with the information provided. Responses were obtained from 545 cancer survivors. Information elements such as surgical procedure (98.3%), surgical outcome (98.1%), and names of administered chemotherapy agents (97.8%) were commonly provided, whereas mental care resources and providers (29.7%), effects on marital relationship and sexual health (35.7%), and effects on fertility (43.4%) were less common. A large proportion of cancer survivors received verbal information only. For 18 of 20 elements, except for effects on fertility and duration of hormonal therapy, satisfaction was significantly higher when both forms of information were provided (P information can better meet the needs of Japanese cancer survivors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Cervical Cancer Screening. Second edition--summary document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, M; Anttila, A; Jordan, J; Ronco, G; Schenck, U; Segnan, N; Wiener, H; Herbert, A; von Karsa, L

    2010-03-01

    European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Cervical Cancer Screening have been initiated in the Europe Against Cancer Programme. The first edition established the principles of organised population-based screening and stimulated numerous pilot projects. The second multidisciplinary edition was published in 2008 and comprises approximately 250 pages divided into seven chapters prepared by 48 authors and contributors. Considerable attention has been devoted to organised, population-based programme policies which minimise adverse effects and maximise benefits of screening. It is hoped that this expanded guidelines edition will have a greater impact on countries in which screening programmes are still lacking and in which opportunistic screening has been preferred in the past. Other methodological aspects such as future prospects of human papillomavirus testing and vaccination in cervical cancer control have also been examined in the second edition; recommendations for integration of the latter technologies into European guidelines are currently under development in a related project supported by the European Union Health Programme. An overview of the fundamental points and principles that should support any quality-assured screening programme and key performance indicators are presented here in a summary document of the second guidelines edition in order to make these principles and standards known to a wider scientific community.

  14. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers includes information on BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants (breast and ovarian cancer) and Lynch syndrome (endometrial cancer). Get more information about hereditary breast and gynecologic cancer syndromes in this clinician summary.

  15. The availability of reliable information about medicines in Serbia for health professionals summary of product characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Ljiljana C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Today, there are many drugs for the treatment of a large number of indicator areas. Significant financial resources are invested in research with the aim of introducing reliable therapeutics to therapy. Therefore, it is necessary to provide health care professionals exact information about new therapies. The overall process of scientific data, ideas and information exchange is possible through numerous communications of modern IT tools. Methodology According to the Law, key information on registered drug is included in the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC for health professionals, which is harmonized with EU directives and regulations (SmPC.Protocol content and structure of the information provided in SPC is determined in the guidelines of the EU, therefore, a unique set of data is established for all the drugs registered in Serbia. Topic This paper presents the key segments of SPC, with special reference to the description of the regulations that are required for data related to indications, mechanism of action, dosage, contraindications, side effects, interactions and other important information regarding the profile of the drug, which are standardized and harmonized with the structure of identical documents which operate at the EU level, or EMEA. Conclusions SPC is the regulatory determined technical document on medicinal products in the RS in which there are listed scientifically proven, clinical and pharmacological data and information on the profile of the drug, which are essential for health professionals - doctors and pharmacists in the implementation of pharmacotherapy in our society. This document is the starting point for the development of applied Pharmacoinformatics and it includes a range of activities important for the development of appropriate manuals and makes available data and information for monitoring indicators of the national policy on drugs and modern effective drugs treatment.

  16. Online Cancer Information Seeking: Applying and Extending the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stee, Stephanie K; Yang, Qinghua

    2017-10-30

    This study applied the comprehensive model of information seeking (CMIS) to online cancer information and extended the model by incorporating an exogenous variable: interest in online health information exchange with health providers. A nationally representative sample from the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 4 was analyzed to examine the extended CMIS in predicting online cancer information seeking. Findings from a structural equation model supported most of the hypotheses derived from the CMIS, as well as the extension of the model related to interest in online health information exchange. In particular, socioeconomic status, beliefs, and interest in online health information exchange predicted utility. Utility, in turn, predicted online cancer information seeking, as did information-carrier characteristics. An unexpected but important finding from the study was the significant, direct relationship between cancer worry and online cancer information seeking. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  17. General Information about Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the ovaries or to other parts of the body. The ... single ovary or fallopian tube. In stage IB, cancer is found inside both ovaries or fallopian tubes. In stage IC, cancer is ...

  18. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Skin Cancer includes information about genes and hereditary syndromes associated with basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma skin cancer. Get comprehensive information about the genetics of skin cancer and interventions in this summary for clinicians.

  19. Satisfaction with information provided to Danish cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction.......To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction....

  20. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Meulen, N. van der; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, Th.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients’ recall of information after

  1. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Meulen, N. van der; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient

  2. Recall in older cancer patients: Measuring memory for medical information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; van Weert, J.; van der Meulen, N.; van Dulmen, S.; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient

  3. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Barriers to information provision regarding breast cancer and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Enns, Heather J; Woodgate, Roberta L; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2017-10-01

    Women with breast cancer require information about their cancer and its treatment during the process of treatment decision-making, yet it is unclear if there are barriers to information support. This study explores the experience of making treatment decisions in breast cancer, paying particular attention to the barriers experienced to the provision of information. Using a grounded theory methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 women with invasive breast cancer exploring the experience of treatment decision-making. Data was organized using ATLAS.ti software and analyzed using constant comparisons. Analysis of the data showed that barriers to cancer and treatment information include intrapersonal and interpersonal communication challenges (emotional distress, patient-provider communication, "making it personal," access to information) which reside at different levels of the breast cancer experience (individual, dyad, group, organization). A model is provided to depict this experience. Women want information about their cancer and its treatment and experience barriers to information provision at various levels. Satisfactory information provision cannot occur without addressing barriers at every level. Utilizing interprofessional models of care may minimize existing barriers to information provision and empower patients to make satisfying treatment decisions that are consistent with their individual wishes.

  6. Patient representatives? views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    OpenAIRE

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed consent is possible to provide. We explored patient representatives? views and perceptions on the written trial information used in clinical cancer trials. Methods Written patient information leaflet...

  7. Biomass energy systems program summary. Information current as of September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This program summary describes each of the DOE's Biomass Energy System's projects funded or in existence during fiscal year 1979 and reflects their status as of September 30, 1979. The summary provides an overview of the ongoing research, development, and demonstration efforts of the preceding fiscal year as well. (DMC)

  8. 77 FR 12836 - Draft Toxicological Review of Biphenyl: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... the draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of Biphenyl: In Support of Summary... email: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: EPA's IRIS is a human health assessment... exposure to chemical substances found in the environment. Through the IRIS Program, EPA provides the...

  9. Association of eHealth literacy with cancer information seeking and prior experience with cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Moon, Mikyung; Baeg, Jung Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a critical disease with a high mortality rate in the US. Although useful information exists on the Internet, many people experience difficulty finding information about cancer prevention because they have limited eHealth literacy. This study aimed to identify relationships between the level of eHealth literacy and cancer information seeking experience or prior experience with cancer screening tests. A total of 108 adults participated in this study through questionnaires. Data covering demographics, eHealth literacy, cancer information seeking experience, educational needs for cancer information searching, and previous cancer screening tests were obtained. Study findings show that the level of eHealth literacy influences cancer information seeking. Individuals with low eHealth literacy are likely to be less confident about finding cancer information. In addition, people who have a low level of eHealth literacy need more education about seeking information than do those with a higher level of eHealth literacy. However, there is no significant relationship between eHealth literacy and cancer screening tests. More people today are using the Internet for access to information to maintain good health. It is therefore critical to educate those with low eHealth literacy so they can better self-manage their health.

  10. General Information about Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  11. Relative quality of internet-derived gastrointestinal cancer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David S Y; Willicombe, Anita; Reid, Thomas D; Beaton, Ceri; Arnold, David; Ward, James; Davies, I Llion; Lewis, Wyn G

    2012-12-01

    Internet-derived health care information is increasingly accessed by patients, yet its quality and accuracy is variable and unregulated. The aim of this study was to assess the information available regarding common gastrointestinal cancers via three internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and Bing). The top 30 websites for each of the terms: oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colon and rectal cancer were evaluated (University of Michigan Consumer Health Website Checklist) and scored [-80 (poor) to 90 (excellent)]. The median score was 53 (-7 to 81) and was significantly higher for oesophageal (61) and pancreatic (65) cancer websites, compared with gastric (49), colon (48) and rectal cancer (50) (p = 0.014). Median scores related to charitable organisations were significantly better than academic, commercial, news agency, care provider, layperson and medical information websites collectively (79 vs. 42, p < 0.0001). Overall quality of internet-derived gastrointestinal cancer information remains poor and patients and clinicians should be aware.

  12. Cancer Fatalism, Literacy, and Cancer Information Seeking in the American Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C.; Smith, Samuel G.

    2016-01-01

    Information seeking is an important behavior for cancer prevention and control, but inequalities in the communication of information about the disease persist. Conceptual models have suggested that low health literacy is a barrier to information seeking, and that fatalistic beliefs about cancer may be a mediator of this relationship. Cancer…

  13. Cancer screening information at community health fairs: What the participants do with information they receive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrose, Erica; Ledergerber, Jessica; Acheampong, Derrick; Jandorf, Lina

    2017-09-21

    To assess participants' reasons for seeking cancer screening information at community health fairs and what they do with the information they receive. Mixed quantitative and qualitative approach was used. Community health fairs are organized in underserved New York City neighbourhoods. From June 14, 2016 to August 26, 2016, cancer prevention tables providing information about various cancer screenings were established at 12 local community health fairs in New York City. In-person and follow up telephone surveys assessing interest in the cancer prevention table, personal cancer screening adherence rates, information-sharing behaviours and demographic variables have been taken into account. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS 22.0: frequencies, descriptive, cross tabulations. All qualitative data was coded by theme so that it could be analysed through SPSS. For example, Were you interested in a specific cancer? may be coded as 2 for yes , breast cancer . One hundred and sixteen patrons participated in the initial survey. Of those, 88 (78%) agreed to give their contact information for the follow-up survey and 60 follow-up surveys were completed (68%). Of those who reported reading the material, 45% shared the information; 15% subsequently spoke to a provider about cancer screenings and 40% intended to speak to a provider. Participants disseminated information without prompting; suggesting the reach of these fairs extends beyond the people who visit our table. Future studies should look at whether patrons would share information at higher rates when they are explicitly encouraged to share the information.

  14. Levels of Evidence: Cancer Genetics Studies (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levels of Evidence for Cancer Genetics Studies addresses the process and challenges of developing evidence-based summaries. Get information about how to weigh the strength of the evidence from cancer genetics studies in this summary for clinicians.

  15. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  16. Cancer articles in weekly magazines: useful media to deliver cancer information to the public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Masayoshi; Takita, Morihito; Kishi, Yukiko; Kodama, Yuko; Matsumura, Tomoko; Murashige, Naoko; Homma, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro

    2013-04-01

    Japanese weekly magazines, which have a circulation of over 2 700 000, play important roles in communicating with the public. They offer a wide range of information, entertainment, gossip, politics and economics, and often include articles on cancer. However, cancer articles in magazines have not been systematically analyzed. We investigated cancer-related articles and advertisements in six major Japanese weekly magazines to demonstrate trends in public interest regarding cancer. The total number of articles assessed from July 2009 to December 2010 was 36 914, of which 696 (1.9%) were cancer articles. The total number of advertisements was 21 718, of which 340 (1.6%) were related to cancer. The number of cancer articles demonstrated an upward trend during the study period. Articles focused on lung (n = 145) and urogenital cancer (n = 122). The most common content comprised therapies and diagnosis (n = 340) and case reports on individual patients (n = 160). After a famous Japanese comedian revealed his prostate cancer diagnosis, the number of articles on prostate cancer increased from 2.0 to 6.6 per month. Immunotherapy including some dubious folk therapies was the most frequently reported cancer therapy in articles and advertisements (30.4%). A small group of oncologists were repeatedly referred to in comment sources; 35.6% of comments were presented by only five doctors. Cancer articles in weekly magazines are common paper media for providing cancer information to the public. However, the information provided might place emphasis on unestablished treatments or biased opinions.

  17. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    of future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. CONCLUSIONS: The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language......BACKGROUND: Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed...... consent is possible to provide. We explored patient representatives' views and perceptions on the written trial information used in clinical cancer trials. METHODS: Written patient information leaflets used in four clinical trials for colorectal cancer were used for the study. The trials included phase I...

  18. Tailored information about cancer risk and screening: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study interventions that provide people with information about cancer risk and about screening that is tailored to their personal characteristics. We assess the tailoring characteristics, theory base and effects on risk perception, knowledge and screening behavior of these

  19. Anonymity versus privacy: Selective information sharing in online cancer communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, J.H.; Vermeulen, I.E.; Beekers, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient

  20. The Norwegian National Summary Care Record: a qualitative analysis of doctors' use of and trust in shared patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyb, Kari; Warth, Line Lundvoll

    2018-04-06

    This paper explores Norwegian doctors' use of and experiences with a national tool for sharing core patient health information. The summary care record (SCR; the Kjernejournal in Norwegian) is the first national system for sharing patient information among the various levels and institutions of health care throughout the country. The health authorities have invested heavily in the development, implementation and deployment of this tool, and as of 2017 all Norwegian citizens have a personalised SCR. However, as there remains limited knowledge about health professionals' use of, experiences with and opinions regarding this new tool, the purpose of this study was to explore doctors' direct SCR experiences. We conducted 25 in-depth interviews with 10 doctors from an emergency ward, 5 doctors from an emergency clinic and 10 doctors from 5 general practitioner offices. We then transcribed, thematically coded and analysed the interviews utilising a grounded theory approach. The SCRs contain several features for providing core patient information that is particularly relevant in acute or emergency situations; nonetheless, we found that the doctors generally used only one of the tool's six functions, namely, the pharmaceutical summary. In addition, they primarily used this summary for a few subgroups of patients, including in the emergency ward for unconscious patients, for elderly patients with multiple prescriptions and for patients with substance abuse conditions. The primary difference of the pharmaceutical summary compared with the other functions of the tool is that patient information is automatically updated from a national pharmaceutical server, while other clinically relevant functions, like the critical information category, require manual updates by the health professionals themselves, thereby potentially causing variations in the accuracy, completeness and trustworthiness of the data. Therefore, we can assume that the popularity of the pharmaceutical summary

  1. Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients' website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, N.; Smets, E. M A; Eddes, E. H.; de Haes, J. C J M; Loos, E. F.; van Weert, J. C M

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of illustrations in online cancer information on older cancer patients' website satisfaction (i.e. satisfaction with the attractiveness, comprehensibility and emotional support from the website) and recall of information. In an online experiment, 174

  2. Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients’ website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, N.; Smets, E.M.A.; Eddes, E.H.; de Haes, J.C.J.M.; Loos, E.F.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of illustrations in online cancer information on older cancer patients' website satisfaction (i.e. satisfaction with the attractiveness, comprehensibility and emotional support from the website) and recall of information. In an online experiment, 174

  3. The information needs of adult cancer survivors across the cancer continuum: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Chloe; Flight, Ingrid; Chapman, Janine; Fennell, Kate; Wilson, Carlene

    2017-03-01

    To provide an updated synthesis of the literature that investigates the self-reported information needs of people diagnosed with cancer across the cancer continuum. We conducted a scoping review of the literature published from August 2003 to June 2015 and expanded an existing typology summarizing the information needs of people diagnosed with cancer. The majority of the included studies (n=104) focused on questions relevant to the diagnosis/active treatment phase of the cancer continuum (52.9%) and thus the most frequently identified information needs related to this phase (33.4%). Information needs varied across the continuum and the results highlight the importance of recognising this fact. People diagnosed with cancer experience discrete information needs at different points from diagnosis to survival. Much of the research conducted in this area has focused on their information needs during the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and literature relating to information needs following completion of treatment is sparse. Further research is needed to discern the specific nature of the treatment concerns and identify the information needs that survivors experience during recurrence of cancer, metastasis or changes in diagnosis, and the end of life phase of the cancer continuum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation.

  5. Public Reporting of Hospital-Level Cancer Surgical Volumes in California: An Opportunity to Inform Decision Making and Improve Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christina A; Asch, Steven M; Baker, Laurence; Bilimoria, Karl; Dudley, R Adams; Fong, Niya; Holliday-Hanson, Merry L; Hopkins, David S P; Imholz, Elizabeth M; Malin, Jennifer; Moy, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Maryann; Parker, Joseph P; Saigal, Christopher S; Spurlock, Bruce; Teleki, Stephanie; Zingmond, David; Lang, Lance

    2016-10-01

    Most patients, providers, and payers make decisions about cancer hospitals without any objective data regarding quality or outcomes. We developed two online resources allowing users to search and compare timely data regarding hospital cancer surgery volumes. Hospital cancer surgery volumes for all California hospitals were calculated using ICD-9 coded hospital discharge summary data. Cancer surgeries included (bladder, brain, breast, colon, esophagus, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, rectum, and stomach) were selected on the basis of a rigorous literature review to confirm sufficient evidence of a positive association between volume and mortality. The literature could not identify threshold numbers of surgeries associated with better or worse outcomes. A multidisciplinary working group oversaw the project and ensured sound methodology. In California in 2014, about 60% of surgeries were performed at top-quintile-volume hospitals, but the per-hospital median numbers of surgeries for esophageal, pancreatic, stomach, liver, or bladder cancer surgeries were four or fewer. At least 670 patients received cancer surgery at hospitals that performed only one or two surgeries for a particular cancer type; 72% of those patients lived within 50 miles of a top-quintile-volume hospital. There is clear potential for more readily available information about hospital volumes to help patient, providers, and payers choose cancer surgery hospitals. Our successful public reporting of hospital volumes in California represents an important first step toward making publicly available even more provider-specific data regarding cancer care quality, costs, and outcomes, so those data can inform decision-making and encourage quality improvement.

  6. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-04-01

    Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. We constructed a recall questionnaire consisting of multiple-choice questions, completion items, and open-ended questions related to information about treatment and recommendations on how to handle side effects. Immediately after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment, 69 older patients (M = 71.8 years, SD = 4.1) completed the questionnaire. We checked recall against the actual communication in video recordings of the consultations. On average, 82.2 items were discussed during the consultations. The mean percentage of information recalled correctly was 23.2% for open-ended questions, 68.0% for completion items, and 80.2% for multiple-choice questions. Older cancer patients are confronted with a lot of information. Recall of information strongly depended on question format; especially active reproduction appeared to be poor. To improve treatment outcomes, it is important that cancer patients are able to actively retrieve knowledge about how to prevent and recognize adverse side effects and that this is checked by the health professional. We make suggestions on how to make information more memorable for older cancer patients.

  7. Cancer Fatalism, Literacy, and Cancer Information Seeking in the American Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Smith, Samuel G

    2016-08-01

    Information seeking is an important behavior for cancer prevention and control, but inequalities in the communication of information about the disease persist. Conceptual models have suggested that low health literacy is a barrier to information seeking, and that fatalistic beliefs about cancer may be a mediator of this relationship. Cancer fatalism can be described as deterministic thoughts about the external causes of the disease, the inability to prevent it, and the inevitability of death at diagnosis. This study aimed to examine the associations between these constructs and sociodemographic factors, and test a mediation model using the American population-representative Health Information and National Trends Survey (HINTS 4), Cycle 3 (n = 2,657). Approximately one third (34%) of the population failed to answer 2/4 health literacy items correctly (limited health literacy). Many participants agreed with the fatalistic beliefs that it seems like everything causes cancer (66%), that one cannot do much to lower his or her chances of getting cancer (29%), and that thinking about cancer makes one automatically think about death (58%). More than half of the population had "ever" sought information about cancer (53%). In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and family cancer history, people with limited health literacy were less likely to have ever sought cancer information (odds ratio [OR] = 0.63; 0.42-0.95) and more frequently endorsed the belief that "there's not much you can do . . ." (OR = 1.61; 1.05-2.47). This fatalistic belief partially explained the relationship between health literacy and information seeking in the mediation model (14% mediation). Interventions are needed to address low health literacy and cancer fatalism to increase public interest in cancer-related information. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  8. Research Summaries: The 11th Biennial Rivkin Center Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Deborah K

    2017-11-01

    In September 2016, the 11th biennial ovarian cancer research symposium was presented by the Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer and the American Association for Cancer Research. The 2016 symposium focused on 4 broad areas of research: Mechanisms of Initiation and Progression of Ovarian Cancer, Tumor Microenvironment and Models of Ovarian Cancer, Detection and Prevention of Ovarian Cancer, and Novel Therapeutics for Ovarian Cancer. The presentations and abstracts from each of these areas are reviewed in this supplement to the International Journal of Gynecologic Oncology.

  9. 19 CFR 103.31 - Information on vessel manifests and summary statistical reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., trade journals, and similar publications shall be permitted to examine vessel manifests and summary..., P.O. Box 68907, Indianapolis, Indiana 46268, or 6026 Lakeside Blvd., Indianapolis, Indiana 46278... mailed from the CBP Data Center, first class, on the next business day after compilation. Parties...

  10. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Genetics Overview discusses hereditary cancers and the role of genetic variants (mutations). Get information about genetic counseling, familial cancer syndromes, genomic sequencing, germline and somatic testing, ethical and legal issues and more in this summary for clinicians.

  11. Communication and information-giving in high-risk breast cancer consultations: influence on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, E A; Butow, P N; Barratt, A; Meiser, B; Gaff, C; Young, M A; Haan, E; Suthers, G; Gattas, M; Tucker, K

    2004-01-26

    This longitudinal study aimed to document (i) the information-giving and patient-communication styles of clinical geneticists and genetic counsellors (consultants) in familial breast cancer clinics and (ii) assess the effect of these styles on women's knowledge, whether their expectations were met, satisfaction, risk perception and psychological status. A total of 158 women from high-risk breast cancer families completed self-report questionnaires at 2 weeks preconsultation and 4 weeks postconsultation. The consultations were audiotaped, transcribed and coded. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that discussing prophylactic mastectomy (P=0.00) and oophorectomy (P=0.01) led to women having significantly more expectations met; discussing genetic testing significantly decreased anxiety (P=0.03) and facilitating understanding significantly decreased depression (P=0.05). Receiving a summary letter of the consultation significantly lowered anxiety (P=0.01) and significantly increased the accuracy of perceived risk (P=0.02). Women whose consultant used more supportive communications experienced significantly more anxiety about breast cancer at the 4 weeks follow-up (P=0.00). These women were not significantly more anxious before genetic counselling. In conclusion, this study found that consultants vary in the amount of information they give and the way they communicate; and this variation can result in better or worse psychosocial outcomes. Greater use of supportive and counselling communications appeared to increase anxiety about breast cancer. Identifying methods to assist consultants to address emotional issues effectively may be helpful.

  12. Postoperative information needs and communication barriers of esophageal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henselmans, Inge; Jacobs, Marc; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Given the poor prognosis of esophageal cancer and the impact of surgery on health-related quality of life (HRQL), addressing patients' postoperative information needs is important. This study aimed to examine (1) the content and type of patients' information needs and (2) patient

  13. Health information dissemination for breast cancer awareness, early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is to explore how information about breast cancer (BC) is disseminated to working class mothers in Lagos State. It is to investigate how information disseminated is used by the respondents to detect early this deadly disease and ascertain if they are aware of any support by organisation and the government.

  14. Evaluation of a patient information website for childhood cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Versluys, A. Birgitta; Braam, Katja I.; Mud, Minke S.; van der Pal, Heleen J.; Caron, Huib N.; Jaspers, Monique W.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are in need of specialized information about late effects of treatment. In the current study, we assessed the perceived usability and satisfaction with the content of a national website with information on late effects and analyzed possible determinants related to

  15. Social tagging in support of cancer patients’ information interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ådland, Marit Kristine; Lykke, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how social tagging can be useful in an information website for cancer patients and their relatives. Methodology/approach: Three studies have been carried out in order to investigate the research questions. Firstly, we reviewed and analy......Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how social tagging can be useful in an information website for cancer patients and their relatives. Methodology/approach: Three studies have been carried out in order to investigate the research questions. Firstly, we reviewed...... and analyzed literature about cancer patients’ information needs and seeking behavior, and about social tagging and patient terminology. Secondly, we analyzed tags applied to blog postings at Blogomkraeft.dk, a blog site at the Danish information web site Cancer.dk. The tags were compared with the formal...... browsing structure of Cancer.dk. Results from the two studies were used to develop a prototype for social tagging at Cancer.dk. Thus thirdly, we evaluated the prototype in a usability study. Findings: We found that tags have the potential to describe and provide access to web site content from the users...

  16. Genomics, Endoscopy, and Control of Gastroesophageal Cancers: A PerspectiveSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Reid

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In The Cancer Genome Atlas the goals were to define how to treat advanced cancers with targeted therapy. However, the challenges facing cancer interception for early detection and prevention include length bias in which current screening and surveillance approaches frequently miss rapidly progressing cancers that then present at advanced stages in the clinic with symptoms (underdiagnosis. In contrast, many early detection strategies detect benign conditions that may never progress to cancer during a lifetime, and the patient dies of unrelated causes (overdiagnosis. This challenge to cancer interception is believed to be due to the speed at which the neoplasm evolves, called length bias sampling; rapidly progressing cancers are missed by current early detection strategies. In contrast, slowly or non-progressing cancers or their precursors are selectively detected. This has led to the concept of cancer interception, which can be defined as active interception of a biological process that drives cancer development before the patient presents in the clinic with an advanced, symptomatic cancer. The solutions needed to advance strategies for cancer interception require assessing the rate at which the cancer evolves over time and space. This is an essential challenge that needs to be addressed by robust study designs including normal and non-progressing controls when known to be appropriate. Keywords: Barrett's Esophagus, Biomarkers, Chromosome Aberrations, Esophageal Neoplasms, Gastroesophageal Reflux, Genomic Instability, Genomics, Stomach

  17. UV Exposure and Sun-Protective Behavior - Prevention Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Nutritional Information Provision to Cancer Patients and Their Relatives Can Promote Dietary Behavior Changes Independent of Nutritional Information Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van Merel R.; Winkels, Renate M.; Janssen, Silvie H.M.; Kampman, Ellen; Beijer, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    We investigated whether obtaining nutritional information influences reported changes in dietary behavior in cancer survivors and their relatives and whether nutritional information needs influence this association. We included 239 cancer survivors and their relatives, recruited from an online panel

  19. Panel summary of cyber-physical systems (CPS) and Internet of Things (IoT) opportunities with information fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasch, Erik; Kadar, Ivan; Grewe, Lynne L.; Brooks, Richard; Yu, Wei; Kwasinski, Andres; Thomopoulos, Stelios; Salerno, John; Qi, Hairong

    2017-05-01

    During the 2016 SPIE DSS conference, nine panelists were invited to highlight the trends and opportunities in cyber-physical systems (CPS) and Internet of Things (IoT) with information fusion. The world will be ubiquitously outfitted with many sensors to support our daily living thorough the Internet of Things (IoT), manage infrastructure developments with cyber-physical systems (CPS), as well as provide communication through networked information fusion technology over the internet (NIFTI). This paper summarizes the panel discussions on opportunities of information fusion to the growing trends in CPS and IoT. The summary includes the concepts and areas where information supports these CPS/IoT which includes situation awareness, transportation, and smart grids.

  20. Male sexuality after cancer treatment - needs for information and support : testicular cancer compared to malignant lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker-Pool, G.; Hoekstra, H.J.; van Imhoff, G.W.; Sonneveld, D.J.A.; Sleijfer, D.T.; van Driel, M.F.; Koops, H.S.; van de Wiel, H.B.M.

    Testicular cancer (TC) as well as malignant lymphoma (NIL), both have nowadays an excellent prognosis. However, both types of cancer may be diagnosed at young adulthood and patients may experience sexual concerns. In this article the need for information and support concerning sexuality will be

  1. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullard Emily

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask. Primary outcomes will be: 1 calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2 timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3 patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. Discussion The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a

  2. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Randhawa, Veenu; McFadden, H Gene; Fought, Angela; Bullard, Emily; Spring, Bonnie

    2009-12-02

    High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter) or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask). Primary outcomes will be: 1) calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2) timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3) patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a public service (the Cancer Information Service) with real

  3. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... certain genes, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene or the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) ...

  4. Evaluation of the Quality of Online Information for Patients with Rare Cancers: Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzel, Ulrike; Monga Sindeu, Tabea; Schroth, Sarah; Huebner, Jutta; Herth, Natalie

    2017-01-24

    The Internet offers an easy and quick access to a vast amount of patient information. However, several studies point to the poor quality of many websites and the resulting hazards of false information. The aim of this study was to assess quality of information on thyroid cancer. A patients' search for information about thyroid cancer on German websites was simulated using the search engine Google and the patient portal "Patienten-Information.de". The websites were assessed using a standardized instrument with formal and content aspects from the German Cancer Society. Supporting the results of prior studies that analysed patient information on the Internet, the data showed that the quality of patient information on thyroid cancer is highly heterogeneous depending on the website providers. The majority of website providers are represented by media and health providers other than health insurances, practices and professionals offering patient information of relatively poor quality. Moreover, most websites offer patient information of low-quality content. Only a few trustworthy, high-quality websites exist. Especially Google, a common search engine, focuses more on the dissemination of information than on quality aspects. In order to improve the patient information from the Internet, the visibility of high-quality websites must be improved. For that, education programs to improve patients' eHealth literacy are needed. A quick and easy evaluation tool for online information suited for patients should be implemented, and patients should be taught to integrate such a tool into their research process.

  5. Postoperative information needs and communication barriers of esophageal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henselmans, Inge; Jacobs, Marc; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Smets, Ellen M A

    2012-07-01

    Given the poor prognosis of esophageal cancer and the impact of surgery on health-related quality of life (HRQL), addressing patients' postoperative information needs is important. This study aimed to examine (1) the content and type of patients' information needs and (2) patient perceived facilitators and barriers to patient participation. Interviews were conducted with 20 purposefully selected esophageal cancer patients. Open and structured questions were alternated. The transcribed interviews were analysed inductively and deductively, using MAXqda. Patients' post-operative information needs concerned HRQL, medical care and prognosis, covering several sub-domains. Different types of needs were identified, e.g., requests for information about cause, course and self-management. Barriers to patient participation mostly reflected beliefs and skills, and could be categorized into agenda and communication barriers. Facilitators of patient participation reflected physician, patient and interaction characteristics, companion support and pre-visit preparation. Many patients saw merit in pre-visit preparation interventions; few endorsed skill-building interventions. This study listed the postoperative information needs of esophageal cancer patients. Moreover, it gained insight into patient-perceived barriers and facilitators of patient participation. The findings demonstrate what information physicians should have available and informs interventions to support patients in meeting their information needs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anonymity versus privacy: selective information sharing in online cancer communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jeana; Vermeulen, Ivar E; Beekers, Nienke

    2014-05-14

    Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient preferences around information sharing in online communities remain poorly understood. Consistent with the privacy calculus perspective adopted from e-commerce research, we suggest that patients approach online information sharing instrumentally, weighing privacy costs against participation benefits when deciding whether to share certain information. Consequently, we argue that patients prefer sharing clinical information over daily life and identity information that potentially compromises anonymity. Furthermore, we explore whether patients' prior experiences, age, health, and gender affect perceived privacy costs and thus willingness to share information. The goal of the present study is to document patient preferences for sharing information within online health platforms. A total of 115 cancer patients reported sharing intentions for 15 different types of information, demographics, health status, prior privacy experiences, expected community utility, and privacy concerns. Factor analysis on the 15 information types revealed 3 factors coinciding with 3 proposed information categories: clinical, daily life, and identity information. A within-subject ANOVA showed a strong preference for sharing clinical information compared to daily life and identity information (F1,114=135.59, P=.001, η(2)=.93). Also, adverse online privacy experiences, age, and health status negatively affected information-sharing intentions. Female patients shared information less willingly. Respondents' information-sharing intentions depend on dispositional and situational factors. Patients share medical details more willingly than daily life or identity information. The results suggest the need to focus on

  7. Anonymity Versus Privacy: Selective Information Sharing in Online Cancer Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Ivar E; Beekers, Nienke

    2014-01-01

    Background Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient preferences around information sharing in online communities remain poorly understood. Consistent with the privacy calculus perspective adopted from e-commerce research, we suggest that patients approach online information sharing instrumentally, weighing privacy costs against participation benefits when deciding whether to share certain information. Consequently, we argue that patients prefer sharing clinical information over daily life and identity information that potentially compromises anonymity. Furthermore, we explore whether patients’ prior experiences, age, health, and gender affect perceived privacy costs and thus willingness to share information. Objective The goal of the present study is to document patient preferences for sharing information within online health platforms. Methods A total of 115 cancer patients reported sharing intentions for 15 different types of information, demographics, health status, prior privacy experiences, expected community utility, and privacy concerns. Results Factor analysis on the 15 information types revealed 3 factors coinciding with 3 proposed information categories: clinical, daily life, and identity information. A within-subject ANOVA showed a strong preference for sharing clinical information compared to daily life and identity information (F 1,114=135.59, P=.001, η2=.93). Also, adverse online privacy experiences, age, and health status negatively affected information-sharing intentions. Female patients shared information less willingly. Conclusions Respondents’ information-sharing intentions depend on dispositional and situational factors. Patients share medical details more willingly than daily life or identity

  8. Leveraging cancer genome information in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampal, Raajit; Levine, Ross L

    2013-05-20

    The use of candidate gene and genome-wide discovery studies in the last several years has led to an expansion of our knowledge of the spectrum of recurrent, somatic disease alleles, which contribute to the pathogenesis of hematologic malignancies. Notably, these studies have also begun to fundamentally change our ability to develop informative prognostic schema that inform outcome and therapeutic response, yielding substantive insights into mechanisms of hematopoietic transformation in different tissue compartments. Although these studies have already had important biologic and translational impact, significant challenges remain in systematically applying these findings to clinical decision making and in implementing new technologies for genetic analysis into clinical practice to inform real-time decision making. Here, we review recent major genetic advances in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, the impact of these findings on prognostic models, our understanding of disease initiation and evolution, and the implication of genomic discoveries on clinical decision making. Finally, we discuss general concepts in genetic modeling and the current state-of-the-art technology used in genetic investigation.

  9. VIDEO CONFERENCE SUMMARY: Information Literacy and THE ROLE OF THE LIBRARY

    OpenAIRE

    Sonntag, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    Literacy in the use of information, known as IL or as the information literacy is a fundamental issue for educators at this time. In this article we will: define the concept of literacy in the use of information, clarify standards for information literacy - skills / basic skills that define this concept, investigate different models for imparting this knowledge / skills, and look at the changes that must happen to have an information literacy program. La alfabetización en el uso de la info...

  10. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-02-01

    Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed consent is possible to provide. We explored patient representatives' views and perceptions on the written trial information used in clinical cancer trials. Written patient information leaflets used in four clinical trials for colorectal cancer were used for the study. The trials included phase I-III trials, randomized and non-randomized trials that evaluated chemotherapy/targeted therapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and palliative settings. Data were collected through focus groups and were analysed using inductive content analysis. Two major themes emerged: emotional responses and cognitive responses. Subthemes related to the former included individual preferences and perceptions of effect, while subthemes related to the latter were comprehensibility and layout. Based on these observations the patient representatives provided suggestions for improvement, which largely included development of future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language, structured text and illustrations to improve the informed consent process and thereby patient enrolment into clinical trials.

  11. Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, C.; Lee, S.

    1996-10-01

    In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal

  12. Survivorship Challenges and Information Needs after Radiotherapy for Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Hoda; Lipnick, Daniella; Gupta, Vishal; Miles, Brett

    2017-12-01

    Oral cancer (OC) treatment can lead to considerable functional impairment, psychological distress, and decrements in quality of life. Given that limited information and support services are available for cancer survivors, many are turning to the Internet. However, little is known about the specific information and service needs of OC survivors. We conducted a descriptive study to (1) characterize the associations between OC survivor functional problems and distress and (2) describe the Internet use of OC survivors, their satisfaction with existing sources of information/support, and their unmet information and service needs. Ninety-three oral cancer survivors completed cross-sectional surveys within 1-year of completing radiotherapy. Clinical levels of distress were 10 % for depression and 16 % for anxiety. Dental health, smell, and range of motion problems were significant (p < .05) determinants of both depression and anxiety symptoms. Eighty-three percent of survivors used the Internet; most used it to obtain health-related information or support. Unmet information needs included how to live a healthy lifestyle after treatment (87 %), strategies for dealing with eating and speaking problems (81 %), and information about what to expect in terms of side effects after treatment (76 %). Findings suggest that interventions that teach survivors coping and problem-solving skills to manage and cope with functional impairments may help to alleviate distress. Results of this study support the need for psychoeducational interventions for this population and showcase the potential of the Internet as a feasible mode for future dissemination.

  13. Radon mitigation in private dwellings. Summary of measures under the National Action Plan against Cancer in Norway 1999-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aanestad, K.; Strand, T.; Hoegmo, T.; Skjennem, M.; Jensen, C. L.; Hoelsbrekken, S.

    2006-01-01

    The report summarizes the remedial measurements carried out under the National Action Plan against Cancer in Norway in the period 1999-2003.The cost effectiveness of the state subsidized remedial measures against radon is evaluated. Other measurements under the National Action Plan against Cancer have also been evaluated, such as measurements of radon in 38.000 dwellings in 158 municipalities, information measures, and actions to increase radon mitigation competence in the building construction industry and in the municipalities. (Author)

  14. Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients' website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, N; Smets, E M A; Eddes, E H; de Haes, J C J M; Loos, E F; van Weert, J C M

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of illustrations in online cancer information on older cancer patients' website satisfaction (i.e. satisfaction with the attractiveness, comprehensibility and emotional support from the website) and recall of information. In an online experiment, 174 younger (text-only information, text with two cognitive illustrations or text with two affective illustrations. In general, adding cognitive illustrations compared with text-only information improved the satisfaction with the attractiveness of the website in both younger and older patients. For older patients in particular, cognitive illustrations facilitated recall of cancer information: whereas older patients recalled less information overall compared with younger patients (39% vs. 50%), no statistically significant differences in age on recall were observed when cognitive illustrations were added to text. Furthermore, older patients were more satisfied with the emotional support from the website than younger patients, especially when affective illustrations were present. Our results suggest that effective online cancer communication for ageing populations involves considering both cognitive and affective illustrations to enhance website satisfaction and recall of cancer information. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 75 FR 45112 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexachloroethane: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... than 540 chemical substances that can be used to support the first two steps (hazard identification and... copies are available from the Information Management Team (Address: Information Management Team, National... qualitative risk information on effects that may result from exposure to chemical substances found in the...

  16. Unusual Cancers of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more information). Unusual Cancers of the Head and Neck Nasopharyngeal Cancer See the PDQ summary on Childhood ... of PDQ documents can be used freely as text. It cannot be identified as an NCI PDQ ...

  17. Anonymity versus privacy: Selective information sharing in online cancer communities

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, J.H.; Vermeulen, I.E.; Beekers, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient preferences around information sharing in online communities remain poorly understood. Consistent with the privacy calculus perspective adopted from e-commerce research, we suggest that patients ap...

  18. The interaction between informal cancer caregivers and health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In order to meet the caregiving challenges, informal caregivers often need a substantial level of interaction with health care professionals (HCPs). This study investigated to which extent the cancer caregivers' needs regarding the interaction with HCPs are met and the associations betwe...

  19. Empowerment of Cancer Survivors Through Information Technology : An Integrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Wim G.; Kuijpers, Wilma; Oldenburg, Hester S.A.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient empowerment may be an effective approach to strengthen the role of cancer survivors and to reduce the burden on health care. However, it is not well conceptualized, notably in oncology. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent information technology (IT) services can contribute

  20. Empowerment of cancer survivors through information technology: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, W.G.; Kuijpers, W.; Oldenburg, H.S.A.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; van Harten, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient empowerment may be an effective approach to strengthen the role of cancer survivors and to reduce the burden on health care. However, it is not well conceptualized, notably in oncology. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent information technology (IT) services can contribute

  1. TRICHLOROETHYLENE: USING NEW INFORMATION TO IMPROVE THE CANCER CHARACTERIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessments of TCE's potential to cause cancer in humans have had to address issues concerning the strengths of the human evidence and the relevance of the animal tumors to humans. The epidemiological database now includes analyses of multiple studies and molecular information. ...

  2. Communicating with older cancer patients: impact on information recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.

    2009-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis was to unravel the relationship between patient characteristics, communication between patient and clinician, and subsequent patient information recall in the context of medical consultations with older cancer patients. Chapter 2 reviewed the literature to explore age

  3. Information at the Point of Care: An Informational Application for Cancer Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Deborah Kirk; Hardeman, Amber; Owen, Larry; Frank, Jennifer Sandson

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to design, develop, and modify a cancer resource application (app) that providers, patients, and caregivers could use to locate local and national cancer resources. The project design used a modified version of the Questionnaire for User Interaction Survey 7.0 to gather information from a convenience sample of nurses and community participants regarding their perception of the app. These data helped to identify gaps in resources and modifications needed to make the app more user-friendly. The current cancer care system is complex, and patients often complain of uncoordinated care, lack of information, and insufficient psychosocial support. Cancer centers are working to meet the American College of Surgeons 2015 recommendation of psychosocial assessment and referrals; the Cancer Resource APP described here provides the resources to meet this need. Prototypes of the app were tested in practice and community settings, then solicited feedback guided needed technology modifications. The resulting Cancer Resource APP provides the healthcare community with information to make timely and consistent referrals for patients and caregivers.

  4. Family information needs at childhood cancer treatment completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Claire E; Butow, Phyllis; Fleming, Catharine A K; Daniel, Gunar; Cohn, Richard J

    2012-04-01

    Despite the recognized importance of information provision across the cancer trajectory, little research has investigated family information needs recently after childhood cancer. This mixed-methods, multiperspective, study explored the information needs of families of childhood cancer survivors in the first year post-treatment. In total, 112 semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 19 survivors (mean age 16.2 years, off treatment for ≤36 months), 44 mothers, 34 fathers, and 15 siblings. Interviews were analyzed inductively, line-by-line, using the framework of Miles and Huberman. Emergent themes were cross-tabulated by sample characteristics using QSR NVivo8. Participant views were mixed regarding the need for a "finishing treatment review" with their oncologist (the primary information source for most families); however, many mothers (29/44) and fathers (17/34) and most siblings (14/15) reported receiving insufficient information post-treatment. Information regarding fertility and how to prepare for likely post-treatment challenges were the most cited unmet needs. Online support was ranked highest by survivors (mean score: 7/2/10) and siblings (7.4/10), whilst parents preferred an information booklet (often due to concerns about accessing accurate and relevant information from the Internet). While many participants reported feelings of isolation/loneliness, many were reluctant to attend face-to-face support groups/seminars. Family members of survivors may experience the most acute unmet needs for information about fertility and in preparation for post-treatment challenges. However, provision of the correct amount of information at the right time for each family member during a highly stressful period remains clinically challenging. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Human factors review of electric power dispatch control centers. Volume 3. Operator information needs summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.J.; Najaf-Zadeh, K.; Darlington, H.T.; McNair, H.D.; Seidenstein, S.; Williams, A.R.

    1982-10-01

    Human factors is a systems-oriented interdisciplinary specialty concerned with the design of systems, equipment, facilities and the operational environment. An important aspect leading to the design requirements is the determination of the information requirements for electric power dispatch control centers. There are significant differences between the system operator's actions during normal and degraded states of power system operation, and power system restoration. This project evaluated the information the operator requires for normal power system and control system operations and investigates the changes of information required by the operator as the power system and/or the control system degrades from a normal operating state. The Phase II study, published in two volumes, defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related. This volume presents a summary of operator information needs, identifying the needs for and the uses of power system information by a system operator in conditions ranging from normal through degraded operation. Training requirements are also included for planning entry-level and follow-on training for operators.

  6. Colon cancer information as a source of exercise motivation for relatives of patients with colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Erin L; Prapavessis, Harry

    2010-12-01

    Using a Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) framework, this study examined whether factual colon cancer information is a meaningful source of exercise motivation for relatives of patients with colon cancer. One hundred sixty-six inactive relatives were randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: PMT group (intervention); and non-PMT group (attention control). At baseline (T1) participants completed demographic information, a questionnaire designed to assess their beliefs toward exercise and colon cancer as well as their exercise intentions. At T2 (one week following T1) participants watched one of two DVD videos that were created for the study. The intervention DVD contained exercise and colon cancer information that was yoked within the four major components of PMT: perceived vulnerability (PV); perceived severity (PS); response efficacy (RE); and self-efficacy (SE), while the attention control DVD contained general diet and cancer information. Immediately following watching the DVD, participants completed the same measures as in T1. Participants assigned to the PMT intervention group showed significant improvement in PV, RE, SE and exercise intentions, whereas participants assigned to the attention control group showed significant improvement only in RE. RE, SE, and PS made significant and unique contributions to prediction of exercise intention. Overall, the results of the present study demonstrate that a single exposure media intervention grounded in a PMT framework can change individuals' exercise and colon cancer beliefs, as well as change their exercise intentions. Implications of these findings and direction for future research are discussed.

  7. Listening to the consumer voice: developing multilingual cancer information resources for people affected by liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotin, Monica C; Porwal, Mamta; Hopwood, Max; Nguyen, Debbie; Sze, Minglo; Treloar, Carla; George, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    In Australia, liver cancer incidence is rising, particularly among people born in hepatitis B-endemic countries. We sought to build an understanding of the information needs of people affected by liver cancer, to inform the design of in-language consumer information resources. We searched the World Wide Web for available in-language consumer information and conducted a literature search on consumers' information needs and their preferred means of accessing it. Qualitative data collection involved bilingual researchers conducting focus group discussions (26 participants) and in-depth interviews (22 participants) with people affected by liver cancer in English, Vietnamese, Cantonese and Mandarin. Sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, translated and thematically analysed. The key themes and salient findings informed the development of in-language multimedia information resources. Many consumer resources did not cater for people with low literacy levels. The participants wanted more information on cancer diagnostic and treatment options, nutrition and Chinese Medicine and experienced communication challenges speaking to health professionals. While Vietnamese speakers relied entirely on information provided by their doctors, other participants actively searched for additional treatment information and commonly used the Internet to source it. We developed multilingual, multimedia consumer information resources addressing identified consumer information needs through an iterative process, in collaboration with our multilingual consumer panel. These resources are available in four languages, as separate modules accessible online and in DVD format. This process enabled the development of user-friendly patient resources, which complement health-care provider information and supports informed patient decision making. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cancer education and effective dissemination: information access is not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, Anita L; Swarz, Jeffrey A; Milliken, Erin L; Ellis, Steven

    2010-06-01

    Education is the main avenue for disseminating new research findings into clinical practice. Understanding factors that affect translation of research into practice may help cancer educators design programs that facilitate the time it takes for research-indicated practices to become standard care. To understand various factors, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Education and Special Initiatives (OESI)(1) with individual cooperation from Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) administered a Practitioner Information Needs survey to five different types of practitioners involved in cancer care. While most of the 2,864 practitioners (83%) agreed they had access to current practice information, practitioners in large practice settings were more likely to report having access to research than those small practice settings. However, only 33% indicated that they had adequate time to access the information. Colleagues or experts within the organization were cited as the most frequently relied on information resource (60%), and peer-reviewed journals were cited as second (57%). Overall, 66% strongly or somewhat agreed that their organizations exhibit effective change management practices. A majority (69%) agreed that implementation of new practices is hindered by the lack of available staff time. Financial factors and the characteristics of the information presented were also believed to be factors contributing to research implementation. Group differences were observed among practitioner groups and practice settings for some factors.

  9. European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening. Summary of the supplements on HPV screening and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence von Karsa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC 31 experts from 11 European countries and IARC have developed supplements to the current European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening. The supplements take into account the potential of primary testing for human papillomavirus (HPV and vaccination against HPV infection to improve cervical cancer prevention and control and will be published by the European Commission in book format. They include 62 recommendations or conclusions for which the strength of the evidence and the respective recommendations is graded. While acknowledging the available evidence for more efficacious screening using HPV primary testing compared to screening based on cytology, the authors and editors of the supplements emphasize that appropriate policy and programme organization remain essential to achieve an acceptable balance between benefit and harm of any screening or vaccination programme. A summary of the supplements and all of the graded recommendations are presented here in journal format to make key aspects of the updated and expanded guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Keywords: Mass screening, Vaccination, Cervical neoplasms, Human papillomavirus, Evidence-based guidelines, Population-based programme

  10. Cancer patients and the provision of informational social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James D; Tian, Yan

    2009-07-01

    Research into the impact of social support on health-care patients has focused on the benefits of receiving social support. Although recipients benefit from social support, there are also potential benefits to the providers of social support that have gone relatively unexplored. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship between the reception and provision of informational social support by cancer patients. Based on the work of Gouldner (1960), this investigation attempts to examine the role reciprocity plays within the social support process. The norm of reciprocity is conceptualized as a generalized moral belief rather than as a simple pattern of exchange between caregivers and care receivers. Use of reciprocity as a generalized moral belief instead of a pattern of behavioral exchange between providers and recipients of social support allows a more thorough integration theoretically and more methodical examination of the role the relationship between providers and recipients plays in this process. Specifically, this investigation employs the notion of optimal matching as part of the mechanism underlying the satisfactions derived from informational social support. The results of the logistic regression analyses suggest that reciprocity is a viable explanation of the mechanism underlying the desire to provide social support to others among cancer patients and among adults who have never been diagnosed with cancer. This relationship between the reception and the provision of informational social support remains even after controlling for age, education, gender, race, social integration, and cancer diagnosis. Implications for the social support literature are discussed.

  11. Water Reuse Highlights: A Summary Volume of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Water Works Association, Denver, CO. Research Foundation.

    This document reports the efforts of the AWWA Research Foundation to gather, prepare, and distribute current technical information in the wastewater reclamation and reuse field. The information reported has been abstracted from other Foundation publications and only attempts here to highlight the field. Categories discussed include research,…

  12. Exercise for cancer cachexia in adults:Executive summary of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Grande, Antonio Jose; Silva, Valter; Maddocks, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome characterized by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass and progressive functional impairment. A proactive management approach is recommended, including physical exercise to maintain function via modulation of muscle metabolism, insulin sensitivity and levels of inflammation. The review aimed to determine the safety, acceptability and effectiveness of exercise in adults with cancer cachexia. Secondary aims, subject to the data availability, w...

  13. Novel findings about management of gastric cancer: A summary from 10th IGCC

    OpenAIRE

    Penon, Danila; Cito, Letizia; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The Tenth International Gastric Cancer Congress (IGCC) was held in Verona, Italy, from June 19 to 22, 2013. The meeting enclosed various aspects of stomach tumor management, including both tightly clinical approaches, and topics more related to basic research. Moreover, an overview on gastrointestinal stromal tumors was provided too, although here not discussed. Here we will discuss some topics related to molecular biology of gastric cancer (GC), inherent to prognostic, diagnostic and therape...

  14. Summary of the 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank: new directions in urologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatek, Robert S; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Galsky, Matthew D; Lee, Cheryl T; Latini, David M; Bochner, Bernard H; Weizer, Alon Z; Apolo, Andrea B; Sridhar, Srikala S; Kamat, Ashish M; Hansel, Donna; Flaig, Thomas W; Smith, Norm D; Lotan, Yair

    2013-10-01

    The 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and representatives from the National Cancer Institute and Industry in an effort to advance bladder cancer research efforts. This year's meeting comprised panel discussions and research involving 5 separate working groups, including the Survivorship, Clinical Trials, Standardization of Care, Data Mining, and Translational Science working groups. In this manuscript, the accomplishments and objectives of the working groups are summarized. Notable efforts include: (1) the development of a survivorship care plan for early and late-stage bladder cancer; (2) the development of consensus criteria for eligibility and endpoints for bladder cancer clinical trials; (3) an improved understanding of current practice patterns regarding the use of perioperative chemotherapy in an effort to standardize care; (4) creation of a comprehensive handbook to assist researchers with developing bladder cancer databases; and (5) identification of response to therapy of high-grade non muscle invasive disease through a collaborative exchange of expertise and resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Summary of the primer on tumor immunology and the biological therapy of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolin Kim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc is one of the "premier destinations for interaction and innovation in the cancer biologics community". It provides a primer course each year during the annual meeting to address the most important areas of tumor immunology and immunotherapy. The course has been given by prominent investigators in the area of interest, covering the core principles of cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The target audience for this program includes investigators from academic, regulatory, and biopharmaceutical venues. The program goal is to enable the attendees to learn the current status and the most recent advances in biologic therapies, and to leverage this knowledge towards the improvement of cancer therapy. The 2008 immunologic primer course was held on October 30 at the 23rd Annual meeting of iSBTc in San Diego, CA. Nine internationally renowned investigators gave excellent presentations on different topics. The topics covered in this primer included: (1 cytokines in cancer immunology; (2 anti-angiogenic therapy; (3 end stage: immune killing of tumors; (4 blocking T cell checkpoints; (5 approach to identification and therapeutic exploitation of tumor antigens; (6 T regulatory cells; (7 adoptive T cell therapy; (8 immune monitoring of cancer immunotherapy; and (9 immune adjuvants. We summarized the topics in this primer for public education. The related topic slides and schedule can be accessed online http://www.isbtc.org/meetings/am08/primer08.

  16. Antecedent characteristics of online cancer information seeking among rural breast cancer patients: an application of the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bret R; Dubenske, Lori L; Han, Jeong Yeob; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Bush, Nigel; Gustafson, David H; McTavish, Fiona

    2008-06-01

    Little research has examined the antecedent characteristics of patients most likely to seek online cancer information. This study employs the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) model as a framework to understand what psychosocial characteristics precede online cancer-related information seeking among rural breast cancer patients who often have fewer health care providers and limited local support services. Examining 144 patients who were provided free computer hardware, Internet access, and training for how to use an interactive cancer communication system, pretest survey scores indicating patients' psychosocial status were correlated with specific online cancer information seeking behaviors. Each of the factors specified by the C-SHIP model had significant relationships with online cancer information seeking behaviors, with the strongest findings emerging for cancer-relevant encodings and self-construals, cancer-relevant beliefs and expectancies, and cancer-relevant self-regulatory competencies and skills. Specifically, patients with more negative appraisals in these domains were more likely to seek out online cancer information. Additionally, antecedent variables associated with the C-SHIP model had more frequent relationships with experiential information as compared with to didactic information. This study supports the applicability of the model to discern why people afflicted with cancer may seek online information to cope with their disease.

  17. Antecedent Characteristics of Online Cancer Information Seeking Among Rural Breast Cancer Patients: An Application of the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bret R.; DuBenske, Lori L.; Han, Jeong Yeob; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Bush, Nigel; Gustafson, David H.; McTavish, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Little research has examined the antecedent characteristics of patients most likely to seek online cancer information. This study employs the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) model as a framework to understand what psychosocial characteristics precede online cancer-related information seeking among rural breast cancer patients who often have fewer healthcare providers and limited local support services. Examining 144 patients who were provided free computer hardware, Internet access and training for how to use an Interactive Cancer Communication System, pre-test survey scores indicating patients’ psychosocial status were correlated with specific online cancer information seeking behaviors. Each of the factors specified by the C-SHIP model had significant relationships with online cancer information seeking behaviors with the strongest findings emerging for cancer-relevant encodings and self-construals, cancer-relevant beliefs and expectancies and cancer-relevant self-regulatory competencies and skills. Specifically, patients with more negative appraisals in these domains were more likely to seek out online cancer information. Additionally, antecedent variables associated with the C-SHIP model had more frequent relationships with experiential information as compared to didactic information. This study supports the applicability of the model to discern why people afflicted with cancer may seek online information to cope with their disease. PMID:18569368

  18. Commercial vehicle fleet management and information systems. Technical memorandum 2 : summary of case study interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The FHWA has commissioned the Commercial Vehicle Fleet Management and Information Systems study to determine if there are fleet management needs that the public sector can address through the development of ITS for commercial vehicle operations. As p...

  19. Geographic information systems - transportation ISTEA management systems server net prototype pooled fund study : phase B - summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The Geographic Information System-Transportation (GIS-T) ISTEA Management Systems Server Net Prototype Pooled Fund Study represents the first national cooperative effort in the transportation industry to address the management and monitoring systems ...

  20. 77 FR 69483 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Summary Subcontract Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... be posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov , including any personal and/or business... appropriate technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. DATES: Submit... small business, small disadvantaged business, historically underutilized business zone (HUBZone) small...

  1. Radioactive waste management information, 1982 summary and record-to-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, G.B.

    1983-07-01

    This document summarizes radioactive waste data records for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) compiled since 1952. Kinds of information include volume, radioactivity, isotopic identity, origin, and decay status. The radioactive waste data presented was obtained from the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Information System (RWMIS). This report is updated annually to incorporate waste management data for the current year and reflects changes in previous annual reports. Changes are made to more accurately reflect the current status of waste operations at the INEL

  2. RIBA Project - Risk-Informed approach for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. Project summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.; Smith, G.

    2001-12-01

    The need for a European review of a Risk-Informed Approach for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components (RIBA) was identified in 1998. This was as a priority item in the programme of activities conducted in the framework of the Council Resolutions of 22 July 1975 and of 18 June 1992 on the Technological Problems of Nuclear Safety. The RIBA Project was established in November 1999 as a 24-month Study Contract funded by the European Commission within the frame of the former DG XI WGCS (Working Group on Codes and Standards). The Study Contract was subsequently managed for the EC by DG TREN. The participants in RIBA were Serco Assurance (project coordinator), Ringhals AB, EDF, Tecnatom SA and Westinghouse Electric Europe. The work is presented in a summary report with the detailed results contained in three companion reports as follows: main conclusions and recommendations, Review of Existing Risk-Informed Methodologies, A Comparative Study of Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection Applications, Conclusions and Recommendations for Risk-Informed in-service inspection methodology applied to Nuclear Power Plants in Europe. (author)

  3. Assessing the information in the Summaries of Product Characteristics for the use of medicines in pregnancy and lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguello, Blanca; Salgado, Teresa M; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the completeness and applicability of information for the use of medicines in pregnancy and lactation contained in European Summaries of Product Characteristics (SmPCs). Methods SmPCs available on the EMA website in April 2011 were retrieved, and information on the use of medicines during pregnancy and lactation was analyzed. A form was designed to extract information regarding drug concentrations crossing the placenta, excretion of the drug in milk, the existence of pre-clinical and clinical studies and clinical experience describing the use of the medicine in pregnancy and lactation, medicine effects on human fertility, medicines use in women of child-bearing potential and specific recommendations for use during pregnancy and breastfeeding. SmPCs were classified as containing ‘conclusive’ or ‘ambiguous’ information depending on whether (or not) they provided clear instructions regarding medicine use in pregnancy and lactation. Results Of the 534 SmPCs, 89.3% did not mention whether the drug crossed the placenta, 67.6% indicated that there was no clinical experience during pregnancy and in 61.4% it was unknown whether the medicine was excreted in human milk. Recommendations for medicine use during pregnancy and breastfeeding were ambiguous in 57.0% and 16.5% of the SmPCs, respectively, and medicine use was restricted in over 90% SmPCs for both pregnancy and breastfeeding, despite no information supporting these restrictions being reported. The time elapsed since a SmPCs first approval was not associated with an increase in information quality. Conclusions Important information deficits on the use of medicines during pregnancy and breastfeeding were found in European SmPCs. PMID:25224071

  4. The iSBTc/SITC primer on tumor immunology and biological therapy of cancer: a summary of the 2010 program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urba Walter J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC (formerly the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer, iSBTc, aims to improve cancer patient outcomes by advancing the science, development and application of biological therapy and immunotherapy. The society and its educational programs have become premier destinations for interaction and innovation in the cancer biologics community. For over a decade, the society has offered the Primer on Tumor Immunology and Biological Therapy of Cancer™ in conjunction with its Annual Scientific Meeting. This report summarizes the 2010 Primer that took place October 1, 2010 in Washington, D.C. as part of the educational offerings associated with the society's 25th anniversary. The target audience was basic and clinical investigators from academia, industry and regulatory agencies, and included clinicians, post-doctoral fellows, students, and allied health professionals. Attendees were provided a review of basic immunology and educated on the current status and most recent advances in tumor immunology and clinical/translational caner immunology. Ten prominent investigators presented on the following topics: innate immunity and inflammation; an overview of adaptive immunity; dendritic cells; tumor microenvironment; regulatory immune cells; immune monitoring; cytokines in cancer immunotherapy; immune modulating antibodies; cancer vaccines; and adoptive T cell therapy. Presentation slides, a Primer webinar and additional program information are available online on the society's website.

  5. Gastric cancer-related information on the Internet: incomplete, poorly accessible, and overly commercial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2011-02-01

    Patients increasingly use the Internet for gastric cancer information. However, the quality of the information is questionable. We evaluated the accuracy, completeness, accessibility, reliability, and readability of gastric cancer websites.

  6. Extraction of basic roadway information for non-state roads in Florida : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) maintains a map of all the roads in Florida, : containing over one and a half million road links. For planning purposes, a wide variety : of information, such as stop lights, signage, lane number, and s...

  7. National Waste Terminal Storage Program Information Management Plan. Volume I. Management summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    A comprehensive information management plan is needed for the processing of the large amount of documentation that will accumulate in the National Waste Terminal Storage program over the next decade. The plan will apply to all documentation from OWI contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers, and to external documentation from OWI organizations

  8. Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Brett C.; Coughlin, Jennifer L.; Mathew, Paul A.

    2009-09-08

    This document presents the results of a review of publicly available information on energy use in health care facilities. The information contained in this document and in the sources cited herein provides the background and context for efforts to reduce energy use and costs in health care. Recognizing the breadth and diversity of relevant information, the author acknowledges that the report is likely not comprehensive. It is intended only to present a broad picture of what is currently known about health care energy use. This review was conducted as part of a 'High Performance Health Care Buildings' research study funded by the California Energy Commission. The study was motivated by the recognition that health care facilities collectively account for a substantial fraction of total commercial building energy use, due in large part to the very high energy intensity of hospitals and other inpatient care facilities. The goal of the study was to develop a roadmap of research, development and deployment (RD&D) needs for the health care industry. In addition to this information review, the road map development process included interviews with industry experts and a full-day workshop at LBNL in March 2009. This report is described as 'Version 1' with the intent that it will be expanded and updated as part of an ongoing LBNL program in healthcare energy efficiency. The document is being released in this form with the hope that it can assist others in finding and accessing the resources described within.

  9. 75 FR 69662 - Workshop: Cumulative Mixtures Risk of Six Selected Phthalates in Support of Summary Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... particular disruption of reproductive development in males and females; and (3) determine approaches to... Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Peer Consultation... phthalates are associated with adverse effects in male and female offspring; (2) determine how phthalates...

  10. 78 FR 23903 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Quarterly Summary of State and Local Government...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Cheryl Lee, Chief, State Finance and Tax Statistics Branch, Governments Division, U.S. Census Bureau... economic research and comparative studies of governmental finances. Tax collection data are used to measure...) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to...

  11. Scarce information about breast cancer screening: An Italian websites analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attena, Francesco; Cancellieri, Mariagrazia; Pelullo, Concetta Paola

    2016-12-01

    Although the public should have complete and correct information about risk/benefit ratio of breast cancer screening, public knowledge appears generally scarce and oriented to overestimate benefits, with little awareness of possible disadvantages of the screening.We evaluated any document specifically addressed to the general female public and posted on internet by Italian public health services. The presence of false positive, false positive after biopsy, false negative, interval cancer, overdiagnosis, lead-time bias, exposure to irradiation, and mortality reduction was analyzed.Of the 255 websites consulted, 136 (53.3%) had sites addressed to the female public. The most commonly reported information points were the false-positive (30.8% of sites) and radiation exposure (29.4%) rates. Only 11 documents mentioned overdiagnosis, 2 mentioned risk of false positive with biopsy, and only 1 mentioned lead-time bias. Moreover, only 15 sites (11.0%) reported quantitative data for any risk variables.Most documents about breast cancer screening published on the web for the female public contained little or no information about risk/benefit ratio and were biased in favor of screening.

  12. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers: A summary of the record linkage study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, G.J. [University of Oxford (United Kingdom). Childhood Cancer Research Group; Little, M.P. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Sorahan, T. [Birmingham University (United Kingdom). Inst. of Occupational Health] [and others

    1997-12-01

    A national study has been conducted to test the Gardner hypothesis`, that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by paternal exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and, more generally, to investigate whether preconception radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. (UK).

  13. Exercise for cancer cachexia in adults: Executive summary of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Antonio Jose; Silva, Valter; Maddocks, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome characterized by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass and progressive functional impairment. A proactive management approach is recommended, including physical exercise to maintain function via modulation of muscle metabolism, insulin sensitivity and levels of inflammation. The review aimed to determine the safety, acceptability and effectiveness of exercise in adults with cancer cachexia. Secondary aims, subject to the data availability, were to compare effectiveness according to the characteristics of the study intervention or population. We sought randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults meeting international criteria for cancer cachexia, comparing a programme of exercise as a sole or adjunct intervention to usual care or an active control. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE and HTA, ISI Web of Science, LILACS, PEDro, SciVerse SCOPUS, Biosis Previews PreMEDLINE and Open Grey databases were searched up to June 2014. Two authors independently assessed studies for eligibility. We screened 3154 separate titles and abstracts, and reviewed 16 full-texts. Corresponding authors were contacted to determine if samples met cachexia staging criteria. Most authors did not explore this concept. No trial met review eligibility criteria. We were unable to perform a meta-analysis to determine any effects from exercise intervention. Despite a strong rationale for the use of exercise, there is insufficient evidence to determine safety and effectiveness in patients with cancer cachexia. Findings from ongoing studies are awaited. Assessment of cachexia domains, ideally against international criteria, is required for future trials of exercise and supportive care interventions.

  14. Summary of world wide studies related to cellular telephony and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swicord, M. L.; Morrissey, J. J.; Joyner, K. H.

    2002-01-01

    Over 170 studies have been initiated using human, animal, and cell culture experimental models to investigate whether exposure to radiofrequency (RF) emissions from mobile telephony can cause or promote cancer. Animal studies will play an important role when epidemiological studies are weak or not definitive. In vitro studies will generally have a supporting or clarifying role

  15. Summary of human social, cultural, behavioral (HSCB) modeling for information fusion panel discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasch, Erik; Salerno, John; Kadar, Ivan; Yang, Shanchieh J.; Fenstermacher, Laurie; Endsley, Mica; Grewe, Lynne

    2013-05-01

    During the SPIE 2012 conference, panelists convened to discuss "Real world issues and challenges in Human Social/Cultural/Behavioral modeling with Applications to Information Fusion." Each panelist presented their current trends and issues. The panel had agreement on advanced situation modeling, working with users for situation awareness and sense-making, and HSCB context modeling in focusing research activities. Each panelist added different perspectives based on the domain of interest such as physical, cyber, and social attacks from which estimates and projections can be forecasted. Also, additional techniques were addressed such as interest graphs, network modeling, and variable length Markov Models. This paper summarizes the panelists discussions to highlight the common themes and the related contrasting approaches to the domains in which HSCB applies to information fusion applications.

  16. Integrated Office Information System (IOIS) Summary Report. Automated Session Manager Analysis, Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    1984, Keen and Scott Morton 1978, Richman 1987, Straub and Beauclair 19881. Previous research has shown the benefits of information technology in...been shown to foster collaboration, communication, deliberation, and negotiation [Apple et al 1986, Beauclair 1987, Easton 1988, Gray 1981, Kull 19821...Illinois. 7. Beauclair , R. A., 1987, "An Experimental Study of the Effects of GDSS Process Support Applica- tions on Small Group Decision Making

  17. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  18. The Source and Credibility of Colorectal Cancer Information on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SoHyun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Park, Gibeom; Suh, Bongwon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Kim, Jin Won; Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2016-02-01

    Despite the rapid penetration of social media in modern life, there has been limited research conducted on whether social media serves as a credible source of health information. In this study, we propose to identify colorectal cancer information on Twitter and assess its informational credibility. We collected Twitter messages containing colorectal cancer-related keywords, over a 3-month period. A review of sample tweets yielded content and user categorization schemes. The results of the sample analysis were applied to classify all collected tweets and users, using a machine learning technique. The credibility of the information in the sampled tweets was evaluated. A total of 76,119 tweets were analyzed. Individual users authored the majority of tweets (n = 68,982, 90.6%). They mostly tweeted about news articles/research (n = 16,761, 22.0%) and risk/prevention (n = 14,767, 19.4%). Medical professional users generated only 2.0% of total tweets (n = 1509), and medical institutions rarely tweeted (n = 417, 0.6%). Organizations tended to tweet more about information than did individuals (85.2% vs 63.1%; P users. Coupled with the Internet's potential to increase social support, Twitter may contribute to enhancing public health and empowering users, when used with proper caution.

  19. DOE systems approach to a low-level waste management information system: summary paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza, V.

    1987-01-01

    The LLWMP is performing an assessment of waste information systems currently in use at each DOE site for recording LLW data. The assessment is being conducted to determine what changes to the waste information systems, if any, are desirable to support implementation of this systems approach to LLW management. Recommendations will be made to DOE from this assessment and what would be involved to modify current DOE waste generator information practices to support an appropriately structured overall DOE LLW data systems. In support of reducing the uncertainty of decision-making, DOE has selected a systems approach to keep pace with an evolving regulatory climate to low-level waste. This approach considers the effects of each stage of the entire low-level waste management process. The proposed systems approach starts with the disposal side of the waste management system and progresses towards the waste generation side of the waste management system. Using this approach provides quantitative performance to be achieved. In addition, a systems approach also provides a method for selecting appropriate technology based on engineering models

  20. Summary of JRC activities related to European-wide exchange of radiological information during nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Court, M.; Vries de, G.; Galmarini, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The large transboundary effects of the radioactive release during the Chernobyl accident evidenced the need for international provisions for data and Information exchange. The JRC, in its EC support activity to DG TREN H.4, called REM (Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring), has more than 10 years experience in developing systems to make early notification and reliable radiological information exchange available to the EU member states in case of nuclear accidents. The aim and status of these systems are described: 1.)ECURIE: The legal basis for the EC systems is the Council Decision 87/600 of 14 December 1987. It resulted in the ECURIE network which allows the EU Member States and Switzerland to notify an accident and to subsequently exchange the radiological information as required by this Council decision. The underlying information exchange code (C.1. structure) does not only provide radiological measurements, but also predicted values, site meteorological data and decisions taken. Software was developed to facilitate coding and decoding of the messages. Initially the messages were transmitted by telex. The latest software (CoDecS, in use since the beginning of 2001) uses ISDN and Internet for the Information exchange. lt runs an the Windows NT and 2000 platforms. Regular exercises test the communication system and the software. In view of improving the efficiency of data and Information transfer for their common Member States, the IAEA and the EC are harmonizing ECURIE and the ENATOM early notification system. A first result has been the definition of an enhanced CIS format. Modifications will be made to the CoDecs software and to the IAEA - ENAC website so that information can be exchanged between the two systems in an automated manner. The EC wishes to extend the ECURIE network to the EU candidate countries. The official agreements are in an advanced state and participation of many candidate countries is foreseen by the end of 2003. It is

  1. Summary of informal meeting on ''facilities for atomic physics research with highly ionized atoms''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocke, C.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984. The meeting was motivated by the realization that the status of facilities for studies of highly ionized atoms is unsettled and that it might be desirable to take action to ensure adequate resources for research over the whole range of charge states and energies of interest. It was assumed that the science to be done with these beams has been amply documented in the literature

  2. Early detection of cervical cancer with visual inspection methods: a summary of completed and on-going studies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaranarayanan R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available India is a high-risk country for cervical cancer which accounts a quarter (126 000 new cases, 71 000 deaths around 2 000 of the world burden. The age-standardized incidence rates range from 16-55 per 100 000 women in different regions with particularly high rates in rural areas. Control of cervical cancer by early detection and treatment is a priority of the National Cancer Control Programme of India. There are no organized cytology screening programmes in the country. The technical and financial constraints to organize cytology screening have encouraged the evaluation of visual inspection approaches as potential alternatives to cervical cytology in India. Four types of visual detection approaches for cervical neoplasia are investigated in India: a naked eye inspection without acetic acid application, widely known as 'downstaging'; b naked eye inspection after application of 3-5% acetic acid (VIA; c VIA using magnification devices (VIAM; d visual inspection after the application of Lugol's iodine (VILI. Downstaging has been shown to be poorly sensitive and specific to detect cervical neoplasia and is no longer considered as a suitable screening test for cervical cancer. VIA, VIAM and VILI are currently being investigated in multicentre cross-sectional studies (without verification bias, in which cytology and HPV testing are also simultaneously evaluated, and the results of these investigations will be available in 2003. These studies will provide valuable information on the average, comparative test performances in detecting high-grade cervical cancer precursors and cancer. Results from pooled analysis of data from two completed studies indicated an approximate sensitivity of 93.4% and specificity of 85.1% for VIA to detect CIN 2 or worse lesions; the corresponding figures for cytology were 72.1% and 91.6%. The efficacy of VIA in reducing incidence of and mortality from cervical cancer and its cost-effectiveness is currently being investigated

  3. Prestige oil spill information and assessment Galicia, Spain January 20-22, 2003 : Meeting summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In mid-November 2002, an oil spill occurred off the coast of northwest Spain when the tanker, Prestige, broke apart and sank. The vast majority of the heavy fuel oil it transported was released into the sea along 900 kilometres of Spanish coastline. More than 20,000 people were affected as bans on fish and shellfish harvesting were issued. A delegation from Newfoundland left for Galicia, Spain in December 2002, to learn from the experience in an effort to enhance spill prevention and response for the Newfoundland and Labrador coastline. A brief overview of the Galicia region of Spain was provided, followed by general information concerning the jurisdictional complexity of Galicia. A number of issues and topics were discussed, such as: marine traffic corridors, safe havens; communication with the public; oil recovery operations; compensation; spill prevention; ban on fishing and shellfish harvesting; and, fishing industry's role in response operations. Tours of the areas affected were organized for the delegation. Upon return to Newfoundland, the delegation shared their acquired information and initiated discussions with the federal government concerning intergovernmental issues on oil spill prevention and response

  4. Annual summary of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System 1994 data base contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, T.L.; Zygmunt, B.C.; Hines, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    The environmental measurements and geographic data bases of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) contain data of known quality that can be accessed by OREIS users. The data within OREIS include environmental measurements data from the following environmental media: groundwater, surface water, sediment, soils, air, and biota. The types of environmental data within OREIS include but are not limited to chemical, biological, ecological, radiological, geophysical, and lithological data. Coordinate data within the environmental measurements data base provide the spatial context of the measurements data and are used to link the measurements data to the geographic data base. Descriptive and qualifier metadata are also part of the data bases. As of 30 September 1994, the OREIS environmental measurements data base consisted of approximately 380,000 rows associated with data generated by environmental restoration projects. The data base also contained 3,400 supporting codes and other reference data rows. Geographic data included the S-16A base map for the Oak Ridge Reservation, boundaries for operable units and ORNL waste area groupings, boundaries of groundwater coordination areas, contours generated as a result of the gamma radiation survey, representations of the environmentally sensitive areas, information received as part of the remedial investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek, high resolution background raster images for the three ORR installations, and locations of wells and other point features generated from ORACLE tables

  5. A cascade of classifiers for extracting medication information from discharge summaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halgrim Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting medication information from clinical records has many potential applications, and recently published research, systems, and competitions reflect an interest therein. Much of the early extraction work involved rules and lexicons, but more recently machine learning has been applied to the task. Methods We present a hybrid system consisting of two parts. The first part, field detection, uses a cascade of statistical classifiers to identify medication-related named entities. The second part uses simple heuristics to link those entities into medication events. Results The system achieved performance that is comparable to other approaches to the same task. This performance is further improved by adding features that reference external medication name lists. Conclusions This study demonstrates that our hybrid approach outperforms purely statistical or rule-based systems. The study also shows that a cascade of classifiers works better than a single classifier in extracting medication information. The system is available as is upon request from the first author.

  6. Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis: Evolving Paradigms and Future DirectionsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luai R. Zarour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients with colorectal cancer (CRC that metastasizes to the liver, there are several key goals for improving outcomes including early detection, effective prognostic indicators of treatment response, and accurate identification of patients at high risk for recurrence. Although new therapeutic regimens developed over the past decade have increased survival, there is substantial room for improvement in selecting targeted treatment regimens for the patients who will derive the most benefit. Recently, there have been exciting developments in identifying high-risk patient cohorts, refinements in the understanding of systemic vs localized drug delivery to metastatic niches, liquid biomarker development, and dramatic advances in tumor immune therapy, all of which promise new and innovative approaches to tackling the problem of detecting and treating the metastatic spread of CRC to the liver. Our multidisciplinary group held a state-of-the-science symposium this past year to review advances in this rapidly evolving field. Herein, we present a discussion around the issues facing treatment of patients with CRC liver metastases, including the relationship of discrete gene signatures with prognosis. We also discuss the latest advances to maximize regional and systemic therapies aimed at decreasing intrahepatic recurrence, review recent insights into the tumor microenvironment, and summarize advances in noninvasive multimodal biomarkers for early detection of primary and recurrent disease. As we continue to advance clinically and technologically in the field of colorectal tumor biology, our goal should be continued refinement of predictive and prognostic studies to decrease recurrence after curative resection and minimize treatment toxicity to patients through a tailored multidisciplinary approach to cancer care. Keywords: Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis, Biomarkers, Hepatic Arterial Infusion, High-Risk Colorectal

  7. Positron Emission Tomography in Prostate Cancer: Summary of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent public health problem worldwide. Over the past decade, there has been tremendous research activity in the potential use of positron emission tomography with a number of radiotracers targeted to various biological aspects of this complex tumor. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are important contributions to the relevant literature that summarize the evidence while reducing the effect of various sources of bias in the published data. The accumulation of releva...

  8. Circulating Tumor DNA Analysis for Liver Cancers and Its Usefulness as a Liquid BiopsySummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA carrying tumor-specific sequence alterations has been found in the cell-free fraction of blood. Liver cancer tumor specimens are difficult to obtain, and noninvasive methods are required to assess cancer progression and characterize underlying genomic features. Methods: We analyzed 46 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent hepatectomy or liver transplantation and for whom whole-genome sequencing data was available. We designed personalized assays targeting somatic rearrangements of each tumor to quantify serum ctDNA. Exome sequencing was performed using cell-free DNA paired primary tumor tissue DNA from a patient with recurrent liver cancer after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE. Results: We successfully detected ctDNA from 100 μL of serum samples in 7 of the 46 patients before surgery, increasing with disease progression. The cumulative incidence of recurrence and extrahepatic metastasis in the ctDNA-positive group were statistically significantly worse than in the ctDNA-negative group (P = .0102 and .0386, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified ctDNA (OR 6.10; 95% CI, 1.11–33.33, P = .038 as an independent predictor of microscopic vascular invasion of the portal vein (VP. We identified 45 nonsynonymous somatic mutations in cell-free DNA after TACE and 71 nonsynonymous somatic mutations in primary tumor tissue by exome sequencing. We identified 25 common mutations in both samples, and 83% of mutations identified in the primary tumor could be detected in the cell-free DNA. Conclusions: The presence of ctDNA reflects tumor progression, and detection of ctDNA can predict VP and recurrence, especially extrahepatic metastasis within 2 years. Our study demonstrated the usefulness of ctDNA detection and sequencing analysis of cell-free DNA for personalized treatment of liver cancer. Keywords: Circulating Tumor DNA, Exome Sequencing, Hepatocellular

  9. Positron Emission Tomography in Prostate Cancer: Summary of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent public health problem worldwide. Over the past decade, there has been tremendous research activity in the potential use of positron emission tomography with a number of radiotracers targeted to various biological aspects of this complex tumor. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are important contributions to the relevant literature that summarize the evidence while reducing the effect of various sources of bias in the published data. The accumulation of relevant data in this clinical setting has recently provided the opportunity for systematic reviews. In this brief article, I summarize the published systematic reviews and meta-analysis of positron emission tomography in prostate cancer. Most robust evidence suggests a probable role for first-line use of positron emission tomography with radiolabeled choline in restating patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer with the diagnostic performance that appears to be positively associated with the serum prostate specific antigen level and velocity. Future systematic reviews will be needed for other emerging radiotracers such as those based on prostate specific membrane antigen and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor.

  10. Novel findings about management of gastric cancer: a summary from 10th IGCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penon, Danila; Cito, Letizia; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-07-21

    The Tenth International Gastric Cancer Congress (IGCC) was held in Verona, Italy, from June 19 to 22, 2013. The meeting enclosed various aspects of stomach tumor management, including both tightly clinical approaches, and topics more related to basic research. Moreover, an overview on gastrointestinal stromal tumors was provided too, although here not discussed. Here we will discuss some topics related to molecular biology of gastric cancer (GC), inherent to prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic tools shown at the conference. Results about well known subjects, such as E-cadherin loss of expression/function, were presented. They revealed that other mutations of the gene were identified, showing a continuous research to improve diagnosis and prognosis of stomach tumor. Simultaneously, new possible molecular markers with an established role for other neoplasms, were discussed, such as mesothelin, stomatin-like protein 2 and Notch-1. Hence, a wide overview including both old and new diagnostic/prognostic tools was offered. Great attention was also dedicated to possible drugs to be used against GC. They included monoclonal antibodies, such as MS57-2.1, drugs used in other pathologies, such as maraviroc, and natural extracts from plants such as biflorin. We would like to contribute to summarize the most impressive studies presented at the IGCC, concerning novel findings about molecular biology of gastric cancer. Although further investigations will be necessary, it can be inferred that more and more tools were developed, so as to better face stomach neoplasms.

  11. Predicting Cancer Information Seeking Behaviors of Smokers, Former Smokers and Nonsmokers Using the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suekyung

    2013-01-01

    Cancer can be one of the most serious diseases that can result in a costly reduction in the quality of life. Among a number of cancer risk factors, tobacco use has been identified as the leading preventable cause of deaths. Prior research has suggested that cancer information seeking may be a pre-step to adopt health protective behaviors that can…

  12. Radiology online: information, education, and networking--a summary of the 2012 Intersociety Committee Summer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Gerald D; Naeger, David M

    2013-05-01

    The "new online" (Web 2.0) world is evolving rapidly, and the digital information, education, and networking resources available to radiologists have exploded over the past 2 decades. The 2012 Intersociety Committee Summer Conference attendees explored the online resources that have been produced by societies, universities, and commercial entities. Specific attention was given to identifying the best products and packaging them in tablet computers for use by residents and practicing radiologists. The key functions of social networking websites and the possible roles they can play in radiology were explored as well. It was the consensus of the attendees that radiologic digital resources and portable electronic devices have matured to the point that they should become an integral part of our educational programs and clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Health care consumers' experiences of information communication technology--a summary of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Kerstin M; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2007-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in reaching consumers directly through the Internet and different telecommunication systems. The most important contacts in health care will always be the face-to-face meetings, but the tools of health informatics can be seen as a means to an end, which is to provide the best possible health care. A variety of applications have been described in different references. To our knowledge there has been no review of a research-based state of the art in the field of consumers' experiences in using different applications in health informatics. According to the benefits in using information communication technology (ICT) as being cost-effective and timesaving it is of great importance to focus on and examine consumers' experiences. It is important that it is user friendly and regarded as valuable and useful. The aim of this study was to describe consumers' subjective experiences of using electronic resources with reference to health and illness. DESIGN AND/OR METHOD: A systematic literature search was performed in databases CINAHL, Medline and Cochrane, as well as a manual search. Retrieved references (n=14) were appraised according to their scientific structure and quality. A broad search was performed in order to find as many different applications as possible. Our primary intention was to identify existing references describing consumers' experiences with ICT. In spite of this broad search few references were found. Twelve references remained and three themes were identified: support and help, education and information, and telecommunication instead of on-site visiting. Consumers felt more confident and empowered, their knowledge increased and their health status improved due to the ICT resources. Lack of face-to-face meetings or privacy did not appear to be a problem. ICT can improve the nurse-patient relationship and augment well-being for consumers. More research is needed to measure consumers' experiences and factors that influence it

  14. Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer prevention strategies include quitting or avoiding exposure to smoking, occupational carcinogens, and radon. Get detailed information about risk factors and lung cancer prevention in this summary for clinicians.

  15. Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anal cancer is uncommon, but often curable with treatment. Treatments include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Get detailed information about anal cancer including risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  16. Childhood Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cavity cancer in children is usually lymphoma or sarcoma, but most tumors of the mouth are benign. Get information about the risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, and treatment of oral cavity cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric cancer treatment options depend on extent of disease and may include radical surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of newly diagnosed and recurrent gastric cancer in this clinician summary.

  18. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer screening most often includes mammography but can also include ultrasound, MRI, and other tests. Get detailed information about the potential benefits and harms of the tests used to screen for breast cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  19. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer treatment commonly includes various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. Prognosis and selection of therapy is influenced by clinical and pathology features. Get detailed information about breast cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  20. Summary of global warming uncertainties and the value of information: An analysis using CETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    The authors investigate the sensitivity of optimal carbon control strategies to parameters of the Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment (CETA) Model, and they use CETA in a simple decision tree framework to estimate the value of information about global warming uncertainties. They find that if an optimal control policy is used under uncertainty, the eventual resolution of uncertainty has high value relative to current research budgets, and resolving uncertainty about the costs of warming is nearly as important as resolving uncertainty about the extent of warming. In addition, the authors find that there is not a high premium on immediate resolution of uncertainty, if resolution would otherwise occur within, say, twenty years; this implies that time is available to plan and execute a carefully designed research program. On the other hand, they find that if the real-world political process would result in a suboptimal control policy being chosen under uncertainty, and this choice could be prevented by early resolution of uncertainty, the benefit of early resolution may be as much as three orders of magnitude greater

  1. Annual summary of the contents of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) 1993 data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, R.A.; Herr, D.D.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Monroe, F.E.; Olson, R.J.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.

    1994-06-01

    The data base of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) contains data of known quality that can be accessed by OREIS users. OREIS meets data management/access requirements for environmental data as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation and the State Oversight Agreement between the State of Tennessee and the Department of Energy. The types of environmental data within OREIS include measurement data from the following environmental disciplines: groundwater, surface water, sediment, soils, air, and biota. In addition to measurement data, the OREIS data base contains extensive descriptive and qualifier metadata to help define data quality and to enable end users to analyze the appropriateness of data for their purposes. Another important aspect of measurement data is their spatial context; OREIS maintains a comprehensive library of geographic data and tools to analyze and display spatial relationships of the data. As of November 1993, the OREIS data base consists of approximately 100,000 records associated with three environmental restoration projects along with coordinate data and background map data. The data base also contains 2,700 supporting codes and other reference data records. Geographic data include the S-16A base map for the Oak Ridge Reservation, boundaries for operable units, and high-resolution raster images for each of the sites

  2. Supporting Informed Decision Making in Prevention of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino MARTINS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and making the correct decision on the best health treatment or screening test option can become a difficult task. Therefore is important that the patients get all types of information appropriate to manage their health. Decision aids can be very useful when there is more than one reasonable option about a treatment or uncertain associated with screening tests. The decision aids tools help people to understand their clinical condition, through the description of the different options available. The purpose of this paper is to present the project “Supporting Informed Decision Making In Prevention of Prostate Cancer” (SIDEMP. This project is focused on the creation of a Web-based decision platform specifically directed to screening prostate cancer, that will support the patient in the process of making an informed decision

  3. 77 FR 72858 - Toxicological Review of Inorganic Arsenic (Cancer and Noncancer Effects): In Support of Summary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... public stakeholder workshop to inform the development of a state of the science toxicological review of... arsenic (iAs) public stakeholder workshop is designed to inform the planning for EPA's toxicological... impact the toxicological review, and discuss approaches for dose-response. The ultimate goals of the...

  4. Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues

  5. Empowerment of Cancer Survivors Through Information Technology: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wim G; Kuijpers, Wilma; Oldenburg, Hester Sa; Wouters, Michel Wjm; Aaronson, Neil K; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-11-27

    Patient empowerment may be an effective approach to strengthen the role of cancer survivors and to reduce the burden on health care. However, it is not well conceptualized, notably in oncology. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent information technology (IT) services can contribute to empowerment of cancer survivors. We aim to define the conceptual components of patient empowerment of chronic disease patients, especially cancer survivors, and to explore the contribution of existing and new IT services to promote empowerment. Electronic databases were searched to identify theoretical and empirical articles regarding empowerment. We extracted and synthesized conceptual components of patient empowerment (ie, attributes, antecedents, and consequences) according to the integrated review methodology. We identified recent IT services for cancer survivors by examining systematic reviews and a proposed inventory of new services, and we related their features and effects to the identified components of empowerment. Based on 26 articles, we identified five main attributes of patient empowerment: (1) being autonomous and respected, (2) having knowledge, (3) having psychosocial and behavioral skills, (4) perceiving support from community, family, and friends, and (5) perceiving oneself to be useful. The latter two were specific for the cancer setting. Systematic reviews of IT services and our additional inventory helped us identify five main categories: (1) educational services, including electronic survivorship care plan services, (2) patient-to-patient services, (3) electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) services, (4) multicomponent services, and (5) portal services. Potential impact on empowerment included knowledge enhancement and, to a lesser extent, enhancing autonomy and skills. Newly developed services offer promising and exciting opportunities to empower cancer survivors, for instance, by providing tailored advice for supportive or follow-up care based on

  6. A novel model to combine clinical and pathway-based transcriptomic information for the prognosis prediction of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. With the increasing awareness of heterogeneity in breast cancers, better prediction of breast cancer prognosis is much needed for more personalized treatment and disease management. Towards this goal, we have developed a novel computational model for breast cancer prognosis by combining the Pathway Deregulation Score (PDS based pathifier algorithm, Cox regression and L1-LASSO penalization method. We trained the model on a set of 236 patients with gene expression data and clinical information, and validated the performance on three diversified testing data sets of 606 patients. To evaluate the performance of the model, we conducted survival analysis of the dichotomized groups, and compared the areas under the curve based on the binary classification. The resulting prognosis genomic model is composed of fifteen pathways (e.g., P53 pathway that had previously reported cancer relevance, and it successfully differentiated relapse in the training set (log rank p-value = 6.25e-12 and three testing data sets (log rank p-value < 0.0005. Moreover, the pathway-based genomic models consistently performed better than gene-based models on all four data sets. We also find strong evidence that combining genomic information with clinical information improved the p-values of prognosis prediction by at least three orders of magnitude in comparison to using either genomic or clinical information alone. In summary, we propose a novel prognosis model that harnesses the pathway-based dysregulation as well as valuable clinical information. The selected pathways in our prognosis model are promising targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Automated selection of relevant information for notification of incident cancer cases within a multisource cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhet, V; Defossez, G; Ingrand, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a selection algorithm of relevant records for the notification of incident cases of cancer on the basis of the individual data available in a multi-source information system. This work was conducted on data for the year 2008 in the general cancer registry of Poitou-Charentes region (France). The selection algorithm hierarchizes information according to its level of relevance for tumoral topography and tumoral morphology independently. The selected data are combined to form composite records. These records are then grouped in respect with the notification rules of the International Agency for Research on Cancer for multiple primary cancers. The evaluation, based on recall, precision and F-measure confronted cases validated manually by the registry's physicians with tumours notified with and without records selection. The analysis involved 12,346 tumours validated among 11,971 individuals. The data used were hospital discharge data (104,474 records), pathology data (21,851 records), healthcare insurance data (7508 records) and cancer care centre's data (686 records). The selection algorithm permitted performances improvement for notification of tumour topography (F-measure 0.926 with vs. 0.857 without selection) and tumour morphology (F-measure 0.805 with vs. 0.750 without selection). These results show that selection of information according to its origin is efficient in reducing noise generated by imprecise coding. Further research is needed for solving the semantic problems relating to the integration of heterogeneous data and the use of non-structured information.

  8. New Approaches in Cancer Biology Can Inform the Biology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lynda; Gordon, Diana; Zelinski, Mary

    2018-03-01

    Students tend to be very interested in medical issues that affect them and their friends and family. Using cancer as a hook, the ART of Reproductive Medicine: Oncofertility curriculum (free, online, and NIH sponsored) has been developed to supplement the teaching of basic biological concepts and to connect biology and biomedical research. This approach allows integration of up-to-date information on cancer and cancer treatment, cell division, male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology, cryopreservation, fertility preservation, stem cells, ethics, and epigenetics into an existing biology curriculum. Many of the topics covered in the curriculum relate to other scientific disciplines, such as the latest developments in stem cell research including tissue bioengineering and gene therapy for inherited mitochondrial disease, how epigenetics occurs chemically to affect gene expression or suppression and how it can be passed down through the generations, and the variety of biomedical careers students could pursue. The labs are designed to be open-ended and inquiry-based, and extensions to the experiments are provided so that students can explore questions further. Case studies and ethical dilemmas are provided to encourage thoughtful discussion. In addition, each chapter of the curriculum includes links to scientific papers, additional resources on each topic, and NGSS alignment.

  9. Unmet information needs and limited health literacy in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients over the course of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Sarah Maria; Ernstmann, Nicole; Kowalski, Christoph; Pfaff, Holger; Pförtner, Timo-Kolja; Wesselmann, Simone; Enders, Anna

    2016-09-01

    To investigate unmet information needs in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients over the course of cancer treatment and its association with health literacy. We present results from a prospective, multicenter cohort study (PIAT). Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (N=1060) were surveyed directly after breast cancer surgery, 10 and 40 weeks later. Pooled linear regression modeling was employed analyzing changes in unmet information needs over time and its association with health literacy. Unmet information needs on side effects and medication and medical examination results and treatment options were high and increased during the first 10 weeks after breast cancer surgery. Considering health promotion and social issues, unmet information needs started high and decreased during post-treatment. Patients with limited health literacy had higher unmet information needs. Our results indicate a mismatch in information provision and breast cancer patients' information needs. Patients with limited health literacy may be at a distinct disadvantage in having their information needs met over the course of breast cancer treatment. Strategies are needed to reduce unmet information needs in breast cancer patients considering treatment-phase and health literacy and thereby enable them to better cope with their diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Approaches to cancer assessment in EPA's Integrated Risk Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhaus, Martin W; Gift, Jeffrey S; Hogan, Karen A; Kopylev, Leonid; Schlosser, Paul M; Kadry, Abdel-Razak

    2011-07-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program develops assessments of health effects that may result from chronic exposure to chemicals in the environment. The IRIS database contains more than 540 assessments. When supported by available data, IRIS assessments provide quantitative analyses of carcinogenic effects. Since publication of EPA's 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, IRIS cancer assessments have implemented new approaches recommended in these guidelines and expanded the use of complex scientific methods to perform quantitative dose-response assessments. Two case studies of the application of the mode of action framework from the 2005 Cancer Guidelines are presented in this paper. The first is a case study of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, as an example of a chemical with a mutagenic mode of carcinogenic action thus warranting the application of age-dependent adjustment factors for early-life exposure; the second is a case study of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, as an example of a chemical with a carcinogenic action consistent with a nonlinear extrapolation approach. The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to quantify interindividual variability and account for human parameter uncertainty as part of a quantitative cancer assessment is illustrated using a case study involving probabilistic PBPK modeling for dichloromethane. We also discuss statistical issues in assessing trends and model fit for tumor dose-response data, analysis of the combined risk from multiple types of tumors, and application of life-table methods for using human data to derive cancer risk estimates. These issues reflect the complexity and challenges faced in assessing the carcinogenic risks from exposure to environmental chemicals, and provide a view of the current trends in IRIS carcinogenicity risk assessment. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Approaches to cancer assessment in EPA's Integrated Risk Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlhaus, Martin W.; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Hogan, Karen A.; Kopylev, Leonid; Schlosser, Paul M.; Kadry, Abdel-Razak

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program develops assessments of health effects that may result from chronic exposure to chemicals in the environment. The IRIS database contains more than 540 assessments. When supported by available data, IRIS assessments provide quantitative analyses of carcinogenic effects. Since publication of EPA's 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment, IRIS cancer assessments have implemented new approaches recommended in these guidelines and expanded the use of complex scientific methods to perform quantitative dose-response assessments. Two case studies of the application of the mode of action framework from the 2005 Cancer Guidelines are presented in this paper. The first is a case study of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, as an example of a chemical with a mutagenic mode of carcinogenic action thus warranting the application of age-dependent adjustment factors for early-life exposure; the second is a case study of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, as an example of a chemical with a carcinogenic action consistent with a nonlinear extrapolation approach. The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to quantify interindividual variability and account for human parameter uncertainty as part of a quantitative cancer assessment is illustrated using a case study involving probabilistic PBPK modeling for dichloromethane. We also discuss statistical issues in assessing trends and model fit for tumor dose-response data, analysis of the combined risk from multiple types of tumors, and application of life-table methods for using human data to derive cancer risk estimates. These issues reflect the complexity and challenges faced in assessing the carcinogenic risks from exposure to environmental chemicals, and provide a view of the current trends in IRIS carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  12. Predicting Genes Involved in Human Cancer Using Network Contextual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Hossein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI networks have been widely used for the task of predicting proteins involved in cancer. Previous research has shown that functional information about the protein for which a prediction is made, proximity to specific other proteins in the PPI network, as well as local network structure are informative features in this respect. In this work, we introduce two new types of input features, reflecting additional information: (1 Functional Context: the functions of proteins interacting with the target protein (rather than the protein itself; and (2 Structural Context: the relative position of the target protein with respect to specific other proteins selected according to a novel ANOVA (analysis of variance based measure. We also introduce a selection strategy to pinpoint the most informative features. Results show that the proposed feature types and feature selection strategy yield informative features. A standard machine learning method (Naive Bayes that uses the features proposed here outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods by more than 5% with respect to F-measure. In addition, manual inspection confirms the biological relevance of the top-ranked features.

  13. Summary of the evidence of breast cancer service screening outcomes in Europe and first estimate of the benefit and harm balance sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paci, Eugenio; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    To construct a European 'balance sheet' of key outcomes of population-based mammographic breast cancer screening, to inform policy-makers, stakeholders and invited women.......To construct a European 'balance sheet' of key outcomes of population-based mammographic breast cancer screening, to inform policy-makers, stakeholders and invited women....

  14. The role of companions in aiding older cancer patients to recall medical information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Wijngaards-de Meij, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.J.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates information recall in unaccompanied and accompanied older cancer patients and their companions.Methods: One hundred cancer patients (aged >/=65 years) and 71 companions completed a recall questionnaire after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment.

  15. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Communicating cancer treatment information using the Web: utilizing the patient's perspective in website development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopmans, W.; Damman, O.C.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Haasbeek, C.J.A.; Slotman, B.J.; Senan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Online cancer information can support patients in making treatment decisions. However, such information may not be adequately tailored to the patient's perspective, particularly if healthcare professionals do not sufficiently engage patient groups when developing online information. We

  18. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... black women, but have decreased in both groups. Women who have a family history of ovarian cancer and/or certain inherited gene ... ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer: Personal history of breast cancer A woman who has had breast cancer has an increased ...

  19. Nutritional Information Provision to Cancer Patients and Their Relatives Can Promote Dietary Behavior Changes Independent of Nutritional Information Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Merel R; Winkels, Renate M; Janssen, Silvie H M; Kampman, Ellen; Beijer, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    We investigated whether obtaining nutritional information influences reported changes in dietary behavior in cancer survivors and their relatives and whether nutritional information needs influence this association. We included 239 cancer survivors and their relatives, recruited from an online panel of cancer survivors and relatives. This panel completed a survey about their experiences with nutritional information provision by healthcare professionals and the media in the period after diagnosis, their information needs regarding nutrition and cancer, and whether they changed their dietary behavior since diagnosis. The survey showed that 56% of respondents obtained nutritional information, mostly during treatment. Respondents who obtained nutritional information more often reported to have altered their dietary behavior after diagnosis. This association was not altered by having information needs. The reported changes in dietary behavior were coherent with the recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund: respondents reported to choose less products that promote weight gain, increased intake of plant foods, and decreased meat and alcohol use. Respondents who obtained nutritional information more often changed their dietary behavior, regardless whether they had nutritional information needs. This might be an indication that healthcare professionals should provide nutritional information not only to those expressing a need for nutritional information.

  20. Information needs of cancer patients: Validation of the Greek Cassileth's Information Styles Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamanou, G Despoina; Balokas, A Sotirios; Fotos, V Nikolaos; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Brokalaki, Hero

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the translated in Greek Cassileth's Information Styles Questionnaire (ISQ). It was a cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of one hundred and nine adult patients diagnosed with cancer, attending the oncology outpatient department (outpatients) or being hospitalized (inpatients), from January 2013 to September 2013, in one general hospital in Athens. Two instruments were used: The Control Preference Scale (CPS), an assessment tool to measure decision-making preferences of cancer patients and ISQ to assess the information needs of patients. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was carried out to evaluate construct validity of the ISQ. The internal consistency of subscales was analyzed with Cronbach's alpha and the association of demographics and clinical variables with the ISQ was explored using linear regression analysis. Sixty one (56%) patients were males. The mean age was 65.5 (SD = 11.9) years. Two dimensions of the ISQ were revealed. Cronbach's alpha was 0.92 for "Disease and treatment" dimension (12 of 17 items of the questionnaire) and 0.89 for "Psychological" dimension (5 of 17 items of the questionnaire). Statistical analysis showed that the patients' preferred decision making roles were associated with the ISQ dimensions. Also, age, sex, diagnosis, educational level and the existence of metastasis were associated with the score of "Disease and treatment" dimension. All the scales of ISQ, exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.70. The results showed that the Greek ISQ is a reliable and valid tool for identifying the information needs of cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cancer survival classification using integrated data sets and intermediate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shinuk; Park, Taesung; Kon, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Although numerous studies related to cancer survival have been published, increasing the prediction accuracy of survival classes still remains a challenge. Integration of different data sets, such as microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, might increase the accuracy of survival class prediction. Therefore, we suggested a machine learning (ML) approach to integrate different data sets, and developed a novel method based on feature selection with Cox proportional hazard regression model (FSCOX) to improve the prediction of cancer survival time. FSCOX provides us with intermediate survival information, which is usually discarded when separating survival into 2 groups (short- and long-term), and allows us to perform survival analysis. We used an ML-based protocol for feature selection, integrating information from miRNA and mRNA expression profiles at the feature level. To predict survival phenotypes, we used the following classifiers, first, existing ML methods, support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF), second, a new median-based classifier using FSCOX (FSCOX_median), and third, an SVM classifier using FSCOX (FSCOX_SVM). We compared these methods using 3 types of cancer tissue data sets: (i) miRNA expression, (ii) mRNA expression, and (iii) combined miRNA and mRNA expression. The latter data set included features selected either from the combined miRNA/mRNA profile or independently from miRNAs and mRNAs profiles (IFS). In the ovarian data set, the accuracy of survival classification using the combined miRNA/mRNA profiles with IFS was 75% using RF, 86.36% using SVM, 84.09% using FSCOX_median, and 88.64% using FSCOX_SVM with a balanced 22 short-term and 22 long-term survivor data set. These accuracies are higher than those using miRNA alone (70.45%, RF; 75%, SVM; 75%, FSCOX_median; and 75%, FSCOX_SVM) or mRNA alone (65.91%, RF; 63.64%, SVM; 72.73%, FSCOX_median; and 70.45%, FSCOX_SVM). Similarly in the glioblastoma multiforme data, the accuracy of miRNA/mRNA using IFS

  2. Using the Internet for information about breast cancer: a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Sophie Anna; Barr, Lester

    2013-09-01

    To identify the proportion of breast cancer patients that used the Internet for breast cancer information; to classify patterns of use based on patient demographics; and to evaluate whether using the Internet for this purpose was beneficial or problematic. Also to recognize whether a specific demographic group was more likely to experience problems when using the Internet for breast cancer information. A 10-item questionnaire was given to patients who attended the breast unit at the University Hospital of South Manchester between May and June 2011 following breast cancer treatment within the last 5 years. 200 questionnaires were completed. 50.5% of patients had used the Internet for breast cancer information, with younger (pincome (pInternet for breast cancer information, particularly those from ethnic minorities. Health professionals need to include a discussion about Internet use in consultations with breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Profile of e-patients: analysis of their cancer information-seeking from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghye; Kwon, Nahyun

    2010-10-01

    Researchers have yet to fully understand how competent e-patients are in selecting and using health information sources, or, more importantly, who e-patients are. This study attempted to uncover how cancer e-patients differ from other cancer information seekers in terms of their sociodemographic background, social networks, information competence, and selection of cancer information sources. We analyzed data from the National Cancer Institute's 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, and a series of chi-square tests showed that factors that distinguished cancer e-patients from other cancer information seekers were age, gender, education, employment status, health insurance, and membership in online support groups. They were not different in the other factors measured by the survey. Our logistic regression analysis revealed that the e-patients were older and talked about their health issues with friends or family more frequently compared with online health information seekers without cancer. While preferring information from their doctors over the Internet, e-patients used the Internet as their primary source. In contrast to previous literature, we found little evidence that e-patients were savvy health information consumers who could make informed decisions on their own health. The findings of this study addressed a need for a better design and delivery of health information literacy programs for cancer e-patients.

  4. Quality of prostate cancer screening information on the websites of nationally recognized cancer centers and health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Bogdan-Alexandru; Wakefield, Daniel V; Dove, Austin P; Dulaney, Caleb R; Marcrom, Samuel R; Schwartz, David L; Farmer, Michael R

    2017-12-24

    The purpose of this study was to survey the accessibility and quality of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening information from National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer center and public health organization Web sites. We surveyed the December 1, 2016, version of all 63 NCI-designated cancer center public Web sites and 5 major online clearinghouses from allied public/private organizations (cancer.gov, cancer.org, PCF.org, USPSTF.org, and CDC.gov). Web sites were analyzed according to a 50-item list of validated health care information quality measures. Web sites were graded by 2 blinded reviewers. Interrater agreement was confirmed by Cohen kappa coefficient. Ninety percent of Web sites addressed PSA screening. Cancer center sites covered 45% of topics surveyed, whereas organization Web sites addressed 70%. All organizational Web pages addressed the possibility of false-positive screening results; 41% of cancer center Web pages did not. Forty percent of cancer center Web pages also did not discuss next steps if a PSA test was positive. Only 6% of cancer center Web pages were rated by our reviewers as "superior" (eg, addressing >75% of the surveyed topics) versus 20% of organizational Web pages. Interrater agreement between our reviewers was high (kappa coefficient = 0.602). NCI-designated cancer center Web sites publish lower quality public information about PSA screening than sites run by major allied organizations. Nonetheless, information and communication deficiencies were observed across all surveyed sites. In an age of increasing patient consumerism, prospective prostate cancer patients would benefit from improved online PSA screening information from provider and advocacy organizations. Validated cancer patient Web educational standards remain an important, understudied priority. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Model of health information sharing behavior among patients in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragil Tri atmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second highest cause of death for women in Indonesia, despite a deadly illness, patients with cervical cancer are not desperate to survive. Instead, they are motivated to undertake positive actions, one of which is to do health informtion sharing or share information on environmental health tersekatnya. This study aims to look at how the patterns of behavior of sharing health information on cervical cancer patients, as well as the motive behind their actions the health information sharing. This study uses the method of qualitative research grounded approach. Location of the study conducted in Surabaya, while the search for informants researchers used snowball sampling. The results from this study is there are different behavior patterns of health information sharing among cervical cancer patients who have been diagnosed with advanced cervical cancer with cervical cancer at an early stage level.

  6. A Typology of Cancer Information Seeking, Scanning and Avoiding: Results from an Exploratory Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Sara; Van den Bulck, Jan; Beullens, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to (a) construct a typology of how individuals acquire cancer information, and (b) examine whether these types differ regarding socio-demographics and cancer-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Method: A standardized, cross-sectional survey among cancer diagnosed and non-diagnosed individuals in Flanders,…

  7. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genetics risk assessment and genetic counseling includes family history, psychosocial assessments, and education on hereditary cancer syndromes, testing, and risk. Get more information including the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetic testing in this summary for clinicians.

  8. Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult primary liver cancer includes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma. Treatments include surveillance, surgery, liver transplant, ablation therapy, embolization therapy, targeted therapy, and radiation therapy. Get comprehensive information about liver cancer and treatment in this clinician summary.

  9. Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy or a combination of both. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed or recurrent metastatic squamous neck cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  10. General Information about Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as those found in the following jobs: Furniture-making. Sawmill work. Woodworking (carpentry). Shoemaking. Metal-plating. ... cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells ...

  11. Historical summary of the fuel and waste handling and disposition activities of the TMI-2 Information and Examination Program (1980-1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    This report is a historical summary of the major activities conducted by the TMI-2 Information and Examination Program in managing fuel and special radioactive wastes resulting from the accident at the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2). The activities often required the development and use of advanced handling, processing, and/or disposal technologies for those wastes

  12. Origin of cancer: an information, energy and matter disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Günter Hanselmann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cells are open, highly ordered systems far away from equilibrium. For that reason, the first function of any cell is to prevent the permanent threat of disintegration described by thermo-dynamic laws and to preserve highly ordered cell characteristics like structures, cell cycle and metabolism. In that context, three basic categories play a central role - energy, matter and information. Every single of these three categories is equally important to the cell and depends on the others reciprocally. For that reason, we suggest that either energy loss (e.g. by disturbed mitochondria or disturbance of information (e.g. mutations, aneuploidy or changes in matter composition or exposition (e.g. micro-environmental changes, toxic agents can irreversibly disturb molecular mechanisms leading to increased local entropy of cellular functions and structures. In terms of physics, changes to these normally highly ordered reaction probabilities lead to a biologically irreversibly, imbalanced but thermodynamically more stable state. This primary change independent of the initiator now provokes and drives a complex interplay between energy availability, matter exposition and increasing information disturbance depending on reactions that try to overcome or stabilize this intra-cellular, irreversible disorder described by entropy. Because the return to the original ordered state is not possible due to the thermodynamic reasons cells die, or persist in an meta-stable state and enter into a self-driven adaptive and evolutionary process that generates progressive, disordered cells resulting in a broad spectrum of progeny with different characteristics, and maybe one day one of these cells will show an autonomous and aggressive behavior – a cancer cell.

  13. Personal Web home pages of adolescents with cancer: self-presentation, information dissemination, and interpersonal connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Lalita K; Beale, Ivan L

    2006-01-01

    The content of personal Web home pages created by adolescents with cancer is a new source of information about this population of potential benefit to oncology nurses and psychologists. Individual Internet elements found on 21 home pages created by youths with cancer (14-22 years old) were rated for cancer-related self-presentation, information dissemination, and interpersonal connection. Examples of adolescents' online narratives were also recorded. Adolescents with cancer used various Internet elements on their home pages for cancer-related self-presentation (eg, welcome messages, essays, personal history and diary pages, news articles, and poetry), information dissemination (e.g., through personal interest pages, multimedia presentations, lists, charts, and hyperlinks), and interpersonal connection (eg, guestbook entries). Results suggest that various elements found on personal home pages are being used by a limited number of young patients with cancer for self-expression, information access, and contact with peers.

  14. Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Kim, Jane J; Halm, Ethan A; Ballard, Rachel M; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Multiple advisory groups now recommend that high-risk smokers be screened for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given that the development of lung cancer screening programs will face many of the same issues that have challenged other cancer screening programs, the National Cancer Institute-funded Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium was used to identify lessons learned from the implementation of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening that should inform the introduction of lung cancer screening. These lessons include the importance of developing systems for identifying and recruiting eligible individuals in primary care, ensuring that screening centers are qualified and performance is monitored, creating clear communication standards for reporting screening results to referring physicians and patients, ensuring follow-up is available for individuals with abnormal test results, avoiding overscreening, remembering primary prevention, and leveraging advances in cancer genetics and immunology. Overall, this experience emphasizes that effective cancer screening is a multistep activity that requires robust strategies to initiate, report, follow up, and track each step as well as a dynamic and ongoing oversight process to revise current screening practices as new evidence regarding screening is created, new screening technologies are developed, new biological markers are identified, and new approaches to health care delivery are disseminated. Cancer 2016;122:1338-1342. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. The information needs of cancer patients in the Pretoria and Witwatersrand area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. McLoughlin

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 48 500 South Africans annually are confronted with the diagnosis of cancer. (Sitas, 1994 Judging from the literature it would seem that the acquisition of information about the various aspects of their disease is a very important coping mechanism for the cancer patient. Various studies concerning the information needs of cancer patients have been published in the USA, the UK and Australia, Similar studies have not yet been published in South Africa.

  16. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral CT scans has been shown to decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer in heavy smokers. Screening with chest x-ray or sputum cytology does not reduce lung cancer mortality. Get detailed information about lung cancer screening in this clinician summary.

  17. Prostate cancer survivors as community health educators: implications for informed decision making and cancer communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Santosh; Wray, Ricardo J; Jupka, Keri; Clarke, Ryan; Shahid, Mellve

    2013-12-01

    Recent evidence questioning the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen testing leave community-based prostate cancer (CaP) outreach programs with a dilemma between promoting screening and highlighting screening risks. CaP survivors are uniquely positioned to address this problem by drawing upon real-life experiences to share nuanced information and perspectives. While CaP survivors have historically been incorporated into outreach programs, little is known about their impact on psychosocial outcomes and their effectiveness compared to professional health educators. This study addressed these gaps through a quasi-experimental design where African American men attended a CaP screening session conducted by a health educator (HE) or survivor educator (SV). The presentation included prostate cancer statistics, CaP information, and descriptions of CaP screening tests. SV were encouraged to bolster their presentations with personal stories whereas HE maintained fidelity to the curriculum content. All participants completed pre- and post-test questionnaires. Our sample comprised a total of 63 participants (HE group = 32; SV group = 31) with an age range of 40-70 years. Decision self-efficacy increased significantly in the SV group (p = 0.01) whereas perceived screening risks reduced significantly in the HE group (p communication efforts confronted by the CaP screening controversy. We discuss conceptual and programmatic implications of our findings and present directions for future research.

  18. HBCUs inform students and the community about cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julian S; Williams, Deloris G; Scott, Dolores B; Madison, Shirley B; Comer, Kimberly D; Haynes, Joseph A

    2009-12-01

    In summary, HBCUs can no longer remain reactive, but must spearhead efforts to increase both the health of the student body, as well as the community at large. HBCUs should collaboratively initiate a "Call to Action", whereby policies and programs could be created to aid in the prevention of HPV and other STIs. To support this action, HBCUs could more actively pursue funding sources that support both universities and the communities in which they exist. Student orientation could be redefined to include short courses in STI awareness and prevention, and be communicated in a manner that is professional, yet engaging to students. Moreover, university departments which have an interest in the health of communities should supervise these efforts. The knowledge of university faculty members within departments of Nursing, Social Work, Public Health, Rehabilitation Counseling and Physical Education should extend beyond the classroom and into the community. Clark commented, "Perhaps course content across departments could be revised to encompass an increased focus on practice skills which support awareness and prevention efforts". Through employment, volunteerism and student internships, each of these disciplines have established relationships with the surrounding community and understand the associated critical needs. Such relationships provide the best environment for both the creation and implementation of services, and provide students with a model of how to "give back" to the community by utilizing their education. Campus health centers should be more prevention-driven beyond the distribution of condoms and pamphlets, to collaborate with local area high schools and community-based organizations to create an information network accessible to students and community residents. Additionally, health centers should promote the availability of HPV vaccination, which depending on state of residence and age, may be free or available at a discounted cost. According to Bynum

  19. Cancer Information Seeking Among Adult New Zealanders: a National Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosalina; McNoe, Bronwen; Iosua, Ella; Reeder, Anthony; Egan, Richard; Marsh, Louise; Robertson, Lindsay; Maclennan, Brett; Dawson, Anna; Quigg, Robin; Petersen, Anne-Cathrine

    2018-06-01

    Organisations seeking to establish themselves as leading cancer information sources for the public need to understand patterns and motivators for information seeking. This study describes cancer information seeking among New Zealanders through a national cross-sectional survey conducted in 2014/15 with a population-based sample of adults (18 years and over). Participants were asked if they had sought information about cancer during the past 12 months, the type of information they sought, what prompted them to look for information and ways of getting information they found helpful. Telephone interviews were completed by 1064 participants (588 females, 476 males, 64% response rate). Of these, 33.8% of females and 23.3% of males (total, 29.2%) had searched for information about cancer over the past year. A search was most frequently prompted by a cancer diagnosis of a family member or friend (43.3%), a desire to educate themselves (17.5%), experience of potential symptoms or a positive screening test (9.4%), family history of cancer (8.9%) or the respondent's own cancer diagnosis (7.7%). Across the cancer control spectrum, the information sought was most commonly about treatment and survival (20.2%), symptoms/early detection (17.2%) or risk factors (14.2%), although many were general or non-specific queries (50.0%). The internet was most commonly identified as a helpful source of information (71.7%), followed by health professionals (35.8%), and reading material (e.g. books, pamphlets) (14.7%).This study provides a snapshot of cancer information seeking in New Zealand, providing valuable knowledge to help shape resource delivery to better meet the diverse needs of information seekers and address potential unmet needs, where information seeking is less prevalent.

  20. Internet Support and Information for Women with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owen, Jason

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods of providing psychosocial interventions for cancer patients are associated with positive patient outcomes but have limited overall impact attributable to low participation rates...

  1. Internet Support and Information for Women with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owen, Jason

    2001-01-01

    Traditional methods of providing psychosocial interventions for cancer patients are associated with positive patient outcomes but have limited overall impact attributable to low participation rates...

  2. Internet Support and Information for Women with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owen, Jason

    2003-01-01

    A large body of literature indicates that psychosocial support interventions for cancer patients, which provide specific cognitive-behavioral and coping skills training, are effective in the reduction...

  3. Covering women's greatest health fear: breast cancer information in consumer magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Childers, Kim; Edwards, Heather; Grobmyer, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    Women identify consumer magazines as a key source of information on many health topics, including breast cancer, which continues to rank as women's greatest personal health fear. This study examined the comprehensiveness and accuracy of breast cancer information provided in 555 articles published in 17 consumer magazines from 2002 through 2007. Accuracy of information was determined for 33 key breast cancer facts identified by an expert panel as important information for women to know. The results show that only 7 of 33 key facts were mentioned in at least 5% of the articles. These facts all dealt with breast cancer risk factors, screening, and detection; none of the key facts related to treatment or outcomes appeared in at least 5% of the articles. Other topics (not key facts) mentioned centered around controllable risk factors, support for breast cancer patients, and chemotherapy treatment. The majority of mentions of key facts were coded as fully accurate, although as much as 44% of mentions of some topics (the link between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer) were coded as inaccurate or only partially accurate. The magazines were most likely to emphasize family history of breast cancer or genetic characteristics as risk factors for breast cancers; family history was twice as likely to be discussed as increasing age, which is in fact the most important risk factor for breast cancer other than being female. Magazine coverage may contribute to women's inaccurate perceptions of their breast cancer risk.

  4. European Medicines Agency approval summary: Zaltrap for the treatment of patients with oxaliplatin-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanel, Stefan Cristian; Sjöberg, Jan; Salmonson, Tomas; Foggi, Paolo; Caleno, Mariapaola; Melchiorri, Daniela; Gravanis, Iordanis; Tzogani, Kyriaki; Pignatti, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    On 1 February 2013, a marketing authorisation valid throughout the European Union was issued for aflibercept (Zaltrap) in combination with irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid chemotherapy for the treatment of adults with metastatic colorectal cancer resistant to or progressive after an oxaliplatin-containing regimen. Aflibercept is a recombinant fusion protein which blocks the activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and the proliferation of endothelial cells, acting as a soluble decoy receptor that binds to VEGF-A with higher affinity than its native receptors, as well as placental growth factor and VEGF-B. The use of aflibercept was studied in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who had previously been treated with an oxaliplatin-based treatment with or without prior bevacizumab. Aflibercept (n=612) was compared with placebo (n=614), both in combination with FOLFIRI (infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan). The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival (OS). The median OS in the intent-to-treat population was 13.5 months in subjects treated with aflibercept compared with 12.1 months for subjects in the control arm (stratified HR=0.817, 95% CI 0.714 to 0.935, stratified pvalue=0.0032). The frequency of adverse events was higher in the aflibercept arm compared with the placebo arm, reflecting the toxicity profile of anti-VEGF agents in combination with chemotherapy. This paper is based on the scientific review of the application leading to approval of aflibercept in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information for this product are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). Trial registration number NCT00561470, Results.

  5. Evolving Information Needs among Colon, Breast, and Prostate Cancer Survivors: Results from a Longitudinal Mixed-Effects Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy S L; Nagler, Rebekah H; Hornik, Robert C; DeMichele, Angela

    2015-07-01

    This study describes how cancer survivors' information needs about recurrence, late effects, and family risks of cancer evolve over the course of their survivorship period. Three annual surveys were conducted from 2006 to 2008 in a cohort of Pennsylvania cancer survivors diagnosed with colon, breast, or prostate cancer in 2005 (round 1, N = 2,013; round 2, N = 1,293; round 3, N = 1,128). Outcomes were information seeking about five survivorship topics. Key predictors were survey round, cancer diagnosis, and the interaction between these variables. Mixed-effects logistic regression analyses were performed to predict information seeking about each topic, adjusting for demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and clustering of repeated observations within individuals. Information seeking about reducing risks of cancer recurrence was the most frequently reported topic across survivors and over time. Breast cancer survivors were more likely to seek about survivorship topics at round 1 compared with other survivors. In general, information seeking declined over time, but cancer-specific patterns emerged: the decline was sharpest for breast cancer survivors, whereas in later years female colon cancer survivors actually sought more information (about how to reduce the risk of family members getting colon cancer or a different cancer). Cancer survivors' information needs varied over time depending on the topic, and these trends differed by cancer type. Clinicians may need to intervene at distinct points during the survivorship period with information to address concerns about cancer recurrence, late effects, and family members' risks. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Syazwani; Muda, Zurina

    2015-05-01

    Most Malaysians do not realize that they are suffer from a chronic disease until the disease is confirmed to be at a critical stage. This is because lack of awareness among Malaysians about a chronic disease especially in a childhood cancer. Based on report of the National Cancer Council (MAKNA),11 million adults and children suffered with cancer and 6 million of them die in a worldwide. Lack of public exposure to this disease leads to health problems to their children. Information model design health service childhood cancer for p arents and caregivers using an android application medium can be used by a doctor to deliver an information of cancer to the parents and caregivers. The development of this information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers are using an integration of health promotion theory, spiral model and lean model to form a new model that can be used as a model design content of health service. The method using in this study are by an interview technique and questionnaires along the study was conducted. Hopefully the production of this information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers using an android apps as a medium can help parents, caregivers and public to know more about information of childhood cancer and at the same time can gain an awareness among them and this app also can be used as a medium for doctors to deliver an information to the parents and caregivers.

  7. Internet Information for Patients on Cancer Diets - an Analysis of German Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herth, Natalie; Kuenzel, Ulrike; Liebl, Patrick; Keinki, Christian; Zell, Joerg; Huebner, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Internet has become an important source of information for cancer patients. Various cancer diets that are publicized on the Web promise significant benefits. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of online patient information about cancer diets. A patient's search for 'cancer diets' on German websites was simulated using the search engine Google. The websites were evaluated utilizing a standardized instrument with formal and content aspects. An analysis of 60 websites revealed that websites from nonprofit associations as well as self-help groups offer the best content and formal ranking. Websites whose owners aim to make a profit, practices that offer cancer diet therapies, and newspapers received the poorest quality score. The majority of content provided on the Web gets published by profit-oriented content groups. The divergence between profit-driven websites offering low-quality content and the few trustworthy websites on cancer diets is enormous. The information given online about cancer diets may turn out to be a hazardous pitfall. In order to present evidence-based information about cancer diets, online information should be replenished to create a more accurate picture and give higher visibility to the right information. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  8. Cancer pain management: Basic information for the young pain physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk-benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain.

  9. Symposium summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, G.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is provided of the issues discussed at the climate change implications for water and ecological resources conference, and recommendations that came out of the conference. The objectives of the meeting were to present and discuss results of recent climate change experiments undertaken in Canada; evaluate a variety of climate models and impact analyses and to develop methods and strategies for future study; and to establish working linkages between modellers and analysts in the fields of climate, hydrology, and ecosystem research, as well as between social scientists and policy makers interested in the implications of climate change. Recommendations were made in the five areas of research, monitoring, risk assessment, policy and information dissemination. Additional research should be undertaken to foster improved understanding of relationships between climate, climate change, and ecological and human processes. A suitable monitoring program, including a national wetlands monitoring program, should be established. Risk assessments should be undertaken to evaluate vulnerabilities of ecosystem components, to assess options, and to provide the information required to develop and implement appropriate policy objectives. The impacts of a range of public policy responses and feedbacks should be assessed. The dissemination of well-targeted and accurate information is vital if basic societal attitudes regarding the value of water and ecosystems are to be changed

  10. Health information sources for different types of information used by Chinese patients with cancer and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bo; Su, Zhaohui; Liu, Yihao; Wang, Mo; Zhang, Ming

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the information sources of Chinese patients with cancer and their family caregivers, yet this knowledge is critical for providing patient-centred care. To assess and compare the information sources used by Chinese patients with cancer and their family caregivers. The validated Health Information Wants Questionnaire (HIWQ) was translated and administered in March 2014. The oncology department of a general hospital in south-west China. A convenience sample of 198 individuals, including 79 patients with cancer (mean age=55.24, SD=13.80) and 119 family caregivers (mean age=46.83, SD=14.61). Ratings on the HIWQ items assessing information sources for different types of information. The interaction between information source and group was significant (F 3,576 =6.32, Pinformation than patients from the Internet. Caregivers and patients did not differ in the amount of information they obtained from doctors/nurses, interpersonal contacts or mass media. The interaction between information type and information source was significant (F 18,3456 =6.38, Pinformation of all types from doctors/nurses than from the other three sources and obtained more information from interpersonal contacts than from mass media or the Internet. The information sources of Chinese patients with cancer and their family caregivers were similar, with an important difference that caregivers obtained more online information than patients. These findings have important implications for patient care and education in China where the family typically plays a major role in the care and decision making. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The impact of geographic unit of analysis on socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival and distant summary stage - a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna E; Morrell, Stephen; Aranda, Sanchia; Roder, David; You, Hui; Niyonsenga, Theo; Walton, Richard; Baker, Deborah; Currow, David

    2016-12-13

    When using area-level disadvantage measures, size of geographic unit can have major effects on recorded socioeconomic cancer disparities. This study examined the extent of changes in recorded socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival and distant stage when the measure of socioeconomic disadvantage was based on smaller Census Collection Districts (CDs) instead of Statistical Local Areas (SLAs). Population-based New South Wales Cancer Registry data were used to identify cases diagnosed with primary invasive cancer in 2000-2008 (n=264,236). Logistic regression and competing risk regression modelling were performed to examine socioeconomic differences in odds of distant stage and hazard of cancer death for all sites combined and separately for breast, prostate, colorectal and lung cancers. For all sites collectively, associations between socioeconomic disadvantage and cancer survival and distant stage were stronger when the CD-based socioeconomic disadvantage measure was used compared with the SLA-based measure. The CD-based measure showed a more consistent socioeconomic gradient with a linear upward trend of risk of cancer death/distant stage with increasing socioeconomic disadvantage. Site-specific analyses provided similar findings for the risk of death but less consistent results for the likelihood of distant stage. The use of socioeconomic disadvantage measure based on the smallest available spatial unit should be encouraged in the future. Implications for Public Health: Disadvantage measures based on small spatial units can more accurately identify socioeconomic cancer disparities to inform priority settings in service planning. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. Information Seeking and Satisfaction with Information Sources Among Spouses of Men with Newly Diagnosed Local-Stage Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Aasthaa; Koepl, Lisel M; Fedorenko, Catherine R; Li, Chunyu; Smith, Judith Lee; Hall, Ingrid J; Penson, David F; Ramsey, Scott D

    2018-04-01

    Information sources about prostate cancer treatment and outcomes are typically designed for patients. Little is known about the availability and utility of information for partners. The objectives of our study were to evaluate information sources used by partners to understand prostate cancer management options, their perceived usefulness, and the relationship between sources used and satisfaction with treatment experience. A longitudinal survey of female partners of men newly diagnosed with local-stage prostate cancer was conducted in three different geographic regions. Partners and associated patients were surveyed at baseline (after patient diagnosis but prior to receiving therapy) and at 12 months following diagnosis. Information sources included provider, literature, friends or family members, Internet websites, books, traditional media, and support groups. Utility of an information source was defined as whether the partner would recommend it to caregivers of other patients with local-stage prostate cancer. Our study cohort included 179 partner-patient pairs. At diagnosis, partners consulted an average of 4.6 information sources. Non-Hispanic white partners were more likely than others to use friends and family as an information source (OR = 2.44, 95% CI (1.04, 5.56)). More educated partners were less likely to use support groups (OR = 0.31, 95% CI (0.14, 0.71)). At 12-month follow-up, partners were less likely to recommend books (OR = 0.23, 95% CI (0.11, 0.49)) compared to baseline. Partners consulted a large number of information sources in researching treatment options for local-stage prostate cancer and the types of sources accessed varied by race/ethnicity and educational attainment. Additional resources to promote selection of high-quality non-provider information sources are warranted to enable partners to better aid patients in their treatment decision-making process.

  13. Wisconsin’s Environmental Public Health Tracking Network: Information Systems Design for Childhood Cancer Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Lawrence P.; Anderson, Henry A.; Busby, Brian; Bekkedal, Marni; Sieger, Thomas; Stephenson, Laura; Knobeloch, Lynda; Werner, Mark; Imm, Pamela; Olson, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    In this article we describe the development of an information system for environmental childhood cancer surveillance. The Wisconsin Cancer Registry annually receives more than 25,000 incident case reports. Approximately 269 cases per year involve children. Over time, there has been considerable community interest in understanding the role the environment plays as a cause of these cancer cases. Wisconsin’s Public Health Information Network (WI-PHIN) is a robust web portal integrating both Health Alert Network and National Electronic Disease Surveillance System components. WI-PHIN is the information technology platform for all public health surveillance programs. Functions include the secure, automated exchange of cancer case data between public health–based and hospital-based cancer registrars; web-based supplemental data entry for environmental exposure confirmation and hypothesis testing; automated data analysis, visualization, and exposure–outcome record linkage; directories of public health and clinical personnel for role-based access control of sensitive surveillance information; public health information dissemination and alerting; and information technology security and critical infrastructure protection. For hypothesis generation, cancer case data are sent electronically to WI-PHIN and populate the integrated data repository. Environmental data are linked and the exposure–disease relationships are explored using statistical tools for ecologic exposure risk assessment. For hypothesis testing, case–control interviews collect exposure histories, including parental employment and residential histories. This information technology approach can thus serve as the basis for building a comprehensive system to assess environmental cancer etiology. PMID:15471739

  14. An exploratory study on the information needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos P. Kassianos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the information needs of men with prostate cancer and their partners retrospectively at various points in the treatment process. An online questionnaire was used to collect information from men with prostate cancer and their partners about information needs, and when these developed. Readers of a Prostate Care Cookbook and members of a Prostate Cancer Charity were invited to participate: 73 men with prostate cancer and 25 partners completed the questionnaire. Responses showed that participants develop their information needs close to diagnosis. Less educated men with prostate cancer and partners developed their needs closer to the time after diagnosis than those with higher education. Partners develop an interest on information related to treatment and interaction earlier than patients. Patients prioritised treatment and disease-specific information. Patients and partners differ in how their information needs develop. Medical information is prioritized by patients as opposed to practical information by partners. Health care provision can be tailored to meet the different needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners at different times in the treatment process

  15. Culturally-Relevant Online Cancer Education Modules Empower Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners to Disseminate Cancer Information and Reduce Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Katie; Revels, Laura; Cueva, Melany; Lanier, Anne P; Dignan, Mark; Viswanath, K; Fung, Teresa T; Geller, Alan C

    2017-04-12

    To address a desire for timely, medically accurate cancer education in rural Alaska, ten culturally relevant online learning modules were developed with, and for, Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps). The project was guided by the framework of Community-Based Participatory Action Research, honored Indigenous Ways of Knowing, and was informed by Empowerment Theory. A total of 428 end-of-module evaluation surveys were completed by 89 unique Alaska CHA/Ps between January and December 2016. CHA/Ps shared that as a result of completing the modules, they were empowered to share cancer information with their patients, families, friends, and communities, as well as engage in cancer risk reduction behaviors such as eating healthier, getting cancer screenings, exercising more, and quitting tobacco. CHA/Ps also reported the modules were informative and respectful of their diverse cultures. These results from end-of-module evaluation surveys suggest that the collaboratively developed, culturally relevant, online cancer education modules have empowered CHA/Ps to reduce cancer risk and disseminate cancer information. "brought me to tears couple of times, and I think it will help in destroying the silence that surrounds cancer".

  16. Breast cancer information on the internet: analysis of accessibility and accuracy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, E M

    2012-02-18

    Studies show internet sourced information often has poor accuracy. However, it is rapidly becoming a major source of patient information. Our aim was to assess accuracy of breast cancer-related information on the internet. The top five breast cancer-related search terms were identified using the commercial program "Wordtracker". These terms were searched using the search-engine "Google" and the top 100 webpages per topic analysed for applicability and accuracy of information. Overall 500 webpages were analysed. 42% were inapplicable to the question asked. Applicable accuracy rates were variable amongst the five terms: "breast cancer symptoms" 84%, "breast cancer care" 87%, "breast cancer stage" 88%, "breast cancer survival" 91% and "breast cancer signs" 78%. Educational websites were more likely to be accurate(p < 0.001) and interest group administered websites less likely to be accurate(p = 0.018) than other websites. Finding accurate breast cancer information on the internet is difficult due to large numbers of inapplicable unregulated websites preferentially returned via search engines.

  17. Perspectives of patients with haematological cancer on how clinicians meet their information needs: "Managing" information versus "giving" it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Kirsten; Young, Bridget; Kalakonda, Nagesh; Salmon, Peter

    2018-03-23

    Practitioners treating patients with haematological cancers have extensive clinical information available to give to patients, and patients need to be informed. However, many patients want to be protected from having information that is too detailed or threatening. To illuminate how practitioners can address this dilemma and help patients feel appropriately informed, we explored patients' experience of feeling informed or uninformed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 patients who had been diagnosed with haematological cancer and had recently received results from clinical investigations or from evaluations of treatment response. Inductive and interpretive analysis of the transcribed audio-recorded interviews drew on constant comparison. Patients described the need for practitioners carefully to manage the information that they provided, and many felt alarmed by information that they did not experience as having been managed for them. A few patients who had difficulty trusting practitioners were not content with the information provided. These findings can be understood using attachment theory, whereby practitioners' careful management of information demonstrates their care for patients, and patients' trust in the practitioner enables them to feel informed. It follows that, when patients do not feel informed, the solution will not necessarily be more information but might be to help patients feel more secure in a caring clinical relationship. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Cancer) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell) includes the hereditary cancer syndromes von Hippel-Lindau disease, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, and hereditary papillary renal carcinoma. Get comprehensive information on these syndromes in this clinician summary.

  19. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and female cancer: Informing the patients

    OpenAIRE

    Racho?, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Breast and uterine cancer are the most frequent female gender related neoplasms whose growth is mostly estrogen dependent. Therefore, any EDC exhibiting estrogenic effects may increase the risk of these two malignancies. This review focuses on the potential role of EDCs with estrogenic potential on the risk of breast and uterine neoplasms but also points to the possible role of the exposure to EDCs in the pathogenesis of ovarian and cervical cancer. It also underlines the necessity of informi...

  20. E-loyalty towards a cancer information website: applying a theoretical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutzen, Rik; Beekers, Nienke; van Eenbergen, Mies; Becker, Monique; Jongen, Lilian; van Osch, Liesbeth

    2014-06-01

    To provide more insight into user perceptions related to e-loyalty towards a cancer information website. This is needed to assure adequate provision of high quality information during the full process of cancer treatment-from diagnosis to after care-and an important first step towards optimizing cancer information websites in order to promote e-loyalty. Participants were cancer patients (n = 63) and informal caregivers (n = 202) that visited a website providing regional information about cancer care for all types of cancer. Subsequently, they filled out a questionnaire assessing e-loyalty towards the website and user perceptions (efficiency, effectiveness, active trust and enjoyment) based on a theoretical framework derived from the field of e-commerce. A structural equation model was constructed to test the relationships between user perceptions and e-loyalty. Participants in general could find the information they were looking for (efficiency), thought it was relevant (effectiveness) and that they could act upon it (active trust) and thought the visit itself was pleasant (enjoyment). Effectiveness and enjoyment were both positively related with e-loyalty, but this was mediated by active trust. Efficiency was positively related with e-loyalty. The explained variance of e-loyalty was high (R(2)  = 0.70). This study demonstrates that the importance of user perceptions is not limited to fields such as e-commerce but is also present within the context of cancer information websites. The high information need among participants might explain the positive relationship between efficiency and e-loyalty. Therefore, cancer information websites need to foster easy search and access of information provided. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Hazmat Yearly Incident Summary Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Series of Incident data and summary statistics reports produced which provide statistical information on incidents by type, year, geographical location, and others....

  2. Patterns of Internet-based health information seeking in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claridy, Mechelle D; Hudson, Melissa M; Caplan, Lee; Mitby, Pauline A; Leisenring, Wendy; Smith, Selina A; Robison, Leslie L; Mertens, Ann C

    2018-05-01

    To assess where, when, and why survivors of childhood cancer seek health information. Data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort (n = 1386) and Health Information National Trends Survey (n = 2385) were analyzed to determine the health information seeking strategies of childhood cancer survivors. Descriptive frequencies, χ 2 analyses, t-tests, and multivariable logistic regression models were used. To seek health-related information for themselves, 54% (n = 742) of the childhood survivors reported using the Internet in the past 12 months, compared to 45% of the general population (adjusted OR: 2.76; 95% CI: 2.40-3.19). Childhood cancer survivors who used the Internet for health information were more likely to be female, between the ages of 18-34, have received some college education or be a college graduate, and report being in poor health. Although survivors were less likely than the general population to trust health information from the Internet (P < 0.01), they indicated that they would like a secure website that uses information from their medical records to provide individualized health-related information. The use of the Internet to access health information among the childhood cancer survivors was over 50%. Information on late effects was a high priority for most survivors, as was their interest in websites related to late effects and a website on patient information tailored to personal situations. Identification of factors associated with searching the Internet for cancer information may provide direction for development of effective cancer communication interventions for this at-risk population. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. YouTube as a Source of Information on Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Janak; Sharma, Priyadarshani; Arjyal, Lubina; Uprety, Dipesh

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurate information about cervical cancer to general public can lower the burden of the disease including its mortality. We aimed to look at the quality of information available in YouTube for cervical cancer. We searched YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) for videos using the keyword Cervical cancer on November 12, 2015. Videos were then analyzed for their source and content of information. We studied 172 videos using the keyword Cervical cancer on November 12, 2015. We found that there were videos describing the personal stories, risk factors, and the importance of screening. However, videos discussing all the aspects of cancers were lacking. Likewise, videos from the reputed organization were also lacking. Although there were numerous videos available in cervical cancer, videos from reputed organizations including Center for Disease Control and Prevention, American Cancer Society, and World Health Organization were lacking. We strongly believe that quality videos from such organizations via YouTube can help lower the burden of disease.

  4. Factors related to cancer information scanning and seeking behavior among high school students in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kye, Su Yeon; Yun, E Hwa; Park, Keeho

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed to determine the relationship between cancer information scanning and seeking experience of adolescents and cancer preventive behavior, perceived cancer risk, and levels of cancer- related knowledge. The study sample comprised 1,000 second-year students from 6 high schools: the general and vocational school systems were each represented by 1 boys', 1 girls', and 1 coeducational high school. In July 2011, trained researchers visited each classroom, explained the purpose of the study, distributed questionnaires to the students who agreed to participate, instructed them to complete the survey by self-reporting, and collected the completed questionnaires. The students who attended general high schools (as compared with vocational high schools), earned higher grades, consumed more vegetables, had a higher perceived cancer risk, and answered the cancer-related questions more correctly and had more cancer information scanning and seeking experience. These results reinforce the importance of cancer prevention health education. Furthermore, the results may help in preparing a strategy that enables people to acquire accurate cancer-related information easily and quickly.

  5. Comprehensive Molecular Profiling of African-American Prostate Cancer to Inform on Prognosis and Disease Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations...2% Movember-Prostate Cancer Foundation $250,000/yr Challenge Award Interrogating DNA Repair Defects to Improve Management...Improve Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer Goal(s): Comprehensively interrogate DNA repair alterations in both AR-positive and AR-negative CRPC

  6. Does age really matter? Recall of information presented to newly referred patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Butow, P.N.; van Weert, J.C.M.; van Dulmen, S.; Devine, R.J.; Heeren, T.J.; Bensing, J.M.; Tattersall, M.H.N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine age- and age-related differences in recall of information provided during oncology consultations. Patients and Methods Two hundred sixty patients with cancer diagnosed with heterogeneous cancers, seeing a medical or radiation oncologist for the first time, participated in the

  7. Does age really matter? Recall of information presented to newly referred patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Butow, P.N.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Dulmen, S. van; Devine, R.J.; Heeren, T.J.; Bensing, J.M.; Tattersall, M.H.N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine age- and age-related differences in recall of information provided during oncology consultations. Patients and Methods: Two hundred sixty patients with cancer diagnosed with heterogeneous cancers, seeing a medical or radiation oncologist for the first time, participated in the

  8. Informing family members about a hereditary predisposition to cancer: attitudes and practices among clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, Y.; Menko, F.H.; Westerman, M.J.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    If a hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer or breast cancer is diagnosed, most guidelines state that clinical geneticists should request index patients to inform their at-risk relatives about the existence of this condition in their family, thus enabling them to consider presymptomatic

  9. Correlates of Cancer Information Overload: Focusing on Individual Ability and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jiyoung; Lee, Chul-joo; Jensen, Jakob D

    2016-01-01

    The present study defined cancer information overload (CIO) as an aversive disposition wherein a person is confused and overwhelmed by cancer information, which occurs when he or she fails to effectively categorize new information due to a lack of resources for effective learning. Based on the definition and informed by previous studies on information overload and the cognitive mediation model, we hypothesized that low ability and motivation to process cancer information would lead to CIO. We used education level and trait anxiety as factors related to ability. Cancer history and the use of active media channels (such as the Internet and print media) were adopted as motivational factors. Four samples (three from the United States and one from South Korea) were used to explore the relationship between ability/motivation and CIO. Among them, only Sample 4 participants answered questions about stomach cancer, and other participants were asked about cancer in general. In all four samples, trait anxiety was positively associated with CIO. Health information use from active media channels (print or the Internet) was negatively associated with CIO in three samples. The associations between family history and CIO, and between education and CIO, were found in two samples. In short, the present study demonstrated that CIO partly depends on individual ability and motivation, thereby showing that CIO is influenced by personal characteristics as well as environmental factors.

  10. Evaluation plan : national advanced rural transportation systems : field operational tests of traveler information services in tourism areas : executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This evaluation addresses technical challenges of developing advanced traveler information systems (ATIS) in rural environments, institutional benefits and issues, usefulness of the information to the traveling public, effectiveness of various media ...

  11. Patterns of information-seeking for cancer on the internet: an analysis of real world data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishai Ofran

    Full Text Available Although traditionally the primary information sources for cancer patients have been the treating medical team, patients and their relatives increasingly turn to the Internet, though this source may be misleading and confusing. We assess Internet searching patterns to understand the information needs of cancer patients and their acquaintances, as well as to discern their underlying psychological states. We screened 232,681 anonymous users who initiated cancer-specific queries on the Yahoo Web search engine over three months, and selected for study users with high levels of interest in this topic. Searches were partitioned by expected survival for the disease being searched. We compared the search patterns of anonymous users and their contacts. Users seeking information on aggressive malignancies exhibited shorter search periods, focusing on disease- and treatment-related information. Users seeking knowledge regarding more indolent tumors searched for longer periods, alternated between different subjects, and demonstrated a high interest in topics such as support groups. Acquaintances searched for longer periods than the proband user when seeking information on aggressive (compared to indolent cancers. Information needs can be modeled as transitioning between five discrete states, each with a unique signature representing the type of information of interest to the user. Thus, early phases of information-seeking for cancer follow a specific dynamic pattern. Areas of interest are disease dependent and vary between probands and their contacts. These patterns can be used by physicians and medical Web site authors to tailor information to the needs of patients and family members.

  12. Patterns of information-seeking for cancer on the internet: an analysis of real world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofran, Yishai; Paltiel, Ora; Pelleg, Dan; Rowe, Jacob M; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2012-01-01

    Although traditionally the primary information sources for cancer patients have been the treating medical team, patients and their relatives increasingly turn to the Internet, though this source may be misleading and confusing. We assess Internet searching patterns to understand the information needs of cancer patients and their acquaintances, as well as to discern their underlying psychological states. We screened 232,681 anonymous users who initiated cancer-specific queries on the Yahoo Web search engine over three months, and selected for study users with high levels of interest in this topic. Searches were partitioned by expected survival for the disease being searched. We compared the search patterns of anonymous users and their contacts. Users seeking information on aggressive malignancies exhibited shorter search periods, focusing on disease- and treatment-related information. Users seeking knowledge regarding more indolent tumors searched for longer periods, alternated between different subjects, and demonstrated a high interest in topics such as support groups. Acquaintances searched for longer periods than the proband user when seeking information on aggressive (compared to indolent) cancers. Information needs can be modeled as transitioning between five discrete states, each with a unique signature representing the type of information of interest to the user. Thus, early phases of information-seeking for cancer follow a specific dynamic pattern. Areas of interest are disease dependent and vary between probands and their contacts. These patterns can be used by physicians and medical Web site authors to tailor information to the needs of patients and family members.

  13. Explaining and improving breast cancer information acquisition among African American women in the Deep South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Lewis, Charkarra; Ross, Levi; Johnson, Jarrett; Hastrup, Janice L; Green, B Lee; Kohler, Connie L

    2012-06-01

    A major challenge facing contemporary cancer educators is how to optimize the dissemination of breast cancer prevention and control information to African American women in the Deep South who are believed to be cancer free. The purpose of this research was to provide insight into the breast cancer information-acquisition experiences of African American women in Alabama and Mississippi and to make recommendations on ways to better reach members of this high-risk, underserved population. Focus group methodology was used in a repeated, cross-sectional research design with 64 African American women, 35 years old or older who lived in one of four urban or rural counties in Alabama and Mississippi. Axial-coded themes emerged around sources of cancer information, patterns of information acquisition, characteristics of preferred sources, and characteristics of least-preferred sources. It is important to invest in lay health educators to optimize the dissemination of breast cancer information to African American women who are believed to be cancer free in the Deep South.

  14. Family Caregivers in Cancer: Roles and Challenges (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family caregivers, also called informal caregivers, play an important role in treatment planning, decision making, and managing cancer care. Get comprehensive information on the importance of caregiver roles and concerns and helpful interventions for caregivers in this summary for clinicians.

  15. Internet access and online cancer information seeking among Latino immigrants from safety net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsky, Claire; Luta, George; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Huerta, Elmer E; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2013-01-01

    Internet use is widespread, but little is known about Internet use for cancer information among Latinos, especially those who rely on safety net clinics. The authors investigated access to and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among low income, immigrant Latinos predominately from Central and South America. A cross-sectional study of 1,273 Latinos 21 years and older attending safety net clinics or health fairs was conducted from June 2007 to November 2008. The authors used logistic regression models to evaluate associations of age, acculturation, psychosocial factors and other covariates with Internet access and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among those with access. Of the sample, 44% reported Internet access. Higher information self-efficacy and greater trust in the Internet were independently associated with Internet access (p = .05 and p Internet use for cancer information, considering covariates. In addition, those with high (vs. low) perceived risk of cancer (OR = 1.76; 95% CI [1.14, 2.73]; p = .01) and higher levels of trust in online health information (OR = 1.47 per one-point increase; 95% [CI 1.19, 1.82]; p = .0004) were more likely to intend to seek cancer information online. These findings that Internet access is fairly high in the immigrant Latino population and that the Internet is a trusted source of cancer information suggest that the Internet may be a channel for cancer control interventions.

  16. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Status of implementation and organization of cancer screening in The European Union Member States-Summary results from the second European screening report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Partha; Ponti, Antonio; Anttila, Ahti; Ronco, Guglielmo; Senore, Carlo; Vale, Diama Bhadra; Segnan, Nereo; Tomatis, Mariano; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Primic Žakelj, Maja; Dillner, Joakim; Elfström, Klara Miriam; Lönnberg, Stefan; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2018-01-01

    The second report on the implementation status of cancer screening in European Union (EU) was published in 2017. The report described the implementation status, protocols and organization (updated till 2016) and invitation coverage (for index year 2013) of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening in the EU. Experts in screening programme monitoring (N = 80) from the EU Member States having access to requisite information in their respective countries provided data on breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening through online questionnaires. Data was collected for screening performed in the framework of publicly mandated programmes only. Filled in questionnaires were received from 26 Member States for all three sites and from one Member State for breast cancer only. Substantial improvement in screening implementation using population-based approach was documented. Among the age-eligible women, 94.7% were residents of Member States implementing or planning population-based breast cancer screening in 2016, compared to 91.6% in 2007. The corresponding figures for cervical cancer screening were 72.3 and 51.3% in 2016 and 2007, respectively. Most significant improvement was documented for colorectal cancer screening with roll-out ongoing or completed in 17 Member States in 2016, compared to only five in 2007. So the access to population-based screening increased to 72.4% of the age-eligible populations in 2016 as opposed to only 42.6% in 2007. The invitation coverage was highly variable, ranging from 0.2-111% for breast cancer, 7.6-105% for cervical cancer and 1.8-127% for colorectal cancer in the target populations. In spite of the considerable progress, much work remains to be done to achieve optimal effectiveness. Continued monitoring, regular feedbacks and periodic reporting are needed to ensure the desired impacts of the programmes. © 2017 UICC.

  18. Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet: effects of visual cues and language complexity on information recall and satisfaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J.C.M. van; Noort, G. van; Bol, N.; Dijk, L. van; Tates, K.; Jansen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated. Methods: An experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex

  19. Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet: effects of visual cues and language complexity on information recall and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, J.C.M.; van Noort, G.; Bol, N.; van Dijk, L.; Tates, K.; Jansen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated. Methods An experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex

  20. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three articles relevant to school crisis response: (1) "Factors Contributing to Posttraumatic Growth," summarized by Steve DeBlois; (2) "Psychological Debriefing in Cross-Cultural Contexts" (Stacey Rice); and (3) "Brain Abnormalities in PTSD" (Sunny Windingstad). The first summary reports the findings of a…

  1. Information needs of the Chinese community affected by cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bee Teng; Butow, Phyllis; Mills, Jill; Miller, Annie; Goldstein, David

    2017-10-01

    The information needs of patients and carers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, including from the Chinese community, are not well understood, and there has been no previous synthesis of the literature. We conducted a systematic review of the information needs of the Chinese community affected by cancer. Database, reference list, and author searches were conducted to identify studies reporting information needs of the Chinese community affected by cancer. Data synthesis was undertaken to define categories of information needs. Initial searches yielded 2558 articles. Out of the 40 full-text articles reviewed, 26 met all the eligibility criteria. Cancer-specific, treatment, and prognosis information were the most frequently reported information needs across the cancer care continuum. Similarly, this information was the most commonly reported information needs across different health systems, migration statuses, and Chinese cultural values. Though less frequent, information needs related to interpersonal/social, financial/legal, and body image/sexuality were also raised. Thirteen studies quantified the prevalence of unmet needs, and the most frequently reported unmet needs were related to health system and information, followed by psychological, patient care and support, physical daily living, and sexuality needs. Language and cultural factors were identified in all studies involving Chinese migrants living in English-speaking countries. Failing to meet the information needs of the Chinese community members affected by cancer increases the risk for poor cancer outcomes. Potential interventions such as translated resources, bilingual advocates, an online information portal, and communication aids can be helpful in addressing the unmet needs for this community. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Do multimedia based information services increase knowledge and satisfaction in head and neck cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, V; Blouin, E; Zeitouni, A; Muller, K; Allison, P J

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the impact of a Multimode Comprehensive Tailored Information Package (MCTIP) on Head and Neck (H&N) cancer patients' knowledge and satisfaction. A non-randomized controlled trial was conducted at two participating hospitals. One hospital delivered the MCTIP and the second hospital provided normal care. The study was approved by local ethical committees. Patients with Stage III and IV cancer in the H&N region were recruited between their diagnosis and treatment. All participants were evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6months later using the Satisfaction with Cancer Information Profile (SCIP) and a Cancer Knowledge questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, T tests, chi square tests and finally linear mixed model analyses to test the potential impact of the intervention. A total of 103 participants participated in this study and complete data at all time points were collected for 96. The Test group reported higher levels of Cancer Knowledge and Satisfaction at all time points (pmultimedia based tailored information and higher levels of satisfaction and cancer knowledge compared to those who receive information in ad hoc manner. Exploring patients' informational needs is necessary before planning information services to them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of information seeking and avoidance behavior on self-rated health status among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Ramanadhan, Shoba; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2013-07-01

    Social determinants, such as socioeconomic status (SES) and race/ethnicity are linked to striking health disparities across the cancer continuum. One important mechanism linking social determinants and health disparities may be communication inequalities that are caused by differences in accessing, processing and utilizing cancer information. In this context, we examined health information-seeking/avoidance as a potential mediator between social determinants and self-rated health (SRH) status among cancer survivors. Data came from the 2008 well-informed, thriving and surviving (WITS) study of post-treatment cancer survivors (n=501). We examined the mediating effect of health communication-related behavior between SES and disparities in SRH. The likelihood of belonging to the Low SRH group was higher among patients who had avoided health information and whose family members had not sought health information on behalf of the survivor, those in the lowest household income bracket, and those who had high school or less education after adjusting for potential confounders. Differences in SRH among cancer survivors are associated with SES as well as communication inequalities. It is necessary to provide a supportive environment in which health information is made available if disparities in health-related quality of life among cancer survivors are to be reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Summary of blog

    CERN Document Server

    Reader, Capitol

    2013-01-01

    This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Hugh Hewitt in his book "Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation that's Changing Your World". This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Hugh Hewitt's book.Hewitt argues that blogs have an important potential and he believes that it would be a dreadful mistake to avoid their power.

  5. Effect of providing risk information on undergoing cervical cancer screening: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Yoshiki; Taneichi, Akiyo; Ohashi, Mai; Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Koyanagi, Takahiro; Morisawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Suzuyo; Sato, Naoto; Machida, Shizuo; Takei, Yuji; Saga, Yasushi; Suzuki, Mitsuaki

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the cervical cancer screening rate is extremely low. Towards improving the cervical cancer screening rate, encouraging eligible people to make an informed choice, which is a decision-making process that relies on beliefs informed by adequate information about the possible benefits and risks of screening, has attracted increased attention in the public health domain. However, there is concern that providing information on possible risks of screening might prevent deter from participating. In total, 1,912 women aged 20-39 years who had not participated in screening in the fiscal year were selected from a Japanese urban community setting. Participants were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group A received a printed reminder with information about the possible benefits of screening, group B received a printed reminder with information about possible benefits and risks, and group C received a printed reminder with simple information only (control group). Out of 1,912 participants, 169 (8.8%) participated in cervical cancer screening. In the intervention groups, 137 (10.9%) participated in cervical cancer screening, compared to only 32 (4.9%) of the control group (p < 0.001). In addition, logistic regression analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in screening rate between group A and group B (p = 0.372). Providing information on the possible risks of screening may not prevent people from taking part in cervical cancer screening among a Japanese non-adherent population.

  6. Perceived information needs and social support of Chinese-Australian breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, C; White, K

    2014-10-01

    Both informational and social support are vital components in achieving a high quality of life as a cancer survivor. The study aims to explore the perceptions of information needs and social support among Chinese-Australian breast cancer survivors and how these resources impacted their cancer experience. Three focus groups were conducted with 23 Chinese-Australian women diagnosed with breast cancer in their native language (Mandarin and Cantonese). Each interview was translated and transcribed. Content analysis was used to uncover the major themes. Themes for information needs were identified as (1) using linguistically appropriate information, (2) the need for culturally sensitive information for the management of expected side effect and promotion of recovery and (3) the need for information on signs and symptoms of recurrence. Families were described as a primary source of multifaceted social support, although it was challenging to obtain. Support groups were also an important support source, but health care professionals were not identified as a source of support. Our study has provided practical insight into the information needs and social support of Chinese women with breast cancer. These findings can be used to inform the development of linguistically and culturally tailored support and survivorship interventions for this vulnerable population.

  7. Informational Needs of Korean Women with Breast Cancer: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Toronto Informational Needs Questionnaire of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsun Yi, RN, DNS

    2007-12-01

    Conclusion: The TINQ-BC, developed and tested in Canada, was adapted and successfully utilized in this study in Korea, indicating that it has the potential to assess the informational needs of women with breast cancer on an international basis. Health care professionals must be aware of the domains of information that these women perceive to be important so that educational interventions can be effectively planned and executed.

  8. Deconstructing Cancer Patient Information Seeking in a Consumer Health Library Toward Developing a Virtual Information Consult for Cancer Patients and Their Caregivers: A Qualitative, Instrumental Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, Janet; Trang, Aileen; Cyr, Alaina B; Abdelmutti, Nazek; Giuliani, Meredith E; Snow, Michelle; McCurdie, Tara; Pulandiran, Menaka; Urowitz, Sara; Wiljer, David

    2017-05-24

    Cancer patients and their caregivers want information about their disease and are interested in finding health information online. Despite the abundance of cancer information online, it is often fragmented, its quality is highly variable, and it can be difficult to navigate without expert-level knowledge of the cancer system. The Patient & Family Library at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre offers a broad collection of high-quality cancer health information and staff are available to help patrons refine their questions and explore information needs that they may not have considered. The purpose of this research study was to deconstruct patrons' information-seeking behaviors in the library to assess the feasibility of replicating the services provided in the library through a Web app, extending the service beyond the walls of the cancer centre. The specific aims of this research were to understand (1) how patrons approach information seeking in the library (interface design), (2) how patrons communicate their informational needs (information categorization and metadata requirements), and (3) what resources are provided to address the patrons' information needs (collection development). We employed a qualitative, instrumental case study to deconstruct patrons' health information-seeking behavior. The study population included patients, the librarian, and library volunteers. Ethnographic observation was conducted at the library over 3 days and key informant interviews with library staff were conducted to address the first aim. A closed card-sorting activity was conducted to address the second aim and the library shift logs and Search Request Forms (SRFs) were reviewed to address the third aim. A total of 55 interactions were recorded during the ethnographic observation and nine semistructured interviews were conducted during the key informant interviews. Seven library patron personas were identified: (1) Newbie, (2) Seasoned, (3) Direct, (4) Window Shopper, (5

  9. Hospital Nurses' and Physicians' Use of Information Sources during their Production of Discharge Summaries: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hellesø, Ragnhild; Sogstad, Maren Kristine Raknes

    2014-01-01

    Hospital nurses' and physicians' production and exchange of accurate information between levels of care are crucial for ensuring safe and seamless care for patients in transition. We report on a study in which we explored hospital providers' use of information sources when they prepared discharge information for colleges in the community health-care sector. In this cross-sectional study, 510 nurses and 236 physicians responded through a questionnaire. Our findings show that nurses and physici...

  10. Health-Related Information-Seeking Behaviors and Preferences Among Mexican Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Perez-Montessoro, Viridiana; Rojo-Castillo, Patricia; Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the preferred sources of health-related information among patients with cancer is essential for designing successful cancer education and prevention strategies. However, little is known about health-related information-seeking practices among patients living in low- and middle-income countries. We studied the preferred sources of health-related information among Mexican patients with cancer and explored which factors influence these choices. The health-related information-seeking practices among patients with cancer treated at a public hospital in Mexico City were evaluated using questions from the Spanish Version of the Health Information National Trends Survey. The characteristics of patients who sought health-related information, and of those who chose the internet as their preferred source of information, were analyzed. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were used for statistical analyses. One hundred forty-eight patients answered the survey (median age 60 years, 70% female), of which 88 (59%) had sought for health-related information. On multivariate analysis, the only characteristic associated with lower odds of seeking health-related information was increasing age (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.90-0.97). Sixty-one respondents (69%) listed the internet as their preferred source of health-related information. On multivariate analysis, only being of the female gender (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.3-18.3) was related with higher odds of preferring other sources of information over the internet. Among Mexican patients with cancer, the Internet is the most widely used information source. Older age was the characteristic most strongly associated with not seeking health-related information, while being female was strongly associated with preferring other sources of information over the Internet.

  11. Breast and colorectal cancer screening and sources of cancer information among older women in the United States: results from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Berkowitz, Zahava; Hawkins, Nikki A; Tangka, Florence

    2007-07-01

    The number of people in the United States aged 65 years and older is increasing. Older people have a higher risk of dying from cancer; however, recent information about breast and colorectal cancer screening rates among women aged 65 years and older and about sources of health information consulted by these women is limited. We examined data from the Health Information National Trends Survey for women aged 65 years and older who had no personal history of breast or colorectal cancer. Women whose self-reported race and ethnicity was non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, or Hispanic were included in the analysis. The overall response rate for the 2003 survey was 34.5%. Women aged 75 years and older had lower rates of recent mammography (mammogram in previous 2 years) than did women aged 65 to 74 years. In both age groups, rates were especially low for Hispanic women and women with a household income of less than $15,000 per year. Rates of recent colorectal cancer screening (fecal occult blood test in previous year or endoscopy in previous 5 years) were markedly lower for non-Hispanic black women aged 75 years and older than for other women in this age group, and for Hispanic women aged 65 to 74 years than for non-Hispanic women in this age group. Screening rates were lowest for women with an annual household income of less than $15,000, no family history of cancer, no usual health care provider, or 1 or no provider visits in the previous year. Differences were found in the groups' preferred channel for receiving health information. Women who had had a mammogram in the previous 2 years were more likely to pay attention to health information on the radio or in newspapers and magazines than were women who had not received a recent mammogram. Women who had had a recent colorectal cancer screening test were more likely to pay attention to health information in magazines or on the Internet than were those who had not. Personalized print and other publications were the

  12. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  13. Caring for the person with cancer: Information and support needs and the role of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynsbergh, Natalie; Botti, Mari; Heckel, Leila; Livingston, Patricia M

    2018-06-01

    Informal carers experience a variety of information and support needs when providing care to someone with cancer. It is unclear when carers seek information and what resources they access to support themselves throughout the cancer trajectory. A sample of 45 carers and 15 oncology nurses were recruited to participate in either focus groups or phone interviews. Carers in the study were more likely to be women (60%), caring for a spouse or partner (64.4%), living with the patient (86.7%), and hold a university degree (46.7%). The majority of oncology nurses were females (66.6%). Findings showed that carers had limited access to adequate information as needs arose. Supports used to address information needs included information booklets, the Internet, and communication with healthcare professionals or with other carers. Barriers in communication between nurses and carers impacted on the adequacy of information received. Participants reported that technology, such as smartphone applications, might be appropriate for improving information and support needs. Caring for someone with cancer is multifaceted. Carers need access to timely information to help them effectively manage patients' needs. Future studies should assess the role of contemporary approaches, such as digital technology, as a solution to the delivery of information and support for carers of people with cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Real-Time Moment-to-Moment Emotional Responses to Narrative and Informational Breast Cancer Videos in African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Sarah; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    In a randomized experiment using moment-to-moment audience analysis methods, we compared women's emotional responses with a narrative versus informational breast cancer video. Both videos communicated three key messages about breast cancer: (i) understand your breast cancer risk, (ii) talk openly about breast cancer and (iii) get regular…

  15. Use of information sources by cancer patients: results of a systematic review of the research literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyani Ankem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Existing findings on cancer patients' use of information sources were synthesized to 1 rank the most and least used information sources and the most helpful information sources and to 2 find the impact of patient demographics and situations on use of information sources. Method. . To synthesize results found across studies, a systematic review was conducted. Medline and CINAHL were searched to retrieve literature on cancer patients' information source use. The retrieved articles were carefully selected according to predetermined criteria, and several articles were eliminated in a systematic approach. Analysis. The twelve articles that met the criteria were systematically analysed by extracting data from articles and summarizing data for the purpose of synthesis to determine the meaning of findings on most used information sources, least used information sources, most helpful information sources, effect of patient characteristics on preference for an information source, and effect of patient situations on preference for an information source. Results. In descending order of use, health care professionals, medical pamphlets, and family and friends were most used information sources. Internet and support groups were least used. In descending order of helpfulness, books, health care professionals and medical pamphlets were found to be most helpful information sources. Younger patients used health care professionals and certain forms of written information sources more than older patients. Conclusion. . The systematic review shows that many areas of cancer patients' information source use have been either neglected or barely analysed. An in-depth understanding of cancer patients' use of information sources and the characteristics in information sources they consider to be helpful is important for developing successful interventions to better inform patients.

  16. Information-seeking experiences and decision-making roles of Japanese women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Mitsuyo; Kuroki, Syoji; Shinkoda, Harumi; Suetsugu, Yoshiko; Shimada, Kazuo; Kaku, Tsunehisa

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the information-seeking experiences and decision-making roles of Japanese women with breast cancer, to examine the relationship between information-seeking experiences and decision-making roles, and to explore the factors that influenced taking a more active role than the preferred role during the treatment decision-making process. In a cross-sectional study, women with breast cancer were retrospectively administered the Control Preferences Scale and the Information-Seeking Experience Scale. The Chi-Square test was used to compare differences among individual variables in decision-making roles and information-seeking experiences. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the factors that influenced taking a more active role than the preferred role. One hundred and four patients with breast cancer participated in the investigation. Eighty-five patients (78%) perceived themselves as having knowledge of breast cancer and most patients (92%) sought information on breast cancer. The preferred roles in decision-making that they reported having before treatment were 18% active, 69% collaborative and 13% passive. The actual roles they perceived having experienced were 27% active, 43% collaborative and 30% passive. Although there was concordance of preferred and actual role for only 59% of the women, most patients reported that they were satisfied with their decision-making. Many women with breast cancer reported negative experiences with information seeking, including wanting more information (49%), expending a lot of effort to obtain the information needed (53%), not having enough time to obtain needed information (55%), frustration during the search for information (44%), concerns about the quality of the information (45%) and difficulty understanding the information received (49%). This study revealed that having a more active actual role than the initial preferred role was associated with emotional expression to the physician, having undergone

  17. 78 FR 26790 - Summary of Responses To Request for Information (RFI): Opportunities To Apply a Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... sources of information; for example, if utilized as a text message program, URLs could be included to link... Responses To Request for Information (RFI): Opportunities To Apply a Department of Health and Human Services Message Library To Advance Understanding About Toddler and Preschool Nutrition and Physical Activity...

  18. Developing common information elements for renewable energy systems: summary and proceedings of the SERI/AID workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, J.H.; Neuendorffer, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the Workshop on Evaluation Systems for Renewable Energy Systems sponsored by the Agency for International Development and SERI, held 20-22 February 1980 in Golden, Colorado. The primary objectives of the workshop was to explore whether it was possible to establish common information elements that would describe the operation and impact of renewable energy projects in developing countries. The workshop provided a forum for development program managers to discuss the information they would like to receive about renewable energy projects and to determine whether common data could be agreed on to facilitate information exchange among development organizations. Such information could be shared among institutions and used to make informed judyments on the economic, technical, and social feasibility of the technologies. Because developing countries and foreign assistance agencies will be financing an increasing number of renewable energy projects, these organizations need information on the field experience of renewable energy technologies. The report describes the substance of the workshop discussions and includes the papers presented on information systems and technology evaluation and provides lists of important information elements generated by both the plenary sessions and the small working groups.

  19. Information management system: A summary discussion. [for use in the space shuttle sortie, modular space station and TDR satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    An information management system is proposed for use in the space shuttle sortie, the modular space station, the tracking data relay satellite and associated ground support systems. Several different information management functions, including data acquisition, transfer, storage, processing, control and display are integrated in the system.

  20. A quantitative assessment of changing trends in internet usage for cancer information.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, Seamus M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The internet is an important source of healthcare information. To date, assessment of its use as a source of oncologic information has been restricted to retrospective surveys. METHODS: The cancer-related searches of approximately 361,916,185 people in the United States and the United Kingdom were examined. Data were collected from two separate 100-day periods in 2008 and 2010. RESULTS: In 2008, there were 97,531 searches. The majority of searches related to basic cancer information (18,700, 19%), followed by treatment (8404, 9%) and diagnosis (6460, 7%). This compares with 179,025 searches in 2010 representing an increase of 183%. In 2008 breast cancer accounted for 21,102 (21%) individual searches, increasing to 85,825 searches in 2010. In 2010 a total of 0.2% (321) of searches focused on litigation, with those searching for breast cancer information most likely to research this topic (P=0.000). CONCLUSION: Use of the internet as a source of oncological information is increasing rapidly. These searches represent the most sensitive information relating to cancer, including prognosis and litigation. It is imperative now that efforts are made to ensure the reliability and comprehensiveness of this information.

  1. The Effects of Viewing and Preferences for Online Cancer Information Among Patients' Loved Ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauckner, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Emotional and psychological distress is common among loved ones of cancer patients, who sometimes report more severe mental health issues than the patients themselves. In addition, many loved ones feel as though their information needs are not being met, which can lead them to seek out additional information online. This survey research examined the experiences of cancer patients' loved ones in viewing online content about the disease and the emotional outcomes of such browsing sessions. Participants (N = 191) were recruited from cancer- and caregiver-related nonprofits and online discussion boards. Results indicated that patients' loved ones were active users of online cancer Web sites. They primarily viewed and expressed a desire for information-based, rather than support-based, content. Many individuals desired in-depth treatment information, and those who viewed it had significantly more hope. Interestingly, multiple regression analysis revealed that viewing user-generated content was associated only with negative emotions, illustrating the potential dangers of social media spaces. Overall, this study shows the need for supporting patients' loved ones during their almost inevitable viewings of online cancer information. More research is needed in order to determine the best methods of mitigating potential negative effects of cancer Web sites and developing a useful online resource for this population.

  2. Objective burden, resources, and other stressors among informal cancer caregivers: a hidden quality issue?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ryn, Michelle; Sanders, Sara; Kahn, Katherine; van Houtven, Courtney; Griffin, Joan M.; Martin, Michelle; Atienza, Audie A.; Phelan, Sean; Finstad, Deborah; Rowland, Julia

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of clinical cancer care is delivered in the home by informal caregivers (e.g. family, friends), who are often untrained. Caregivers' context varies widely, with many providing care despite low levels of resources and high levels of additional demands. Background Changes in health care have shifted much cancer care to the home, with limited data to inform this transition. We studied the characteristics, care tasks, and needs of informal caregivers of cancer patients. Methods Caregivers of seven geographically and institutionally defined cohorts of newly diagnosed colorectal and lung cancer patients completed self-administered questionnaires (n = 677). We combined this information with patient survey and chart abstraction data and focused on caregivers who reported providing, unpaid, at least 50% of the patient's informal cancer care. Results Over half of caregivers (55%) cared for a patient with metastatic disease, severe comorbidity, or undergoing current treatment. Besides assisting with activities of daily living, caregivers provided cancer-specific care such as watching for treatment side effects (68%), helping manage pain, nausea or fatigue (47%), administering medicine (34%), deciding whether to call a doctor (30%), deciding whether medicine was needed (29%), and changing bandages (19%). However, half of caregivers reported not getting training perceived as necessary. In addition, 49% of caregivers worked for pay, 21% reported poor or fair health, and 21% provided unpaid care for other individuals. One in four reported low confidence in the quality of the care they provided. Conclusions Much assistance for cancer patients is delivered in the home by informal caregivers, often without desired training, with a significant minority having limited resources and high additional demands. Future research should explore the potentially high yield of addressing caregiver needs in improving quality of cancer care and both survivors' and caregivers' outcomes

  3. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention strategies include avoiding known risk factors, adopting a healthy lifestyle, polyp removal, and aspirin. Get detailed information about risk factors for CRC and potential interventions for prevention in this summary for clinicians.

  4. How do cancer patients navigate the public information environment? Understanding patterns and motivations for movement among information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Rebekah H; Romantan, Anca; Kelly, Bridget J; Stevens, Robin S; Gray, Stacy W; Hull, Shawnika J; Ramirez, A Susana; Hornik, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about how patients move among information sources to fulfill unmet needs. We interviewed 43 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients. Using a grounded theory approach, we identified patterns and motivations for movement among information sources. Overall, patients reported using one source (e.g., newspaper) followed by the use of another source (e.g., Internet), and five key motivations for such cross-source movement emerged. Patients' social networks often played a central role in this movement. Understanding how patients navigate an increasingly complex information environment may help clinicians and educators to guide patients to appropriate, high-quality sources.

  5. Statistical summary 1990-91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The information contained in this statistical summary leaflet summarizes in bar charts or pie charts Nuclear Electric's performance in 1990-91 in the areas of finance, plant and plant operations, safety, commercial operations and manpower. It is intended that the information will provide a basis for comparison in future years. The leaflet also includes a summary of Nuclear Electric's environmental policy statement. (UK)

  6. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  7. Multimedia information intervention and its benefits in partners of the head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, V; Blouin, E; Zeitouni, A; Muller, K; Allison, P J

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the levels of anxiety, depression, satisfaction with information provision and cancer-related knowledge in partners of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving a Multimode Comprehensive Tailored Information Package (MCTIP). A non-randomised, controlled trial was conducted with partners of HNC patients recruited at two academic hospitals in Montreal. The Test participants received the MCTIP, while the Control participants received information in an ad hoc manner. All participants were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Satisfaction with Cancer Information Profile and a cancer knowledge questionnaire at baseline, and 3 and 6 months later. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, t-test and chi-square test, and mixed model analysis to test the impact of the intervention. A total of 31 partners of HNC patients participated in this study and completed all the evaluations. The partners in the Test group experienced significantly lower levels of anxiety (P = 0.001) and depression (P = 0.003) symptoms and were more satisfied (P = 0.002) with cancer information provided than partners in the Control group. Providing tailored information seems to have positive outcomes regarding anxiety, depression, and satisfaction in partners of HNC patients. Larger randomised studies are warranted to validate these effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  10. NORDCAN--a Nordic tool for cancer information, planning, quality control and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engholm, Gerda; Ferlay, Jacques; Christensen, Niels; Bray, Freddie; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Klint, Asa; Køtlum, Jóanis E; Olafsdóttir, Elínborg; Pukkala, Eero; Storm, Hans H

    2010-06-01

    The NORDCAN database and program ( www.ancr.nu ) include detailed information and results on cancer incidence, mortality and prevalence in each of the Nordic countries over five decades and has lately been supplemented with predictions of cancer incidence and mortality; future extensions include the incorporation of cancer survival estimates. The data originates from the national cancer registries and causes of death registries in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Faroe Islands and is regularly updated. Presently 41 cancer entities are included in the common dataset, and conversions of the original national data according to international rules ensure comparability. With 25 million inhabitants in the Nordic countries, 130 000 incident cancers are reported yearly, alongside nearly 60 000 cancer deaths, with almost a million persons living with a cancer diagnosis. This web-based application is available in English and in each of the five Nordic national languages. It includes comprehensive and easy-to-use descriptive epidemiology tools that provide tabulations and graphs, with further user-specified options available. The NORDCAN database aims to provide comparable and timely data to serve the varying needs of policy makers, cancer societies, the public, and journalists, as well as the clinical and research community.

  11. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  12. Effects of the source of social comparison information on former cancer patients' quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakel, T.M.; Dijkstra, A.; Buunk, Abraham (Bram)

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Life, following curative treatment, can be a struggle for former cancer patients. In this phase of their illness, social comparison information may help to improve a patient's quality of life (QOL). The objective of this study was to determine whether the effects of this information

  13. Does age really matter? Recall of information presented to newly referred patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jesse; Butow, Phyllis N; van Weert, Julia C M; van Dulmen, Sandra; Devine, Rhonda J; Heeren, Thea J; Bensing, Jozien M; Tattersall, Martin H N

    2008-11-20

    To examine age- and age-related differences in recall of information provided during oncology consultations. Two hundred sixty patients with cancer diagnosed with heterogeneous cancers, seeing a medical or radiation oncologist for the first time, participated in the study. Patients completed questionnaires assessing information needs and anxiety. Recall of information provided was measured using a structured telephone interview in which patients were prompted to remember details physicians gave about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Recall was checked against the actual communication in audio-recordings of the consultations. Recall decreased significantly with age, but only when total amount of information presented was taken into account. This indicates that if more information is discussed, older patients have more trouble remembering the information than younger ones. In addition, recall was selectively influenced by prognosis. First, patients with a poorer prognosis recalled less. Next, the more information was provided about prognosis, the less information patients recalled, regardless of their actual prognosis. Recall is not simply a function of patient age. Age only predicts recall when controlling for amount of information presented. Both prognosis and information about prognosis are better predictors of recall than age. These results provide important insights into intervention strategies to improve information recall in patients with cancer.

  14. Accuracy of Self-Reported Breast Cancer Information among Women from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, A.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I. L.; Knight, J. A.; Barisic, A.; Knight, J. A.; Glendon, G.; Weerasooriya, N.; Andrulis, I. L.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining complete medical record information can be challenging and expensive in breast cancer studies. The current literature is limited with respect to the accuracy of self-report and factors that may influence this. We assessed the agreement between self-reported and medical record breast cancer information among women from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Women aged 20-69 years diagnosed with incident breast cancer 1996-1998 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry, sampled on age and family history. We calculated kappa statistics, proportion correct, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values and conducted unconditional logistic regression to examine whether characteristics of the women influenced agreement. The proportions of women who correctly reported having received a broad category of therapy (hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery) as well as sensitivity and specificity were above 90%, and the kappa statistics were above 0.80. The specific type of hormonal or chemotherapy was reported with low-to-moderate agreement. Aside from recurrence, no factors were consistently associated with agreement. Thus, most women were able to accurately report broad categories of treatment but not necessarily specific treatment types. The finding of this study can aid researchers in the use and design of self-administered treatment questionnaires

  15. Conflicting Online Health Information and Rational Decision Making: Implication for Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heesoo; Sohn, Minsung; Choi, Mankyu; Jung, Minsoo

    Although people in the social media age can access health information easier, they have difficulty judging conflicting rational information or summarizing the large amounts of health information available. Conflicting health information occurs when contrary assertions or information about a certain health issue comes from different information sources. This study examined the background knowledge and the current phenomenon of why conflicting health information occurs in real-world conditions. We also reviewed causes and solutions by reviewing the literature. In particular, we recommend a method that solves problems that patients have including cancer survivors who cannot themselves be active in seeking health information. Thus, we categorized the specific types of conflicting health information and analyzed the sociodemographic factors and information carrier factors that have an impact on the health information-seeking behavior of individuals.

  16. Information needs of adolescent and young adult cancer patients and their parent-carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Maria C; McNeil, Robyn; Drew, Sarah; Orme, Lisa; Sawyer, Susan M

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to explore health-related information needs of adolescent and young adults (AYAs) and their parent-carers and to examine demographic and clinical variables associated with unmet information needs, including patient activation. In a national cross-sectional study, 196 Australian AYAs diagnosed with cancer between 15 and 25 years and within 24 months of diagnosis and 204 parent-carers reported on total and unmet needs for cancer and health-related information. Fifty-one percent of AYAs were male, 81% had completed treatment and 86% were treated in adult hospitals. AYAs and parents reported high levels of total need for information. The mean number of unmet needs was 5.63 and 6.82 for AYAs and parents, respectively. AYAs reported the highest unmet needs in relation to their cancer (e.g. late effects and cancer recurrence, and having children in the future). The highest unmet parent information needs were related to medical information about their child as well as information on financial issues for their children and themselves. Unmet information need was associated with psychological distress (posttraumatic stress symptoms) for AYAs and parents. Patient activation was negatively associated with unmet information needs for AYAs. Demographic and treatment variables were not significantly associated with information needs. These findings indicate the importance of information needs for AYAs and their carers. The association between patient activation and information needs suggests that promoting young people's engagement with healthcare is a key opportunity within AYA care. Parent information needs and associated emotional distress additionally highlight the importance of family-centered care.

  17. An informal summary of a new formalism for classifying spin-orbit systems using tools distilled from the theory of bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, K.; Ellison, J.A.

    2015-02-01

    We give an informal summary of ongoing work which uses tools distilled from the theory of fibre bundles to classify and connect invariant fields associated with spin motion in storage rings. We mention four major theorems. One ties invariant fields with the notion of normal form, the second allows comparison of different invariant fields and the two others tie the existence of invariant fields to the existence of certain invariant sets. We explain how the theorems apply to the spin dynamics of spin-1/2 and spin-1 particles. Our approach elegantly unifies the spin-vector dynamics from the T-BMT equation with the spin-tensor dynamics and other dynamics and suggests an avenue for addressing the question of the existence of the invariant spin field.

  18. Age Differences in Dual Information-Processing Modes: Implications for Cancer Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ellen; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Hess, Thomas M.; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Age differences in affective/experiential and deliberative processes have important theoretical implications for cancer decision making as cancer is often a disease of older adulthood. We examine evidence for adult age differences in affective and deliberative information processes, review the sparse evidence about age differences in decision making and introduce how dual process theories and their findings might be applied to cancer decision making. Age-related declines in the efficiency of deliberative processes predict poorer-quality decisions as we age, particularly when decisions are unfamiliar and the information is numeric. However, age-related adaptive processes, including an increased focus on emotional goals and greater experience, can influence decision making and potentially offset age-related declines. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie cancer decision processes in our aging population should ultimately allow us to help older adults to better help themselves. PMID:19058148

  19. Age differences in dual information-processing modes: implications for cancer decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ellen; Diefenbach, Michael A; Hess, Thomas M; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2008-12-15

    Age differences in affective/experiential and deliberative processes have important theoretical implications for cancer decision making, as cancer is often a disease of older adulthood. The authors examined evidence for adult age differences in affective and deliberative information processes, reviewed the sparse evidence about age differences in decision making, and introduced how dual process theories and their findings might be applied to cancer decision making. Age-related declines in the efficiency of deliberative processes predict poorer-quality decisions as we age, particularly when decisions are unfamiliar and the information is numeric. However, age-related adaptive processes, including an increased focus on emotional goals and greater experience, can influence decision making and potentially offset age-related declines. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie cancer decision processes in our aging population should ultimately allow us to help older adults to better help themselves.

  20. Quality of online information to support patient decision-making in breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jordan G; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Steffens, Nicole M; Neuman, Heather B

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites' structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered "good." 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0-4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1-4.7]), with 24% rated as "good." Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3-4.4]), with only 7% scoring "good." Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily- accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients' experiences with decision-making. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Unsolicited information letters to increase awareness of Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer: reactions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Lautrup, Charlotte Kvist; Lindberg, Lars Joachim; Ladelund, Steen; Nilbert, Mef

    2018-04-12

    Dissemination of information on a genetically increased risk should according to guidelines primarily be family-mediated. Incomplete and incorrect information spread has, however, been documented and implies missed possibilities for prevention. In Denmark, the national HNPCC register has been granted an exception to send unsolicited letters with information on hereditary colorectal cancer and an invitation to genetic counseling to members of families with familial and hereditary colorectal cancer. To evaluate this approach, we investigated reactions and attitudes to unsolicited letters in 708 members of families with genetic predisposition and in 1600 individuals from the general population. Support for information letters was expressed by 78% of the family members and by 82% of the general population. Regarding route of information, 90% of family members preferred a letter to no information, 66% preferred information from the hospital rather than from family members and 40% preferred to obtain information from a close family member. Our results suggest that use of unsolicited information letters from the health care system may be a feasible and highly acceptable strategy to disseminate information to families at high risk of colorectal cancer.

  2. Effects of persuasive message order on coping with breast cancer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice-Dunn, S; Floyd, D L; Flournoy, J M

    2001-02-01

    The current study explored the impact of varying the order of message components on coping with breast cancer information. In a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design, threat information, coping information and order of information were manipulated. College students read persuasive essays that varied in emphasis on threat of developing breast cancer and effectiveness of breast self-examination (BSE) in averting the threat of cancer. Participants who read the high-threat message reported higher intentions to perform BSE, more rational problem solving and more hopelessness than did those who read a low-threat message. The coping information messages produced a similar pattern of results. In addition, those who read the high-coping message reported less fatalism than did participants who read the low-coping message. When threat information was presented first, the high-threat message led to less hopelessness and reliance on religious faith than when the coping information was presented first. These results demonstrate the threatening health information energizes one to act in both adaptive and maladaptive ways, and that coping information decreases the tendency to respond maladaptively to the health threat. They also suggest that the order of presentation of the information may affect the extent to which people respond adaptively.

  3. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported significantly higher concerns about diet (44.3 vs. 25.4 %,) and exercise (40.4 vs. 19.7 %,) during the course of treatment. Compared to whites, blacks also had significantly higher concern about treatment-related issues (white vs. black mean, 25.52 vs. 31.78), self-image issues (7.03 vs. 8.60), family-related issues (10.44 vs. 12.84), and financial concerns (6.42 vs. 8.90, all p < 0.05). Blacks, compared to whites, also had significantly greater post-treatment information needs regarding follow-up tests (8.17 vs. 9.44), stress management (4.12 vs. 4.89), and handling stigma after cancer treatment (4.21 vs. 4.89) [all p < 0.05]. Pre-treatment concerns and post-treatment information needs differed by race, with black patients reporting greater information needs and concerns. In clinical practice, tailored approaches may work particularly well in addressing the needs and concerns of black patients.

  4. Information needs of cancer patients and survivors regarding diet, exercise and weight management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Martin, G; Koczwara, B; Smith, E L; Miller, M D

    2014-05-01

    While advanced cancer is often associated with weight loss, curative cancer treatment is often associated with weight gain. Weight gain during treatment may be associated with greater risk of cancer recurrence and development of lifestyle diseases. Currently, limited resources are available to cancer patients focussed on weight control. This study assessed the information needs of patients undergoing curative chemotherapy regarding diet, exercise and weight management for the purpose of developing weight management resources. Focus groups were held with oncology practitioners, patients and survivors to determine current information provision and needs. Focus groups highlighted a perception that information provision regarding diet, exercise and weight management is insufficient and no routine assessment of weight occurs during chemotherapy. Barriers to information provision described included lack of resources and time, and practitioners' uncertainty regarding appropriate messages to provide. Patients wanted more information regarding diet, exercise and weight during treatment time. The findings of this study suggest an increase in provision of diet, exercise and weight management information is needed. This information should be evidence-based and delivered at an appropriate time by the preferred health care professional. It would also be beneficial to implement protocols regarding assessment of weight during treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Information gathering and technology use among low-income minority men at risk for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hayeon; Cramer, Emily M; McRoy, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Health communication researchers, public health workers, and health professionals must learn more about the health information-gathering behavior of low-income minority men at risk for prostate cancer in order to share information effectively with the population. In collaboration with the Milwaukee Health Department Men's Health Referral Network, a total of 90 low-income adult men were recruited to complete a survey gauging information sources, seeking behavior, use of technology, as well as prostate cancer awareness and screening behavior. Results indicated participants primarily relied on health professionals, family, and friends for information about general issues of health as well as prostate cancer. The Internet was the least relied on source of information. A hierarchical regression indicated interpersonal information sources such as family or friends to be the only significant predictor enhancing prostate cancer awareness, controlling for other sources of information. Prostate screening behaviors were predicted by reliance on not only medical professionals but also the Internet. Practical implications of the study are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. [Cancer information and media: ethical and deontological aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerni, B

    2001-04-01

    Public information in medicine - including oncology - is not new and is growing with the development of the media. The majority is news preferably spectacular for the entertainment of the reader or viewer; there are some reviews and also educative papers or programs in specialized journals. Often this information is given or sponsored by private interests which are not always clear and which do not always have public interest in mind. All medical information may be easily accessible, especially if it is useful for the people concerned. It must be independent, genuine, clear. Physicians may play an important role in health education for the general public and for special patients. They have to give proved data, in an understandable form, with caution, keeping in mind the interest of informed persons.

  7. The role of companions in aiding older cancer patients to recall medical information.

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Wijngaards-de Meij, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.J.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates information recall in unaccompanied and accompanied older cancer patients and their companions.Methods: One hundred cancer patients (aged >/=65 years) and 71 companions completed a recall questionnaire after a nursing consultation preceding chemotherapy treatment. Recall was checked against the actual communication in video-recordings of the consultations. Patients also completed measures of anxiety and memory-related beliefs.Results: Findings revealed that...

  8. YouTube as a source of information on mouth (oral) cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassona, Y; Taimeh, D; Marahleh, A; Scully, C

    2016-04-01

    We examined the content of YouTube(™) videos on mouth (oral) cancer and evaluated their usefulness in promoting early detection of oral cancer. A systematic search of YouTube(™) for videos containing information on mouth cancer was conducted using the keywords 'mouth cancer' and 'oral cancer'. Demographics of videos, including type, source, length, and viewers' interaction, were evaluated, and three researchers independently assessed the videos for usefulness in promoting early detection of oral cancer. A total of 188 YouTube(™) videos (152 patient-oriented educational videos and 36 testimonial videos) were analyzed. The overall usefulness score ranged from 0 to 10 (mean = 3.56 ± 2.44). The most useful videos ranked late on the viewing list, and there was no significant correlation between video usefulness and viewing rate, viewers' interaction, and video length. Videos uploaded by individual users were less useful compared with videos uploaded by professional organizations or by healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals, academic institutions, and professional organizations have a responsibility for improving the content of YouTube(™) about mouth cancer by uploading useful videos, and directing patients to reliable information sources. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Systematic Review of Unmet Information and Psychosocial Support Needs of Adults Diagnosed with Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Yong Gyu; Alhashemi, Ahmad; Fazelzad, Rouhi; Goldberg, Alyse S; Goldstein, David P; Sawka, Anna M

    2016-09-01

    Patient education and psychosocial support to patients are important elements of comprehensive cancer care, but the needs of thyroid cancer survivors are not well understood. The published English-language quantitative literature on (i) unmet medical information and (ii) psychosocial support needs of thyroid cancer survivors was systematically reviewed. A librarian information specialist searched seven electronic databases and a hand search was conducted. Two reviewers independently screened citations from the electronic search and reviewed relevant full-text papers. There was consensus between reviewers on the included papers, and duplicate independent abstraction was performed. The results were summarized descriptively. A total of 1984 unique electronic citations were screened, and 51 full-text studies were reviewed (three from the hand search). Seven cross-sectional, single-arm, survey studies were included, containing data from 6215 thyroid cancer survivor respondents. The respective study sizes ranged from 57 to 2398 subjects. All of the studies had some methodological limitations. Unmet information needs were variable relating to the disease, diagnostic tests, treatments, and co-ordination of medical care. There were relatively high unmet information needs related to aftercare (especially long-term effects of the disease or its treatment and its management) and psychosocial concerns (including practical and financial matters). Psychosocial support needs were incompletely met. Patient information on complementary and alternative medicine was very limited. In conclusion, thyroid cancer survivors perceive many unmet information needs, and these needs extend to aftercare. Psychosocial information and supportive care needs may be insufficiently met in this population. More work is needed to improve knowledge translation and psychosocial support for thyroid cancer survivors.

  10. Summary of researches being performed in the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science on computer science and information technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the informatization notion (which assumes automation of majority of human activities applying computers, computer networks, information technologies towards the notion of {\\it Global Information Society} (GIS challenges the determination of new paradigms of society: automation and intellectualization of production, new level of education and teaching, formation of new styles of work, active participation in decision making, etc. To assure transition to GIS for any society, including that from Republic of Moldova, requires both special training and broad application of progressive technologies and information systems. Methodological aspects concerning impact of GIS creation over the citizen, economic unit, national economy in the aggregate demands a profound study. Without systematic approach to these aspects the GIS creation would have confront great difficulties. Collective of researchers from the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science (IMCS of Academy of Sciences of Moldova, which work in the field of computer science, constitutes the center of advanced researches and activates in those directions of researches of computer science which facilitate technologies and applications without of which the development of GIS cannot be assured.

  11. Screening for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen test: are patients making informed decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, K J; Volk, R J; Cass, A R; Spann, S J

    1999-09-01

    The benefits of early detection of prostate cancer are uncertain, and the American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend individual decision making in prostate cancer screening. This study reports the knowledge of male primary care patients about prostate cancer and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and examines how that knowledge is related to PSA testing, preferences for testing in the future, and desire for involvement in physician-patient decision making. The sample included 160 men aged 45 to 70 years with no history of prostate cancer who presented for care at a university-based family medicine clinic. Before scheduled office visits, patients completed a questionnaire developed for this study that included a 10-question measure of prostate cancer knowledge, the Deber-Kraestchmer Problem-Solving Decision-Making Scale, sociodemographic indicators, and questions on PSA testing. In general, patients who were college graduates were more knowledgeable about prostate cancer and early detection than those with a high school education or less. Aside from college graduates, most patients could not identify the principle advantages and disadvantages of PSA testing. Patients indicating previous or future plans for PSA testing demonstrated greater knowledge than other patients. Desire for involvement in decision making varied by patient education but was not related to past PSA testing. Patients lack knowledge about prostate cancer and early detection. This knowledge deficit may impede the early detection of prostate cancer and is a barrier to making an informed decision about undergoing PSA testing.

  12. The TRAIN-project: railway safety and the train driver information environment and work situation. A summary of the main results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecklund, L. [MTO Psychology and Swedish National Rail Administration (Sweden); Ingre, M.; Kecklund, G.; Soederstroem, M.; Aakerstedt, T. [National Inst. for Psychosocial Factors and Health (Sweden); Lindberg, E. [Swedish National Rail Administration (Sweden); Jansson, A.; Olsson, E.; Sandblad, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Human-Computer Interaction; Almqvist, P. [Swedish State Railways (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    The TRAIN project investigates traffic safety related risks, focusing in particular on the train driver work situation, use of information but also on the supporting safety organisation. It is an on-going project funded and managed by Swedish National Rail Administration and carried out by independent researchers. The project provides a multi-disciplinary investigation by use of a man-technology-organisation (MTO) perspective. Activities performed are task analysis, evaluation of the drivers use of information and interaction with the ATP system as well as analyses of stress, mental workload and work hours. Several methods are being used such as interviews, questionnaires, diaries, activity monitoring and videotapes. This paper gives an overview of the project as well as a short summary of the main results. Detailed results are presented in separate reports as started in the reference list. Some of the main results are that the drivers report severe problems concerning sleepiness on early morning shifts, problems with maintenance on vehicles, lack of information supporting the planning task as well as problems in understanding ATP functions. Two groups of drivers having a feed-back related as opposed to a feed-forward driving style could be identified. In conclusion there is a great need to perform more scientific studies of human factors and railway safety as well as to implement safety management programs including professional human factors competence in the railway industries. (orig.)

  13. Influence of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use on ovarian and endometrial cancer: Summary of epidemiologic evidence of cancer risk and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoodt, F; Kjaer, S K; Friis, S

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for aspirin use in reducing the incidence and mortality of several cancer types. This has spurred a new wave of interest in this widely used drug. In this review, we present and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence of the association between the use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the incidence and prognosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. The evidence of a preventive effect of NSAID use on risk of ovarian or endometrial cancer is based primarily on results from observational studies and, consequently, is only suggestive. Overall, observational studies indicate modest reductions in risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer with aspirin use, whereas the results for non-aspirin NSAID use are equivocal. The strongest inverse associations have been reported for long-term consistent aspirin use, notably among subgroups of users (e.g., those with high body mass index). Few studies have evaluated the influence of NSAID use on the mortality of ovarian or endometrial cancer, and substantial heterogeneity of study characteristics and results preclude any conclusions. Additional studies of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and ovarian or endometrial cancer risk and prognosis are warranted. In the present review, we discuss the importance of comprehensive exposure definitions (i.e., duration, timing, consistency and intensity/dose) and evaluation of potential effect modification according to user characteristics, with the aim of identifying women who may experience the largest benefit of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use on risk or prognosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tangled in the breast cancer web: an evaluation of the usage of web-based information resources by breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sonia Kim Anh; Ingledew, Paris-Ann

    2013-12-01

    This study describes Internet use by breast cancer patients highlighting search patterns and examining the impact of web-based information on the clinical encounter. From September 2011 to January 2012, breast cancer patients at a cancer center completed a survey. Answers were closed and open-ended. Eighty-one patients were approached and 56 completed the survey. Forty-five (80 %) respondents used the Internet and 32 (71 %) searched for breast cancer information. All used Google as their principal search engine. To evaluate quality, 47 % referred to author credentials and 41 % examined references. Most sought information with respect to treatment or prognosis. Eighty percent felt that the information increased their knowledge and influenced treatment decision making for 53 %. This study highlights search patterns and factors used by breast cancer patients in seeking web-based information. Physicians must appreciate that patients use the Internet and address discrepancies between information sought and that which is available.

  15. Managing the unmet psychosocial and information needs of patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Abrahamson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Abrahamson1, Morgan Durham1, Rebekah Fox21Department of Public Health, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA; 2Department of Communication, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USAAbstract: In this article, we synthesize current literature regarding the unmet needs of cancer patients, with a specific focus on interventions that address psychosocial distress, social support, and information deficits. Research indicates many patients diagnosed with cancer express unmet needs in terms of emotional distress, decision-making support, and practical concerns such as childcare, transportation, and financial assistance. Four types of system-level barriers to the meeting of patient psychosocial and information-based needs emerge from the literature: underidentification of needs due to inadequate assessment, time constraints on cancer care providers, lack of adequate reimbursement for psychosocial and information services, and barriers related to communication of disease-related information. There is also evidence that unmet need, especially unmet information need, is related to the level of patient health literacy. Patient empowerment through the resolution of unmet needs increases patient participation in care, and is especially crucial in regards to understanding risks and benefits of treatment. There is evidence that some interventions are effective for some patients, and that even relatively simple interventions can reduce psychosocial and information-based needs. The challenge is therefore to discover which intervention will be effective for each individual patient, and to attain the skills and resources necessary to intervene appropriately.Keywords: cancer, unmet need, health literacy, intervention

  16. Geographic Information Systems-Transportation ISTEA management systems server-net prototype pooled fund study: Phase B summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, J. Jr.; Dean, C.D.; Armstrong, H.M. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The Geographic Information System-Transportation (GIS-T) ISTEA Management Systems Server Net Prototype Pooled Fund Study represents the first national cooperative effort in the transportation industry to address the management and monitoring systems as well as the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). The Study was initiated in November 1993 through the Alliance for Transportation Research and under the leadership of the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department. Sandia National Laboratories, an Alliance partner, and Geographic Paradigm Computing. Inc. provided technical leadership for the project. In 1992, the Alliance for Transportation Research, the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department, Sandia National Laboratories, and Geographic Paradigm Computing, Inc., proposed a comprehensive research agenda for GIS-T. That program outlined a national effort to synthesize new transportation policy initiatives (e.g., management systems and Intelligent Transportation Systems) with the GIS-T server net ideas contained in the NCHRP project {open_quotes}Adaptation of GIS to Transportation{close_quotes}. After much consultation with state, federal, and private interests, a project proposal based on this agenda was prepared and resulted in this Study. The general objective of the Study was to develop GIS-T server net prototypes supporting the ISTEA requirements for transportation planning and management and monitoring systems. This objective can be further qualified to: (1) Create integrated information system architectures and design requirements encompassing transportation planning activities and data. (2) Encourage the development of functional GIS-T server net prototypes. (3) Demonstrate multiple information systems implemented in a server net environment.

  17. Informant Accuracy in Recall of Communications and Perception of One’s Place in Global Social Structure and Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    to represent. For exam - ple, for any algorithm, the behavioral clique (1-2-3-4-5-6) is typically represented by the cognitive clique (1-7-8-9-10...often was never a family member. Characteristics of Ss and Ts enabled many strong predictions to be made. For exam - pIe, the most likely sex of the...ducking the problem en- tirely!) may not be the answer. Over what group of informants should one aggregate? All Bostonians? All violin players? All

  18. Cancer patient and survivor research from the cancer information service research consortium: a preview of three large randomized trials and initial lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alfred C; Diefenbach, Michael A; Stanton, Annette L; Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Raich, Peter C; Morra, Marion E; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Tran, Zung Vu; Bright, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe 3 large randomized trials from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium. Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 also tests a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the 2-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1: n =208; Project 2: n =340; Project 3: n =792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52%, and 67% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most, or some) was 90%, 85%, and 83% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium interventions, perceived usefulness and benefit was high, and more than 90% reported that they would recommend them to other cancer patients. The authors present 5 initial lessons learned that may help inform future cancer communications research.

  19. The WHO evidence-informed guideline development process and implications for vitamin and mineral research priorities: symposium rationale and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Lynnette M; Jalal, Chowdhury S B; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; Tovey, David; Lutter, Chessa K; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Habicht, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    The WHO evidence-informed guidelines provide recommendations to Member States and their partners on interventions with vitamins and minerals. Evidence gathered and synthesized through systematic reviews contributes to the development of these guidelines, a process that is dependent on the availability and quality of evidence. Although the guideline development process is stringently governed and supervised to maintain clarity and transparency, the lack of adequacy and specificity of available evidence poses limitations to the formulation of recommendations that can be easily applied for policy and program decision making in diverse contexts. The symposium created a space for dialogue among scientists and public health practitioners to improve the understanding of how evidence fulfills the needs and reflect on mechanisms by which policy and program guidance and priorities for research could be better informed by policy and program needs. Ultimately, programmatic success depends not only on identifying efficacious agents but ensuring effective delivery to those with the potential to respond. To do this, we must understand the rationale for recommending interventions, the biological pathways by which interventions work, delivery systems required to make efficacious interventions work, and other contextual factors that might limit or facilitate successful implementation.

  20. A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  1. Physical and emotional health information needs and preferences of long-term prostate cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Eric S; Bober, Sharon L; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Hu, Jim C; Kantoff, Philip W; Recklitis, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    Many men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PC) will experience physical and psychosocial late effects of treatment. Their interest/preferences for receiving information about addressing common sequelae is not well understood. We examined long-term PC survivors' level of interest, whether this differed based upon symptomatology, and their preferred coping information source. N=615 PC survivors (3-8 years post-diagnosis) completed a survey on physical and psychological health and their information interests and preferences related to late effects of cancer treatment. Over half of PC survivors reported interest in information about late effects of treatment or sexual health, while approximately a quarter were interested in emotional health information. Survivors preferred to receive information about late effects of treatment from their oncologists, sexual health information from their primary care providers (PCP), oncologist, or written/online resources, and emotional health information from their PCP. Information needs were more commonly reported among men with poorer domain-specific health functioning. Long-term PC survivors report significant interest in receiving information about their physical, sexual, and emotional health. Medical providers caring for these men should inquire about survivors' information needs and future intervention efforts should consider who delivers the information, dependent upon the type of dysfunction reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Information Needs of Women Who Have Undergone Breast Cancer Surgery in the West of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2017-09-01

    This descriptive study aimed to evaluate the information needs of breast cancer patients who have undergone surgery, and the level to which those information needs are met in the west of Turkey. It was conducted in 55 women who had undergone surgical intervention between March 2013 and March 2014 in a university hospital in the west of Turkey. A personal information form and the Patient Information Needs Scale were used to gather data. Descriptive statistics, the Chi-square test, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to analyze the data. It was found that the information need of the patients (3.9 +/- 0.6) was near the "very important" level, and that this need was "somewhat met" (2.4 +/- 0.9). When the information needs of the patients and the level to which those needs were fulfilled were compared, the level of fulfillment was statistically significantly lower (p < 0.001). Among the different subscales evaluated, information relating to medication was the most needed, and the information needs pertaining to this subscale were met to a greater degree (p < 0.05) than the remaining subscales. The results showed that the information needs, primarily the medication-related information needs, of the patients were high, but that the level of meeting these needs was low. It should be considered important for patients who have undergone breast cancer surgery to be kept informed and provided with information regarding their medication.

  3. Facilitating Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling Through Information, Preparation and Referral: A Pilot Program Using the Cancer Information Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Previous research has shown that women often lack knowledge regarding the kinds of information that are required to determine inherited risk as well as on the process and content of risk assessment/genetic testing...

  4. Facilitating Breast Cancer Genetic Couseling through Information, Preparation and Referral: A Pilot Program Using the Cancer Information Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Previous research has shown that women often lack knowledge regarding the kinds of information that are required to determine inherited risk as well as on the process and content of risk assessment/genetic testing...

  5. Facilitating Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling Through Information, Preparation and Referral: A Pilot Study Using the Cancer Information Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    Previous research shows that women often lack knowledge regarding the kinds of information required to determine inherited risk as well as on the process and content of risk assessment/genetic testing...

  6. Examining patterns of association with defensive information processing about colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Amy; Swank, Paul R; Vernon, Sally W

    2014-11-01

    To reduce negative psychological affect from information or behavior that is inconsistent with one's positive self-concept, individuals use a variety of defensive strategies. It is unknown whether correlates differ across defenses. We examined correlates of four levels of defensive information processing about colorectal cancer screening. Cross-sectional surveys were completed by a convenience sample of 287 adults aged 50-75 years. Defenses measures were more consistently associated with individual differences (especially avoidant coping styles); however, situational variables involving health-care providers also were important. Future research should examine changes in defenses after risk communication and their relative impact on colorectal cancer screening. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell BJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bethany J Russell, Alicia M WardSouthern Adelaide Palliative Services, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Communicating effectively with patients who have advanced cancer is one of the greatest challenges facing physicians today. Whilst guiding the patient through complex diagnostic and staging techniques, treatment regimens and trials, the physician must translate often imprecise or conflicting data into meaningful personalized information that empowers the patient to make decisions about their life and body. This requires understanding, compassion, patience, and skill. This narrative literature review explores current communication practices, information preferences of oncology patients and their families, and communication strategies that may assist in these delicate interactions. Overwhelmingly, the literature suggests that whilst the majority of patients with advanced cancer do want to know their diagnosis and receive detailed prognostic information, this varies not only between individuals but also for a given individual over time. Barriers to the delivery and understanding of information exist on both sides of the physician–patient relationship, and family dynamics are also influential. Despite identifiable trends, the information preferences of a particular patient cannot be reliably predicted by demographic, cultural, or cancer-specific factors. Therefore, our primary recommendation is that the physician regularly asks the patient what information they would like to know, who else should be given the information and be involved in decision making, and how that information should be presented.Keywords: metastatic, communication, prognosis, physician–patient relations

  8. Cancer Risk-Promoting Information: The Communication Environment of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Rachel F; Kohler, Racquel E; Viswanath, K

    2017-09-01

    Young adulthood represents a time of myriad transitions, which leave young adults (YAs) more susceptible to the influences of cancer risk-promoting information. The tobacco, alcohol, indoor tanning, and food and beverage industries engage in aggressive marketing strategies through both traditional and social media to target this age group to consume their products, which have known links to cancer. Despite this barrage of messaging, detailed data are lacking on the communication behaviors of subgroups of this diverse age group, particularly those from low SES. This paper explores the available data on media usage among YAs and describes the cancer risk-promoting information environment, with a focus on communication inequalities and their implications for cancer research and control. Nationally representative data on media consumption patterns indicate that the majority of YAs access a diverse range of traditional and social media platforms, but these data do not fully describe differences at the intersection of age and important factors such as SES, gender, race/ethnicity, or urban/rural residence. Meanwhile, risk-promoting information is heavily marketed to YAs across media, with an increasing focus on using social media sites to normalize products and evade marketing restrictions. Gaps in the available data on YAs' media consumption behaviors, coupled with aggressive risk-promoting marketing strategies toward YAs, may impede cancer control efforts. Relationships between exposure to various cancer risk-promoting information, concurrent risk behaviors, SES disparities, and communication inequalities should be investigated to develop innovative and effective control programs and policies to promote cancer control in this important group. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-agent systems: effective approach for cancer care information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, prevent or determine the effectiveness of treatment, and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The cancer care environment has become more complex because of the need for coordination and communication among health care professionals with different skills in a variety of roles and the existence of large amounts of data with various formats. The goals of health care systems in such a complex environment are correct health data management, providing appropriate information needs of users to enhance the integrity and quality of health care, timely access to accurate information and reducing medical errors. These roles in new systems with use of agents efficiently perform well. Because of the potential capability of agent systems to solve complex and dynamic health problems, health care system, in order to gain full advantage of E- health, steps must be taken to make use of this technology. Multi-agent systems have effective roles in health service quality improvement especially in telemedicine, emergency situations and management of chronic diseases such as cancer. In the design and implementation of agent based systems, planning items such as information confidentiality and privacy, architecture, communication standards, ethical and legal aspects, identification opportunities and barriers should be considered. It should be noted that usage of agent systems only with a technical view is associated with many problems such as lack of user acceptance. The aim of this commentary is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers of this new artificial intelligence tool for cancer care information as an approach to improve cancer care management.

  10. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations

  11. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations.

  12. Differences among college women for breast cancer prevention acquired information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and daughter-initiated information to mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Amatya, Anup; Vilchis, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine among college women acquired breast cancer prevention information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and information given to mothers. Using a cross-sectional study, a survey was administered to college women at a southwestern university. College women (n = 546) used the Internet (44 %) for active breast cancer prevention information-seeking and used the Internet (74 %), magazines (69 %), and television (59 %) for passive information receipt. Over half of the participants desired breast cancer prevention apps (54 %) and texts (51 %). Logistic regression analyses revealed predictors for interest to receive apps were ethnicity (Hispanic), lower self-efficacy, actively seeking online information, and older age and predictors for interest to receive texts were lower self-efficacy and higher university level. Eighteen percent of college women (n = 99) reported giving information to mothers and reported in an open-ended item the types of information given to mothers. Predictors for giving information to mothers were actively and passively seeking online information, breast self-exam practice, and higher university level. Screenings were the most frequent types of information given to mothers. Breast cancer prevention information using apps, texts, or Internet and daughter-initiated information for mothers should be considered in health promotion targeting college students or young women in communities. Future research is needed to examine the quality of apps, texts, and online information and cultural differences for breast cancer prevention sources.

  13. Survival differences of CIMP subtypes integrated with CNA information in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihan; Yan, Weili; Zhang, Shumei; Gu, Yue; Wang, Yihan; Wei, Yanjun; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Fang; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Yan

    2017-07-25

    CpG island methylator phenotype of breast cancer is associated with widespread aberrant methylation at specified CpG islands and distinct patient outcomes. However, the influence of copy number contributing to the prognosis of tumors with different CpG island methylator phenotypes is still unclear. We analyzed both genetic (copy number) and epigenetic alterations in 765 breast cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas data portal and got a panel of 15 biomarkers for copy number and methylation status evaluation. The gene panel identified two groups corresponding to distinct copy number profiles. In status of mere-loss copy number, patients were faced with a greater risk if they presented a higher CpG islands methylation pattern in biomarker panels. But for samples presenting merely-gained copy number, higher methylation level of CpG islands was associated with improved viability. In all, the integration of copy number alteration and methylation information enhanced the classification power on prognosis. Moreover, we found the molecular subtypes of breast cancer presented different distributions in two CpG island methylation phenotypes. Generated by the same set of human methylation 450K data, additional copy number information could provide insights into survival prediction of cancers with less heterogeneity and might help to determine the biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer patients in a more personalized approach.

  14. HPV vaccine awareness and the association of trust in cancer information from physicians among males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Dexter L; Hernandez, Natalie D; Rollins, Latrice; Akintobi, Tabia Henry; McAllister, Calvin

    2017-05-09

    Black and Hispanic men are diagnosed with more HPV-related cancers and at later stages compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Physician communication with men about HPV vaccination may be beneficial to increasing HPV vaccinations and decreasing HPV transmission. The purpose of this study was to examine HPV and HPV vaccine awareness among men by race, and the association between trust in cancer information from physicians and ever hearing about HPV and the HPV vaccine. U.S. adult males (age 18+) were identified from the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) (n=1203). Binomial logistic regression models assessed the influences of race/ethnicity and trust of cancer information from physicians on men having heard of HPV and the HPV vaccination. Approximately 50% of the sample had never heard of HPV and 53% had never heard of the vaccine. Black men were less likely to know that HPV is sexually transmitted compared to White and Hispanic men (pcancer information compared to White and Black men (pawareness about HPV among men. Furthermore, statistically significant racial/ethnic differences were found in HPV vaccine knowledge and trust in receiving cancer information from physicians. Future interventions should include community-based approaches and improved physicians' HPV-related communication to increase knowledge and uptake of the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    assessment process, licensee actions, regulatory actions. Summaries from the three days of workshop discussions as well as information from the licensee and regulatory responses to two pre-workshop surveys are presented. Also included are highlights from the numerous invited presentations. The conclusions and findings from the extensive group and plenary discussions are summarised too. Supporting material, discussion group presentation slides, slides from the invited presenters, and information/responses to the licensee and regulatory surveys are included in the attached Appendices

  16. Ethnic differences in breast cancer prevention information-seeking among rural women: will provider mobile messages work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Wilson, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Although growing research supports cancer survivor information-seeking, little is known about breast cancer prevention information-seeking among women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in breast cancer risk factor knowledge, information sources, and desired mobile messages among Hispanic and non-Hispanic rural women. Women were recruited to complete a survey at an imaging center during a mammography screening visit. A total of 156 women (mean age = 61, SD = 12.07) completed the survey. Breast cancer risk factor knowledge was significantly higher for non-Hispanic women compared to Hispanic women (p = .035). Television, magazines, and Internet were the most frequent information sources. Providers were the most frequent interpersonal information source. Nearly 87 % used cell phones and 47 % used texting. Hispanic women were more likely to desire breast cancer prevention cell voice messages (p breast cancer prevention education, and best practices to manage screening appointments.

  17. Identifying relevant group of miRNAs in cancer using fuzzy mutual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Jayanta Kumar; Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as a major biomarker of cancer. All miRNAs in human body are not equally important for cancer identification. We propose a methodology, called FMIMS, which automatically selects the most relevant miRNAs for a particular type of cancer. In FMIMS, miRNAs are initially grouped by using a SVM-based algorithm; then the group with highest relevance is determined and the miRNAs in that group are finally ranked for selection according to their redundancy. Fuzzy mutual information is used in computing the relevance of a group and the redundancy of miRNAs within it. Superiority of the most relevant group to all others, in deciding normal or cancer, is demonstrated on breast, renal, colorectal, lung, melanoma and prostate data. The merit of FMIMS as compared to several existing methods is established. While 12 out of 15 selected miRNAs by FMIMS corroborate with those of biological investigations, three of them viz., "hsa-miR-519," "hsa-miR-431" and "hsa-miR-320c" are possible novel predictions for renal cancer, lung cancer and melanoma, respectively. The selected miRNAs are found to be involved in disease-specific pathways by targeting various genes. The method is also able to detect the responsible miRNAs even at the primary stage of cancer. The related code is available at http://www.jayanta.droppages.com/FMIMS.html .

  18. Summary of the Special Issue “Neutrosophic Information Theory and Applications” at “Information” Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentin Smarandache

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Over a period of seven months (August 2017–February 2018, the Special Issue dedicated to “Neutrosophic Information Theory and Applications” by the “Information” journal (ISSN 2078-2489, located in Basel, Switzerland, was a success. The Guest Editors, Prof. Dr. Florentin Smarandache from the University of New Mexico (USA and Prof. Dr. Jun Ye from the Shaoxing University (China, were happy to select—helped by a team of neutrosophic reviewers from around the world, and by the “Information” journal editors themselves—and publish twelve important neutrosophic papers, authored by 27 authors and coauthors. There were a variety of neutrosophic topics studied and used by the authors and coauthors in Multi-Criteria (or Multi-Attribute and/or Group Decision-Making, including Cross Entropy-Based MAGDM, Neutrosophic Hesitant Fuzzy Prioritized Aggregation Operators, Biparametric Distance Measures, Pattern Recognition and Medical Diagnosis, Intuitionistic Neutrosophic Graph, NC-TODIM-Based MAGDM, Neutrosophic Cubic Set, VIKOR Method, Neutrosophic Multiple Attribute Group Decision-Making, Competition Graphs, Intuitionistic Neutrosophic Environment, Neutrosophic Commutative N-Ideals, Neutrosophic N-Structures Applied to BCK/BCI-Algebras, Neutrosophic Similarity Score, Weighted Histogram, Robust Mean-Shift Tracking, and Linguistic Neutrosophic Cubic Numbers.

  19. Older women breast cancer survivors: decision making, sources of information and wellness activities in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nor Aini; Muhamad, Mazanah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study ??s to profile older breast cancer survivors in Malaysia. In a survey study, ? custom made questionnaire was administered to 69 breast cancer patients and survivors between 60 and 84 years of age in Peninsular Malaysia. The main ethnic group recorded was Chinese, followed by Malay and Indian. The majority of women were married (87%) and had children (84.1%). Just over half (53.6%) had primary and secondary education, whereas 24.7% had higher education. Fifty five percent of the study participants made their own decision on treatment, 60.8% exercised at least 3 times in a week, and 56.6% sought information from specialists. Our study suggests that older breast cancer survivors are aware of the importance of exercise in their daily lives and make attempts to be cancer free (e.g. doing exercise, recreational activity and have good relationships with friends and family).

  20. Summary of the contractor information exchange meeting for improving the safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants, February 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes a meeting held on February 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. The meeting was held primarily to exchange information among the contractors involved in the U.S. Department of Energy`s efforts to improve the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Previous meetings have been held on December 5-6, 1995, and May 22, 1996. The meetings are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy works with countries to increase the level of safety at 63 Soviet-designed nuclear reactors operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The work is implemented largely by commercial companies and individuals who provide technologies and services to the countries with Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Attending the meeting were 71 representatives of commercial contractors, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, national laboratories, and other federal agencies. The presentations and discussions that occurred during the exchange are summarized in this report. While this report captures the general presentation and discussion points covered at the meeting, it is not a verbatim, inclusive record. To make the report useful, information presented at the meeting has been expanded to clarify issues, respond to attendees` requests, or place discussion points in a broader programmatic context. Appendixes A through F contain the meeting agenda, list of attendees, copies of presentation visuals and handouts, the Strategy Document discussed at the meeting, and a summary of attendees` post-meeting evaluation comments. As with past information exchanges, the participants found this meeting valuable and useful. In response to the participant`s requests, a fourth information exchange will be held later in 1997.

  1. Summary of the contractor information exchange meeting for improving the safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants, February 19, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes a meeting held on February 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. The meeting was held primarily to exchange information among the contractors involved in the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to improve the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Previous meetings have been held on December 5-6, 1995, and May 22, 1996. The meetings are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy works with countries to increase the level of safety at 63 Soviet-designed nuclear reactors operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The work is implemented largely by commercial companies and individuals who provide technologies and services to the countries with Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Attending the meeting were 71 representatives of commercial contractors, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, national laboratories, and other federal agencies. The presentations and discussions that occurred during the exchange are summarized in this report. While this report captures the general presentation and discussion points covered at the meeting, it is not a verbatim, inclusive record. To make the report useful, information presented at the meeting has been expanded to clarify issues, respond to attendees' requests, or place discussion points in a broader programmatic context. Appendixes A through F contain the meeting agenda, list of attendees, copies of presentation visuals and handouts, the Strategy Document discussed at the meeting, and a summary of attendees' post-meeting evaluation comments. As with past information exchanges, the participants found this meeting valuable and useful. In response to the participant's requests, a fourth information exchange will be held later in 1997

  2. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This column features summaries of research articles from 3 recent crisis management publications. The first, "School Shootings and Counselor Leadership: Four Lessons from the Field" summarized by Kristi Fenning, was conducted as the result of the increased demand for trained crisis personnel on school campuses. Survey participants were…

  3. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  4. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, N.; van Nimwegen, N.; van der Erf, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Demography Monitor 2008 gives a concise overview of current demographic trends and related developments in education, the labour market and retirement for the European Union and some other countries. This executive summary highlights the major findings of the Demography Monitor 2008 and further

  5. Online information and support needs of women with advanced breast cancer: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Emma; Koczwara, Bogda; Butow, Phyllis; Turner, Jane; Girgis, Afaf; Schofield, Penelope; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas; Levesque, Janelle; Spence, Danielle; Vatandoust, Sina; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Roy, Amitesh; Sukumaran, Shawgi; Karapetis, Christos S; Richards, Caroline; Fitzgerald, Michael; Beatty, Lisa

    2018-04-24

    Women with advanced breast cancer (ABC) face significant adjustment challenges, yet few resources provide them with information and support, and attendance barriers can preclude access to face-to-face psychosocial support. This paper reports on two qualitative studies examining (i) whether information and support-seeking preferences of women with ABC could be addressed in an online intervention, and (ii) how an existing intervention for patients with early stage cancer could be adapted for women with ABC. Women with ABC participated in telephone interviews about their information and support-seeking preferences (N = 21) and evaluated an online intervention focused on early-stage cancer (N = 15). Interviews were transcribed and underwent thematic analysis using the framework method to identify salient themes. Participants most commonly sought medical, lifestyle-related, and practical information/support; however, when presented with an online intervention, participants most commonly gave positive feedback on content on coping with emotional distress. Difficulty finding information and barriers to using common sources of information/support including health professionals, family and friends, and peers were reported; however, some women also reported not wanting information or support. All participants evaluating the existing intervention gave positive feedback on various components, with results suggesting an online intervention could be an effective means of providing information/support to women with ABC, given improved specificity/relevance to ABC and increased tailoring to individual circumstances and preferences. Adaptation of an existing online intervention for early stage cancer appears to be a promising avenue to address the information and support needs of women with ABC.

  6. Survivorship Care Plan Information Needs: Perspectives of Safety-Net Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Nancy J; Napoles, Tessa M; Banks, Priscilla J; Orenstein, Fern S; Luce, Judith A; Joseph, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) 2005 recommendation, few care organizations have instituted standard survivorship care plans (SCPs). Low health literacy and low English proficiency are important factors to consider in SCP development. Our study aimed to identify information needs and survivorship care plan preferences of low literacy, multi-lingual patients to support the transition from oncology to primary care and ongoing learning in survivorship. We conducted focus groups in five languages with African American, Latina, Russian, Filipina, White, and Chinese medically underserved breast cancer patients. Topics explored included the transition to primary care, access to information, knowledge of treatment history, and perspectives on SCPs. Analysis of focus group data identified three themes: 1) the need for information and education on the transition between "active treatment" and "survivorship"; 2) information needed (and often not obtained) from providers; and 3) perspectives on SCP content and delivery. Our data point to the need to develop a process as well as written information for medically underserved breast cancer patients. An SCP document will not replace direct communication with providers about treatment, symptom management and transition, a communication that is missing in participating safety-net patients' experiences of cancer care. Women turned to peer support and community-based organizations in the absence of information from providers. "Clear and effective" communication of survivorship care for safety-net patients requires dedicated staff trained to address wide-ranging information needs and uncertainties.

  7. Generating Concise Natural Language Summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Kathleen; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an approach to summarization that combines information from multiple facts into a single sentence using linguistic constructions. Describes two applications: one produces summaries of basketball games, and the other contains summaries of telephone network planning activity. Both summarize input data as opposed to full text. Discusses…

  8. Workshop Summary for Maintaining Innovation and Security in Biotechnology: Lessons Learned from Nuclear, Chemical, and Informational Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althouse, Paris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-11

    In the fast-paced field of biotechnology where innovation has such far-reaching impacts on human health and the environment, dealing with the implications of possible illicit activities, accidents or unintended research consequences with potential detrimental societal impacts tends to remain in the background. While controls may be inevitable for the biotech industry, workshop attendees agreed that the way in which controls are implemented will play a major role in the agility and innovation of the biotechnology industry. There is little desire to slow down the pace of the gains while dealing with the security issues that arise. As was seen from the brief examinations of the Nuclear, Chemical, and Information Technology sectors explored in this workshop, establishing a regulatory regime needs to be a partnership between the public, corporate interests, scientists, and the government. Regulation is often written to combat perceived risk rather than actual risk—the public’s perceptions (occasionally even fictional portrayals) can spur regulatory efforts. This leads to the need for a thorough and continuing assessment of the risks posed by modern biotechnology. Inadequate or minimal risk assessment might expedite development in the short term but has potential negative long-term security and economic consequences. Industry and the technical community also often have a large role in setting regulatory policy, especially when well-crafted incentives are incorporated into the regulations. Such incentives might actually lead to enhanced innovation while poorly designed incentives can actually reduce safety and security. Any regulations should be as agile and flexible as the technology they regulate and when applied to biotechnologies they will need a new framework for thinking and implementing. The new framework should consider biotechnology as a technology and not simply a science since it is an extremely complex and adaptive system. This suggests the need to invest

  9. Santería as Informal Mental Health Support Among U.S. Latinos with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ROSARIO, ADELAIDA M.; DE LA ROSA, MARIO

    2014-01-01

    This article explores and examines Santería’s function as a culturally congruent informal mental health support that assists U.S. Latinos to cope with the psychosocial sequelae of living with cancer. Research has demonstrated that Santería serves as a mediating institution for many Latinos. The tradition functions as both a religion and a health care system within various Latino subgroups and has functioned as an informal mental health service in occurrences of health versus illness.

  10. Side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients : The Internet as an information source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, S; Käsmann, L; Fahlbusch, F B; Rades, D; Vordermark, D

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women necessitating adjuvant radiotherapy. As the Internet has become a major source of information for cancer patients, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of websites giving information on side effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. A patients' search for the English terms "breast cancer - radiotherapy - side effects" and the corresponding German terms "Brustkrebs - Strahlentherapie - Nebenwirkungen" was carried out twice (5 months apart) using the search engine Google. The first 30 search results each were evaluated using the validated 16-question DISCERN Plus instrument, the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria. The overall quality (DISCERN score) of the retrieved websites was further compared to queries via Bing and Yahoo search engines. The DISCERN score showed a great range, with the majority of websites ranking fair to poor. Significantly superior results were found for English websites, particularly for webpages run by hospitals/universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGO), when compared to the respective German categories. In general, only a minority of websites met all JAMA benchmarks and was HONcode certified (both languages). We did not determine a relevant temporal change in website ranking among the top ten search hits, while significant variation occurred thereafter. Mean overall DISCERN score was similar between the various search engines. The Internet can give breast cancer patients seeking information on side effects of radiotherapy an overview. However, based on the currently low overall quality of websites and the lack of transparency for the average layperson, we emphasize the value of personal contact with the treating radio-oncologist in order to integrate and interpret the information found online.

  11. Side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. The Internet as an information source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, S.; Kaesmann, L.; Rades, D.; Fahlbusch, F.B.; Vordermark, D.

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women necessitating adjuvant radiotherapy. As the Internet has become a major source of information for cancer patients, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of websites giving information on side effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. A patients' search for the English terms ''breast cancer - radiotherapy - side effects'' and the corresponding German terms ''Brustkrebs - Strahlentherapie - Nebenwirkungen'' was carried out twice (5 months apart) using the search engine Google. The first 30 search results each were evaluated using the validated 16-question DISCERN Plus instrument, the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria. The overall quality (DISCERN score) of the retrieved websites was further compared to queries via Bing and Yahoo search engines. The DISCERN score showed a great range, with the majority of websites ranking fair to poor. Significantly superior results were found for English websites, particularly for webpages run by hospitals/universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGO), when compared to the respective German categories. In general, only a minority of websites met all JAMA benchmarks and was HONcode certified (both languages). We did not determine a relevant temporal change in website ranking among the top ten search hits, while significant variation occurred thereafter. Mean overall DISCERN score was similar between the various search engines. The Internet can give breast cancer patients seeking information on side effects of radiotherapy an overview. However, based on the currently low overall quality of websites and the lack of transparency for the average layperson, we emphasize the value of personal contact with the treating radio-oncologist in order to integrate and interpret the information found online. (orig.) [de

  12. Interrelationships between Health Behaviors and Coping Strategies among Informal Caregivers of Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzelman, Kristin; Kent, Erin E.; Rowland, Julia H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recent research among cancer survivors suggests that health behaviors and coping are intertwined, with important implications for positive behavior change and health. Informal caregivers may have poor health behaviors, and caregivers' health behaviors have been linked to those of survivors. Aims: This hypothesis generating study…

  13. Gender Differences in Self-Silencing and Psychological Distress in Informal Cancer Carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Jane M.; Perz, Janette

    2010-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in self-silencing, the relationship between self-silencing and psychological distress, and reasons for self-silencing in informal cancer carers (329 women, 155 men), using a mixed-method design. Men reported greater self-silencing than women on the Silencing the Self Scale; however, women reported higher…

  14. Interventions to improve recall of medical information in cancer patients: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, N. van der; Jansen, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.; Weert, J. van

    2008-01-01

    This systematic review investigates which interventions are effective to improve recall of medical information in cancer patients. A literature research was done in PubMed, PsychINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Library, following the guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration. The methodological quality of

  15. Skin cancer concerns and genetic risk information-seeking in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, J; Kaphingst, K A; Baser, R; Li, Y; Hensley-Alford, S; McBride, C M

    2012-01-01

    Genomic testing for common genetic variants associated with skin cancer risk could enable personalized risk feedback to motivate skin cancer screening and sun protection. In a cross-sectional study, we investigated whether skin cancer cognitions and behavioral factors, sociodemographics, family factors, and health information-seeking were related to perceived importance of learning about how (a) genes and (b) health habits affect personal health risks using classification and regression trees (CART). The sample (n = 1,772) was collected in a large health maintenance organization as part of the Multiplex Initiative, ranged in age from 25-40, was 53% female, 41% Caucasian, and 59% African-American. Most reported that they placed somewhat to very high importance on learning about how genes (79%) and health habits (88%) affect their health risks. Social influence actors were associated with information-seeking about genes and health habits. Awareness of family history was associated with importance of health habit, but not genetic, information-seeking. The investment of family and friends in health promotion may be a primary motivator for prioritizing information-seeking about how genes and health habits affect personal health risks and may contribute to the personal value, or personal utility, of risk information. Individuals who seek such risk information may be receptive to interventions aimed to maximize the social implications of healthy lifestyle change to reduce their health risks. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Potential spillover educational effects of cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising on cancer patients' increased information seeking behaviors: results from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy S L

    2014-06-01

    Spillover effects of exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of cancer treatments on patients' general inquiry about their treatments and managing their illness are not well understood. This study examines the effects of cancer patients' exposure to cancer-related DTCA on subsequent health information seeking behaviors from clinician and non-clinician sources (lay media and interpersonal contacts). Using a longitudinal survey design over 3 years, data was collected from cancer survivors diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer who were randomly sampled from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Study outcome measures include patients' information engagement with their clinicians and information seeking from non-medical sources about cancer treatment and quality of life issues, measured in the second survey. The predictor variable is the frequency of exposure to cancer-related DTCA since diagnosis, measured at the round 1 survey. The analyses utilized lagged-weighted multivariate regressions and adjusted for round 1 levels of patient-clinician engagement, information seeking from nonmedical sources, and confounders. Exposure to cancer-related DTCA is associated with increased levels of subsequent patient-clinician information engagement (B = .023, 95% CI = .005-.040, p = .012), controlling for confounders. In comparison, exposure to DTCA is marginally significant in predicting health information seeking from non-clinician sources (B = .009, 95% CI = -.001-.018, p = .067). Cancer-related DTCA has potentially beneficial spillover effects on health information seeking behaviors among cancer patients. Exposure to DTCA predicts (a little) more patient engagement with their physicians.

  17. Potential Spillover Educational Effects Of Cancer-Related Direct-To-Consumer Advertising On Cancer Patients’ Increased Information Seeking Behaviors: Results From A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy SL

    2014-01-01

    Spillover effects of exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of cancer treatments on patients’ general inquiry about their treatments and managing their illness are not well understood. This study examines the effects of cancer patients’ exposure to cancer-related DTCA on subsequent health information seeking behaviors from clinician and non-clinician sources (lay media and interpersonal contacts). Using a longitudinal survey design over three years, data was collected from cancer survivors diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer who were randomly sampled from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Study outcome measures include patients’ information engagement with their clinicians and information seeking from non-medical sources about cancer treatment and quality of life issues, measured in the second survey. The predictor variable is the frequency of exposure to cancer-related DTCA since diagnosis, measured at the round 1 survey. The analyses utilized lagged weighted multivariate regressions and adjusted for round 1 levels of patient-clinician engagement, information seeking from non-medical sources, and confounders. Exposure to cancer-related DTCA is associated with increased levels of subsequent patient-clinician information engagement (B=.023, 95%CI=.005 to .040, p=.012), controlling for confounders. In comparison, exposure to DTCA is marginally significant in predicting health information seeking from non-clinician sources (B=.009, 95%CI=−.001 to .018, p=.067). Cancer-related DTCA has potentially beneficial spillover effects on health information seeking behaviors among cancer patients. Exposure to DTCA predicts (a little) more patient engagement with their physicians. PMID:24254248

  18. Improving the Deaf community's access to prostate and testicular cancer information: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkins, Ann; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Ko, Celine; Branz, Patricia; Marsh, Shane; Bovee, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background Members of the Deaf community face communication barriers to accessing health information. To resolve these inequalities, educational programs must be designed in the appropriate format and language to meet their needs. Methods Deaf men (102) were surveyed before, immediately following, and two months after viewing a 52-minute prostate and testicular cancer video in American Sign Language (ASL) with open text captioning and voice overlay. To provide the Deaf community with information equivalent to that available to the hearing community, the video addressed two cancer topics in depth. While the inclusion of two cancer topics lengthened the video, it was anticipated to reduce redundancy and encourage men of diverse ages to learn in a supportive, culturally aligned environment while also covering more topics within the partnership's limited budget. Survey data were analyzed to evaluate the video's impact on viewers' pre- and post-intervention understanding of prostate and testicular cancers, as well as respondents' satisfaction with the video, exposure to and use of early detection services, and sources of cancer information. Results From baseline to immediately post-intervention, participants' overall knowledge increased significantly, and this gain was maintained at the two-month follow-up. Men of diverse ages were successfully recruited, and this worked effectively as a support group. However, combining two complex cancer topics, in depth, in one video appeared to make it more difficult for participants to retain as many relevant details specific to each cancer. Participants related that there was so much information that they would need to watch the video more than once to understand each topic fully. When surveyed about their best sources of health information, participants ranked doctors first and showed a preference for active rather than passive methods of learning. Conclusion After viewing this ASL video, participants showed significant increases

  19. WE-B-207-02: CT Lung Cancer Screening and the Medical Physicist: A Dosimetry Summary of CT Participants in the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan

  20. WE-B-207-02: CT Lung Cancer Screening and the Medical Physicist: A Dosimetry Summary of CT Participants in the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. [National Cancer Institute (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan

  1. Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkham, M.

    1991-01-01

    This summary will begin with short remarks, trying to recall some of the spirit of the presentations of each of the speakers during the first day, with no attempt at detail or completeness, given the need for a 20:1 compression relative to the original talk. The author hopes these idiosyncratic recollections do not infuriate the speakers too much. Since the speakers on the second day presented such interlocking topics, he simply tries to present some sort of consensus report, to which he adds some comments of his own. The two talks preceding this Summary on the final day dealt with the prospects for applications; since he had no chance to attempt to prepare a proper report on these, he says only a few words about those presentations

  2. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  3. [Impact of an informative intervention on the colorectal cancer screening program in primary care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Aracil, Llúcia; Binefa-Rodriguez, Gemma; Milà-Diaz, Núria; Lluch-Canut, M Teresa; Puig-Llobet, Montse; Garcia-Martinez, Montse

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of an intervention in primary care professionals on their current knowledge about colorectal cancer screening, subsequent surveillance recommendations and referral strategies. Cluster randomized controlled trial. Primary Care Centers in L'Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona). Primary Care Professionals (doctors and nurses). Training session in six of the 12 centers (randomly selected) about the colorrectal cancer screening program, and three emails with key messages. Professionals and centers characteristics and two contextual variables; involvement of professionals in the screening program; information about colorectal cancer knowledge, risk factors, screening procedures, surveillance recommendations and referral strategies. The total score mean on the first questionnaire was 8.07 (1.38) and the second 8.31 (1.39). No statistically significant differences between the intervention and control groups were found, however, in 9 out of 11 questions the percentage of correct responses was increased in the intervention group, mostly related to the surveillance after the diagnostic examination. The intervention improves the percentage of correct answers, especially in those in which worst score obtained in the first questionnaire. This study shows that professionals are familiar with colorectal cancer screening, but there's a need to maintain frequent communication in order to keep up to date the information related to the colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Certification of Public Librarians in the United States. A Detailed Summary of Legally Mandated and Voluntary Certification Plans for Public Librarians Based on Information Supplied by the Various Certificating State Agencies or Other Appropriate Sources. 3rd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Mary J., Ed.

    This report contains summaries of legally mandated and voluntary certification plans for public librarians in the United States based on information supplied by the various certifying state agencies or other appropriate sources in April 1979. Each plan is identified by the descriptive terms "mandatory" (certification required by law--23 states),…

  5. Certification of Public Librarians in the United States; A Detailed Summary of Legal and Voluntary Certification Plans for Public Librarians Based on Information Supplied by the Various Certificating State Agencies or other Appropriate Sources, 2nd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Ruth R.; Coyne, John R.

    Contained in this report is a detailed summary of legal and voluntary certification plans for public librarians in each of the 50 states. Descriptions of the certification plans for public librarians are based on information supplied by state agencies in September 1971. Each plan is identified by the descriptive terms--mandatory, permissive or…

  6. Summary talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, H.

    1978-10-01

    A general overview is given in this high energy physics conference summary. Quantum chromodynamics as a theory of strong interactions and studied by experimental tests, SU(2) x U(1) theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions and its experimental tests, weak interactions above 100 GeV, simple unification of weak and electromagnetic interactions, and the grand and the ultimate unifications with extended supergravity are discussed. 28 references

  7. Summary talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    In this summary talk some implications of points raised during the Daresbury Study Weekend on heavy-ion reactions are examined and discussed in particular those concerning polarized heavy ions, the connection between analyzing powers and dynamics, transfer reactions, total reaction cross section measurements with polarized beams, and the implications of break-up reaction results for theories of nuclear reactions involving loosely bound projectiles. (U.K.)

  8. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  9. A lack of information engagement among colorectal cancer screening non-attenders: cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay C. Kobayashi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NHS Cancer Screening Programmes in England now operate a policy of ‘informed choice’ about participation in cancer screening. Engagement with written information about screening is important to facilitate informed choice, although the degree to which the screening-eligible public engages with the available information is unknown. We examined the association between reading of the standard informational booklet (‘Bowel Cancer Screening: The Facts' and participation in the nationally organised NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 1307 adults who were age-eligible for nationally organised colorectal cancer (CRC; also called bowel cancer in a population-based survey in England in 2014. Respondents were shown an image of ‘The Facts’ booklet and were asked how much of it they had read when they received their screening invitation (‘none’, ‘a little’, ‘some’, ‘most’, ‘almost all’, or ‘all’. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations between screening uptake status (‘never’ vs. ‘ever’ and self-reported reading of ‘The Facts’ booklet (dichotomised to ‘none vs. ‘any’, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, educational attainment, and occupation-based social grade. Results Overall, 69 % of the sample (908/1307 had participated in CRC screening at least once (‘ever’ screeners. One-fifth of the sample reported that they had read ‘none’ of ‘The Facts’ booklet (22 %; 287/1307, while half reported having read ‘all’ of it (52 %; 680/1307. Reading of the booklet was strongly differential according to screening uptake status: nearly two-thirds of ‘never’ screeners had read none of ‘The Facts’ booklet (63 %; 251/399, compared to less than one in twenty ‘ever’ screeners (4 %; 36/908; adjusted OR = 39.0; 95 % CI: 26.2-58.1 for reading ‘none’ in ‘never’ vs.

  10. Cancer-Related Post-traumatic Stress (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer-related post-traumatic stress (PTS) can occur any time from diagnosis until the end of treatment; treatment used in PTSD can be useful in reducing distress. Get comprehensive information on PTS in this summary for clinicians.

  11. Oral Cavity, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about factors that may influence the risk of developing oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers and about approaches that may help in the prevention of these diseases.

  12. Cognitive Impairment in Adults with Non-CNS Cancers (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognitive impairment (problems with memory and thinking) is often reported by cancer patients and survivors and is sometimes called "chemobrain" or "chemofog.” Get detailed information about cognitive impairment and treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  13. [Information quality in general public French-speaking websites dedicated to oral cancer detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivien, A; Kowalski, V; Chatellier, A; Babin, E; Bénateau, H; Veyssière, A

    2017-02-01

    The goal set by the French highest national authorities in the 2014-2019 Cancer Plan is to "heal more sick persons by promoting early diagnosis through screening". Screening requires information. Nowadays, Internet allows for access to information "in one click". The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of information found on the Internet. Several sites dedicated to oral cavity cancer screening were selected on Google. The quality of health information found in these sites was evaluated by the DISCERN questionnaire. The quality of decision support provided by the sites was evaluated by the IPDAS checklist. Twenty-seven sites were selected. The average DISCERN score was 25.1/75 (15/75 to 40/75). Eighteen sites (66.6%) had very poor, 8 sites (29.6%) had poor and 1 site had average information quality. IPDAS scores ranged from 11.1 to 38.1. Eight sites (29.6%) had less than 20%, 14 sites (51.9%) had between 20 and 30% and 5 sites (18.5%) had 30% or more validated criteria. No site achieved the pass mark. The quality of general public French-speaking website dedicated to oral cancer detection is very bad. The role of health professionals such as general practitioners and head and neck surgeons, remains essential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Head and neck cancer information on the internet: type, accuracy and content.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Riordain, Richeal

    2009-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the type, accuracy and content of information available on the internet regarding head and neck cancer. The search engine Google was used to generate a list of the top 100 websites about head and neck cancer. The websites were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument and the JAMA benchmarks and whether the site displayed the Health on the Net seal was also recorded. The search yielded 1,650,000 sites on the Google website. Of the top 100 sites, a total of 33 sites were suitable for analysis due to duplicate links, non-functioning links and irrelevant website. 45% achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and 18% achieved only 1 benchmark. No website receiving the maximum mark on the overall score and four websites received the lowest overall score regarding the DISCERN instrument. The question with the poorest response score was \\'Does it describe how the treatment choices affect overall quality of life?\\' 39% of the websites displayed the Health on the Net (HON) seal. A wide variety of types of information are available on the internet regarding head and neck cancer with variable accuracy levels based on both Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmarks and DISCERN. The onus lies with the practitioner to guide the patient regarding scientific reliability of information and to direct the patient in filtering the information sourced. The inclusion of quality of life related information is currently lacking and should be addressed to ensure a more comprehensive understanding for patients of treatment options.

  15. Improving the quality of cancer care in America through health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Thomas W; Sledge, George W; Levit, Laura; Ganz, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    A recent report from the Institute of Medicine titled Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, identifies improvement in information technology (IT) as essential to improving the quality of cancer care in America. The report calls for implementation of a learning healthcare IT system: a system that supports patient-clinician interactions by providing patients and clinicians with the information and tools necessary to make well informed medical decisions and to support quality measurement and improvement. While some elements needed for a learning healthcare system are already in place for cancer, they are incompletely implemented, have functional deficiencies, and are not integrated in a way that creates a true learning healthcare system. To achieve the goal of a learning cancer care delivery system, clinicians, professional organizations, government, and the IT industry will have to partner, develop, and incentivize participation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. The clinical communication and information challenges associated with the psychosexual aspects of prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Susan A; Tucker, Samantha R; McPhillips, Rebecca; Peters, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    Prostate cancer and its treatment have significant sexual side effects that necessitate timely patient information and open communication with healthcare professionals. However, very little is known about men's experiences of talking to clinicians about the psychosexual difficulties associated with the disease. This study aims to advance understanding of men's perceptions of the communication and information challenges associated with the psychosexual aspects of prostate cancer and its treatment. Between October 2013 and April 2014, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 men from the UK who had been treated for prostate cancer. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes describe the communication challenges men face: (1) It can be too soon to talk about sex; (2) the psychology of sex is missing; (3) communication is not individually tailored. Clinicians might usefully (1) consider and discuss with patients how their psychosexual communication needs and information processing abilities may fluctuate across the cancer timeline; (2) initiate discussions about the consequences of treatment that extend beyond biological and mechanical aspects to include emotional and relational factors; (3) tailor communication to the dynamic mix of attributes that shape men's individual psychosexual needs, including their relationship status, sexual orientation, sexual motivations and values. Skills-based training in communication and psychosexual awareness may facilitate the proactive and permissive stance clinicians need to discuss sexual side effects with a heterogeneous group of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Follow-up Care Education and Information: Identifying Cancer Survivors in Need of More Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Denalee M; Hudson, Shawna V; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Bator, Alicja; Lee, Heather S; Gundersen, Daniel A; Miller, Suzanne M

    2016-03-01

    Cancer survivors engage in cancer screenings and protective health behaviors at suboptimal rates despite their increased risk for future illness. Survivorship care plans and other educational strategies to prepare cancer survivors to adopt engaged roles in managing long-term follow-up care and health risks are needed. In a sample of cancer survivors, we identified patient characteristics and psychosocial predictors associated with increased follow-up care informational needs. Cross-sectional surveys were administered to early-stage breast and prostate survivors (N = 278; 68 % breast) at least 2 years post treatment from four community hospital programs in New Jersey between May 2012 and July 2013. Patient demographics, medical history, psychosocial characteristics (i.e., worries about the future, fear of disease recurrence, and patient activation), and perceptions of oncology and primary care were assessed. African-American survivors (AOR = 2.69, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.68) and survivors with higher comorbidity (AOR =1.16, CI 1.01-1.33) were more likely to want additional information to guide follow-up care. Adjusting for race and comorbidities, survivors who wanted more information to guide their follow-up care reported greater worries about the future (p < 0.05) and fears about disease recurrence (p < 0.05) compared to those who did not want additional information. Results emphasize the need to develop cancer survivorship educational strategies that are both responsive to the needs of specific populations (e.g., African-American survivors and patients with multiple comorbidities) and the psychosocial profiles that motivate requests for more extensive follow-up guidance.

  18. Satisfaction with fertility- and sexuality-related information in young women with breast cancer--ELIPPSE40 cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Charif, Ali; Bouhnik, Anne-Déborah; Rey, Dominique; Provansal, Magali; Courbiere, Blandine; Spire, Bruno; Mancini, Julien

    2015-08-05

    Young breast cancer survivors are often dissatisfied with the information provided on fertility and sexuality. Our aim was to discuss possible contributing factors and to propose strategies to increase patient satisfaction with such information. Using the French National Health Insurance System database, we constituted the ELIPPSE40 regional cohort of 623 women, aged 18-40, diagnosed with breast cancer between 2005 and 2011. As of January 2014, 319 women had taken part in the 10-, 16-, 28 and 48-month telephone interviews. Satisfaction with the information provided about the potential impact of cancer and its treatment on fertility and sexuality was assessed at 48 months after diagnosis on 5-point Likert scales. Four years after diagnosis, only 53.0 and 42.6% of women were satisfied with fertility- and sexuality-related information, respectively, without any significant change over the 2009-2014 period (P = 0.585 and P = 0.676 respectively). The two issues were moderately correlated (ρ = 0.60; P fertility-related information was greater among women with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer who had the opportunity to ask questions at the time of cancer disclosure. Satisfaction with sexuality-related information increased with the spontaneous provision of information by physicians at cancer disclosure. Promoting both patients' question asking behavior and more systematic information could improve communication between caregivers and young breast cancer survivors and address distinct unmet needs regarding fertility- and sexuality- related information.

  19. Ecuadorian Cancer Patients' Preference for Information and Communication Technologies: Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrez Ojeda, Ivan; Vanegas, Emanuel; Torres, Michell; Calderón, Juan Carlos; Calero, Erick; Cherrez, Annia; Felix, Miguel; Mata, Valeria; Cherrez, Sofia; Simancas, Daniel

    2018-02-20

    The instantaneous spread of information, low costs, and broad availability of information and communication technologies (ICTs) make them an attractive platform for managing care, patient communication, and medical interventions in cancer treatment. There is little information available in Latin America about the level of usage of ICTs for and by cancer patients. Our study attempts to fill this gap. The aim of this study was to assess the level of ICT use and patterns of preferences among cancer patients. We conducted an anonymous cross-sectional survey study in 500 Ecuadorian cancer patients. This questionnaire consisted of 22 items about demographic and clinical data, together with the preferences of people who use ICTs. Chi-square, crude, and adjusted logistic regressions were performed. Of the total, 43.2% (216/500) of participants reported that they had access to the Internet, and 25.4% (127/500) reported that they neither owned a cell phone nor did they have access to the Internet. The Internet constituted the highest usage rate as a source of information about malignant diseases (74.3%, 162/218) regardless of age (PWhatsApp (66.5%, 145/218) and short message service (SMS) text messaging (61.0%, 133/218) were widely reported as interesting communication channels. Similarly, WhatsApp (72.0%, 157/218) followed by SMS (63.8%, 139/218) were reported as the preferred ICTs through which patients would like to ask physicians about diseases. Adjusted regression analysis showed that patients aged between 40 and 64 years were more likely to be interested in receiving information through SMS (odds ratio, OR 5.09, 95% CI 1.92-13.32), as well as for asking questions to physicians through this same media (OR 9.78, CI 3.45-27.67) than the oldest group. WhatsApp, SMS, and email are effective and widely used ICTs that can promote communication between cancer patients and physicians. According to age range, new ICTs such as Facebook are still emerging. Future studies should

  20. Ecuadorian Cancer Patients’ Preference for Information and Communication Technologies: Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background The instantaneous spread of information, low costs, and broad availability of information and communication technologies (ICTs) make them an attractive platform for managing care, patient communication, and medical interventions in cancer treatment. There is little information available in Latin America about the level of usage of ICTs for and by cancer patients. Our study attempts to fill this gap. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the level of ICT use and patterns of preferences among cancer patients. Methods We conducted an anonymous cross-sectional survey study in 500 Ecuadorian cancer patients. This questionnaire consisted of 22 items about demographic and clinical data, together with the preferences of people who use ICTs. Chi-square, crude, and adjusted logistic regressions were performed. Results Of the total, 43.2% (216/500) of participants reported that they had access to the Internet, and 25.4% (127/500) reported that they neither owned a cell phone nor did they have access to the Internet. The Internet constituted the highest usage rate as a source of information about malignant diseases (74.3%, 162/218) regardless of age (PWhatsApp (66.5%, 145/218) and short message service (SMS) text messaging (61.0%, 133/218) were widely reported as interesting communication channels. Similarly, WhatsApp (72.0%, 157/218) followed by SMS (63.8%, 139/218) were reported as the preferred ICTs through which patients would like to ask physicians about diseases. Adjusted regression analysis showed that patients aged between 40 and 64 years were more likely to be interested in receiving information through SMS (odds ratio, OR 5.09, 95% CI 1.92-13.32), as well as for asking questions to physicians through this same media (OR 9.78, CI 3.45-27.67) than the oldest group. Conclusions WhatsApp, SMS, and email are effective and widely used ICTs that can promote communication between cancer patients and physicians. According to age range, new ICTs such as

  1. The Internet as a source of health information: experiences of cancer survivors and caregivers with healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C

    2011-05-01

    To describe the experiences of cancer survivors and caregivers with healthcare providers in the context of the Internet as a source of health information. Qualitative description. Online cancer communities hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources. Purposive sample of 488 cancer survivors, with varying cancer types and survivorship stages, and caregivers. Secondary data analysis using Krippendorff's thematic clustering technique of qualitative content analysis. Survivorship, healthcare relationships, and the Internet. Disenchantment with healthcare relationships was associated with failed expectations related to evidence-based practice, clinical expertise, informational support, and therapeutic interpersonal communication. Survivors and caregivers exercised power in healthcare relationships through collaboration, direct confrontation, becoming expert, and endorsement to influence and control care decisions. Disenchantment propelled cancer survivors and caregivers to search the Internet for health information and resources. Conversely, Internet information-seeking precipitated the experience of disenchantment. Through online health information and resources, concealed failures in healthcare relationships were revealed and cancer survivors and caregivers were empowered to influence and control care decisions. The findings highlight failures in cancer survivorship care and underscore the importance of novel interdisciplinary programs and models of care that support evidence-informed decision making, self-management, and improved quality of life. Healthcare professionals need to receive education on survivors' use of the Internet as a source of health information and its impact on healthcare relationships. Future research should include studies examining the relationship between disenchantment and survivorship outcomes.

  2. 76 FR 21736 - Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer) in Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... Program report recommended that pathology reviews be carried out to resolve differences of opinion in the... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences plan to jointly sponsor an independent Pathology Working Group... the listening session, indicate in your registration that you would like to make oral comments and...

  3. Satisfaction with information provided to Danish cancer patients: validation and survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit; Lundstrøm, Louise Hyldborg; Groenvold, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction. The questionnaire was validated by patient-observer agreement and cognitive interviews. The prevalence of dissatisfaction was assessed in a cross-sectional sample of all cancer patients in contact with hospitals during the past year in three Danish counties. The validation showed that the CPWQ performed well. Between 3 and 23% of the 1490 participating patients were dissatisfied with each of the measured aspects of information. The highest level of dissatisfaction was reported regarding the guidance, support and help provided when the diagnosis was given. Younger patients were consistently more dissatisfied than older patients. The brief CPWQ performs well for survey purposes. The survey depicts the heterogeneous patient population encountered by hospital staff and showed that younger patients probably had higher expectations or a higher need for information and that those with more severe diagnoses/prognoses require extra care in providing information. Four brief questions can efficiently assess information needs. With increasing demands for information, a wide range of innovative initiatives is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Awareness of diagnosis, and information-seeking behavior of hospitalized cancer patients in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokalaki, Eirini I; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Brokalaki, Hero

    2005-11-01

    The goal of our study was to evaluate the extent of disease-related knowledge and the need for further information of cancer patients in Greece. We evaluated 203 mentally competent adult cancer patients hospitalized in general and oncological hospitals in the city of Athens and its suburbs. Data were collected by means of semistructured interviews. Patients were evaluated as to whether they had awareness of their diagnosis. Those who did so (n = 83) were further questioned about additional disease-related information. The majority of patients (59%) claimed to have no knowledge of their diagnosis. Women (p = 0.004) as well as high school and university graduates (p = 0.024) showed significantly superior levels of information when compared to men and graduates of elementary schools, respectively. Age was also a factor that influenced the level of the awareness of the diagnosis and the request for additional information: patients who were informed about the diagnosis and patients who asked for more information were significantly younger than their counterparts who ignored the diagnosis (p family beliefs, "mind-set" difficulties, and organizational issues should not become barriers to the patients' right to be fully informed of their diagnoses and choices of potential therapies.

  5. The Health Behavior Information Needs and Preferences of Teenage and Young Adult Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Gemma; Hough, Rachael E; Gravestock, Helen L; Jackson, Sarah E; Fisher, Abigail

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to establish teenage and young adult cancer survivors (TYACS') specific interest in receiving information on physical activity, diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption and their preferences regarding the delivery, format, and timing of such health behavior information. TYACS aged 13-25 years were invited to complete a questionnaire assessing the advice they had received in the past and their preferences on when and how health behavior information should be delivered. A total of 216 TYACS (mean age: 20 years; mean age at diagnosis: 16 years) completed the questionnaire. Approximately 40% of TYACS received no advice on physical activity and diet, and more than half (54%) received no advice on weight management. The majority (>70%) reported receiving no advice on smoking or alcohol consumption. Interest in receiving lifestyle advice was high overall (71%) but varied across behaviors, with TYACS reporting a greater level of interest in receiving advice on health protective behaviors (physical activity and diet) than health risk behaviors (smoking and alcohol consumption) (∼85% vs. ∼15%, respectively). TYACS reported seeking health behavior information from health professionals and were most interested in information delivered online or in the form of a mobile app. Similar proportions (18%-29%) felt health behavior information should first be provided before, during, immediately after, and post-treatment. It is evident that there is a need to develop lifestyle interventions in a range of formats available to TYACS throughout the care pathway to address the health behavior information needs of young people with cancer.

  6. An integrated clinical and genomic information system for cancer precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeongjun; Choi, Taekjin; Kim, Jongho; Park, Jisub; Seo, Jihae; Kim, Sangok; Kwon, Yeajee; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2018-04-20

    Increasing affordability of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has created an opportunity for realizing genomically-informed personalized cancer therapy as a path to precision oncology. However, the complex nature of genomic information presents a huge challenge for clinicians in interpreting the patient's genomic alterations and selecting the optimum approved or investigational therapy. An elaborate and practical information system is urgently needed to support clinical decision as well as to test clinical hypotheses quickly. Here, we present an integrated clinical and genomic information system (CGIS) based on NGS data analyses. Major components include modules for handling clinical data, NGS data processing, variant annotation and prioritization, drug-target-pathway analysis, and population cohort explorer. We built a comprehensive knowledgebase of genes, variants, drugs by collecting annotated information from public and in-house resources. Structured reports for molecular pathology are generated using standardized terminology in order to help clinicians interpret genomic variants and utilize them for targeted cancer therapy. We also implemented many features useful for testing hypotheses to develop prognostic markers from mutation and gene expression data. Our CGIS software is an attempt to provide useful information for both clinicians and scientists who want to explore genomic information for precision oncology.

  7. Abnormal ovarian cancer screening test result: women's informational, psychological and practical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patricia Y; Graves, Kristi D; Pavlik, Edward J; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the identification of cost-effective approaches to screening for ovarian cancer (OC). Transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) is one such screening approach. Approximately 5-7% of routine TVS screening tests yield abnormal results. Some women experience significant distress after receipt of an abnormal TVS screening test. Four focus groups provided in-depth, qualitative data regarding the informational, psychological, and practical needs of women after the receipt of an abnormal TVS result. Through question and content analytic procedures, we identified four themes: anticipation, emotional response, role of the screening technician, and impact of prior cancer experiences. Results provide initial guidance toward development of interventions to promote adaptive responses after receipt of an abnormal cancer screening test result.

  8. Stories about breast cancer in Australian women's magazines: information sources for risk, early detection and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, L; Withnall, J; Harris, R; White, K; Beale, B; Hobson, J; Durham, M; Kristjanson, L

    2001-06-01

    Sixty articles in five Australian women's magazines were analyzed for journalistic qualities, metaphors, narrative features and accuracy of clinical facts related to risk, early detection and treatment of breast cancer. The stories were features, news features or soft news stories. The stories reflected the 'good news' editorial style of women's magazines. A dominant theme in the stories was that early detection of breast cancer is crucial and equals survival. While there were few inaccuracies in the stories, there was little detail of treatment modalities, an emphasis on lifestyle as a risk factor and a prevailing message that a genetic history of breast cancer means you will get it. A major implication of the findings is that nurses, who provide information to women, must be aware of the goals of journalists and the educational power of narrative logic of stories in women's magazines.

  9. 49 CFR 1150.44 - Caption summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caption summary. 1150.44 Section 1150.44... Exempt Transactions Under 49 U.S.C. 10902 for Class III Rail Carriers § 1150.44 Caption summary. The caption summary must be in the following form. The information symbolized by numbers is identified in the...

  10. The impact of a multimedia informational intervention on healthcare service use among women and men newly diagnosed with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiselle, Carmen G; Dubois, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    This quasi-experimental longitudinal study documented the impact of a comprehensive cancer informational intervention using information technology on healthcare service use among individuals newly diagnosed with cancer. Women with breast cancer (n = 205) and men with prostate cancer (n = 45) were recruited within 8 weeks of diagnosis at 4 university teaching hospitals in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The intervention group (n = 148) received a 1-hour training on information technology use, a CD-ROM on cancer, and a list of reputable cancer-related Web sites. The intervention material was available for a period of 8 weeks. The control group (n = 102) received usual care. Self-reported questionnaires were completed at T1 (baseline), T2 (1 week after intervention), and T3 (3 months after intervention). Using multivariate statistics, the experimental group reported significantly more satisfaction with cancer information received compared to the control group. No significant differences were found between experimental and control groups in their reliance on healthcare services. However, women as opposed to men spent more time with nurses, were more satisfied with cancer information received, and relied more heavily on health services. Future research would explore whether the latter observations reflect genuine sex differences or are more contingent on the specific cancer diagnosis.

  11. Text mining of cancer-related information: review of current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasić, Irena; Livsey, Jacqueline; Keane, John A; Nenadić, Goran

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews the research literature on text mining (TM) with the aim to find out (1) which cancer domains have been the subject of TM efforts, (2) which knowledge resources can support TM of cancer-related information and (3) to what extent systems that rely on knowledge and computational methods can convert text data into useful clinical information. These questions were used to determine the current state of the art in this particular strand of TM and suggest future directions in TM development to support cancer research. A review of the research on TM of cancer-related information was carried out. A literature search was conducted on the Medline database as well as IEEE Xplore and ACM digital libraries to address the interdisciplinary nature of such research. The search results were supplemented with the literature identified through Google Scholar. A range of studies have proven the feasibility of TM for extracting structured information from clinical narratives such as those found in pathology or radiology reports. In this article, we provide a critical overview of the current state of the art for TM related to cancer. The review highlighted a strong bias towards symbolic methods, e.g. named entity recognition (NER) based on dictionary lookup and information extraction (IE) relying on pattern matching. The F-measure of NER ranges between 80% and 90%, while that of IE for simple tasks is in the high 90s. To further improve the performance, TM approaches need to deal effectively with idiosyncrasies of the clinical sublanguage such as non-standard abbreviations as well as a high degree of spelling and grammatical errors. This requires a shift from rule-based methods to machine learning following the success of similar trends in biological applications of TM. Machine learning approaches require large training datasets, but clinical narratives are not readily available for TM research due to privacy and confidentiality concerns. This issue remains the main

  12. What physicians think about the need for informed consent for communicating the risk of cancer from low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsli, Tijen; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Self, Julie L.; Rosenfeld, Jason Anders; Butler, Susan; Simoneaux, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, a subsidiary of the Food and Drug Administration, has declared that X-ray radiation at low doses is a human carcinogen. The purpose of our study was to determine if informed consent should be obtained for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiation-based imaging. Institutional review board approval was obtained for the prospective survey of 456 physicians affiliated with three tertiary hospitals by means of a written questionnaire. Physicians were asked to state their subspecialty, number of years in practice, frequency of referral for CT scanning, level of awareness about the risk of radiation-induced cancer associated with CT, knowledge of whether such information is provided to patients undergoing CT, and opinions about the need for obtaining informed consent as well as who should provide information about the radiation-induced cancer risk to patients. Physicians were also asked to specify their preference among different formats of informed consent for communicating the potential risk of radiation-induced cancer. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-squared test. Most physicians stated that informed consent should be obtained from patients undergoing radiation-based imaging (71.3%, 325/456) and the radiology department should provide information about the risk of radiation-induced cancer to these patients (54.6%, 249/456). The informed consent format that most physicians agreed with included modifications to the National Institute of Environmental Health Services report on cancer risk from low-dose radiation (20.2%, 92/456) or included information on the risk of cancer from background radiation compared to that from low-dose radiation (39.5%, 180/456). Most physicians do not know if patients are informed about cancer risk from radiation-based imaging in their institutions. However, they believe that informed consent for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer

  13. Increasing Information Dissemination in Cancer Communication: Effects of Using "Palliative," "Supportive," or "Hospice" Care Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jessica M; Greenberg, Patricia; Bagga, Margy Barbieri; Casarett, David; Propert, Kathleen

    2018-04-20

    When attempting to share information about comfort-oriented care, many use "palliative," "supportive," and "hospice" care terminology interchangeably, but we lack evidence about the effects of using these different terms. This study was designed to test whether the use of "palliative," "supportive," or "hospice" terminology can improve the dissemination of information among breast cancer patients-a large and growing oncology population. Design, Setting, and Measurement: This experimental study was conducted at a major U.S. hospital serving a diverse population. Patients visiting a cancer clinic encountered opportunities to learn more about cancer care. They were offered health materials that were described as reporting on "palliative," "supportive," or "hospice" care and the primary outcome was whether a patient decided to select or reject each. As a secondary outcome, the study measured the patient's level of interest in receiving each. Compared with alternatives, materials labeled as "supportive" care were most likely to be selected and considered valuable (p value information labeled as being about "supportive" care was significantly more likely to be selected. If these effects are supported by additional research, there may be low-cost, highly feasible changes in language choice that increase the dissemination of relevant health information.

  14. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    On 18 May 2001, the Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, within the municipality of Eurajoki. The Municipality Council and the government has made positive decisions earlier, at the end of 2000, and in compliance with the Nuclear Energy Act, Parliament's ratification was then required. The decision is valid for the spent fuel generated by the existing Finnish nuclear power plants and means that the construction of the final disposal facility is considered to be in line with the overall good of society. Earlier steps included, amongst others, the approval of the technical project by the Safety Authority. Future steps include construction of an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO (2003-2004), and application for separate construction and operating licences for the final disposal facility (from about 2010). How did this political and societal decision come about? The FSC Workshop provided the opportunity to present the history leading up to the Decision in Principle (DiP), and to examine future perspectives with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It presents, for the most part, a factual account of the individual presentations and of the discussions that took place. It relies importantly on the notes that were taken at the meeting. Most materials are elaborated upon in a fuller way in the texts that the various speakers and session moderators contributed for these proceedings. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's perspective aiming to place the results of all discussions, feedback and site visit into an international perspective. (authors)

  15. Validation study of the EORTC information questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-INFO25) in Iranian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Ahmadi Pishkuhi, Mahin; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Safiri, Saeid; Sepidarkish, Mahdi

    2015-07-01

    Developing a tool for measuring patient's needs is a vital step in the process of cancer treatment and research. In recent years, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) made a questionnaire to measure cancer patients' received information. Since validity and reliability of any instrument should be evaluated in the new environment and culture, the aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the EORTC QLQ-INFO25 in Iranian cancer patients. One hundred seventy-three patients with different stages of cancer filled questionnaire EORTC QLQ-INFO25, EORTC QLQ-C30, and EORTC IN-PATSAT32. Twenty-five patients answered the questionnaire twice at an interval of 2 weeks. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach's alpha, interclass correlation, test retest, inter-rater agreement (IRA), and exploratory factorial analyses. Using a conservative approach, the IRA for the overall relevancy and clarity of the tool was 87/86% and 83.33%, respectively. Overall appropriateness and clarity were 94.13 and 91.87%, respectively. Overall integrity of the instrument was determined to be 85%. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for all domains and total inventory were top 70 and 90%, respectively. Interclass correlation index ranges between 0.708 and 0.965. Exploratory factorial analyses demonstrate six fields suitable for instrument. Correlation between areas of the questionnaires EORTC QLQ-INFO25 and EORTC in-Patsat32 represents the convergent validity of the questionnaire. Also, results show a standard divergent validity in all domains of the questionnaire (Rho validity of the questionnaire. The results showed that Persian version of the questionnaire EORTC QLQ-INFO25 is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring the perception of information in cancer patients.

  16. Information Needs of Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer When Making Radiation Therapy Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Kelly, Gabrielle; Gross, Cary; Killelea, Brigid K; Mougalian, Sarah; Presley, Carolyn; Fraenkel, Liana; Evans, Suzanne B

    2017-07-15

    To identify the information older women with early-stage breast cancer need when making radiation therapy decisions, and who patients identify as the main decision maker. We surveyed (through face-to-face interview, telephone, or mail) women aged ≥65 years who received lumpectomy and were considering or receiving adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. The survey instrument was constructed with input from patient and professional advisory committees, including breast cancer survivors, advocates of breast cancer care and aging, clinicians, and researchers. Participants rated the importance (on a 4-point scale) of 24 statements describing the benefits, side effects, impact on daily life, and other issues of radiation therapy in relation to radiation therapy decision making. Participants also designated who was considered the key decision maker. The response rate was 56.4% (93 of 165). Mean age was 72.5 years, ranging from 65 to 93 years. More than 96% of participants indicated they were the main decision maker on receiving radiation therapy. There was wide variation in information needs regarding radiation therapy decision making. Participants rated a mean of 18 (range, 3-24) items as "essential." Participants rated items related to benefits highest, followed by side effects. Participants who were older than 75 years rated 13.9 questions as essential, whereas participants aged ≤74 years rated 18.7 as essential (P=.018). Older women desire information and have more agency and input in the decision-making process than prior literature would suggest. The variation in information needs indicates that future decision support tools should provide options to select what information would be of interest to the participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. "When information is not enough": A model for understanding BRCA-positive previvors' information needs regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah; Scherr, Courtney L; Clements, Meredith; Koruo, Rachel; Martinez, Jennifer; Ross, Amy

    2017-09-01

    To investigate BRCA-positive, unaffected patients' - referred to as previvors - information needs after testing positive for a deleterious BRCA genetic mutation. 25 qualitative interviews were conducted with previvors. Data were analyzed using the constant comparison method of grounded theory. Analysis revealed a theoretical model of previvors' information needs related to the stage of their health journey. Specifically, a four-stage model was developed based on the data: (1) pre-testing information needs, (2) post-testing information needs, (3) pre-management information needs, and (4) post-management information needs. Two recurring dimensions of desired knowledge also emerged within the stages-personal/social knowledge and medical knowledge. While previvors may be genetically predisposed to develop cancer, they have not been diagnosed with cancer, and therefore have different information needs than cancer patients and cancer survivors. This model can serve as a framework for assisting healthcare providers in meeting the specific information needs of cancer previvors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This paper is an 'executive summary' of work undertaken to review proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high level radioactive wastes in an underground repository, appropriate to the U.K. context, with particular reference to: waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially-shielded block; stages of disposal; transportation within the repository; emplacement in vertical holes or horizontal tunnels; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; and costs. The paper contains a section on general conclusions and recommendations. (U.K.)

  19. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  20. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  1. Breast cancer prevention knowledge, beliefs, and information sources between non-Hispanic and Hispanic college women for risk reduction focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Amatya, Anup; Vilchis, Hugo

    2015-02-01

    Although growing research focuses on breast cancer screenings, little is known about breast cancer prevention with risk reduction awareness for ethnic differences among college-age women. This study examined breast cancer prevention knowledge, beliefs, and information sources between non-Hispanic and Hispanic college women. Using a cross-sectional study, women at a university in the Southwest completed a 51-item survey about breast cancer risk factors, beliefs, and media and interpersonal information sources. The study was guided by McGuire's Input Output Persuasion Model. Of the 546 participants, non-Hispanic college women (n = 277) and Hispanic college women (n = 269) reported similar basic knowledge levels of modifiable breast cancer risk factors for alcohol consumption (52 %), obesity (72 %), childbearing after age 35 (63 %), and menopausal hormone therapy (68 %) using bivariate analyses. Most common information sources were Internet (75 %), magazines (69 %), provider (76 %) and friends (61 %). Least common sources were radio (44 %), newspapers (34 %), and mothers (36 %). Non-Hispanic college women with breast cancer family history were more likely to receive information from providers, friends, and mothers. Hispanic college women with a breast cancer family history were more likely to receive information from their mothers. Breast cancer prevention education for college women is needed to include risk reduction for modifiable health behavior changes as a new focus. Health professionals may target college women with more information sources including the Internet or apps.

  2. Development and application of a permit information system for shale oil (PERMISSO). Final report appendix: summary sheets of regulations required for oil shale development, June 1978--May 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This appendix is comprised of summaries of various governmental permits, licenses and other approvals required for oil shale development. The summaries were completed during the period June--October 1978, and are current as of July 1, 1978, although more recent authority was cited in some cases. One of the major purposes of Phase II of the project will be to update these summaries as statutes and regulations are added, changed or eliminated. This updating will be particularly important in the case of environmental permits and approvals. Many legislative and regulatory changes affecting environmental requirements are pending at this time and will alter many of the summaries herein. In addition, many regulatory proposals have been or likely will be challenged in the courts. When such conflicts are resolved further changes may be in order.

  3. Informing men about prostate cancer screening: a randomized controlled trial of patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Egberts, Kristine; McKenzie, Joanne E; Risbridger, Gail; Green, Sally

    2008-04-01

    Patient education materials can assist patient decision making on prostate cancer screening. To explore the effectiveness of presenting health information on prostate cancer screening using video, internet, and written interventions on patient decision making, attitudes, knowledge, and screening interest. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 161 men aged over 45, who had never been screened for prostate cancer, were randomized to receive information on prostate cancer screening. Participants were assessed at baseline and 1-week postintervention for decisional conflict, screening interest, knowledge, anxiety, and decision-making preference. A total of 156 men were followed-up at 1-week postintervention. There was no statistical, or clinical, difference in mean change in decisional conflict scores between the 3 intervention groups (video vs internet -0.06 [95% CI -0.24 to 0.12]; video vs pamphlet 0.04 [95%CI -0.15 to 0.22]; internet vs pamphlet 0.10 [95%CI -0.09 to 0.28]). There was also no statistically significant difference in mean knowledge, anxiety, decision-making preference, and screening interest between the 3 intervention groups. Results from this study indicate that there are no clinically significant differences in decisional conflict when men are presented health information on prostate cancer screening via video, written materials, or the internet. Given the equivalence of the 3 methods, other factors need to be considered in deciding which method to use. Health professionals should provide patient health education materials via a method that is most convenient to the patient and their preferred learning style.

  4. Conditional net survival: Relevant prognostic information for colorectal cancer survivors. A French population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouillard, Antoine; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Rollot, Fabien; Faivre, Jean; Jooste, Valérie; Lepage, Côme

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, survival estimates have been reported as survival from the time of diagnosis. A patient's probability of survival changes according to time elapsed since the diagnosis and this is known as conditional survival. The aim was to estimate 5-year net conditional survival in patients with colorectal cancer in a well-defined French population at yearly intervals up to 5 years. Our study included 18,300 colorectal cancers diagnosed between 1976 and 2008 and registered in the population-based digestive cancer registry of Burgundy (France). We calculated conditional 5-year net survival, using the Pohar Perme estimator, for every additional year survived after diagnosis from 1 to 5 years. The initial 5-year net survival estimates varied between 89% for stage I and 9% for advanced stage cancer. The corresponding 5-year net survival for patients alive after 5 years was 95% and 75%. Stage II and III patients who survived 5 years had a similar probability of surviving 5 more years, respectively 87% and 84%. For survivors after the first year following diagnosis, five-year conditional net survival was similar regardless of age class and period of diagnosis. For colorectal cancer survivors, conditional net survival provides relevant and complementary prognostic information for patients and clinicians. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A social media approach to inform youth about breast cancer and smoking: an exploratory descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; Struik, Laura L; Bissell, Laura J L; Graham, Raquel; Stevens, Jodie; Richardson, Chris G

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco exposure during periods of breast development has been shown to increase risk of premenopausal breast cancer. An urgent need exists, therefore, to raise awareness among adolescent girls about this new evidence, and for adolescent girls and boys who smoke to understand how their smoking puts their female peers at risk for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to develop two youth-informed, gender specific YouTube-style videos designed to raise awareness among adolescent girls and boys about tobacco exposure as a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer and to assess youths' responses to the videos and their potential for inclusion on social media platforms. Both videos consisted of a combination of moving text, novel images, animations, and youth-friendly music. A brief questionnaire was used to gather feedback on two videos using a convenience sample of 135 youth in British Columbia, Canada. The overall positive responses by girls and boys to their respective videos and their reported interest in sharing these videos via social networking suggests that this approach holds potential for other types of health promotion messaging targeting youth. The videos offer a promising messaging strategy for raising awareness about tobacco exposure as a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Tailored, gender-specific messages for use on social media hold the potential for cost-effective, health promotion and cancer prevention initiatives targeting youth.

  6. Assessing Technologies for Information-Seeking on Prostate Cancer Screening by Low-Income Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan W. McRoy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents a multipart investigation of the benefits and challenges in deploying automated question-answering as an alternative to web-based searching to provide information about prostate cancer screening for low-income men age 40 years and older. Methods: The study comprised: 1 a survey assessing current use of the Internet, mobile phones and texting; 2 a controlled observational study of both web-based searching and automated question-answering for information about prostate cancer; and 3 a formative field study in which subjects interacted with a health department nurse using text messages. Results: Survey results suggest the target population has greater access to, and familiarity with, cell phones and text messaging compared to the Internet and web-based searching. Participants were significantly more confident using a cell phone and preferred to get health information through text messaging. Participants in the controlled observational study accepted the text messaging system, with most indicating it answered their questions, was easy to use and was a favorable tool for information-seeking. The field study also demonstrated potential for automated question-answering and text messaging to help the target population access health information. Conclusions: A two-way text messaging system has great potential to promote health communication and health information distribution. Participant interest in this system was high and did not seem to be specific to prostate cancer screening, suggesting that information about other topics, such as high blood pressure screening, could be provided similarly. We believe more investigations should be focused on this area, especially on benefits for the low-income community.

  7. Concordance of self-reported and medical chart information on cancer diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Xiao Ou

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reported information is an important tool for collecting clinical information for epidemiologic studies and in clinical settings where electronic medical records are not employed and shared. Methods Using data collected from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS, a population-based, prospective cohort study of 5,042 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Shanghai, China, we compared the concordance of patient questionnaire responses to a survey administered approximately 6 months after cancer diagnosis with medical chart information obtained from the diagnostic hospitals for several disease and treatment-related variables. Results Of 5,042 SBCSS participants, medical chart information was available for 4,948 women (98.1%. Concordance between patient self-reported and medical chart information was high for the majority of disease-related variables, including: diagnosing hospital (agreement: 98.7%, kappa: 0.99, type of surgery conducted (94.0%, 0.53, ER/PR status (94.5%, 0.91, and tumor position (98.2%, 0.97, as well as for important calendar dates, such as date of diagnosis, surgery, and first chemotherapy treatment. The 10 most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs were all reported with agreement rates of at least 82%, with associated kappa values that ranged from 0.41 for calcium folinate to 0.76 for vinorelbine. Conclusions Our study found high validity for patient self-reported information for a variety of disease and treatment-related variables, suggesting the utility of self-reports as an important source of clinical information for both epidemiological research and patient care.

  8. Profiles of dyadic adjustment for advanced prostate cancer to inform couple-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Scott, Jennifer L; Monsour, Michael; Nuwayhid, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe from a relational perspective, partners' psychological adjustment, coping and support needs for advanced prostate cancer. A mixed methods design was adopted, employing triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, to produce dyadic profiles of adjustment for six couples recruited from the urology clinics of local hospitals in Tasmania, Australia. Dyads completed a video-taped communication task, semi-structured interview and standardised self-report questionnaires. Themes identified were associated with the dyadic challenges of the disease experience (e.g. relationship intimacy, disease progression and carer burden). Couples with poor psychological adjustment profiles had both clinical and global locus of distress, treatment side-effects, carer burden and poor general health. Resilient couples demonstrated relationship closeness and adaptive cognitive and behavioural coping strategies. The themes informed the adaption of an effective program for couples coping with women's cancers (CanCOPE, to create a program for couples facing advanced prostate cancer (ProCOPE-Adv). Mixed method results inform the development of psychological therapy components for couples coping with advanced prostate cancer. The concomitance of co-morbid health problems may have implications for access and engagement for older adult populations in face-to-face intervention.

  9. Quality of life in children surviving cancer: a personality and multi-informant perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Barbara; De Fruyt, Filip; Koot, Hans M; Benoit, Yves

    2004-12-01

    To describe quality of life (QoL) of children surviving cancer in relation to their personality, using self- and maternal reports and examining differences with healthy referents. Sixty-seven children who survived childhood cancer were compared with eighty-one healthy children on QoL and personality characteristics. Children who survived cancer reported higher QoL than healthy children, whereas there were no differences for personality. Two main effects emerged for informant with children rating themselves as less neurotic and more conscientious than their mothers. The correspondence between mothers and children was substantially higher for survivors for QoL and personality ratings. QoL and trait measures share substantial variance, and personality traits significantly predict QoL. Parental personality ratings explained child QoL beyond children's personality ratings. Personality traits contribute to quality of life, indicating that personality significantly influences child's quality of life beyond the experience of a negative life event such as surviving cancer and its treatment. From a diagnostic perspective, parental trait ratings are informative in addition to children's ratings of personality to understand children's QoL.

  10. Information Framing Reduces Initial Negative Attitudes in Cancer Patients' Decisions About Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Ilona; Glare, Paul A; Stabler, Stacy M; Epstein, Andrew S; Wiesenthal, Alison; Leblanc, Thomas W; Higgins, E Tory

    2018-06-01

    Negative attitudes toward hospice care might prevent patients with cancer from discussing and choosing hospice as they approach end of life. When making a decision, people often naturally focus on either expected benefits or the avoidance of harm. Behavioral research has demonstrated that framing information in an incongruent manner with patients' underlying motivational focus reduces their negative attitudes toward a disliked option. Our study tests this communication technique with cancer patients, aiming to reduce negative attitudes toward a potentially beneficial but often-disliked option, that is, hospice care. Patients (n = 42) with active cancer of different types and/or stages completed a paper survey. Participants read a vignette about a patient with advanced cancer and a limited prognosis. In the vignette, the physician's advice to enroll in a hospice program was randomized, creating a congruent message or an incongruent message with patients' underlying motivational focus (e.g., a congruent message for someone most interested in benefits focuses on the benefits of hospice, whereas an incongruent message for this patient focuses on avoiding harm). Patients' attitudes toward hospice were measured before and after receiving the physician's advice. Regression analyses indicated that information framing significantly influenced patients with strong initial negative attitudes. Patients were more likely to reduce intensity of their initial negative attitude about hospice when receiving an incongruent message (b = -0.23; P negative reactions toward hospice care. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fatigue in Advanced Cancer Patients: Congruence Between Patients and Their Informal Caregivers About Patients' Fatigue Severity During Cancer Treatment With Palliative Intent and Predictors of Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, Hanneke; Peters, Marlies E. W. J.; Gielissen, Marieke F. M.; Verhagen, Constans A. H. H. V. M.; Bleijenberg, Gijs; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Wearden, Alison J.; Knoop, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Informal caregivers (ICs) are increasingly involved in the monitoring of symptoms during advanced cancer patients' treatment with palliative intent. A common but subjective symptom during this extended treatment phase is fatigue. This exploratory longitudinal study aimed to determine agreement

  12. Fatigue in Advanced Cancer Patients: Congruence Between Patients and Their Informal Caregivers About Patients' Fatigue Severity During Cancer Treatment With Palliative Intent and Predictors of Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, H.; Peters, M.E.W.J.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Bleijenberg, G.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Wearden, A.J.; Knoop, H.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Informal caregivers (ICs) are increasingly involved in the monitoring of symptoms during advanced cancer patients' treatment with palliative intent. A common but subjective symptom during this extended treatment phase is fatigue. OBJECTIVES: This exploratory longitudinal study aimed to

  13. Evaluating time to cancer recurrence as a surrogate marker for survival from an information theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ariel; Molenberghs, Geert

    2008-10-01

    The last two decades have seen a lot of development in the area of surrogate marker validation. One of these approaches places the evaluation in a meta-analytic framework, leading to definitions in terms of trial- and individual-level association. A drawback of this methodology is that different settings have led to different measures at the individual level. Using information theory, Alonso et al. proposed a unified framework, leading to a new definition of surrogacy, which offers interpretational advantages and is applicable in a wide range of situations. In this work, we illustrate how this information-theoretic approach can be used to evaluate surrogacy when both endpoints are of a time-to-event type. Two meta-analyses, in early and advanced colon cancer, respectively, are then used to evaluate the performance of time to cancer recurrence as a surrogate for overall survival.

  14. Using QR codes to enable quick access to information in acute cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Joanne; Olsson-Brown, Anna; Marshall, Ernie; Sacco, Joseph

    2017-05-25

    Quick access to toxicity management information ensures timely access to steroids/immunosuppressive treatment for cancer patients experiencing immune-related adverse events, thus reducing length of hospital stays or avoiding hospital admission entirely. This article discusses a project to add a QR (quick response) code to a patient-held immunotherapy alert card. As QR code generation is free and the immunotherapy clinical management algorithms were already publicly available through the trust's clinical network website, the costs of integrating a QR code into the alert card, after printing, were low, while the potential benefits are numerous. Patient-held alert cards are widely used for patients receiving anti-cancer treatment, and this established standard of care has been modified to enable rapid access of information through the incorporation of a QR code.

  15. Understanding cancer survivors' information needs and information-seeking behaviors for complementary and alternative medicine from short- to long-term survival: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarton, Lou Ann; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Gibson, Bryan; Logan, Robert; Workman, T Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The research examined complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) information-seeking behaviors and preferences from short- to long-term cancer survival, including goals, motivations, and information sources. A mixed-methods approach was used with cancer survivors from the "Assessment of Patients' Experience with Cancer Care" 2004 cohort. Data collection included a mail survey and phone interviews using the critical incident technique (CIT). Seventy survivors from the 2004 study responded to the survey, and eight participated in the CIT interviews. Quantitative results showed that CAM usage did not change significantly between 2004 and 2015. The following themes emerged from the CIT: families' and friends' provision of the initial introduction to a CAM, use of CAM to manage the emotional and psychological impact of cancer, utilization of trained CAM practitioners, and online resources as a prominent source for CAM information. The majority of participants expressed an interest in an online information-sharing portal for CAM. Patients continue to use CAM well into long-term cancer survivorship. Finding trustworthy sources for information on CAM presents many challenges such as reliability of source, conflicting information on efficacy, and unknown interactions with conventional medications. Study participants expressed interest in an online portal to meet these needs through patient testimonials and linkage of claims to the scientific literature. Such a portal could also aid medical librarians and clinicians in locating and evaluating CAM information on behalf of patients.

  16. Mineral commodity summaries 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2015 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2014 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses.

  17. Informal work and formal plans: articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, Rikke Juul; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Brostrøm Kousgaard, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Formal pathway models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer ...... participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed....

  18. Informal work and formal plans: Articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, R.; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kousgaard, MB

    2013-01-01

    Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories........ When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed....

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and ... of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research ...

  3. Assessing Information Needs Regarding Metabolic Syndrome Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors: A Concurrent Mixed Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Ji-Su; Kim, Minhae; Lee, Eunkyung

    2018-04-27

    Cancer survivors have an increased risk of non-cancer-related deaths, particularly metabolic syndrome (MetS). We aimed to assess knowledge deficits regarding metabolism-related diseases among gynecological cancer survivors and the preferred source of health information. Using a mixed methods approach, 70 participants responded to a structured modified version of the MetS questionnaire. We conducted 28 semistructured interviews of gynecological cancer survivors with MetS. Responses were independently coded by 2 researchers, including MetS knowledge, behaviors for self-management, and preferred learning methods. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 17% of the participants. More than 50% of the participants wanted to learn about MetS and requested a consultation with healthcare providers, 70% reported that they had heard of MetS, and 61.4% reported that they had MetS-related knowledge (correct answer rate by MetS-related component, ~50%). The level of MetS-related knowledge was poor in both the quantitative and qualitative data. Most of the participants defined MetS-related self-management health behaviors as regular eating and exercise in their own words. Participants mostly wanted exercise management (29% of the participants), followed by dietary life management (27.4%), stress management (17.4%), weight management (13.7%), definition and diagnostic methods of MetS (9.1%), and smoking and drinking management (3.3%). Participants wished to use a handbook in small groups or receive counseling by healthcare providers. We observed poor awareness and knowledge level and the need for information regarding MetS among gynecological cancer survivors. An educational handbook or counseling could effectively improve self-management of health-related behaviors.

  4. Finding out about sperm banking: what information is available online for men diagnosed with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, H; Wright, E; Pacey, A A; Eiser, C

    2012-09-01

    Sperm banking is routinely offered to men where there is a risk of infertility following cancer treatment but uptake is lower than expected. Since these men may turn to the internet for information, we used the search engine www.google.com to identify the material available about sperm banking and fertility preservation options. Sixty-six resources (NHS/Private Clinic, Charity, Press Releases, General and Forums/Blogs) fulfilled the criteria for inclusion and were examined for quality including readability, layout and content. The most frequently reported information related to: (1) effects of cancer treatment on fertility (77.3%); (2) reasons to bank sperm (69.7%); and (3) fertility recovery after treatment (57.6%). Information about maintaining contact with the sperm bank (18.2%) and disposal of banked samples (10.6%) was less often included. The quality of information available on the Internet about sperm banking was variable. The readability of all resources was assessed as 'fairly difficult', i.e. reading skills required were too complex for the average member of the public to understand. Furthermore, visual presentation of material (e.g. lay out) did not facilitate easy reading. More attention should be given to information about longer-term issues, such as fertility recovery and the use or disposal of banked sperm.

  5. Quantifying the burden of informal caregiving for patients with cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Amir; Gilloteau, Isabelle; Lees, Michael; DaCosta Dibonaventura, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Informal caregivers for patients with cancer provide critical emotional and instrumental support, but this role can cause substantial burden. This study expands our understanding of cancer-related caregiving burden in Europe. Caregivers (n = 1,713) for patients with cancer and non-caregivers (n = 103,868) were identified through the 2010 and 2011 European Union National Health and Wellness Survey, administered via the Internet to adult populations in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Respondents completed measures of sociodemographics and health behaviors, health-related quality of life (using SF-12v2), work productivity and activity impairment (using WPAI), healthcare resource use (emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and traditional provider visits), and reported diagnosis of stress-related comorbidities (depression, anxiety, insomnia, headache, migraine, and gastrointestinal problems). Two-sided tests of means or proportions compared caregivers against non-caregivers. Multivariable regression models, comparing caregivers for patients with any cancer vs. non-caregivers on all health outcomes, adjusted for covariates (age, sex, college, income, marital status, employment, body mass index, alcohol, smoking, and Charlson comorbidity index). Caregivers for patients with cancer vs. non-caregivers reported significant (P status, 0.043-point lower health utilities, 1.46 times as much work impairment, and 1.97 times the odds of anxiety). Caregivers for patients with cancer experienced significant impairments. These findings reinforce the need for enhancing our understanding of the caregiving experience and developing supportive and personalized multicomponent interventions for caregivers, given their pivotal role in providing support for patients.

  6. More Cancer Types - SEER Cancer Stat Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  7. Understanding requirements of novel healthcare information systems for management of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagholikar, Amol S; Fung, Maggie; Nelson, Colleen C

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases is a global health priority. A healthcare information system offers opportunities to address challenges of chronic disease management. However, the requirements of health information systems are often not well understood. The accuracy of requirements has a direct impact on the successful design and implementation of a health information system. Our research describes methods used to understand the requirements of health information systems for advanced prostate cancer management. The research conducted a survey to identify heterogeneous sources of clinical records. Our research showed that the General Practitioner was the common source of patient's clinical records (41%) followed by the Urologist (14%) and other clinicians (14%). Our research describes a method to identify diverse data sources and proposes a novel patient journey browser prototype that integrates disparate data sources.

  8. Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood liver cancer has two major histologic subgroups: hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Less common histologies are undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver, infantile choriocarcinoma, and vascular liver tumors. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood liver cancers including tumor biology, presentation, prognosis, staging, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  9. Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anal cancer is often curable with treatment. Major prognostic factors are site, size, and nodal status. Treatments include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Get detailed information for anal cancer risk factors, classification, staging, prognosis, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  10. Childhood Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood thyroid cancer usually presents as a thyroid mass with or without painless cervical adenopathy. It may occur as part of a tumor predisposition syndrome such as multiple endocrine neoplasia or DICER1 syndrome. Get detailed information about the risk factors, histopathology, molecular features, presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of papillary, follicular, and medullary thyroid cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  11. Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male breast cancer treatment may include surgery with or without radiation therapy, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and/or HER2-directed therapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent male breast cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  12. Assessment of the contents related to screening on Portuguese language websites providing information on breast and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ferreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the quality of the contents related to screening in a sample of websites providing information on breast and prostate cancer in the Portuguese language. The first 200 results of each cancer-specific Google search were considered. The accuracy of the screening contents was defined in accordance with the state of the art, and its readability was assessed. Most websites mentioned mammography as a method for breast cancer screening (80%, although only 28% referred to it as the only recommended method. Almost all websites mentioned PSA evaluation as a possible screening test, but correct information regarding its effectiveness was given in less than 10%. For both breast and prostate cancer screening contents, the potential for overdiagnosis and false positive results was seldom addressed, and the median readability index was approximately 70. There is ample margin for improving the quality of websites providing information on breast and prostate cancer in Portuguese.

  13. Improvements in Clinical Trials Information Will Improve the Reproductive Health and Fertility of Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauti, Angela; Gerstl, Brigitte; Chong, Serena; Chisholm, Orin; Anazodo, Antoinette

    2017-06-01

    There are a number of barriers that result in cancer patients not being referred for oncofertility care, which include knowledge about reproductive risks of antineoplastic agents. Without this information, clinicians do not always make recommendations for oncofertility care. The objective of this study was to describe the level of reproductive information and recommendations that clinicians have available in clinical trial protocols regarding oncofertility management and follow-up, and the information that patients may receive in clinical trials patient information sheets or consent forms. A literature review of the 71 antineoplastic drugs included in the 68 clinical trial protocols showed that 68% of the antineoplastic drugs had gonadotoxic animal data, 32% had gonadotoxic human data, 83% had teratogenic animal data, and 32% had teratogenic human data. When the clinical trial protocols were reviewed, only 22% of the protocols reported the teratogenic risks and 32% of the protocols reported the gonadotoxic risk. Only 56% of phase 3 protocols had gonadotoxic information and 13% of phase 3 protocols had teratogenic information. Nine percent of the protocols provided fertility preservation recommendations and 4% provided reproductive information in the follow-up and survivorship period. Twenty-six percent had a section in the clinical trials protocol, which identified oncofertility information easily. When gonadotoxic and teratogenic effects of treatment were known, they were not consistently included in the clinical trial protocols and the lack of data for new drugs was not reported. Very few protocols gave recommendations for oncofertility management and follow-up following the completion of cancer treatment. The research team proposes a number of recommendations that should be required for clinicians and pharmaceutical companies developing new trials.

  14. Assessing the information desire of patients with advanced cancer by providing information with a decision aid, which is evaluated in a randomized trial: a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, L.J.M.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Stalmeier, P.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a continuing debate on the desirability of informing patients with cancer and thereby involving them in treatment decisions. On the one hand, information uptake may be hampered, and additional stress could be inflicted by involving these patients. On the other hand, even

  15. Development of the Informing Relatives Inventory (IRI): Assessing Index Patients' Knowledge, Motivation and Self-Efficacy Regarding the Disclosure of Hereditary Cancer Risk Information to Relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, Eveline; Aalfs, Cora M.; Menko, Fred H.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Verdam, Mathilde G. E.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of genetic services, counselees do not always share hereditary cancer information with at-risk relatives. Reasons for not informing relatives may be categorized as a lack of: knowledge, motivation, and/or self-efficacy. This study aims to develop and test the psychometric properties

  16. Development of the Informing Relatives Inventory (IRI) : Assessing Index Patients' Knowledge, Motivation and Self-Efficacy Regarding the Disclosure of Hereditary Cancer Risk Information to Relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, Eveline; Aalfs, Cora M.; Menko, Fred H.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Verdam, Mathilde G. E.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    Despite the use of genetic services, counselees do not always share hereditary cancer information with at-risk relatives. Reasons for not informing relatives may be categorized as a lack of: knowledge, motivation, and/or self-efficacy. This study aims to develop and test the psychometric properties

  17. Development of the Informing Relatives Inventory (IRI): Assessing index patients' knowledge, motivation and self-efficacy regarding the disclosure of hereditary cancer risk information to relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.; Aalfs, C.M.; Menko, F.H.; Sijmons, R.H.; Verdam, M.G.E.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.; Smets, E.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the use of genetic services, counselees do not always share hereditary cancer information with at-risk relatives. Reasons for not informing relatives may be categorized as a lack of: knowledge, motivation, and/or self-efficacy. Purpose: This study aims to develop and test the

  18. PATI: Patient accessed tailored information: A pilot study to evaluate the effect on preoperative breast cancer patients of information delivered via a mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, N M; O'Connell, E P; Lehane, E A; Livingstone, V; Maher, B; Kaimkhani, S; Cil, T; Relihan, N; Bennett, M W; Redmond, H P; Corrigan, M A

    2016-12-01

    The information needs of cancer patients are highly variable. Literature suggests an improved ability to modulate personalised stress, increased patient involvement with decision making, greater satisfaction with treatment choices and reduced anxiety levels in cancer patients who have access to information. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effects of a mobile information application on anxiety levels of patients undergoing surgery for breast cancer. An application was developed for use with Apple iPad containing information on basic breast cancer biology, different treatments used and surgical techniques. Content and face validity studies were performed. A randomized control trial was designed, with a 1:2 allocation. Data collected include basic demographics and type of surgery. Questionnaires used included: the HADS, Mini-MAC, information technology familiarity and information satisfaction. A total of 39 women participated. 13 women had access to an iPad containing additional information and 26 women acted as controls. The mean age was 54 and technology familiarity was similar among both groups. Anxiety and depression scores at seven days were significantly lower in control patients without access to the additional information provided by the mobile application (p = 0.022 and 0.029 respectively). Anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients is both multifactorial and significant, with anxiety levels directly correlating with reduced quality of life. Intuitively, information should improve anxiety levels, however, we have demonstrated that surgical patients with less information reported significantly lower anxiety. We advise the thorough testing and auditing of information initiatives before deployment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Summary of the evidence of breast cancer service screening outcomes in Europe and first estimate of the benefit and harm balance sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    To construct a European 'balance sheet' of key outcomes of population-based mammographic breast cancer screening, to inform policy-makers, stakeholders and invited women. From the studies reviewed, the primary benefit of screening, breast cancer mortality reduction, was compared with the main harms, over-diagnosis and false-positive screening results (FPRs). Pooled estimates of breast cancer mortality reduction among invited women were 25% in incidence-based mortality studies and 31% in case-control studies (38% and 48% among women actually screened). Estimates of over-diagnosis ranged from 1% to 10% of the expected incidence in the absence of screening. The combined estimate of over-diagnosis for screened women, from European studies correctly adjusted for lead time and underlying trend, was 6.5%. For women undergoing 10 biennial screening tests, the estimated cumulative risk of a FPR followed by non-invasive assessment was 17%, and 3% having an invasive assessment. For every 1000 women screened biennially from age 50-51 until age 68-69 and followed up to age 79, an estimated seven to nine lives are saved, four cases are over-diagnosed, 170 women have at least one recall followed by non-invasive assessment with a negative result and 30 women have at least one recall followed by invasive procedures yielding a negative result. The chance of saving a woman's life by population-based mammographic screening of appropriate quality is greater than that of over-diagnosis. Service screening in Europe achieves a mortality benefit at least as great as the randomized controlled trials. These outcomes should be communicated to women offered service screening in Europe.

  20. The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA): maintaining and operating a public information repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kenneth; Vendt, Bruce; Smith, Kirk; Freymann, John; Kirby, Justin; Koppel, Paul; Moore, Stephen; Phillips, Stanley; Maffitt, David; Pringle, Michael; Tarbox, Lawrence; Prior, Fred

    2013-12-01

    The National Institutes of Health have placed significant emphasis on sharing of research data to support secondary research. Investigators have been encouraged to publish their clinical and imaging data as part of fulfilling their grant obligations. Realizing it was not sufficient to merely ask investigators to publish their collection of imaging and clinical data, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) created the open source National Biomedical Image Archive software package as a mechanism for centralized hosting of cancer related imaging. NCI has contracted with Washington University in Saint Louis to create The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA)-an open-source, open-access information resource to support research, development, and educational initiatives utilizing advanced medical imaging of cancer. In its first year of operation, TCIA accumulated 23 collections (3.3 million images). Operating and maintaining a high-availability image archive is a complex challenge involving varied archive-specific resources and driven by the needs of both image submitters and image consumers. Quality archives of any type (traditional library, PubMed, refereed journals) require management and customer service. This paper describes the management tasks and user support model for TCIA.

  1. Information about diagnosis and prognosis related to anxiety and depression in children with cancer aged 8-16 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Last, B. F.; van Veldhuizen, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that being openly informed about the diagnosis and prognosis benefits the emotional well-being of children with cancer. A stratified sample of 56 children with cancer aged 8-16 years and their parents participated. The parents were interviewed about

  2. Informed decision making does not affect health-related quality of life in lung cancer screening (NELSON trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Karien A. M.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; van Klaveren, Rob J.; de Koning, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is believed that making an informed decision about (screening) participation is associated with better health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes. This is the first study in cancer screening to explore this association in subjects participating in a lung cancer computed

  3. Program summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The report provides summary information on all phases of nuclear regulation, and is intended as an information and decision-making tool for mid and upper level management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is divided functionally into ten sections: (1) nuclear power plants in the United States; (2) operating nuclear power plants; (3) reactors under construction; (4) operating license applications under NRC review; (5) construction permit applications and special projects under NRC review; (6) ACRS and ASLBP; (7) nuclear materials; (8) standards and regulations; (9) research projects; and (10) foreign reactors

  4. 'With the best of reasons': cervical cancer prevention policy and the suppression of sexual risk factor information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, V; Gavey, N

    1999-05-01

    Cervical cancer is a very common but largely preventable cancer. Despite considerable medical knowledge of risk and even causal factors, possible social-behavioural strategies for the primary prevention of cervical cancer have rarely been explored as a viable addition to cervical screening. We examine key policy documents and interview 18 key informants on cervical cancer prevention in New Zealand. Using a discourse analytic approach we identify and discuss two discourses (which we have labelled 'protectionism' and 'right to know') which inform positions on whether or not women should be provided with information regarding sexual risk factors for cervical cancer. Cervical cancer prevention policy in New Zealand, which largely reflects a protectionist discourse, suppresses sexual risk factor information and focuses exclusively on cervical screening. The right to know discourse informs an alternative position, which contends that women have a right to be informed about risk factors. We discuss these positions in relation to questions about women's rights, the principle of informed choice, and attempts to judge what is in women's 'best interests.'

  5. Reaching rural women: breast cancer prevention information seeking behaviors and interest in Internet, cell phone, and text use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Wilson, Susan; Vilchis, Hugo

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the breast cancer prevention information seeking behaviors among rural women, the prevalence of Internet, cell, and text use, and interest to receive breast cancer prevention information cell and text messages. While growing literature for breast cancer information sources supports the use of the Internet, little is known about breast cancer prevention information seeking behaviors among rural women and mobile technology. Using a cross-sectional study design, data were collected using a survey. McGuire's Input-Ouput Model was used as the framework. Self-reported data were obtained from a convenience sample of 157 women with a mean age of 60 (SD = 12.12) at a rural New Mexico imaging center. Common interpersonal information sources were doctors, nurses, and friends and common channel information sources were television, magazines, and Internet. Overall, 87% used cell phones, 20% had an interest to receive cell phone breast cancer prevention messages, 47% used text messaging, 36% had an interest to receive text breast cancer prevention messages, and 37% had an interest to receive mammogram reminder text messages. Bivariate analysis revealed significant differences between age, income, and race/ethnicity and use of cell phones or text messaging. There were no differences between age and receiving text messages or text mammogram reminders. Assessment of health information seeking behaviors is important for community health educators to target populations for program development. Future research may identify additional socio-cultural differences.

  6. After initial treatment for primary breast cancer: information needs, health literacy, and the role of health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anna; Ernstmann, Nicole; Wesselmann, Simone; Pfaff, Holger; Wirtz, Markus; Kowalski, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    After a short hospital stay of just some days follows long-term outpatient care for breast cancer patients. The aim of the study is to describe the information needs of breast cancer outpatients and to get in touch with aspects of health literacy, as well as contact various health care workers. In a multicenter study, patients were asked about their information needs 10 weeks after surgery. The analysis on hand includes data about 1248 female patients. In addition to descriptive analyses identifying the most prevalent information needs, logistic regression analyses were calculated to identify factors associated with these. The results show that information needs of breast cancer outpatients are mainly in "follow-up after acute treatment", "coping with long-term side effects", and "heredity of breast cancer". In addition to sociodemographic patient characteristics, perceived helpful contacts with various health care workers as well as a satisfactory patient's level of health literacy reduced the probability of unmet information needs. Breast cancer outpatients have numerous information needs. In addition to provide information at the right time regarding a specific disease phase, it is important that health professionals' support affected breast cancer patients in coping with the new situation.

  7. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  8. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  9. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  10. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand, E-mail: as4351@columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions.

  11. Physician Evaluation of Internet Health Information on Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Anand; Paly, Jonathan J.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients considering prostate cancer (PCa) treatment options report seeking proton beam therapy (PBT) based in part on information readily available on the Internet. There is, however, potential for considerable variation in Internet health information (IHI). We thus evaluated the characteristics, quality, and accuracy of IHI on PBT for PCa. Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study using snowball-purposive sampling in which we evaluated the top 50 Google search results for “proton prostate cancer.” Quality was evaluated on a 5-point scale using the validated 15-question DISCERN instrument. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing IHI with the best available evidence. Results: Thirty-seven IHI websites were included in the final sample. These websites most frequently were patient information/support resources (46%), were focused exclusively on PBT (51%), and had a commercial affiliation (38%). There was a significant difference in quality according to the type of IHI. Substantial inaccuracies were noted in the study sample compared with best available or contextual evidence. Conclusions: There are shortcomings in quality and accuracy in consumer-oriented IHI on PBT for PCa. Providers must be prepared to educate patients how to critically evaluate IHI related to PBT for PCa to best inform their treatment decisions

  12. Information contracting tools in a cancer specialist unit:the role of Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Marlow

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for high quality management information within the contracting process has driven many of the major developments in health service computing. These have often merged clinical and financial requirements, usually along patient-centred lines. In order to identify a common currency for a range of clinical activities that are inherently variable, price tariffs have been drawn up on the basis of 'episodes of care' within specialties. Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs were designed to meet the need for a common information currency. However, they were designed for acute care. The study on which this paper is based aims to examine their applicability to chronic care in a cancer specialist unit. The data were drawn from the patient information system within a major cancer unit. The focus of the investigation is encapsulated in the following questions: a Do HRGs really work as a grouping and costing methodology? b How relevant are HRG classifications for long-term patient care? The investigation demonstrated that not all HRGs are iso-resource within this environment. The findings from the data analysis are echoed by the NHS Executive's own evaluation . This does not negate advantages in their use. Furthermore, the development of Health Benefit Groups as information management tools, through a focus on health conditions and interventions rather than on purely on treatments, offers potential for greater validity within a chronic care situation.

  13. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6 %), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4 %), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0 % of pre-roll video views and 44.4 % of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost.

  14. Conference summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Tim [Inta Communication Limited for European Service Network/ DG Research, Trillium House, 32 New Street, St. Neots, Cambridge PE19 1AJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of

  15. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Each session of the workshop consisted of a number of presentations followed by a panel discussion moderated by the session Chairs. A summary of each session and subsequent discussion that ensued are provided. Session 1: National approaches for long term interim storage facilities. Seven papers were presented during this session by representatives of research institutes in USA (EPRI) and in Norway (IFE), governmental authorities for the nuclear industry in Finland (STUK) and Slovak Republic (UJD), technical support organizations in Germany (GRS) and France (IRSN) and the public company in charge of waste management in Spain (ENRESA). The papers discussed the national policy, the regulatory framework and the current situation for storage of SF and HLW in various European countries (Germany, Spain, Finland, Norway and Slovak Republic). The main activities the EPRI is undertaking to establish the technical bases for extended (long-term) storage and the IRSN's definition of the safety principles and objectives for new storage facilities regarding long-term storage are also discussed. Session 2: Safety requirements, regulatory framework and implementation issues. Eleven papers were presented during this session by representatives from international groups (the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)), representatives of regulatory bodies from the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and Germany (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)), German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), operators from the United Kingdom (Sellafield Limited, UK) and France (EDF), vendors (AREVA), and representatives of TSOs in Germany (TUV and Oko-Institut). Session 3: Technical issues and operational experience, needs for R and D. This session was chaired by Karl Wasinger (AREVA, Germany) and Fumihisa Nagase (JAEA, Japan). Ten papers were presented during this session by representatives of research institutes of Japan (CRIEPI

  16. Meeting the health information needs of prostate cancer patients using personal health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, H H; Lau, F; Barnett, J; Jones, S

    2013-12-01

    There is interest in the use of health information technology in the form of personal health record (phr) systems to support patient needs for health information, care, and decision-making, particularly for patients with distressing, chronic diseases such as prostate cancer (pca). We sought feedback from pca patients who used a phr. For 6 months, 22 pca patients in various phases of care at the BC Cancer Agency (bcca) were given access to a secure Web-based phr called provider, which they could use to view their medical records and use a set of support tools. Feedback was obtained using an end-of-study survey on usability, satisfaction, and concerns with provider. Site activity was recorded to assess usage patterns. Of the 17 patients who completed the study, 29% encountered some minor difficulties using provider. No security breaches were known to have occurred. The two most commonly accessed medical records were laboratory test results and transcribed doctor's notes. Of survey respondents, 94% were satisfied with the access to their medical records, 65% said that provider helped to answer their questions, 77% felt that their privacy and confidentiality were preserved, 65% felt that using provider helped them to communicate better with their physicians, 83% found new and useful information that they would not have received by talking to their health care providers, and 88% said that they would continue to use provider. Our results support the notion that phrs can provide cancer patients with timely access to their medical records and health information, and can assist in communication with health care providers, in knowledge generation, and in patient empowerment.

  17. Breast cancer and quality of life: medical information extraction from health forums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Thomas; Aze, Jérome; Bringay, Sandra; Joutard, Cyrille; Lavergne, Christian; Mollevi, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Internet health forums are a rich textual resource with content generated through free exchanges among patients and, in certain cases, health professionals. We tackle the problem of retrieving clinically relevant information from such forums, with relevant topics being defined from clinical auto-questionnaires. Texts in forums are largely unstructured and noisy, calling for adapted preprocessing and query methods. We minimize the number of false negatives in queries by using a synonym tool to achieve query expansion of initial topic keywords. To avoid false positives, we propose a new measure based on a statistical comparison of frequent co-occurrences in a large reference corpus (Web) to keep only relevant expansions. Our work is motivated by a study of breast cancer patients' health-related quality of life (QoL). We consider topics defined from a breast-cancer specific QoL-questionnaire. We quantify and structure occurrences in posts of a specialized French forum and outline important future developments.

  18. Need for information, honesty and respect: patient perspectives on health care professionals communication about cancer and fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Ussher, Jane M.; Parton, Chloe; Perz, Janette

    2018-01-01

    Background Individuals affected by cancer report a need for information about fertility from health care professionals (HCPs), in order to inform decision making and alleviate anxiety. However, there is evidence that many health professionals do not engage in such discussions. Method A mixed method design was used to examine the construction and subjective experience of communication with health professionals about fertility in the context of cancer, from the perspective of patients. A survey...

  19. Management summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A most pressing problem in many environmental assessments is determining the extent of contamination to the biosphere resulting from a given activity. This could result from the planned or accidental release of a contaminant to the environment and its subsequent transport through air, water, or the food chain. In either case, three critical questions need to be raised in the environmental assessment of the problem: Where are the contaminants; When will they arrive at a specific location; How much of the contaminant will be at the point of uptake. The location of the contaminant is important, since a contaminant isolated from man both now and in the future may represent little hazard, even in rather large quantities. Under other conditions, small amounts of contaminants arriving at critical locations over a short period may involve severe hazard. The problem of location is simplified by concentrating on those places where the contaminants will interface with the biosphere. Applications in evaluating the consequences of ground water contamination are discussed. Environmental consequences or impacts are most effectively and efficiently communicated by: Blending extensive technical results and reducing them to simple summary relationships, i.e., the arrival distributions; focusing on the arrival distributions as the central theme of communication efforts; and determining quantitative consequences or impacts to the biosphere through use of the arrival distributions. Appropriately applied, these principles can reduce a voluminous impact statement on subsurface pollution to a few pages that are directly useful to decision-makers and the public

  20. Theory summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    This is a summary of the advances in magnetic fusion energy theory research presented at the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference from 19 24 October, 1998 in Yokohama, Japan. Theory and simulation results from this conference provided encouraging evidence of significant progress in understanding the physics of thermonuclear plasmas. Indeed, the grand challenge for this field is to acquire the basic understanding that can readily enable the innovations which would make fusion energy practical. In this sense, research in fusion energy is increasingly able to be categorized as fitting well the 'Pasteur's Quadrant' paradigm, where the research strongly couples basic science ('Bohr's Quadrant') to technological impact ('Edison's Quadrant'). As supported by some of the work presented at this conference, this trend will be further enhanced by advanced simulations. Eventually, realistic three-dimensional modeling capabilities, when properly combined with rapid and complete data interpretation of results from both experiments and simulations, can contribute to a greatly enhanced cycle of understanding and innovation. Plasma science theory and simulation have provided reliable foundations for this improved modeling capability, and the exciting advances in high-performance computational resources have further accelerated progress. There were 68 papers presented at this conference in the area of magnetic fusion energy theory