WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer index composite

  1. Mapping breast cancer blood flow index, composition, and metabolism in a human subject using combined diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging and diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Hossein S.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Leproux, Anais; Hill, Brian; Durkin, Amanda; Telep, Seraphim; Lam, Jesse; Yazdi, Siavash S.; Police, Alice M.; Carroll, Robert M.; Combs, Freddie J.; Strömberg, Tomas; Yodh, Arjun G.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) are model-based near-infrared (NIR) methods that measure tissue optical properties (broadband absorption, μa, and reduced scattering, μs‧) and blood flow (blood flow index, BFI), respectively. DOSI-derived μa values are used to determine composition by calculating the tissue concentration of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (HbO2, HbR), water, and lipid. We developed and evaluated a combined, coregistered DOSI/DCS handheld probe for mapping and imaging these parameters. We show that uncertainties of 0.3 mm-1 (37%) in μs‧ and 0.003 mm-1 (33%) in μa lead to ˜53% and 9% errors in BFI, respectively. DOSI/DCS imaging of a solid tissue-simulating flow phantom and a breast cancer patient reveals well-defined spatial distributions of BFI and composition that clearly delineates both the flow channel and the tumor. BFI reconstructed with DOSI-corrected μa and μs‧ values had a tumor/normal contrast of 2.7, 50% higher than the contrast using commonly assumed fixed optical properties. In conclusion, spatially coregistered imaging of DOSI and DCS enhances intrinsic tumor contrast and information content. This is particularly important for imaging diseased tissues where there are significant spatial variations in μa and μs‧ as well as potential uncoupling between flow and metabolism.

  2. Mitotic activity index in interval breast cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, R.P.R.; Bult, P.; Noppen, C.M.; Boetes, C.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Wobbes, Th.

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: The Mitotic Activity Index (MAI) is a strong prognostic factor for disease free survival in breast cancer. The MAI is lower in screen detected tumours, correlating with less aggressive biological behaviour in this group. In this study the MAI is compared between screen detected, interval and s

  3. Indonesian Stock Market Crisis Observation with Spectral and Composite Index

    OpenAIRE

    Situngkir, Hokky

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the employment of the index composed from the dynamical tree of correlations among stock prices both with the popularly used standard (conventional) composite one. The spectral index focus on the dynamics of the correlation coefficients among stock prices while composite index is the dynamical aggregate of the whole stocks traded in the market. Some advantages is conjectured by incorporating both indexes to the historical data of Indonesian Stock Market data. Both are show...

  4. Heuristic Model Of The Composite Quality Index Of Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarov, A. N.; Knyaginin, A. A.; Bondarenko, D. V.; Shepet, I. P.; Korolkova, L. N.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to present the heuristic model of the composite environmental quality index based on the integrated application of the elements of utility theory, multidimensional scaling, expert evaluation and decision-making. The composite index is synthesized in linear-quadratic form, it provides higher adequacy of the results of the assessment preferences of experts and decision-makers.

  5. Negative Refractive Index in Optics of Metal-Dielectric Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Kildishev, A.V.; Cai, W; Chettiar, U K; Yuan, H.-K.; Sarychev, A. K.; Drachev, V. P.; Shalaev, V. M.

    2005-01-01

    Specially designed metal-dielectric composites can have a negative refractive index in the optical range. Specifically, it is shown that arrays of single and paired nanorods can provide such negative refraction. For pairs of metal rods, a negative refractive index has been observed at 1.5 micrometer. The inverted structure of paired voids in metal films may also exhibit a negative refractive index. A similar effect can be accomplished with metal strips in which the refractive index can reach ...

  6. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayo, W. S.; Urrutia, J. D.; Temple, J. M. F.; Sandoval, J. R. D.; Sanglay, J. E. A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a time series model of the Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index and its volatility using the finite mixture of ARIMA model with conditional variance equations such as ARCH, GARCH, EG ARCH, TARCH and PARCH models. Also, the study aimed to find out the reason behind the behaviorof PSEi, that is, which of the economic variables - Consumer Price Index, crude oil price, foreign exchange rate, gold price, interest rate, money supply, price-earnings ratio, Producers’ Price Index and terms of trade - can be used in projecting future values of PSEi and this was examined using Granger Causality Test. The findings showed that the best time series model for Philippine Stock Exchange Composite index is ARIMA(1,1,5) - ARCH(1). Also, Consumer Price Index, crude oil price and foreign exchange rate are factors concluded to Granger cause Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index.

  7. Detection value of Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes in patients with liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pai-Qiang Chen; Qiao-Li Jiang; Jun Li; Jing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the detection value of Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes in the patients with liver cancer.Methods: A total of 59 patients with liver cancer in our hospital from July 2015 to June 2016 were selected as the observation group, 59 healthy persons of the same ages with physical examination were selected as the control group, then the serum Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes levels of two groups were detected and compared, then the serum Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes levels of observation group with different stages and types of liver cancer were compared too. Results:The serum Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes levels of observation group were all higher than those of control group, the serum Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes levels of observation group with different stages and types of liver cancer had obvious differences (allP<0.05).Conclusions: The Th17 related indexes and platelet activation indexes of patients with liver cancer show higher expression state, and the expression levels of patients with different stages and types of liver cancer have obvious differences too, so the clinical detection value of those indexes in the patients with liver cancer are higher.

  8. A new plan quality index for nasopharyngeal cancer SIB IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Yi, J; Zhou, Y; Yan, H; Han, C; Xie, C

    2014-02-01

    A new plan quality index integrating dosimetric and radiobiological indices was proposed to facilitate the evaluation and comparison of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. Ten NPC patients treated by SIB-IMRT were enrolled in the study. Custom software was developed to read dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves from the treatment planning system (TPS). A plan filtering matrix was introduced to filter plans that fail to satisfy treatment protocol. Target plan quality indices and organ at risk (OAR) plan quality indices were calculated for qualified plans. A unique composite plan quality index (CPQI) was proposed based on the relative weight of these indices to evaluate and compare competing plans. Plan ranking results were compared with detailed statistical analysis, radiation oncology quality system (ROQS) scoring results and physician's evaluation results to verify the accuracy of this new plan quality index. The average CPQI values for plans with OAR priority of low, normal, high, and PTV only were 0.22 ± 0.08, 0.49 ± 0.077, 0.71 ± 0.062, and -0.21 ± 0.16, respectively. There were significant differences among these plan quality indices (One-way ANOVA test, p plans were selected. Plan filtering matrix was able to speed up the plan evaluation process. The new matrix plan quality index CPQI showed good consistence with physician ranking results. It is a promising index for NPC SIB-IMRT plan evaluation.

  9. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI, an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002. For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%. However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78. Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06, and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58. In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10-5. Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk.

  10. Body composition in remission of childhood cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Anisimova, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Khomyakova, I. A.; Konovalova, M. V.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Starunova, O. A.; Vashura, A. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Here, we describe the results of a cross-sectional bioimpedance study of body composition in 552 Russian children and adolescents aged 7-17 years in remission of various types of cancer (remission time 0-15 years, median 4 years). A sample of 1500 apparently healthy individuals of the same age interval was used for comparison. Our data show high frequency of malnutrition in total cancer patients group depending on type of cancer. 52.7% of patients were malnourished according to phase angle and percentage fat mass z-score with the range between 42.2% in children with solid tumors located outside CNS and 76.8% in children with CNS tumors. The body mass index failed to identify the proportion of patients with malnutrition and showed diagnostic sensitivity 50.6% for obesity on the basis of high percentage body fat and even much less so for undernutrition - 13.4% as judged by low phase angle. Our results suggest an advantage of using phase angle as the most sensitive bioimpedance indicator for the assessment of metabolic alterations, associated risks, and the effectiveness of rehabilitation strategies in childhood cancer patients.

  11. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  12. Improvement in the correlation between the composition index and the explosibility index for coal dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Torrent, J.; Cantalapiedra-Fuchs, J.; Montes-Villalon, J.M.; Alcantara-Pedreira, R. (Laboratorio Oficial Madariaga, Madrid (Spain))

    1991-09-01

    The correlation previously found between composition and explosibility index for coal dust has been improved by means of three main modifications: use of better laboratory apparatus, correction of volatile matter data and increased number of samples. The new mathematical expressions proved to be consistent and useful as a first approach to improve classification of ignition risk and to apply protective measures against the occurrence of dust explosions. 5 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. EFFECT OF BODY MASS INDEX ON COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张霁; 苏向前; 郑俊全; 顾晋; 宗祥龙; 王怡; 季加孚

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and the risk of colorectal cancer. Methods: 331 patients with rectal cancer and 175 with colon cancer who accepted surgical operation at Beijing Cancer Hospital during 1995 and 2002 were enrolled. Data were collected by reviewing the pathology materials and hospital records. 258 healthy people who accepted health examination at Beijing Cancer Hospital during 2000 and 2002 were also enrolled as control. Data of height, weight and gender at the time of examination were also collected. Obesity was estimated by body mass index (BMI), computed as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (kg/m2). The degree of obesity was compared between the two groups using BMI(18.5, 24-27.9 and (28 (kg/m2) as the cut-off points for underweight, overweight and obesity. Associations with obesity were estimated by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All ORs were adjusted for age and sex. Results: Obesity was significantly prevalent in female patients with rectal cancer. All the patients with colon cancer showed lower level of BMI than control subjects. The ORs for rectal cancer rose with increasing BMI in women. Meanwhile, the ORs for colon cancer dropped with increasing BMI in both men and women. Obesity was an independent risk factor for rectal cancer, but not an independent risk factor for colon cancer. Conclusion: Rectal cancer and colon cancer may have different biological behavior. Obese women have relatively high risk for rectal cancer.

  14. Correlation of thyroid cancer Doppler hemodynamic indexes with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis indexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Jin Zhang; Jian-Jun Zhang; Hui Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of thyroid cancer Doppler hemodynamic indexes with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis indexes.Methods:A total of 108 cases of thyroid cancer were diagnosed by B-ultrasound and pathology and then included in the observation group of the research, 107 cases of non-cancer patients who received excision of thyroid adenoma in our hospital during the same period were selected as healthy control group, thyroid hemodynamic indexes, tumor proliferation-related indexes and serum angiogenesis-related indexes of two groups were detected, and the correlation of thyroid cancer hemodynamic indexes with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis indexes was further analyzed.Results:S and D values of observation group were higher than those of control group (P0.05); p53, PCNA and Ki-67 expression levels in thyroid tumor of observation group were higher than those of control group while TIPE2 protein expression level was lower than that of control group (P<0.05); serum VEGF, Ang-2, HIF-1α, IGF-Ⅱ and endostatin values of observation group were higher than those of control group while MBP value was lower than that of control group (P<0.05); thyroid artery peak systolic velocity (S) and end diastolic velocity (D) were directly proportional to p53, PCNA, Ki-67, VEGF, Ang-2, HIF-1α, IGF-Ⅱ and endostatin values, and inversely proportional to TIPE2 and MBP values (P<0.05).Conclusions:Artery blood flow velocity in patients with thyroid cancer is directly correlated with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis, and can be used as the reliable index to judge tumor condition and curative effect.

  15. Composite circulation index of weather extremes (the example for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Ustrnul

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation of a composite circulation index of weather extremes (CIE. The new index informs about the synoptic conditions favoring the occurrence of extremes on a regional scale. It was evaluated for temperature and precipitation extremes for Poland. Daily homogenized data obtained from 14 weather stations, which cover most of the country, were used. The data used cover the 60-year period from 1951 to 2010. The index is based on relationships between extremes and mesoscale circulation conditions. The core material also included data describing circulation types for the study period. Three different calendars were used (Grosswetterlagen, by Lity?ski, by Nied?wied?. The conditional probability of the occurrence of extremes for particular types was calculated independently using partial indices (Partial Index of weather Extremes ? PIE. The higher the index values, the more favorable the synoptic situation for the occurrence of extremes. The results were grouped by describing the probability of temperature and precipitation extremes on the IPCC likelihood scale. Three thresholds corresponding to the frequency of an occurrence were identified via a seasonal approach. The CIE was validated using basic correlation coefficients as well as contingency tables based on feature-displacement criteria and Bayesian Probability Methods. The results confirmed the significance of atmospheric circulation in the formation of temperature and precipitation extremes in Poland. The CIE proved the relationship by trying to estimate the probability of temperature and precipitation extremes occurrence depending on the circulation type forecasted.

  16. Optimization and Ranking in Web Service Composition using Performance Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinath V

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Selection of the best service from the existing composite services is an emerging technology that aims at attaining a better performance. The steps involved include selection of relevant web services from the composite service, followed by optimization and ranking that ultimately leads to the execution of the best service. This paper concentrates on combining optimization and ranking based on non-functional QoS parameters to evaluate its quality. The concept of optimization is carried out by ACO (Ant Colony Optimization algorithm. The optimization principle uses the concept of pheromone deposition and evaporation on the services. Ranking is done using performance index which is calculated dynamically from the non-functional QoS parameters. This ensures that the application based on this approach is efficient and fault tolerant. The result is obtained by measuring the performance of the services for multiple requests.

  17. Childhood body mass index growth trajectories and endometrial cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Julie; Gamborg, Michael; Tilling, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that excess weight already in childhood has positive associations with endometrial cancer; however, associations with changes in body mass index (BMI) during childhood are not well understood. Therefore, we examined whether growth in childhood BMI is associated with endometri...... cancer risk. We did not identify any sensitive childhood growth period, which suggests that excess gain in BMI during the entire childhood period should be avoided.[on SciFinder (R)]...

  18. Childhood body composition in relation to body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, L M; Wisemandle, W; Roche, A F; Chumlea, W C; Guo, S S; Siervogel, R M

    2001-02-01

    The aim is to describe body composition in relation to body mass index (BMI; body weight/stature(2)) to provide health care professionals insight into the meaning, significance, and limitations of BMI as an index of adiposity during childhood. Data from 387 healthy, white children 8 to 18 years of age from the Fels Longitudinal Study were analyzed. Measurements were scheduled annually and each child was examined 1 to 11 times, totaling 1748 observations. Total body fat (TBF) and fat-free mass (FFM) were determined from hydrodensitometry. Stature and weight were measured using standard methods and BMI and the components of BMI, TBF/stature(2), and FFM/stature(2) were calculated. Analyses included correlations between BMI and body composition variables; age-related patterns of BMI, TBF/stature(2), and FFM/stature(2); and annual changes in BMI, TBF/stature(2), and FFM/stature(2). Generally, correlations between BMI and body composition variables were strong and significantly different from zero. Means for BMI throughout childhood were similar for boys and girls, although significantly larger values were observed for girls at ages 12 to 13 years. Age-related patterns of TBF/stature(2) and FFM/stature(2) differed between sexes. In each sex, annual increases in BMI were driven primarily by increases in FFM/stature(2) until late adolescence, with increases in TBF/stature(2) contributing to a larger proportion of the BMI increases in girls than in boys. Unlike adults, annual increases in BMI during childhood are generally attributed to the lean rather than to the fat component of BMI. Because the properties of BMI vary during childhood, health care professionals must consider factors such as age and sex when interpreting BMI.

  19. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or enviro......BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic...... or environmental factors. METHODS: We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated...... genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482). We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from...

  20. A global view on cancer incidence and national levels of the human development index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Miranda M; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Bray, Freddie

    2016-12-01

    Socioeconomic factors are associated with cancer incidence through complex and variable pathways. We assessed cancer incidence for all cancers combined and 27 major types according to national human development levels. Using GLOBOCAN data for 184 countries, age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) were assessed by four levels (low, medium, high, very high) of the Human Development Index (HDI), a composite index of life expectancy, education, and gross national income. A strong positive relationship between overall cancer incidence and HDI level was observed. When comparing the ASR in very high HDI regions with that in low HDI regions, we observed a positive association ranging from 2 to 14 and 2 to 11 times higher in males and females, respectively, depending on the cancer type. Positive dose-response relationships between the ASR and HDI level were observed in both sexes for the following cancer types: lung, pancreas, leukemia, gallbladder, colorectum, brain/nervous system, kidney, multiple myeloma, and thyroid. Positive associations were also observed for testicular, bladder, lip/oral cavity, and other pharyngeal cancers, Hodgkin lymphoma, and melanoma of the skin in males, and corpus uteri, breast, and ovarian cancers and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in females. A negative dose-response relationship was observed for cervical and other pharyngeal cancers and Kaposi sarcoma in females. Although the relationship between incidence and the HDI remained when assessed at the country-specific level, variations in risk within HDI levels were also observed. We highlight positive and negative associations between incidence and human development for most cancers, which will aid the planning of cancer control priorities among countries undergoing human development transitions. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Image indexing and retrieval using linear phase coefficient composite filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotto, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    Content-based retrieval techniques can be characterized in several ways: by the manner in which image data are indexed, by the level of specificity/generality of the query and response of the system, by the type of query (e.g., iconic or symbolic), and by the kind of information used (intrinsic image features or attached information such as text). The method described in this paper automatically indexes images in the database, and is intended to retrieve specific objects by image query based on inherent image content. Our method is actually quite similar to object recognition except that instead of searching a single image for a given object, an entire database of images is examined. The approach uses linear phase coefficient composite (LPCC) filters to encode and match queries consisting of multiple images (e.g., representative views of an object of interest) against multiple images in the database simultaneously. Retrieval is a two-step process that first isolates those portions of the database containing images that match the query, and then identifies the specific images. Our use of LPCC filters exploits phase information to retrieve specific images that match the query from the database. The results from the experiments suggest that phase information can be used to index and retrieve multiple images from a database in parallel, and that large numbers of operations can be performed simultaneously using a complex number representation. In one experiment well over 100 real correlations were effectively performed by a single complex correlation. Problems encountered in processing video data are discussed.

  2. Body mass index and mortality in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarutti, Anna; Bonn, Stephanie E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Grönberg, Henrik; Bellocco, Rino; Bälter, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Body Mass index (BMI) has been shown to affect risk and mortality of several cancers. Prostate cancer and obesity are major public health concerns for middle-aged and older men. Previous studies of pre-diagnostic BMI have found an increased risk of prostate cancer mortality in obese patients. To study the associations between BMI at time of prostate cancer diagnosis and prostate cancer specific and overall mortality. BMI was analyzed both as a continuous variable and categorized into four groups based on the observed distribution in the cohort (BMI prostate cancer. After 11 years of follow up via linkage to the population-based cause of death registry, we identified 1,161 (37%) deaths off which 690 (59%) were due to prostate cancer. High BMI (BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2) was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of prostate cancer specific mortality (HR:1.44, 95% CI: 1.09-1.90) and overall mortality (HR:1.33, 95% CI: 1.09-1.63) compared to the reference group (BMI 22.5 prostate cancer specific mortality (HR:1.33, 95% CI: 1.02-1.74) and overall mortality (HR:1.36, 95% CI: 1.11-1.67) compared to the reference. However, this effect disappeared when men who died within the first two years of follow-up were excluded from the analyses while the increased risk of prostate cancer specific mortality and overall mortality remained statistically significant for men with a BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2 (HR:1.44, 95% CI: 1.09-1.90 and HR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.09-1.63, respectively). This study showed that a high BMI at time of prostate cancer diagnosis was associated with increased overall mortality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Synchrotron refractive-index microradiography of human liver cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Yongpeng; ZHANG Guilin; LI Yan; HWU Yeukuang; TSAI Wenli; JE Jung Ho; Margaritondo G.; YUAN Dong

    2005-01-01

    Three human liver tissue samples (~5 mm × 40 mm × 20 mm) were excised from a cancer patient's liver during surgery. The microradiology analysis was performed with a non-standard approach on a synchrotron. High-resolution refractive-index edge-enhanced microradiographs that cover a larger volume of the liver tissue sample were obtained. The cancer tissue and normal tissue could be clearly identified and distinguished based on their different textures. Furthermore, new blood vessel hyperplasia was found near the cancer area. Blood vessels with a diameter smaller than 20 μm could be identified. These findings were fully consistent with the histopathological examination of the same area. Microradiographs of the newly formed blood vessels at different angles were also obtained. This result shows that it is possible to further develop this approach into a technique of microradiographic imaging for clinic diagnosis of liver cancer at the early stage.

  4. Substitution of supplementary subtests for core subtests on composite reliability of WAIS--IV Indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph J; Glass, Laura A

    2010-02-01

    The effects of replacing core subtests with supplementary subtests on composite-score reliabilities were evaluated for the WAIS-IV Indexes. Composite score reliabilities and SEMs (i.e., confidence intervals around obtained scores) are provided for the 13 unique Index scores calculated following the subtest substitution guidelines of Wechsler in 2008. In all instances, unique Index composite-score reliabilities were comparable to their respective core Index score composite reliabilities, and measurement error never increased by more than 1 point. Using the standard Verbal Comprehension Index and Perceptual Reasoning Index and the unique subtest combinations for the Working Memory and Processing Speed indexes, which have the lowest composite-score reliabilities, decreased Full Scale composite reliability by .01, while the associated confidence interval of +/- 6 represents an increase in measurement error of 1 IQ point.

  5. Genomic index of sensitivity to endocrine therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmans, W Fraser; Hatzis, Christos; Sotiriou, Christos; Andre, Fabrice; Peintinger, Florentia; Regitnig, Peter; Daxenbichler, Guenter; Desmedt, Christine; Domont, Julien; Marth, Christian; Delaloge, Suzette; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Valero, Vicente; Booser, Daniel J; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Pusztai, Lajos

    2010-09-20

    We hypothesize that measurement of gene expression related to estrogen receptor α (ER; gene name ESR1) within a breast cancer sample represents intrinsic tumoral sensitivity to adjuvant endocrine therapy. A genomic index for sensitivity to endocrine therapy (SET) index was defined from genes coexpressed with ESR1 in 437 microarray profiles from newly diagnosed breast cancer, unrelated to treatment or outcome. The association of SET index and ESR1 levels with distant relapse risk was evaluated from microarrays of ER-positive breast cancer in two cohorts who received 5 years of tamoxifen alone as adjuvant endocrine therapy (n = 225 and 298, respectively), a cohort who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by tamoxifen and/or aromatase inhibition (n = 122), and two cohorts who received no adjuvant systemic therapy (n = 208 and 133, respectively). The SET index (165 genes) was significantly associated with distant relapse or death risk in both tamoxifen-treated cohorts (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.88, P = .002; and HR = 0.76, 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.93, P = .007) and in the chemo-endocrine-treated cohort (HR = 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.69, P = .011) independently from pathologic response to chemotherapy, but was not prognostic in two untreated cohorts. No distant relapse or death was observed after tamoxifen alone if node-negative and high SET or after chemo-endocrine therapy if intermediate or high SET. The SET index of ER-related transcription predicted survival benefit from adjuvant endocrine therapy, not inherent prognosis. Prior chemotherapy seemed to enhance the efficacy of adjuvant endocrine therapy related to SET index.

  6. Comparison of bispectral index and composite auditory evoked potential index for monitoring depth of hypnosis in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.B. van Oud-Alblas; J.W.B. Peters (Jeroen); T.G. de Leeuw (Tom); D. Tibboel (Dick); J. Klein (Jan); F. Weber (Frank)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In pediatric patients, the Bispectral Index (BIS), derived from the electroencephalogram, and the composite A-Line autoregressive index (cAAI), derived from auditory evoked potentials and the electroencephalogram, have been used as measurements of depth of hypnosis during

  7. Comparison of bispectral index and composite auditory evoked potential index for monitoring depth of hypnosis in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.B. van Oud-Alblas; J.W.B. Peters (Jeroen); T.G. de Leeuw (Tom); D. Tibboel (Dick); J. Klein (Jan); F. Weber (Frank)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In pediatric patients, the Bispectral Index (BIS), derived from the electroencephalogram, and the composite A-Line autoregressive index (cAAI), derived from auditory evoked potentials and the electroencephalogram, have been used as measurements of depth of hypnosis during ane

  8. Glycemic index, glycemic load and thyroid cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randi, G; Ferraroni, M; Talamini, R; Garavello, W; Deandrea, S; Decarli, A; Franceschi, S; La Vecchia, C

    2008-02-01

    Risk of thyroid cancer has already been related to refined cereals and starch food, but the association has not been studied in terms of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). We analyzed data from a case-control study conducted in Italy from 1986 to 1992 and including 399 histologically confirmed and incident cases of thyroid cancer and 616 control subjects. Information on dietary habits was derived through a food-frequency questionnaire and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) for GI and GL levels were estimated with adjustment for age, education, sex, area of residence, history of diabetes, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of fruit and vegetables, and noncarbohydrate energy intake. Compared with the lowest tertile, the ORs in subsequent tertiles were 1.68 and 1.73 for GI, and 1.76 and 2.17 for GL. The OR for highest tertile of GI compared with lowest one was 1.70 for papillary and 1.57 for follicular thyroid cancer. The ORs for GL were 2.17 for papillary and 3.33 for follicular thyroid cancer. Our study shows that high dietary levels of GI and GL are associated with thyroid cancer risk.

  9. Classifying regional development in Iran (Application of Composite Index Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sharifzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended abstract1- IntroductionThe spatial economy of Iran, like that of so many other developing countries, is characterized by an uneven spatial pattern of economic activities. The problem of spatial inequality emerged when efficiency-oriented sectoral policies came into conflict with the spatial dimension of development (Atash, 1988. Due to this conflict, extreme imbalanced development in Iran was created. Moreover spatial uneven distribution of economic activities in Iran is unknown and incomplete. So, there is an urgent need for more efficient and effective design, targeting and implementing interventions to manage spatial imbalances in development. Hence, the identification of development patterns at spatial scale and the factors generating them can help improve planning if development programs are focused on removing the constraints adversely affecting development in potentially good areas. There is a need for research that would describe and explain the problem of spatial development patterns as well as proposal of possible strategies, which can be used to develop the country and reduce the spatial imbalances. The main objective of this research was to determine spatial economic development level in order to identify spatial pattern of development and explain determinants of such imbalance in Iran based on methodology of composite index of development. Then, Iran provinces were ranked and classified according to the calculated composite index. To collect the required data, census of 2006 and yearbook in various times were used. 2- Theoretical basesTheories of regional inequality as well as empirical evidence regarding actual trends at the national or international level have been discussed and debated in the economic literature for over three decades. Early debates concerning the impact of market mechanisms on regional inequality in the West (Myrdal, 1957 have become popular again in the 1990s. There is a conflict on probable outcomes

  10. A Quality-Adjusted Price Index for Colorectal Cancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Lucarelli; Sean Nicholson

    2009-01-01

    The average price of treating a colorectal cancer patient with chemotherapy increased from about $100 in 1993 to $36,000 in 2005, due largely to the approval and widespread use of five new drugs between 1996 and 2004. We examine whether the substantial increase in spending has been worth it. Using discrete choice methods to estimate demand, we construct a price index for colorectal cancer drugs for each quarter between 1993 and 2005 that takes into consideration the quality (i.e., the efficac...

  11. Status Gizi Balita Berdasarkan Composite Index of Anthropometric Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurani Rahmadini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Upaya menurunkan prevalensi kurang gizi pemerintah membuat program Keluarga Sadar Gizi (Kadarzi. Cakupan Kadarzi Kota Depok tahun 2011 rendah (12,7% dan prevalensi gizi kurang, pendek, kurus berturut-turut 7,89%, 7%, 4,75%. Penelitian bertujuan mengetahui faktor dominan terhadap status gizi balita 6 - 59 bulan berdasarkan Composite Index of Anthropometric Failure (CIAF. Penelitian menggunakan data sekunder hasil survei Kadarzi 2011. Survei dilakukan di sebelas kecamatan Kota Depok menggunakan desain cross sectional. Sampel sebanyak 1.176 keluarga yang memiliki balita termuda umur 6 _ 59 bulan. Variabel yang diteliti adalah status gizi balita, perilaku Kadarzi, status Kadarzi, karakteristik balita, dan karakteristik keluarga. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan prevalensi balita gagal tumbuh 31%. Terdapat dua variabel yang memberikan pengaruh status gizi balita secara bersama-sama yaitu penimbangan balita (nilai p = 0,003 dan pendidikan ibu (nilai p = 0,034. Uji regresi logistik ganda menunjukkan penimbangan balita sebagai faktor dominan terhadap status gizi balita. Balita yang ditimbang tidak teratur berisiko 1,5 kali mengalami gagal tumbuh dibandingkan yang ditimbang teratur. Indeks CIAF berguna untuk mengetahui prevalensi gizi kurang secara keseluruhan dan penanggulangannya. Diperlukan penyuluhan dan promosi yang lebih aktif kepada masyarakat mengenai pentingnya pemantauan pertumbuhan balita melalui posyandu dan melakukan pembinaan kader posyandu dalam pemantauan status pertumbuhan anak sebagai deteksi dini adanya gangguan pertumbuhan. Effort to reduce malnutrition governments make Keluarga Sadar Gizi (Kadarzi. Kadarzi in Depok 2011 still low (12,7% and the prevalence of underweight, stunting, wasting are respectively 7,89%, 7%, 4,75%. This study aimed to determine the dominant factor for nutritional status of children based on Composite Index of Anthropometric Failure (CIAF. Research using secondary data survey Kadarzi 2011. The survey was conducted

  12. Canada's Composite Learning Index: A path towards learning communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappon, Paul; Laughlin, Jarrett

    2013-09-01

    In the development of learning cities/communities, benchmarking progress is a key element. Not only does it permit cities/communities to assess their current strengths and weaknesses, it also engenders a dialogue within and between cities/communities on the means of enhancing learning conditions. Benchmarking thereby is a potentially motivational tool, energising further progress. In Canada, the Canadian Council on Learning created the world's first Composite Learning Index (CLI), the purpose of which is to measure the conditions of learning nationally, regionally and locally. Cities/communities in Canada have utilised the CLI Simulator, an online tool provided by the Canadian Council on Learning, to gauge the change in overall learning conditions which may be expected depending on which particular indicator is emphasised. In this way, the CLI has proved to be both a dynamic and a locally relevant tool for improvement, moreover a strong motivational factor in the development of learning cities/communities. After presenting the main features of the CLI, the authors of this paper sum up the lessons learned during its first 5 years (2006-2010) of existence, also with a view to its transferability to other regions. Indeed, the CLI model was already adopted in Europe by the German Bertelsmann foundation in 2010 and has the potential to be useful in many other countries as well.

  13. Association of body mass index and prostate cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Reina; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Wallner, Lauren P; Richert-Boe, Kathryn; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Wang, Renyi; Weinmann, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Inconsistent evidence exists on whether obesity is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death post-radical prostatectomy. We examined data from three large health plans to evaluate if an increased body mass index (BMI) at prostate cancer diagnosis is related to prostate cancer mortality This population-based case-control study included 751 men with prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Cases were men who died due to prostate cancer (N=323) and matched controls (N=428). We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the association between BMI at diagnosis and prostate cancer mortality, adjusted for Gleason score, PSA, tumour characteristics, and matching factors. Study subjects were classified into the following BMI (kg/m2) categories: healthy (18.5-24.9), overweight (25-29.9) and obese (≥30). Nearly 43% of the participants had a BMI ≥25 at diagnosis. A higher fraction of cases (30%) were obese compared to controls (22%). Overall, obese men had more than a 50% increase in prostate cancer mortality (adjusted odds ratio=1.50 [95% CI, 1.03-2.19]) when compared to men with healthy BMI. After stratifying by Gleason score, the odds of mortality generally rose with increasing BMI. The strongest effect was observed in the Gleason score 8+ category (2.37, 95% CI: 1.11-5.09). These associations persisted after adjusting for PSA at diagnosis and other tumour characteristics. These results suggest that BMI at diagnosis is strongly correlated with prostate cancer mortality, and that men with aggressive disease have a markedly greater odds of death if they are overweight or obese. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Obesity, body composition, and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowke Jay H

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Established risk factors for prostate cancer have not translated to effective prevention or adjuvant care strategies. Several epidemiologic studies suggest greater body adiposity may be a modifiable risk factor for high-grade (Gleason 7, Gleason 8-10 prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. However, BMI only approximates body adiposity, and may be confounded by centralized fat deposition or lean body mass in older men. Our objective was to use bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA to measure body composition and determine the association between prostate cancer and total body fat mass (FM fat-free mass (FFM, and percent body fat (%BF, and which body composition measure mediated the association between BMI or waist circumference (WC with prostate cancer. Methods The study used a multi-centered recruitment protocol targeting men scheduled for prostate biopsy. Men without prostate cancer at biopsy served as controls (n = 1057. Prostate cancer cases were classified as having Gleason 6 (n = 402, Gleason 7 (n = 272, or Gleason 8-10 (n = 135 cancer. BIA and body size measures were ascertained by trained staff prior to diagnosis, and clinical and comorbidity status were determined by chart review. Analyses utilized multivariable linear and logistic regression. Results Body size and composition measures were not significantly associated with low-grade (Gleason 6 prostate cancer. In contrast, BMI, WC, FM, and FFM were associated with an increased risk of Gleason 7 and Gleason 8-10 prostate cancer. Furthermore, BMI and WC were no longer associated with Gleason 8-10 (ORBMI = 1.039 (1.000, 1.081, ORWC = 1.016 (0.999, 1.033, continuous scales with control for total body FFM (ORBMI = 0.998 (0.946, 1.052, ORWC = 0.995 (0.974, 1.017. Furthermore, increasing FFM remained significantly associated with Gleason 7 (ORFFM = 1.030 (1.008, 1.052 and Gleason 8-10 (ORFFM = 1.044 (1.014, 1.074 after controlling for FM. Conclusions Our results

  15. Obesity, body composition, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowke, Jay H; Motley, Saundra S; Concepcion, Raoul S; Penson, David F; Barocas, Daniel A

    2012-01-18

    Established risk factors for prostate cancer have not translated to effective prevention or adjuvant care strategies. Several epidemiologic studies suggest greater body adiposity may be a modifiable risk factor for high-grade (Gleason 7, Gleason 8-10) prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. However, BMI only approximates body adiposity, and may be confounded by centralized fat deposition or lean body mass in older men. Our objective was to use bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) to measure body composition and determine the association between prostate cancer and total body fat mass (FM) fat-free mass (FFM), and percent body fat (%BF), and which body composition measure mediated the association between BMI or waist circumference (WC) with prostate cancer. The study used a multi-centered recruitment protocol targeting men scheduled for prostate biopsy. Men without prostate cancer at biopsy served as controls (n = 1057). Prostate cancer cases were classified as having Gleason 6 (n = 402), Gleason 7 (n = 272), or Gleason 8-10 (n = 135) cancer. BIA and body size measures were ascertained by trained staff prior to diagnosis, and clinical and comorbidity status were determined by chart review. Analyses utilized multivariable linear and logistic regression. Body size and composition measures were not significantly associated with low-grade (Gleason 6) prostate cancer. In contrast, BMI, WC, FM, and FFM were associated with an increased risk of Gleason 7 and Gleason 8-10 prostate cancer. Furthermore, BMI and WC were no longer associated with Gleason 8-10 (OR(BMI) = 1.039 (1.000, 1.081), OR(WC) = 1.016 (0.999, 1.033), continuous scales) with control for total body FFM (OR(BMI) = 0.998 (0.946, 1.052), OR(WC) = 0.995 (0.974, 1.017)). Furthermore, increasing FFM remained significantly associated with Gleason 7 (OR(FFM) = 1.030 (1.008, 1.052)) and Gleason 8-10 (OR(FFM) = 1.044 (1.014, 1.074)) after controlling for FM. Our results suggest that associations between BMI and

  16. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions.

  17. Glycemic load, glycemic index, and the risk of breast cancer among Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajous, Martin; Willett, Walter; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Sanchez-Zamorano, Luisa Maria; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; Romieu, Isabelle

    2005-12-01

    The amount and composition of dietary carbohydrates is a major determinant of postprandial blood glucose and insulin, and risk of breast cancer has been positively associated with plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1. We sought to evaluate dietary glycemic load (GL) and overall glycemic index (GI) in relation to breast cancer risk in Mexican women. We examined dietary GL and overall GI and breast cancer risk among 475 women with histologically-confirmed breast cancer and a random sample of 1391 women from Mexico City households. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire adapted to the Mexican population. The multivariate adjusted or for all women comparing the highest quartile of dietary GL with the lowest quartile was 1.62 (95% CI 1.13-2.32; p-test for trend = 0.02) with a significant trend. In postmenopausal women, the multivariate adjusted or comparing the extreme quartiles was 2.18 (95% CI 1.34-3.55; p-test for trend=0.005). Overall GI was not significantly associated with risk of breast cancer. High intake of rapidly absorbed carbohydrate appears to play an important role in the risk of breast cancer in Mexican women.

  18. Quick Drought Response Index, 7 Day CONUS Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — QuickDRI, short for Quick Drought Response Index, is a drought-monitoring tool developed by scientists at EROS in collaboration with the National Drought Mitigation...

  19. Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Risk of Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    George, Stephanie Materese; Mayne, Susan T.; Leitzmann, Michael F; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Flood, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have provided limited evidence for a harmful effect of high glycemic index and dietary glycemic load on cancer. The authors analyzed associations among glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer in women and men in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study. Published glycemic index values were assigned to 225 foods/food groups. Glycemic load was calculated by multiplying the glycemic index, carbohydrate content, and intake frequency of individual foo...

  20. Direct relationship between breakdown strength and tracking index of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The following paper shows a clear correlation between the measured tracking index and the breakdown field strength for noncoated glass fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) with either a polyester or an epoxy based resin. 17 types of specimens have been tested according to IEC Publication 60587...

  1. The effect of protein and glycemic index on children's body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Linardakis, Manolis; Larsen, Thomas Meinert;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of protein and glycemic index (GI) on body composition among European children in the randomized, 6-month dietary intervention DiOGenes (diet, obesity, and genes) family-based study.......To investigate the effect of protein and glycemic index (GI) on body composition among European children in the randomized, 6-month dietary intervention DiOGenes (diet, obesity, and genes) family-based study....

  2. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  3. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  4. Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, M.P.; Mullie, P.F.F.; Brants, H.A.M.; Heinen, M.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinemia is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer, determinants of serum insulin levels, like the glycemic load and the glycemic index of the diet, could influence cancer risk. Our objective was to evaluate whether a diet with a high glycemic load or glycemic index is asso

  5. Influence of enamel composite thickness on value, chroma and translucency of a high and a nonhigh refractive index resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Acunzo, Raffaele; Alcidi, Renato

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of thickness on the optical properties of two enamel shade composites, one with a high refractive index and one traditional. A medium value enamel shade was selected from the resin composites Enamel Plus HRi (UE2) and Enamel Plus HFO (GE2). Enamel Plus HRi is a high refractive index composite. Samples were fabricated in five different thicknesses: 0.3, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mm. Three specimens per material and thickness were fabricated. Three measurements per sample, over white, black and dentin composite background were generated with a spectrophotometer (Spectroshade Micro, MHT). Value, chroma, translucency and color differences (ΔE) of the specimens were calculated. RESULTS were analyzed by the Pearson correlation test, ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey test. Increasing the thickness of the enamel layers decreased the translucency and the chroma of the substrate for both materials tested. For HRi the increase of the thickness resulted in an increase of the value, whereas for HFO it resulted in a reduction of the value. The two composites showed a significant difference in value for each thickness, but not in translucency and chroma. Color difference between them was perceptible in layers equal or higher than 0.5 mm. The high refractive index enamel (HRi) composite exhibits different optical behavior compared to the traditional one (HFO). HRi enamel composite behaves more like natural enamel as by increasing the thickness of the enamel layer, the value also increases.

  6. Pasta added with chickpea flour: chemical composition, In vitro starchdigestibility and predicted glycemic index

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Pasta was prepared with of durum wheat flour mixed with chickpea flour at two different levels and its chemical composition, in vitro starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index were assessed. Protein, ash, lipid, and dietary fiber content increased while total starch decreased with the chickpea flour level in the composite pasta, all in accordance to the composition of the legume flour. Potentially available starch decreased and resistant starch (RS) increased by adding chickpea flour ...

  7. Human Development Inequality Index and Cancer Pattern: a Global Distributive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Salman; Khazaei, Somayeh; Mansori, Kamyar; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Ayubi, Erfan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify associations of the human development inequality (HDI) index with incidence, mortality, and mortality to incidence ratios for eight common cancers among different countries. In this ecological study, data about incidence and mortality rates of cancers was obtained from the Global Cancer Project for 169 countries. HDI indices for the same countries was obtained from the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) database. The concentration index was defined as the covariance between cumulative percentage of cancer indicators (incidence, mortality and mortality to incidence ratio) and the cumulative percentage of economic indicators (country economic rank). Results indicated that incidences of cancers of liver, cervix and esophagus were mainly concentrated in countries with a low HDI index while cancers of lung, breast, colorectum, prostate and stomach were concentrated mainly in countries with a high HDI index. The same pattern was observed for mortality from cancer except for prostate cancer that was more concentrated in countries with a low HDI index. Higher MIRs for all cancers were more concentrated in countries with a low HDI index. It was concluded that patterns of cancer occurrence correlate with care disparities at the country level.

  8. Body mass index and colon cancer screening: the road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Imam, Mohamad; Ismail, Bahaa Eldeen Senousy; Castro, Fernando

    2015-02-07

    Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) has been associated with a decreased incidence and mortality from CRC. However, patient adherence to screening is less than desirable and resources are limited even in developed countries. Better identification of individuals at a higher risk could result in improved screening efforts. Over the past few years, formulas have been developed to predict the likelihood of developing advanced colonic neoplasia in susceptible individuals but have yet to be utilized in mass screening practices. These models use a number of clinical factors that have been associated with colonic neoplasia including the body mass index (BMI). Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which obesity contributes to colonic neoplasia as well as clinical studies on this subject have proven the association between BMI and colonic neoplasia. However, there are still controversies on this subject as some studies have arrived at different conclusions on the influence of BMI by gender. Future studies should aim at resolving these discrepancies in order to improve the efficiency of screening strategies.

  9. Clinical impact of ki-67 labeling index in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2013-01-01

    The ki-67 index is a marker of proliferation in malignant tumors. Studies from the period 2000 to 2012 on the prognostic and predictive value of ki-67 labeling index (LI) in non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) are reviewed. Twenty-eight studies reported on the prognostic value of ki-67 index with various...

  10. Body mass index and annual increase of body mass index in long-term childhood cancer survivors; relationship to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Cornelia A J; Gietema, Jourik A; Vonk, Judith M; Tissing, W J E; Boezen, Hendrika M; Zwart, Nynke; Postma, Aleida

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluation of body mass index (BMI) at final height (FH) and annual BMI increase in adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS) after treatment with anthracyclines, platinum, and/or radiotherapy. METHODS: BMI (weight/height²) was calculated retrospectively from diagnosis until FH. The prevalence

  11. Use of Segregation Indices, Townsend Index, and Air Toxics Data to Assess Lifetime Cancer Risk Disparities in Metropolitan Charleston, South Carolina, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaShanta J. Rice

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have demonstrated a relationship between segregation and level of education, occupational opportunities, and risk behaviors, yet a paucity of research has elucidated the association between racial residential segregation, socioeconomic deprivation, and lifetime cancer risk. Objectives: We examined estimated lifetime cancer risk from air toxics by racial composition, segregation, and deprivation in census tracts in Metropolitan Charleston. Methods: Segregation indices were used to measure the distribution of groups of people from different races within neighborhoods. The Townsend Index was used to measure economic deprivation in the study area. Poisson multivariate regressions were applied to assess the association of lifetime cancer risk with segregation indices and Townsend Index along with several sociodemographic measures. Results: Lifetime cancer risk from all pollution sources was 28 persons/million for half of the census tracts in Metropolitan Charleston. Isolation Index and Townsend Index both showed significant correlation with lifetime cancer risk from different sources. This significance still holds after adjusting for other sociodemographic measures in a Poisson regression, and these two indices have stronger effect on lifetime cancer risk compared to the effects of sociodemographic measures. Conclusions: We found that material deprivation, measured by the Townsend Index and segregation measured by the Isolation index, introduced high impact on lifetime cancer risk by air toxics at the census tract level.

  12. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  13. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is a broad-band scanner with four to six bands, depending on the model. The AVHRR senses in the visible, near-, middle-, and thermal- infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This sensor is carried on a series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), beginning with the Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS-N) in 1978. Since 1989, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has been mapping the vegetation condition of the United States and Alaska using satellite information from the AVHRR sensor. The vegetation condition composites, more commonly called greenness maps, are produced every week using the latest information on the growth and condition of the vegetation. One of the most important aspects of USGS greenness mapping is the historical archive of information dating back to 1989. This historical stretch of information has allowed the USGS to determine a 'normal' vegetation condition. As a result, it is possible to compare the current week's vegetation condition with normal vegetation conditions. An above normal condition could indicate wetter or warmer than normal conditions, while a below normal condition could indicate colder or dryer than normal conditions. The interpretation of departure from normal will depend on the season and geography of a region.

  14. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie Materese; Mayne, Susan T; Leitzmann, Michael F; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Flood, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F

    2009-02-15

    Previous studies have provided limited evidence for a harmful effect of high glycemic index and dietary glycemic load on cancer. The authors analyzed associations among glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer in women and men in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. Published glycemic index values were assigned to 225 foods/food groups. Glycemic load was calculated by multiplying the glycemic index, carbohydrate content, and intake frequency of individual foods reported on a food frequency questionnaire. From 1995 through 2003, the authors identified 15,215 and 33,203 cancer cases in women and men, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. For women and men, respectively, the relative risks for total cancer for high versus low glycemic index were 1.03 (P(trend)=0.217) and 1.04 (P(trend)=0.012) and, for glycemic load, were 0.90 (P(trend)=0.024) and 0.93 (P(trend)=0.01). Associations with total cancer held only among the overweight for glycemic index and among those of healthy weight for glycemic load. These findings suggest that glycemic index and glycemic load are not strong predictors of cancer incidence. The direction and small magnitude of associations might be explained by the manner in which high glycemic index and glycemic load track with overall diet and lifestyle patterns.

  15. Determination of the effective refractive index of porous silicon/polymer composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhong Jia

    2005-01-01

    The equation for calculating the effective refractive index of porous silicon inserted polymer was obtained by three-component Bruggeman effective medium model. The dependence of the effective refractive index of porous silicon/polymer composite films on the polymer fraction with various initial porosity was given theorically and experimentally respectively. The porous silicon and polymer polymethylmetacrylate based dispersive red one (PMMA/DR1) composite films were fabricated in our experiments. It is found that the measured effective refractive index of porous silicon inserted polymer was slightly lower than the calculated result because of the oxidization of porous silicon. The effective refractive index of oxidized porous silicon inserted polymer also was analyzed by four-component medium system.

  16. Healthy eating index/alternative healthy eating index and breast cancer mortality and survival: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Makan Pourmasoumi; Razieh Karimbeiki; Nooshin Vosoughi; Awat Feizi; Reza Ghiasvand; Farzane Barak; Maryam Miraghajani

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The effects of overall diet quality instead of single nutrients after breast cancer diagnosis on mortality have been a growing area of research interest. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the relationship between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)/the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and risk of breast cancer mortality or survival rates as a primary outcome, and some related inflammatory factors, as s...

  17. Association of cancer mortality with postdiagnosis overweight and obesity using body mass index

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xinsen; Zhou, Lei; Miao, Runchen; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yanyan; Pang, Qing; Qu, Kai; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Although overweight and obesity increase cancer risk, it is still controversial with respect to cancer mortality. In the current study, we enrolled 2670 patients of 14 tumor types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, to identify the prognostic role of overweight and obesity in cancer patients. After dividing the patients into different groups by the body mass index (BMI), we found significant lower mortality in the obesity group. In addition, we also treat BMI value as a binary catego...

  18. Cancer Plan Index: a measure for assessing the quality of cancer plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Phyllis; Adams, Elizabeth; Porterfield, Deborah S; Holden, Debra; McAleer, Kelly; Steele, C Brooke

    2011-01-01

    To (1) conduct an in-depth assessment of the content of comprehensive cancer control plans and (2) obtain data that can be used to provide guidance to grantees supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) as they refine their plans, and to other health professionals as similar planning is done. Through an iterative development process, a workgroup of subject matter experts from NCCCP and Research Triangle Institute International (RTI International) identified 11 core or essential components that should be considered in cancer plans on the basis of their professional experience and expertise. They also developed a tool, the Cancer Plan Index (CPI), to assess the extent to which cancer plans addressed the 11 core components. Sixty-five comprehensive cancer control programs in states, tribes, territories, and jurisdictions funded by the NCCCP. Raters reviewed and abstracted all available cancer plans (n = 66), which included plans from 62 funded programs and 4 states of the Federated States of Micronesia funded by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a subcontractor of one funded program. Of the 66 plans, 3 plans were used to pilot test the CPI and the remaining 63 plans were subsequently reviewed and abstracted. The primary outcome measures are national-level component scores for 11 defined domains (global involvement of stakeholders, developing the plan, presentation of data on disease burden, goals, objectives, strategies, reduction of cancer disparities, implementation, funds for implementation of plan, evaluation, usability of plan), which represent an average of the component scores across all available cancer plans. To aid in the interpretation and usability of findings, the components were segmented into 3 tiers, representing a range high (average score = 2.01-4.00), moderate (average score = 1.01-2.00), and low (average score = 0-1.00) levels of description of the component

  19. Correlation between body mass index and prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in Korean patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Heon Jong; Joo, Jungnam; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Yoo, Chong Woo; Park, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Myong Cheol

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in Korean women with endometrial cancer. Among 227 patients with endometrial cancer in the study population, 20 patients (8.8%) had HNPCC. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on the BMI: nonobese (BMI ≤25 kg/m) and obese (BMI >25 kg/m); then the nonobese group was subdivided into 2 groups: normal weight (BMI cancer and with HNPCC-related endometrial cancer. Among 207 patients with sporadic endometrial cancer, 119 (57.5%) were nonobese and 88 patients (42.5%) were obese. Of 20 patients with endometrial cancer related to HNPCC, 10 (50.0%) were nonobese and 10 (50.0%) were obese. In a subgroup analysis of only nonobese patients, 68 patients with sporadic endometrial cancer had normal weight and 51 were overweight. On the other hand, all 10 patients with HNPCC related to endometrial cancer had normal weight. There was no significant difference between the group with HNPCC-related endometrial cancer and the group with sporadic endometrial cancer according to BMI (P = 0.221). However, BMI proportions in HNPCC related to endometrial cancer were significantly different from those in sporadic endometrial cancer (P = 0.016). Among a subgroup of nonobese patients, the proportion of normal weight was significant higher in patients with HNPCC-related endometrial cancer compared to those in sporadic endometrial cancer (P = 0.006). Body mass index was not different between sporadic endometrial cancer and HNPCC-related endometrial cancer in Koreans. However, BMI proportions in the patients with HNPCC related to endometrial cancer was significantly different from those in sporadic endometrial cancer. Specifically, among nonobese patients, the proportion of normal weight was significantly high in Korean women with HNPCC.

  20. Accuracy of the Composite Variability Index as a Measure of the Balance Between Nociception and, Antinociception During Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko; Eleveld, Douglas J.; Kalmar, Alain F.; Heeremans, Eleonora H.; De Smet, Tom; Seshagiri, Chandran V.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    BACKGROUND: The Composite Variability Index (CVI), derived from the electroencephalogram, was developed to assess the antinociception-nociception balance, whereas the Bispectral Index (BIS) was developed to assess the hypnotic state during anesthesia. We studied the relationships between these

  1. Concurrency of anisotropy and spatial dispersion in low refractive index dielectric composites

    CERN Document Server

    Ushkov, Andrey A

    2016-01-01

    The article demonstrates uncommon manifestation of spatial dispersion in low refractive index contrast 3D periodic dielectric composites with periods of about one tenth of the wavelength. First principles simulations by the well established plane wave method reveal that spatial dispersion leads to appearance of additional optical axes and tends to compensate anisotropy in certain directions.

  2. Glycemic Index, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Load, and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in a Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Diets with high glycemic index and glycemic load have been associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. We prospectively investigated the associations between glycemic index, carbohydrates, glycemic load, and available carbohydrates dietary constituents (starch and simple sugar) intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We followed the participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study from 1995/1996 through December 2003. A ...

  3. Dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and endometrial cancer risk within the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cust, Anne E.; Slimani, Nadia; Kaaks, Rudolf; van Bakel, Marit; Biessy, Carine; Ferrari, Pietro; Laville, Martine; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Lajous, Martin; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Noethlings, Ute; Boeing, Heiner; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Skeie, Guri; Engeset, Dagrun; Gram, Inger Torhild; Quiros, J. Ramon; Jakszyn, Paula; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Larranaga, Nerea; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Wirfalt, Elisabet; Berglund, Goran; Lundin, Eva; Hallmans, Goeran; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Du, Huaidong; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Bingham, Shelia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Allen, Naomi E.; Key, Timothy J.; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio

    2007-01-01

    The associations of dietary total carbohydrates, overall glycemic index, total dietary glycemic load, total sugars, total starch, and total fiber with endometrial cancer risk were analyzed among 288,428 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (1992-2004), inc

  4. Assessment of nutritional status in cancer--the relationship between body composition and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Carla M M; Maia, Yara L M; Ormsbee, Michael; Sawyer, Michael B; Baracos, Vickie E

    2013-10-01

    Several nutritional assessment tools have been used in oncology settings to monitor nutritional status and its associated prognostic significance. Body composition is fundamental for the assessment of nutritional status. Recently, the use of accurate and precise body composition tools has significantly added to the value of nutritional assessment in this clinical setting. Computerized tomography (CT) is an example of a technique which provides state-of-the-art assessment of body composition. With use of CT images, a great variability in body composition of cancer patients has been identified even in people with identical body weight or body mass index. Severe muscle depletion (sarcopenia) has emerged as a prevalent body composition phenotype which is predictive of poor functional status, shorter time to tumor progression, shorter survival, and higher incidence of dose-limiting toxicity. Variability in body composition of cancer patients may be a source of disparities in the metabolism of cytotoxic agents. Future clinical trials investigating dose reductions in patients with sarcopenia and dose-escalating studies based on pre-treatment body composition assessment have the potential to alter cancer treatment paradigms.

  5. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load, and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, L S; Dal Maso, L; La Vecchia, C; Parpinel, M; Negri, E; Vaccarella, S; Kendall, C W; Jenkins, D J; Francesch, S

    2001-11-01

    Certain types of carbohydrates increase glucose and insulin levels to a greater extent than others. In turn, insulin may raise levels of insulin-like growth factors, which may influence breast cancer risk. We analyzed the effect of type and amount of carbohydrates on breast cancer risk, using the glycemic index and the glycemic load measures in a large case-control study conducted in Italy. Cases were 2,569 women with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer interviewed between 1991 and 1994. Controls were 2588 women admitted to the same hospital network for a variety of acute, non-neoplastic conditions. Average daily glycemic index and glycemic load were calculated from a validated 78-item food frequency questionnaire. Direct associations with breast cancer risk emerged for glycemic index (odds ratio, OR for highest vs. lowest quintile = 1.4; P for trend breast cancer (OR = 1.3) while the intake of pasta, a medium glycemic index food, seemed to have no influence (OR = 1.0). Findings were consistent across different strata of menopausal status, alcohol intake, and physical activity level. This study supports the hypothesis of moderate, direct associations between glycemic index or glycemic load and breast cancer risk and, consequently, a possible role of hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance in breast cancer development.

  6. Comparison of bispectral index and composite auditory evoked potential index for monitoring depth of hypnosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blussé van Oud-Alblas, Heleen J; Peters, Jeroen W B; de Leeuw, Tom G; Tibboel, Dick; Klein, Jan; Weber, Frank

    2008-05-01

    In pediatric patients, the Bispectral Index (BIS), derived from the electroencephalogram, and the composite A-Line autoregressive index (cAAI), derived from auditory evoked potentials and the electroencephalogram, have been used as measurements of depth of hypnosis during anesthesia. The performance and reliability of BIS and cAAI in distinguishing different hypnotic states in children, as evaluated with the University of Michigan Sedation Scale, were compared. Thirty-nine children (aged 2-16 yr) scheduled to undergo elective inguinal hernia surgery were studied. For all patients, standardized anesthesia was used. Prediction probabilities of BIS and cAAI versus the University of Michigan Sedation Scale and sensitivity/specificity were calculated. Prediction probabilities for BIS and cAAI during induction were 0.84 for both and during emergence were 0.75 and 0.74, respectively. At loss of consciousness, the median BIS remained unaltered (94 to 90; not significant), whereas cAAI values decreased (60 to 43; P hypnosis in children. Both indices, however, showed considerable overlap for different clinical conditions.

  7. Adult body mass index and risk of ovarian cancer by subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, Suzanne C; Nagle, Christina M; Thrift, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies have reported a positive association between body mass index (BMI) and ovarian cancer risk. However, questions remain as to whether this represents a causal effect, or holds for all histological subtypes. The lack of association observed for serous cancers may, f...

  8. Indexed

    CERN Document Server

    Hagy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Jessica Hagy is a different kind of thinker. She has an astonishing talent for visualizing relationships, capturing in pictures what is difficult for most of us to express in words. At indexed.blogspot.com, she posts charts, graphs, and Venn diagrams drawn on index cards that reveal in a simple and intuitive way the large and small truths of modern life. Praised throughout the blogosphere as “brilliant,” “incredibly creative,” and “comic genius,” Jessica turns her incisive, deadpan sense of humor on everything from office politics to relationships to religion. With new material along with some of Jessica’s greatest hits, this utterly unique book will thrill readers who demand humor that makes them both laugh and think.

  9. Childhood body mass index and the risk of prostate cancer in adult men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, J; Gamborg, M; Cook, M B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer aetiology is poorly understood. It may have origins early in life; previously we found a positive association with childhood height. The effects of early life body mass index (BMI; kg m(-2)) on prostate cancer remain equivocal. We investigated if childhood BMI, indepen......BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer aetiology is poorly understood. It may have origins early in life; previously we found a positive association with childhood height. The effects of early life body mass index (BMI; kg m(-2)) on prostate cancer remain equivocal. We investigated if childhood BMI......, independently and adjusted for height, is positively associated with adult prostate cancer. METHODS: Subjects were a cohort of 125208 boys formed from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, born 1930-1969 with height and weight measurements at 7-13 years. Cases were identified through linkage...... to the Danish Cancer Registry. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed. RESULTS: Overall, 3355 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Body mass index during childhood was positively associated with adult prostate cancer. The hazard ratio of prostate cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1...

  10. Macronutrient Balance and Dietary Glycemic Index in Pregnancy Predict Neonatal Body Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie V. Kizirian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of maternal macronutrient balance and dietary glycemic index (GI on neonatal body composition has received little study. We hypothesized that the overall quantity and quality of macronutrients, particularly carbohydrate, in the maternal diet could have trimester-specific effects on neonatal growth and body composition in women at risk of gestational diabetes. Maternal diet was assessed using 3-day food records in mid (n = 96 and late (n = 88 pregnancy as part of the GI Baby 3 study. Neonatal body composition was assessed by air-displacement plethysmography within 48 h of birth, adjusted for length, and expressed as fat mass index (FMI and fat-free mass index (FFMI. In mid pregnancy, higher maternal intake of carbohydrate energy was negatively correlated with infant FFMI (p = 0.037. In late pregnancy, higher dietary GI was associated with lower FFMI (p = 0.010 and higher carbohydrate energy predicted lower FMI (p = 0.034. Higher fat intake (%E and saturated fat, but not protein, also predicted neonatal body composition (higher FFMI in mid pregnancy and higher FMI in late pregnancy. Depending on pregnancy stage, a high carbohydrate-low fat diet, particularly from high glycemic sources, may reduce neonatal indices of both lean mass and adiposity.

  11. Macronutrient Balance and Dietary Glycemic Index in Pregnancy Predict Neonatal Body Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizirian, Nathalie V.; Markovic, Tania P.; Muirhead, Roslyn; Brodie, Shannon; Garnett, Sarah P.; Louie, Jimmy C. Y.; Petocz, Peter; Ross, Glynis P.; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of maternal macronutrient balance and dietary glycemic index (GI) on neonatal body composition has received little study. We hypothesized that the overall quantity and quality of macronutrients, particularly carbohydrate, in the maternal diet could have trimester-specific effects on neonatal growth and body composition in women at risk of gestational diabetes. Maternal diet was assessed using 3-day food records in mid (n = 96) and late (n = 88) pregnancy as part of the GI Baby 3 study. Neonatal body composition was assessed by air-displacement plethysmography within 48 h of birth, adjusted for length, and expressed as fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI). In mid pregnancy, higher maternal intake of carbohydrate energy was negatively correlated with infant FFMI (p = 0.037). In late pregnancy, higher dietary GI was associated with lower FFMI (p = 0.010) and higher carbohydrate energy predicted lower FMI (p = 0.034). Higher fat intake (%E) and saturated fat, but not protein, also predicted neonatal body composition (higher FFMI in mid pregnancy and higher FMI in late pregnancy). Depending on pregnancy stage, a high carbohydrate-low fat diet, particularly from high glycemic sources, may reduce neonatal indices of both lean mass and adiposity. PMID:27164136

  12. Degree of tumor FDG uptake correlates with proliferation index in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchou, Julia; Sonnad, Seema S; Bergey, Meredith R; Basu, Sandip; Tomaszewski, John; Alavi, Abass; Schnall, Mitchell

    2010-12-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake may be a useful surrogate marker for proliferation index, but the correlation has not always been clear-cut. Previous research by our group suggests that FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) is sensitive in detecting triple negative breast cancer. We therefore performed a pilot study to test if FDG uptake correlated with proliferation index in women with triple negative cancer. To determine whether proliferation index correlates with metabolic uptake of FDG in women with triple negative breast cancer, we performed a retrospective analysis correlating %Ki67 nuclear stain with tumor maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) in a group of 41 women, 22 with triple negative and 19 with non-triple negative breast cancer. As expected, [18F]-PET imaging was significantly more sensitive in detecting triple negative breast cancer than non-triple negative breast cancer, 95.5% vs 68.4% (p = 0.036). In general, SUVmax and %Ki67 nuclear stain values rise as histologic grade worsens. Histologic grade of triple negative breast cancer was more often poorly differentiated than non-triple negative cancer (p = 0.001). SUVmax correlated with %Ki67 nuclear staining in our entire cohort (spearman correlation = 0.485, p = 0.002). Moreover, this significant correlation appeared to be driven primarily by a subset of women with triple negative cancer (spearman correlation = 0.497, p = 0.019). Degree of tumor FDG uptake correlated significantly with proliferation index in women with triple negative breast cancer suggesting a potential role of FDG-PET in treatment response monitoring for this group of women. Future studies are necessary to define the role of PET imaging as a non-invasive means to monitor breast cancer treatment response in the neoadjuvant setting.

  13. The Composite Strain Index (COSI) and Cumulative Strain Index (CUSI): methodologies for quantifying biomechanical stressors for complex tasks and job rotation using the Revised Strain Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Arun; Moore, J Steven; Kapellusch, Jay M

    2016-11-04

    The Composite Strain Index (COSI) quantifies biomechanical stressors for complex tasks consisting of exertions at different force levels and/or with different exertion times. The Cumulative Strain Index (CUSI) further integrates biomechanical stressors from different tasks to quantify exposure for the entire work shift. The paper provides methodologies to compute COSI and CUSI along with examples. Complex task simulation produced 169,214 distinct tasks. Use of average, time-weighted average (TWA) and peak force and COSI classified 66.9, 28.2, 100 and 38.9% of tasks as hazardous, respectively. For job rotation the simulation produced 10,920 distinct jobs. TWA COSI, peak task COSI and CUSI classified 36.5, 78.1 and 66.6% jobs as hazardous, respectively. The results suggest that the TWA approach systematically underestimates the biomechanical stressors and peak approach overestimates biomechanical stressors, both at the task and job level. It is believed that the COSI and CUSI partially address these underestimations and overestimations of biomechanical stressors. Practitioner Summary: COSI quantifies exposure when applied hand force and/or duration of that force changes during a task cycle. CUSI integrates physical exposures from job rotation. These should be valuable tools for designing and analysing tasks and job rotation to determine risk of musculoskeletal injuries.

  14. Numerical simulations of negative-index refraction in a lamellar composite with alternating single negative layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zheng-Gao; Zhu Shi-Ning; Liu Hui

    2006-01-01

    Negative-index refraction is demonstrated in a lamellar composite with epsilon-negative (ENG) and mu-negative (MNG) materials stacked alternatively. Based on the effective medium approximation, simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability of such a lamellar composite are obtained theoretically and further proven by full-wave simulations. Consequently, the renowned left-handed metamaterial comprising split ring resonators and wires is interpreted as an analogy of such ENG-MNG layers. In addition, beyond the effective medium approximation, the propagating field squeezed near the ENG/MNG interface is demonstrated to be left-handed surface waves with backward phase velocity.

  15. The prostate health index selectively identifies clinically significant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Loeb (Stacy); M.G. Sanda (Martin G.); D.L. Broyles (Dennis L.); S.S. Shin (Sanghyuk S.); C.H. Bangma (Chris); J.T. Wei (John T.); A.W. Partin (Alan W.); G.G. Klee (George); K.M. Slawin (Kevin M.); L.S. Marks (Leonard S.); R.H.N. van Schaik (Ron); D.W. Chan (Daniel); L. Sokoll (Lori); A.B. Cruz (Amabelle B.); I.A. Mizrahi (Isaac A.); W.J. Catalona (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinicall

  16. Association of cancer mortality with postdiagnosis overweight and obesity using body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinsen; Zhou, Lei; Miao, Runchen; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yanyan; Pang, Qing; Qu, Kai; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-26

    Although overweight and obesity increase cancer risk, it is still controversial with respect to cancer mortality. In the current study, we enrolled 2670 patients of 14 tumor types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, to identify the prognostic role of overweight and obesity in cancer patients. After dividing the patients into different groups by the body mass index (BMI), we found significant lower mortality in the obesity group. In addition, we also treat BMI value as a binary categorical variable or continuous variable, respectively. We found significant lower mortality in the higher BMI group. Furthermore, when focusing on each tumor type, cervical cancer and bladder cancer showed lower mortality in the patients with higher BMI values. Taken together, our results demonstrate that postdiagnosis obesity might indicate a better prognosis in cancer patients. However, these findings should be interpreted cautiously because of small sample size.

  17. Measuring the Frailty Index of Multiple Myeloma Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corradini, Andrea; Hansen, Martin; Savic, Toma

    2016-01-01

    We report on a responsive web-based application that we have been developing for the cancer hospital in Vejle, Denmark. The application administers and handles systematic frailty scoring of patients with multiple myeloma and helps doctors make a more efficient and effective treatment choice...

  18. Measuring malnutrition -The role of Z scores and the composite index of anthropometric failure (CIAF)

    OpenAIRE

    Seetharaman N; Chacko T; Shankar SLR; Mathew A

    2007-01-01

    Background : The current WHO recommendation is to use the Z-Score or SD system to grade undernutrition which allows us to measure all the three indices and express the results in terms of Z scores or standard deviation units from the median of the international reference population. Objectives : To estimate the prevalence of undernutrition among under-five children in Coimbatore slums, using the Z-Score system of classification and the recently constructed Composite Index of Anthropometric...

  19. Most Satisfactory Camping: Multi-objective Optimization Based on Composite Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Lin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the rise in popularity of river rafting, we need to schedule an optimal mix of trips of varying duration and propulsion to meet the needs of travelers and improve the company’s interests. To provide a wilderness experience for travelers, we should try to reduce the contacts during the traveling. We firstly analyze the traveling process. And one contact (on-river is counted. We apply step-to-step method to this study. We firstly study this relationship when there is only one kind of travel days. Then we add another kind of travel days to draw the universal rule and finally we derive the relationship when there are many kinds of trips. In order to combine the contacts and company’s interests, we define two satisfaction degree functions by using fuzzy logic. We define a satisfaction degree function to describe the contacts. Then we define another function to describe the company’s interests. Lastly, we define a composite index to combine the two functions by giving them different weight. We base this model on maximizing this composite index and obtain the optimal schedule. When determining the carrying capacity of the river, we take contacts, company’s interests and river’s resources into account. In the same way, we define a satisfaction degree function for river’s resources. We finally define a composite index to combine the three factors by giving them different weights. We base this model on maximizing this composite index and derive the river’s carrying capacity.

  20. Plasma-enhanced growth, composition, and refractive index of silicon oxy-nitride films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1995-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry and refractive index measurements have been carried out on silicon oxy-nitride produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Nitrous oxide and ammonia were added to a constant flow of 2% silane in nitrogen, to produce oxy-nitride films with atomic...... nitrogen concentrations between 2 and 10 at. %. A simple atomic valence model is found to describe both the measured atomic concentrations and published material compositions for silicon oxy-nitride produced by PECVD. A relation between the Si–N bond concentration and the refractive index is found....... This relation suggest that the refractive index of oxy-nitride with a low nitrogen concentration is determined by the material density. It is suggested that the relative oxygen concentration in the gas flow is the major deposition characterization parameter, and that water vapor is the predominant reaction by...

  1. Single color attribute index for shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Commercial dental resin composites under the same shade designations show color discrepancies by brand. Moreover, three Commission Internationale de l′Eclairage (CIE color coordinates show significant variations by measurement method; therefore, direct comparisons of the color coordinates based on different methods are meaningless. This study aimed to assess a hypothesis that a new color attribute index (CAI, which could reduce the color coordinate variations by measurement method, was applicable for the shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites. The Hypothesis: CAI is applicable in the shade conformity judgment of commercial dental resin composites. Using the CIE color coordinates of shade guide tabs and resin composites, combined color indices such as Wa = CIE aFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 and Wb = CIE bFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 were defined, in which DEFNx01 ab was the color difference with a standard white tile. Ratio of Wa/Wb to that of an arbitrary reference shade (A2 in the same brand and measurement was defined as the CAI. The CAI values were significantly different by the shade designation and showed a logical trend by the shade designation number. The CAI of commercial resin composites and the keyed shade guide tabs showed overlaps. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The CAI might be used to judge the shade conformity of resin composites using the values based on different measurement methods. The application of the CAI, instead of conventional three-color coordinates, could efficiently simplify the shade conformity judgment of commercial resin composites. Although the hypothesis of the present study was partially confirmed, further studies for the practical application of this index are highly recommended.

  2. The impact of a high body mass index on laparoscopy assisted gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Min-Chan; Ryu, Seong-Yeob; Kim, Wook; Song, Kyo-Young; Cho, Gyu-Seok; Han, Sang-Uk; Hyung, Woo Jin; Ryu, Seung-Wan

    2009-11-01

    Obesity is known to be associated with postoperative morbidity in gastric cancer surgery, but its impact on laparoscopy assisted gastrectomy (LAG) for gastric cancer has rarely been evaluated. The clinical data for 1,485 LAG procedures for gastric cancer in 10 institutions were reviewed. The patients were divided into high body mass index (BMI) (BMI > or = 25 kg/m(2); n = 432) and low BMI (BMI gastric cancer. However, when a surgeon is relatively inexperienced with LAG, a careful approach is required for male patients with a high BMI.

  3. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique A Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown. METHODS: We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI; body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT images. A body mass index (BMI≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria. RESULTS: Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%; 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%, including 79% of patients with a BMI<25 kg/m² and 34% of those with BMI≥25 kg/m². Sarcopenic patients were older and less frequently African-American. Symptom burden did not differ among patients classified according to BMI and presence of sarcopenia. Median (95% confidence interval survival (days varied according to body composition: 215 (71-358 (BMI<25 kg/m²; sarcopenic, 271 (99-443 (BMI<25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic, 484 (286-681 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; sarcopenic; 501 d (309-693 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic. Higher muscle index and gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index. CONCLUSIONS: Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  4. Body mass index and risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue-Jun; Wang, Chun-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Kang-Kang; Li, Shuang; Bao, Hong-Hong; Zhao, Long-Yu; Liu, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Overweight and obesity, indicated as increased body mass index, are associated with the risk of some cancers. We carried out a meta-analysis on published cohort and case-control studies to assess the strength of association between body mass index and gastric cancer. Relevant studies were identified through PubMed, Web of Science and Medline electronic databases. Adjusted relative risks (odds ratios) with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the strength of association between body mass index and gastric cancer. Sixteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer (odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.24) compared with normal weight (body mass index = 18.5 to obesity and the increased risk of gastric cancer for males (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.48), non-Asians (odds ratio = 1.14, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.28) and both cohort studies (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.22) and case-control studies (odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.60). Both overweight (odds ratio = 1.22, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.42) and obesity (odds ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.15-2.24) were associated with the increased risk of gastric cardia cancer. The results indicated that obesity was associated with the risk of gastric cancer, especially for males and among non-Asians. Both overweight and obesity were associated with the risk of gastric cardia cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Measuring the Frailty Index of Multiple Myeloma Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corradini, Andrea; Hansen, Martin; Savic, Toma

    2016-01-01

    We report on a responsive web-based application that we have been developing for the cancer hospital in Vejle, Denmark. The application administers and handles systematic frailty scoring of patients with multiple myeloma and helps doctors make a more efficient and effective treatment choice....... The application is currently being tested with a small number of patients and is to replace the frailty measurement system used until now, which is done by the doctor on a per patient basis....

  6. Studies on Composite Extrudable Propellant with varied Burning Rate Pressure Index 'n'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Varghese

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of composite propellantextrusion technique and the study of burning rate pressure indices nwith respect to compositional variations. The n is found to vary from0.35 to plateau and plateau to mesa by suitable compositionalmodifications. Compositional influence on burning rate with specificreference to plateau and mesaburning additives is described. Detailsof the process parameters like fluidity of the slurry, extrusion pressure,extrusion rate and die-swell are presented. This propellant is based onISRO-CTPB binder using ISRO-AP as oxidizer. Ammonium perchlorate (AP particle size variation and inclusion of additives likePVC, lead stearate, ammonium sulphate, lithium fluoride etc. are foundto influence the burning rate pressure index n.

  7. Short-Term Prognostic Index for Breast Cancer: NPI or Lpi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Van Belle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Axillary lymph node involvement is an important prognostic factor for breast cancer survival but is confounded by the number of nodes examined. We compare the performance of the log odds prognostic index (Lpi, using a ratio of the positive versus negative lymph nodes, with the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI for short-term breast cancer specific disease free survival. A total of 1818 operable breast cancer patients treated in the University Hospital of Leuven between 2000 and 2005 were included. The performance of the NPI and Lpi were compared on two levels: calibration and discrimination. The latter was evaluated using the concordance index (cindex, the number of patients in the extreme groups, and difference in event rates between these. The NPI had a significant higher cindex, but a significant lower percentage of patients in the extreme risk groups. After updating both indices, no significant differences between NPI and Lpi were noted.

  8. Composite chiral metamaterials with negative refractive index and high values of the figure of merit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaofeng; Alici, Kamil Boratay; Caglayan, Humeyra; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas M; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2012-03-12

    A composite chiral metamaterial (CCMM) is designed and studied both numerically and experimentally. The CCMM is constructed by the combination of a continuous metallic wires structure and a purely chiral metamaterial (CMM) that consists of conjugated Rosettes. For the CMM, only very small, useful bands of negative index can be obtained for circularly polarized waves. These bands are all above the chiral resonance frequencies because of the high value of the effective parameter of relative permittivity ε. After the addition of the continuous metallic wires, which provide negative permittivity, the high value of ε can be partially compensated. Thus, a negative index band for the left circularly polarized wave that is below the chiral resonance frequency is obtained for the CCMM. At the same time, a negative index band for the right circularly polarized wave that is above the chiral resonance frequency is also obtained. Furthermore, both negative index bands correspond to the transmission peaks and have high values of the figure of merit. Therefore, the CCMM design that is proposed here is more suitable than the CMM for the construction of chiral metamaterials with a negative index.

  9. Drinking water composition and incidence of urinary calculus: introducing a new index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, Abbas; Shakhssalim, Nasser; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Pakmanesh, Hamid; Radfar, Mohammad Hadi

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. We searched for a pathophysiologically based feature of major water electrolytes, which may define water quality better than the water hardness, respecting urinary calculus formation. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Utilizing a multistage stratified sampling, 2310 patients were diagnosed in the imaging centers of the provincial capitals in Iran between 2007 and 2008. These were composed of 1755 patients who were settled residents of 24 provincial capitals. Data on the regional drinking water composition, obtained from an accredited registry, and their relationships with the region's incidence of urinary calculi were evaluated by metaregression models. The stone risk index (defined as the ratio of calcium to magnesium-bicarbonate product in drinking water) was used to assess the risk of calculus formation. RESULTS. No correlation was found between the urinary calculus incidence and the amount of calcium, bicarbonate, or the total hardness of the drinking water. In contrast, water magnesium had a marginally significant nonlinear inverse relationship with the incidence of the disease in the capitals (R(2) = 26%, P = .05 for a power model). The stone risk index was associated nonlinearly with the calculus incidence (R(2) = 28.4%, P = .04). CONCLUSIONS. Urinary calculus incidence was inversely related with drinking water magnesium content. We introduced a new index constructed on the foundation of a pathophysiologically based formula; the stone risk index had a strong positive association with calculus incidence. This index can have therapeutic and preventive applications, yet to be confirmed by clinical trials.

  10. Development of a new composite drought index for multivariate drought assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Ajmal, Muhammad; Kim, Tae-Woong

    2015-08-01

    Comprehensibly considering all physical forms of agricultural, hydrological, and meteorological drought is essential to develop reliable monitoring and prediction indices for the proper assessment of drought. This consideration encouraged to develop and evaluate a multivariate composite drought index (CDI) that considers all possible variables related to individual types of drought. The proposed CDI was primarily based on the weighted similarity measure (entropy weighted Euclidian distance) and the anomaly from the possible wettest and driest conditions of the selected study region (sub basin of Han River, South Korea). The CDI time series identified 2008-2009 as the driest year, while May 2008 was the driest month within the selected period (2003-2011). The comparative analysis revealed that the CDI monthly time series had a significant correlation with the aggregate drought index (ADI). In addition, in comparison with the single variable-based indices i.e., the standardized precipitation index (SPI) and the streamflow drought index (SDI), the CDI comprehensively responded to variability embedded in the individual drought attributes. Moreover, it was concluded that the developed CDI provided a physically sound, temporally flexible and unbiased index that can be directly associated with all possible variants and linked to the climate conditions of the study region without considering any feature extraction technique.

  11. Composite Linear Models | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Stuart G. Baker The composite linear models software is a matrix approach to compute maximum likelihood estimates and asymptotic standard errors for models for incomplete multinomial data. It implements the method described in Baker SG. Composite linear models for incomplete multinomial data. Statistics in Medicine 1994;13:609-622. The software includes a library of thirty examples from the literature. |

  12. Glycemic index, carbohydrates, glycemic load, and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Flood, Andrew; Subar, Amy F; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2009-04-01

    Diets with high glycemic index and glycemic load have been associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. We prospectively investigated the associations between glycemic index, carbohydrates, glycemic load, and available carbohydrates dietary constituents (starch and simple sugar) intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We followed the participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study from 1995/1996 through December 2003. A baseline self-administered food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the dietary intake and exposure information. A total of 1,151 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified from 482,362 participants after excluding first-year of follow-up. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for pancreatic cancer. There were no associations between glycemic index, total or available carbohydrates, gycemic load, and pancreatic cancer risk. Participants with high free fructose and glucose intake were at a greater risk of developing pancreatic cancer (highest compared with lowest quintile, RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.04-1.59; P trend = 0.004 and RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.10-1.67; P trend = 0.005, respectively). There were no statistically significant interactions by body mass index, physical activity, or smoking status. Our results do not support an association between glycemic index, total or available carbohydrate intake, and glycemic load and pancreatic cancer risk. The higher risk associated with high free fructose intake needs further confirmation and elucidation.

  13. Increased Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) Is Associated With Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer in Jamaican Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivappa, Nitin; Jackson, Maria D.; Bennett, Franklyn; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy; and it accounts for the most cancer deaths among Jamaican males. Diet has been implicated in the etiology of prostate cancer, including through its effects on inflammation. Method We examined the association between a newly developed dietary inflammatory index (DII) and prostate cancer in a case-control study of 40-80 year-old Jamaican males. A total of 229 incident cases and 250 controls attended the same urology out-patient clinics at 2 major hospitals and private practitioners in the Kingston, Jamaica Metropolitan area between March 2005 and July 2007. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a previously validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that was expanded to assess diet and cancer in this Jamaican population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios, with DII as continuous and expressed as quartiles. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, total energy intake, education, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, physical activity and family history of prostate cancer. Results Men in the highest quartile of the DII were at higher risk of prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.14–5.04 (Ptrend = 0.08)] compared to men in the lowest DII quartile. Conclusion These data suggest a pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by increasing DII score, may be a risk factor for prostate cancer in Jamaican men. PMID:26226289

  14. Factor structure of the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, RTH; Fong, TCT

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) is used extensively to assess subjective sleep disturbance in cancer populations. Although previous studies on the PSQI suggested a better fit for a two- or three-factor model than the original one-factor model, none accounted for the indicator-specific effect between sleep duration and habitual sleep efficiency. This study evaluated the PSQI’s dimensionality and its convergent validity with cancer-related psychopathological states in femal...

  15. Glycemic load, glycemic index and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2009-07-01

    High-glycemic load diets have been hypothesized to increase the risk of breast cancer but epidemiologic studies have yielded inconsistent findings. We examined the associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and glycemic load with risk of overall and hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based cohort of 61,433 women who completed a food frequency questionnaire at enrollment in 1987-1990. During a mean follow-up of 17.4 years, we ascertained 2,952 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. Glycemic load but not carbohydrate intake or glycemic index was weakly positively associated with overall breast cancer risk (p for trend = 0.05). In analyses stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the breast tumors, we observed statistically significant positive associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and glycemic load with risk of ER+/PR- breast cancer; the multivariate relative risks comparing extreme quintiles were 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.93-1.94; p for trend = 0.04] for carbohydrate intake, 1.44 (95% CI = 1.06-1.97; p for trend = 0.01) for glycemic index and 1.81 (95% CI = 1.29-2.53; p for trend = 0.0008) for glycemic load. No associations were observed for ER+/PR+ or ER-/PR- breast tumors. These findings suggest that a high carbohydrate intake and diets with high glycemic index and glycemic load may increase the risk of developing ER+/PR- breast cancer.

  16. Association of body composition with outcome of docetaxel chemotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer: a retrospective review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixin Wu

    Full Text Available Docetaxel, a lipophilic drug, is indicated for castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. Most men with such disease would have had androgen-deprivation therapy, which decreases muscle and increases body fat. Obesity and body composition changes may influence the outcomes of docetaxel therapy.We conducted a retrospective review of 333 patients with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel at a comprehensive cancer center between October 7, 2004 and December 31, 2012. Body composition parameters were measured based on the areas of muscle and adipose tissues in the visceral and subcutaneous compartments on CT images at L3-4 levels. Dose calculations, toxicity and adverse reaction profiles, and overall survival were analyzed.Obese patients were younger at the diagnosis of prostate cancer and had a shorter duration from diagnosis to docetaxel therapy. Analysis of body composition found that a high visceral fat-to-subcutaneous fat area ratio (VSR was associated with poor prognosis but a high visceral fat-to-muscle area ratio (VMR and high body mass index were associated with increased duration from starting docetaxel to death, allowing such men to catch up with patients with normal body mass index in overall survival from cancer diagnosis to death. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that age ≥65 years, high VSR, abnormal serum alkaline phosphatase, and >10% reduction of initial dosage were significant predictors of shorter time between starting docetaxel and death, and that high VMR, obesity, and weekly regimens were significant predictors of longer survival after docetaxel.Obese and overweight patients may benefit more from weekly docetaxel regimens using the reference dosage of 35 mg/m2 without empirical dosage reduction.

  17. Effect of body mass index on clinical and morphological characteristics of triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Schepotin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer phenotype characterized by a more aggressive than other molecular types of tumor. In addition to non-modifiable clinical and pathological factors of aggressiveness of triple negative breast cancer is caused by potentially modifiable lifestyle (obesity, alcohol consumption, hypodynamia etc.. In this study we investigated the relationship between body mass index at diagnosis, clinical and morphological outcome predictors, and the impact of obesity on overall and disease-free survival of patients with triple negative breast cancer.

  18. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Weighted Geometric Brownian Motion Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayo Willy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index (PSEi is the main stock index of the Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE. PSEi is computed using a weighted mean of the top 30 publicly traded companies in the Philippines, called component stocks. It provides a single value by which the performance of the Philippine stock market is measured. Unfortunately, these weights, which may vary for every trading day, are not disclosed by the PSE. In this paper, we propose a model of forecasting the PSEi by estimating the weights based on historical data and forecasting each component stock using Monte Carlo simulation based on a Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM assumption. The model performance is evaluated and its forecast compared is with the results using a direct GBM forecast of PSEi over different forecast periods. Results showed that the forecasts using WGBM will yield smaller error compared to direct GBM forecast of PSEi.

  19. Compositional dependence of optical band gap and refractive index in lead and bismuth borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallur, Saisudha B.; Czarnecki, Tyler; Adhikari, Ashish; Babu, Panakkattu K.

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Refractive indices increase with increasing PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. • Optical band gap arises due to direct forbidden transition. • Optical band gaps decrease with increasing PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. • New empirical relation between the optical band gap and the refractive index. - Abstract: We prepared a series of lead and bismuth borate glasses by varying PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and studied refractive index and optical band gap as a function of glass composition. Refractive indices were measured very accurately using a Brewster’s angle set up while the optical band gaps were determined by analyzing the optical absorption edge using the Mott–Davis model. Using the Lorentz–Lorentz method and the effective medium theory, we calculated the refractive indices and then compared them with the measured values. Bismuth borate glasses show better agreement between the calculated values of the refractive index and experimental values. We used a differential method based on Mott–Davis model to obtain the type of transition and optical band gap (E{sub opt}) which in turn was compared with the value of E{sub opt} obtained using the extinction coefficient. Our analysis shows that in both lead and bismuth borate glasses, the optical band gap arises due to direct forbidden transition. With increasing PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, the absorption edge shifts toward longer wavelengths and the optical band gap decreases. This behavior can be explained in terms of changes to the Pb−O/Bi−O chemical bonds with glass composition. We obtained a new empirical relation between the optical band gap and the refractive index which can be used to accurately determine the electronic oxide polarizability in lead and bismuth oxide glasses.

  20. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load and endometrial cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Helen G; Kitahara, Cari M; Murray, Liam J; Dodd, Kevin W; Black, Amanda; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Cantwell, Marie M

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer risk has been directly associated with glycemic load. However, few studies have investigated this link, and the etiological role of specific dietary carbohydrate components remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk in the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Recruitment took place in 1993-2001. Over a median of 9.0 years of follow-up through 2009, 386 women developed endometrial cancer among 36,115 considered in the analysis. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item diet history questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant inverse associations were detected between endometrial cancer risk and total available carbohydrate intake (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.90), total sugars intake (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96), and glycemic load (HR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.84) when women in the highest quartile of intake were compared with those in the lowest. These inverse associations were strongest among overweight and obese women. No associations with endometrial cancer risk were observed for glycemic index or dietary fiber. Our findings contrast with previous evidence and suggest that high carbohydrate intakes and glycemic loads are protective against endometrial cancer development. Further clarification of these associations is warranted.

  1. Application of Support Vector Machines Regression in Prediction Shanghai Stock Composite Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Dong; Wu Wen-feng

    2003-01-01

    The SVMs for regression is used to forecast Shanghai stock composite index (SSCI). Implementing structural risk minimization principle, SVMs can overcome the over-fitting problem. The regression uses ε-insensitive loss function. The training of SVMs leads to a quadratic programming problem and it has a global unique solution. The experiment uses BP neural networks as benchmark for comparison. The results demonstrate that the prediction figure of SSCI can help to find timing for buy or sell, the forecasting variation of SVMs is smaller than that of BP, and the direction forecasting of SVMs is more accurate than that of BP.

  2. Influence of Body Mass Index on Tumor Pathology and Survival in Uterine Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anne Bjerrum; Hare-Bruun, Helle; Høgdall, Claus Kim;

    2016-01-01

    for uterine cancer or atypical endometrial hyperplasia (International Classification of Diseases-10 codes D070, DC549) 2005 to 2012 (n = 6003). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Impact of BMI on type I and II endometrial cancer survival. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Danish Gynecological Cancer Database data on women with type......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of body mass index (BMI) on endometrial tumor pathology, stage and complication rate and to identify individual prognostic factors, such as BMI, in types I and II endometrial cancer. DESIGN: Register study included all Danish women who underwent surgery...... I and II endometrial cancer were retrieved. Kaplan-Meier plot was used to illustrate differences in survival in relation to BMI. Log-rank test was used to demonstrate difference between the curves. Cox regression hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of the effect of BMI on overall...

  3. MRI-Derived Cellularity Index as a Potential Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0391 TITLE: MRI -Derived Cellularity Index as a Potential...2. REPORT TYPE Annual report 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2013 - 14 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER MRI ...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Standard magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) of the prostate lacks sensitivity in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PCa

  4. Piloting a generic cancer consumer quality index in six European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A.; Roeling, M.P.; Heerink, J.; Sixma, H.; Presti, P.; Lombardo, C.; Harten, W. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accounting for patients’ perspective has become increasingly important. Based on the Consumer Quality Index method (founded on Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) a questionnaire was recently developed for Dutch cancer patients. As a next step, this study aimed to

  5. Association between an inflammatory-nutritional index and nutritional status in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici Pastore, Carla; Paiva Orlandi, Silvana; González, María Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Cachexia is a multifatorial syndrome characterized by loss of body weight, fat and muscle, increasing morbidity and mortality. The use of an index accounting for both serum albumin and C Reactive Protein levels could make early identification of cachexia easier. To evaluate the variation of an inflammatory nutritional index related to nutritional status in cancer patients. Cross sectional study including patients with gastrointestinal and lung cancer of a public chemotherapy service in Brazil. Serum albumin and C Reactive Protein were measured and the nutritional status was defined by Subjective Global Assessment. Statistical analyses were performed using Stata 9.2(TM). A total of 74 patients were evaluated, 58.1% of them were male, mean age 63.4 ± 11.9 years old. Gastrointestinal cancer was the most prevalent type (71.6%). Only 13.7% of the patients were well nourished and 21.9% were severely malnourished. C Reactive Protein significantly increased according to nutritional status decline (p=0.03). When the albumin from patients with systemic inflammation was evaluated, there was no significant variation in relation to nutritional status (p=0.06). The Inflammatory Nutritional Index significantly varied in relation to nutritional status independent of the systemic inflammation (p=0.02). Inflammatory Nutritional Index can be an adjuvant way for biochemical nutritional assessment and follow up in cancer patients with systemic inflammation. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in body mass index in long-term childhood cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, HM; Geskus, Ronald B; Raemaekers, Steven; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Vulsma, Thomas; van der Pal, Helena J H; Caron, Hubert N; Kremer, Leontien C M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported changes in the body mass index (BMI) with time in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) during follow-up. The limitations of these studies include that they described only a subgroup of survivors or used questionnaires with self-reported heights and weights. Th

  7. Changes in body mass index in long-term childhood cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, HM; Geskus, Ronald B; Raemaekers, Steven; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Vulsma, Thomas; van der Pal, Helena J H; Caron, Hubert N; Kremer, Leontien C M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported changes in the body mass index (BMI) with time in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) during follow-up. The limitations of these studies include that they described only a subgroup of survivors or used questionnaires with self-reported heights and weights. Th

  8. Assessment of composite index methods for agricultural vulnerability to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiréhn, Lotten; Danielsson, Åsa; Neset, Tina-Simone S

    2015-06-01

    A common way of quantifying and communicating climate vulnerability is to calculate composite indices from indicators, visualizing these as maps. Inherent methodological uncertainties in vulnerability assessments, however, require greater attention. This study examines Swedish agricultural vulnerability to climate change, the aim being to review various indicator approaches for assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change and to evaluate differences in climate vulnerability depending on the weighting and summarizing methods. The reviewed methods are evaluated by being tested at the municipal level. Three weighting and summarizing methods, representative of climate vulnerability indices in general, are analysed. The results indicate that 34 of 36 method combinations differ significantly from each other. We argue that representing agricultural vulnerability in a single composite index might be insufficient to guide climate adaptation. We emphasize the need for further research into how to measure and visualize agricultural vulnerability and into how to communicate uncertainties in both data and methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load and risk of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, Konstansa; Nagorni, Aleksandar; Jeremić, Miroslav

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relationship between dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, glycemic load and gastric cancer risk. This hospital based case-control study was conducted in Nis (Serbia) between 2005 and 2006. Subjects (n=102) with histologically confirmed gastric cancer and controls (n=204) selected from non-cancer patients were interviewed. The structured questionnaire included information on socio-demographic and lifestyle habits. Data from dietary habits were based on Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). We found reductions in gastric cancer risk for diets high in carbohydrate (OR for highest versus the lowest tertile = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.02-0.23) and mono- and disaccharides (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01-0.09) and increased risk (OR = 4.13, 95% CI: 1.73-9.86) for high polysaccharide intake. Total carbohydrate intake (OR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04-0.66) and mono- and disaccharides intake (OR = 0.06, 95% CI: 0.02-0.20) was associated with a reduction in gastric cancer risk, while polysaccharide intake was associated with an increased risk (OR = 4.85, 95% CI: 1.67-14.09) for the diffuse type only. In both histological subtypes, there was not significant association between glycemic index, glycemic load and the risk of gastric cancer. Our results suggest that increased intake of foods rich in carbohydrate, particularly mono- and disaccharides, as well as reduced consumption of food rich in polysaccharides, may lower the risk of diffuse type of gastric cancer. Our data do not support association between glycemic index, glycemic load and the risk of gastric cancer.

  10. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  11. Prediagnostic Body Mass Index Trajectories in Relation to Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Scott P; Graubard, Barry I; Andreotti, Gabriella; Younes, Naji; Cleary, Sean D; Cook, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Evidence suggests that obesity in adulthood is associated with increased risk of "clinically significant" prostate cancer. However, studies of body mass index (BMI) across the adult life course and prostate cancer risks remain limited. In a prospective cohort of 69 873 men in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, we examined associations of prediagnostic BMI across the adult life course with risk of incident prostate cancer and fatal prostate cancer (prostate cancer-specific mortality). At 13 years of follow-up, we identified 7822 incident prostate cancer cases, of which 3078 were aggressive and 255 fatal. BMI trajectories were determined using latent-class trajectory modeling. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). BMI at age 20 years, 50 years, and baseline questionnaire (mean age = 63 years) were associated with increased risks of fatal prostate cancer (HRs = 1.27-1.32 per five-unit increase). In five BMI trajectories identified, fatal prostate cancer risk was increased in men who had a normal BMI (HR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.21 to 3.12) or who were overweight (HR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.35 to 5.18) at age 20 years and developed obesity by baseline compared with men who maintained a normal BMI. Aggressive and nonaggressive prostate cancer were not associated with BMI, and modest inverse associations were seen for total prostate cancer. Our results suggest that BMI trajectories during adulthood that result in obesity lead to an elevated risk of fatal prostate cancer. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Identification of certain cancer-mediating genes using Gaussian fuzzy cluster validity index

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupam Ghosh; Rajat K De

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we have used an index, called Gaussian fuzzy index (GFI), recently developed by the authors, based on the notion of fuzzy set theory, for validating the clusters obtained by a clustering algorithm applied on cancer gene expression data. GFI is then used for the identification of genes that have altered quite significantly from normal state to carcinogenic state with respect to their mRNA expression patterns. The effectiveness of the methodology has been demonstrated on three gene expression cancer datasets dealing with human lung, colon and leukemia. The performance of GFI is compared with 19 exiting cluster validity indices. The results are appropriately validated biologically and statistically. In this context, we have used biochemical pathways, -value statistics of GO attributes, -test and -score for the validation of the results. It has been reported that GFI is capable of identifying high-quality enriched clusters of genes, and thereby is able to select more cancer-mediating genes.

  13. Is there a role for body mass index in the assessment of prostate cancer risk on biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Ketchum, Norma S; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Thompson, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    We examine the role of body mass index in the assessment of prostate cancer risk. A total of 3,258 participants who underwent biopsy (including 1,902 men with a diagnosis of prostate cancer) were identified from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial. The associations of body mass index with prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer were examined using logistic regression, adjusting for age, race, body mass index adjusted prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, family history of prostate cancer, biopsy history, prostate specific antigen velocity, and time between study entry and the last biopsy. The prediction models were compared with our previously developed body mass index adjusted Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial prostate cancer risk calculator. Of the study subjects 49.1% were overweight and 29.3% were obese. After adjustment, among men without a known family history of prostate cancer, increased body mass index was not associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer (per one-unit increase in logBMI OR 0.83, p=0.54) but was significantly associated with a higher risk of high grade prostate cancer (ie Gleason score 7 or greater prostate cancer) (OR 2.31, p=0.03). For men with a known family history of prostate cancer the risks of prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer increased rapidly as body mass index increased (prostate cancer OR 3.73, p=0.02; high grade prostate cancer OR 7.95, p=0.002). The previously developed risk calculator generally underestimated the risks of prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. Body mass index provided independently predictive information regarding the risks of prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer after adjusting for other risk factors. Body mass index, especially in men with a known family history of prostate cancer, should be considered for inclusion in any clinical assessment of prostate cancer risk and recommendations regarding prostate biopsy. Copyright © 2014

  14. Skeletal Muscle Depletion Predicts the Prognosis of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Palliative Chemotherapy, Independent of Body Mass Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younak Choi

    Full Text Available Body composition has emerged as a prognostic factor in cancer patients. We investigated whether sarcopenia at diagnosis and loss of skeletal muscle during palliative chemotherapy were associated with survival in patients with pancreatic cancer.We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of pancreatic cancer patients receiving palliative chemotherapy between 2003 and 2010. The cross-sectional area of skeletal muscle at L3 by computed tomography was analyzed with Rapidia 3D software. We defined sarcopenia as a skeletal muscle index (SMI< 42.2 cm2/m2 (male and < 33.9 cm2/m2 (female using ROC curve.Among 484 patients, 103 (21.3% patients were sarcopenic at diagnosis. Decrease in SMI during chemotherapy was observed in 156 (60.9% male and 65 (40.6% female patients. Decrease in body mass index (BMI was observed in 149 patients (37.3%, with no gender difference. By multivariate analysis, sarcopenia (P< 0.001, decreasedBMI and SMI during chemotherapy (P = 0.002, P = 0.004, respectively were poor prognostic factors for overall survival (OS. While the OS of male patients was affected with sarcopenia (P< 0.001 and decreased SMI (P = 0.001, the OS of female patients was influenced with overweight at diagnosis (P = 0.006, decreased BMI (P = 0.032 and decreased SMI (P = 0.014. Particularly, while the change of BMI during chemotherapy did not have impact on OS within the patients with maintained SMI (P = 0.750, decrease in SMI was associated with poor OS within the patients with maintained BMI (HR 1.502; P = 0.002.Sarcopenia at diagnosis and depletion of skeletal muscle, independent of BMI change, during chemotherapy were poor prognostic factors in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  15. Composite Distance Transformation for Indexing and k-Nearest-Neighbor Searching in High-Dimensional Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhuang; Yue-Ting Zhuang; Fei Wu

    2007-01-01

    Due to the famous dimensionality curse problem, search in a high-dimensional space is considered as a "hard" problem. In this paper, a novel composite distance transformation method, which is called CDT, is proposed to support a fast k-nearest-neighbor (k-NN) search in high-dimensional spaces. In CDT, all (n) data points are first grouped into some clusters by a k-Means clustering algorithm. Then a composite distance key of each data point is computed. Finally, these index keys of such n data points are inserted by a partition-based B+-tree. Thus, given a query point, its k-NN search in high-dimensional spaces is transformed into the search in the single dimensional space with the aid of CDT index. Extensive performance studies are conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed scheme. Our results showthat this method outperforms the state-of-the-art high-dimensional search techniques, such as the X-Tree, VA-file, iDistance and NB-Tree.

  16. An Average Failure Index Method for the Tensile Strength Prediction of Composite Adhesive-bondedJoints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianyu; SHAN Meijuan; ZHAO Libin; FEI Binjun

    2015-01-01

    An average failure index method based on accurate FEA was proposed for the tensile strength prediction of composite out-of-plane adhesive-bondedπjoints. Based on the simple and independent maximum stress failure criterion, the failure index was introduced to characterize the degree of stress components close to their corresponding material strength. With a brief load transfer analysis, the weak fillers were prominent and further detailed discussion was performed. The maximum value among the average failure indices which were related with different stress components was filtrated to represent the failure strength of the critical surface, which is either the two curved upside surfaces or the bottom plane of the fillers for compositeπjoints. The tensile strength of three kinds ofπjoints with different material systems, configurations and lay-ups was predicted by the proposed method and corresponding experiments were conducted. Good agreements between the numerical and experimental results give evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed method. In contrast to the existed time-consuming strength prediction methods, the proposed method provides a capability of quickly assessing the failure of complex out-of-plane joints and is easy and convenient to be widely utilized in engineering.

  17. Effect of body mass index on the survival of patients with early-stage small cell lung cancer after surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnik, A. P.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is an important medico-social problem. It is connected with high level of incidence and mortality of lung cancer. Nowadays we know that obesity has significant influence on cancer development, including lung cancer. Multivariate analysis confirmed that histological type of tumour, kind of operation and body mass index (BMI) influence on prognosis in patients with early stages of mall cell lung cancer. So, now we can use BMI along with other significant prognostic criteria for dete...

  18. Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Breast Cancer Risk Among Mexican Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadou, Amina; Degoul, Julie; Hainaut, Pierre; Chajes, Veronique; Biessy, Carine; Torres Mejia, Gabriela; Huybrechts, Inge; Moreno Macia, Hortensia; Ortega, Caro; Angeles-Llerenas, Anjélica; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    Very few studies have focused on the relationship among dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and breast cancer risk in Latin American women. Our objective was to assess the associations among dietary carbohydrate, GI, GL, and risk of breast cancer, and to further investigate these associations by levels of overweight/obesity and physical activity. We used data from a Mexican population-based case-control study. We recruited a 1,000 women with incident breast cancer and 1,074 matched control women ages 35 to 69 years between 2004 and 2007. We used conditional logistic regression models and energy-adjusted carbohydrates, GI, and GL using the residual method. Total carbohydrate intake was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women. The odds ratio in the highest versus the lowest quartile was 1.3 (95% confidence interval = 1.0, 1.7; P trend = 0.03). In stratified analyses by body mass index (BMI), the positive association between carbohydrate and risk of premenopausal breast cancer was only observed among overweight women. The odds ratio comparing the top with the bottom quartile was 1.9 (95% confidence interval = 1.2, 3.0; P trend = 0.01) among women with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m. No association was observed among women with BMI carbohydrate diets are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer among premenopausal Mexican women.

  19. The Association between Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Medical Care Cost of Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jun Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study compared comorbidity-related medical care cost associated with different types of cancer, by examining breast (N=287, colon (N=272, stomach (N=614, and lung (N=391 cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods. Using medical benefits claims data, we calculated Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI and total medical cost. The effect of comorbidity on the medical care cost was investigated using multiple regression and logistic regression models and controlling for demographic characteristics and cancer stage. Results. The treatment costs incurred by stomach and colon cancer patients were 1.05- and 1.01-fold higher, respectively, in patients with higher CCI determined. For breast cancer, the highest costs were seen in those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but the increase in cost reduced as CCI increased. Colon cancer patients with diabetes mellitus and a CCI = 1 score had the highest medical costs. The lowest medical costs were incurred by lung cancer patients with COPD and a CCI = 2 score. Conclusion. The comorbidities had a major impact on the use of medical resources, with chronic comorbidities incurring the highest medical costs. The results indicate that comorbidities affect cancer outcomes and that they must be considered strategies mitigating cancer’s economic and social impact.

  20. New Breast Cancer Recursive Partitioning Analysis Prognostic Index in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwinska, Anna, E-mail: alphaonetau@poczta.onet.pl [Department of Breast Cancer and Reconstructive Surgery, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Murawska, Magdalena [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present a new breast cancer recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) prognostic index for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases as a guide in clinical decision making. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of 441 consecutive patients with breast cancer and brain metastases treated between the years 2003 and 2009 was assessed. Prognostic factors significant for univariate analysis were included into RPA. Results: Three prognostic classes of a new breast cancer RPA prognostic index were selected. The median survival of patients within prognostic Classes I, II, and III was 29, 9, and 2.4 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Class I included patients with one or two brain metastases, without extracranial disease or with controlled extracranial disease, and with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 100. Class III included patients with multiple brain metastases with KPS of {<=}60. Class II included all other cases. Conclusions: The breast cancer RPA prognostic index is an easy and valuable tool for use in clinical practice. It can select patients who require aggressive treatment and those in whom whole-brain radiotherapy or symptomatic therapy is the most reasonable option. An individual approach is required for patients from prognostic Class II.

  1. Childhood body mass index and height and risk of histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, J.; Gamborg, M.; Ulrich, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endometrial cancer risk factors include adult obesity and taller stature, but the influence of size earlier in life is incompletely understood. We examined whether childhood body mass index (BMI; kg m(-2)) and height were associated with histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer...... childhood ages. Height at all ages was statistically significant and positively associated with all endometrial cancers, except non-oestrogen-dependent cancers. At 7 years, per ~5.2 cm (1 z-score), the risk of endometrioid adenocarcinoma was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09-1.28). Among non......-users of unopposed oestrogens, associations between BMI and endometrioid adenocarcinoma strengthened, but no effects on height associations were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial carcinogenesis is linked to early-life body size, suggesting that childhood BMI and height may be useful indicators for the risk of later...

  2. The influence of body composition on quality of life of patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Porciúncula Frenzel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unwanted changes in body composition, as well as their impact on these people's quality of life, have been little investigated in patients with breast cancer. Objetive: To assess the role of body composition on quality of life and the impact of chemotherapy on both, in women with breast cancer. Methods: It was assessed prospectively women with breast cancer in a cohort of patients undergoing chemotherapy. Body composition was estimated through bioelectrical impedance. The quality of life was evaluated using the World Health Organization quality of life questionnaire. Results: This study assessed 70 women, 77 and 73% of those were initially overweight and had excess of body fat, respectively. There was a significant increase in fat-free mass (p > 0.001, body mass index (p = 0.03 and weight (p = 0.02 while quality of life stayed the same during the study. Moreover, women with excess of body fat showed a significantly lower initial general health score, compared to those with normal body fat (p = 0.02. Conclusions: Chemotherapy proved to be a potential inducer in the weight gain in this population. We highlight the importance of further investigation about the impact of body fat accumulation on those women's quality of life.

  3. A pressure ulcer and fall rate quality composite index for acute care units: A measure development study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Diane K; Jayawardhana, Ananda; Burman, Mary E; Dunton, Nancy E; Staggs, Vincent S; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Gajewski, Byron J

    2016-11-01

    Composite indices are single measures that combine the strengths of two or more individual measures and provide broader, easy-to-use measures for evaluation of provider performance and comparisons across units and hospitals to support quality improvement. The study objective was to develop a unit-level inpatient composite nursing care quality performance index-the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index. Two-phase measure development study. 5144 patient care units in 857 United States hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indictors(®) during the year 2013. The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index was developed in two phases. In Phase 1 the formula was generated using a utility function and generalized penalty analysis. Experts with experience in healthcare quality measurement provided the point of indicator equivalence. In Phase 2 initial validity evidence was gathered based on hypothesized relationships between the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index and other variables using two-level (unit, hospital) hierarchical linear mixed modeling. The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index=100-PUR-FR, where PUR is pressure ulcer rate and FR is total fall rate. Higher scores indicate better quality. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated agreement between pairs of experts and provided evidence for inter-rater reliability of the formula. The validation process demonstrated that higher registered nurse skill mix, higher percent of registered nurses with a baccalaureate in nursing or higher degree, higher percent of registered nurses with national specialty certification, and lower percent of hours supplied by agency staff were significantly associated with higher Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index scores. Higher percentages of unit patients at risk for a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer and higher unit rates of physical restraint use were not associated with higher Pressure

  4. The Healthy Eating Index 2005 and risk for pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arem, Hannah; Reedy, Jill; Sampson, Josh; Jiao, Li; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Risch, Harvey; Mayne, Susan T; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z

    2013-09-04

    Dietary pattern analyses characterizing combinations of food intakes offer conceptual and statistical advantages over food- and nutrient-based analyses of disease risk. However, few studies have examined dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk and none focused on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We used the Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005) to estimate the association between meeting those dietary guidelines and pancreatic cancer risk. We calculated the HEI-2005 score for 537 218 men and women in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study using responses to food frequency questionnaires returned in 1995 and 1996. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of pancreatic cancer according to HEI-2005 quintiles and explored effect modification by known risk factors. P interaction values were calculated using the Wald test. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified 2383 incident, exocrine pancreatic cancer cases (median = 10.5 years follow-up). Comparing participants who met the most dietary guidelines (Q5) with those who met the fewest guidelines (Q1), we observed a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (HR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.74 to 0.97). Among men there was an interaction by body mass index (P interaction = .03), with a hazard ratio of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.59 to 0.88) comparing Q5 vs Q1 in overweight/obese men (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) but no association among normal weight men. Our findings support the hypothesis that consuming a high-quality diet, as scored by the HEI-2005, may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marta; Lipworth, Loren; Polesel, Jerry; Negri, Eva; Bosetti, Cristina; Talamini, Renato; McLaughlin, Joseph K; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Carbohydrates and dietary glycemic index (GI) influence the secretion of insulin and insulin-related growth factors and may play a role in the development of diabetes and obesity, both of which have been related to pancreatic cancer risk. We examined the association between dietary GI and glycemic load (GL) and pancreatic cancer by conducting a hospital-based case-control study in Italy in 1991-2008 of 326 cases of pancreatic cancer and 652 control patients. Dietary data were obtained with the use of a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were computed with the use of multiple logistic regression. GI was positively associated with pancreatic cancer, with ORs of 1.56 (95% CI, 1.06-2.30) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.20-2.62) for the second and third tertiles, respectively, compared with the lowest. No significant association was observed between GL and pancreatic cancer. Consumption of sugar, candy, honey, and jam was positively associated with pancreatic cancer, whereas consumption of fruit was inversely associated. In conclusion, the positive association with high GI, in the absence of an association with dietary GL, fruit, or total carbohydrates, likely reflects the positive association between sweets or refined carbohydrates and pancreatic cancer in this study population. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of Body Mass Index with Chromosome Damage Levels and Lung Cancer Risk among Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoliang; Bai, Yansen; Wang, Suhan; Nyamathira, Samuel Mwangi; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Wangzhen; Wang, Tian; Deng, Qifei; He, Meian; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wu, Tangchun; Guo, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an etiological link between body mass index (BMI) and cancer risk, but evidence supporting these observations is limited. This study aimed to investigate potential associations of BMI with chromosome damage levels and lung cancer risk. First, we recruited 1333 male workers from a coke-oven plant to examine their chromosome damage levels; and then, a cohort study of 12 052 males was used to investigate the association of BMI with lung cancer incidence. We further carried out a meta-analysis for BMI and male lung cancer risk based on cohort studies. We found that men workers with excess body weight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) had lower levels of MN frequencies than men with normal-weight (BMI: 18.5–24.9). Our cohort study indicated that, the relative risk (RR) for men with BMI ≥ 25 to develop lung cancer was 35% lower than RR for normal-weight men. Further meta-analysis showed that, compared to normal-weight men, men with BMI ≥ 25 had decreased risk of lung cancer among both the East-Asians and others populations. These results indicate that men with excess body weight had significant decreased chromosome damage levels and lower risk of lung cancer than those with normal-weight. However, further biological researches were needed to validate these associations. PMID:25820198

  7. Childhood body mass index and height and risk of histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, J.; Gamborg, M.; Ulrich, L. G.;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 155 505 girls born 1930-1989 with measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years were linked to health registers. BMI and height were transformed to age-specific z-scores. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox......BACKGROUND: Endometrial cancer risk factors include adult obesity and taller stature, but the influence of size earlier in life is incompletely understood. We examined whether childhood body mass index (BMI; kg m(-2)) and height were associated with histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer...

  8. Physical activity and body mass index as predictors of prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotta, Alessandra; Bottai, Matteo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Adams, Swann Arp; Akre, Olof; Blair, Steven Noel; Mariosa, Daniela; Nyrén, Olof; Ye, Weimin; Stattin, Pär; Bellocco, Rino; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2015-10-01

    Physical activity and body mass index (BMI) are involved in prostate cancer etiology; possible biologic mechanisms include their effects on hormonal levels. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, obesity, and prostate cancer. We followed a cohort of 13,109 Swedish men for 13 years and investigated the association of self-reported physical activity and BMI at baseline with prostate cancer incidence. We further analyzed whether BMI could modulate effects of physical activity. Occupational, recreational, and total physical activity were analyzed in relation to overall, localized, and advanced prostate cancer. During the study follow-up, we observed a total of 904 cases of prostate cancer (429 localized, 407 advanced, and 68 unclassified). High levels of occupational physical activity were associated with a nonsignificantly decreased risk of overall (HR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.61-1.07), localized (HR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.51-1.12), and advanced (HR 0.85, 95 % CI 0.55-1.31) prostate cancer. We found no association between high BMI and risk of prostate cancer incidence: We observed, however, a significant interaction between BMI and leisure physical activity. No association was confirmed between total physical activity and localized or advanced prostate cancer. The highest, relative to the lowest, level of occupational physical activity tended to be linked to a lower risk of prostate cancer, with a suggested dose-response relationship. We found no association between high BMI and risk of prostate cancer incidence; however, our analyses suggested an interaction between BMI and physical activity during recreational time that merits further investigation in future studies.

  9. Glycaemic index values in the Finnish food composition database: an approach to standardised value documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, N E; Similä, M E; Pakkala, H; Korhonen, T; Männistö, S; Valsta, L M

    2010-11-01

    The glycaemic index (GI) is used to describe the blood glucose-raising potential of carbohydrate-containing foods. Only a few descriptions of the addition of GI values to national food composition databases (FCDBs) exist. We tested whether the value documentation framework established within the European Food Information Resource (EuroFIR) Network could be used for GI values when adding them to the Finnish FCDB. The list of foods requiring GI values was based on the National FINDIET 2007 Survey data and extended with foods encoded in a food-frequency questionnaire used in other nationally representative studies. The minimum quality of GI measurements was verified when gathering values from various sources, using earlier defined criteria. If a measured GI value for a food was directly available, or could be imputed or estimated, the value was added to the Finnish FCDB and documented using core standard vocabularies of EuroFIR. The GI values of composite foods were calculated using recipe calculation software. A total of 2210 foods required a GI value. GI values for 1322 foods were available and added to the FCDB. The remaining 888 foods were composite foods and received a GI value through recipe calculation. The standard vocabularies describing the origin of the GI values, the methods used in their derivation and their qualitative characteristics were suitable for GI values. GI values can be added to FCDBs and documented using terms similar to those used for traditional food composition data. Standardised value documentation may provide transparency for GI database compilation processes.

  10. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Geeta; Trehan, Mridula; Sharma, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To measure and compare the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of light-cure composite. (Enlight, Ormco.) and dual-cure composite (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho). Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were divided into two groups: group I (blue): conventional light cure composite resin. (Enlight, Ormco.) and group II (green): dual cure composite resin. (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho.) with 30 teeth in each group. These samples were tested on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength. Student t-test showed that the mean shear bond strength of the conventional light cure group (8.54 MPa - 10.42 MPa) was significantly lower than dual cure group (10.45 MPa -12.17 MPa). These findings indicate that the shear bond strength of dual-cure composite resin (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho) is comparatively higher than conventional light-cure composite resin (Enlight, Ormco). In the majority of the samples, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were 4 and 5 in both the groups whereas score 1 is attained by the least number of samples in both the groups. How to cite this article: Verma G, Trehan M, Sharma S. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):166-170.

  11. Assigning glycemic index to foods in a recent Australian food composition database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J C Y; Barclay, A W; Brand-Miller, J C

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the compilation of a special edition of the AUSNUT2011-2013 food composition database that includes glycemic index (GI) values. A 6-step, systematic methodology was used to assign GI to 5644 foods included in AUSNUT2011-2013. A total of 1752 (31%) foods were assigned a GI of 0 owing to low carbohydrate content; 363 (6%) had a direct match in 1 of the 4 data tables used; 1738 (31%) were assigned the GI of a 'closely related' food item; 1526 (27%) were assigned the weighted mean GI of ingredients; 205 (4%) were assigned the median GI of their corresponding food subgroup; 49 (<1%) were assigned a GI of 0 because they were not a significant source of carbohydrate in typical diets; and 5 (<1%) were assigned a default GI. We propose that this database should be used for all future Australian GI research until a subsequent version/update is compiled.

  12. Measuring environmental sustainability in agriculture: A composite environmental impact index approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiha, Noor-E; Salim, Ruhul; Rahman, Sanzidur; Rola-Rubzen, Maria Fay

    2016-01-15

    The present study develops a composite environmental impact index (CEII) to evaluate the extent of environmental degradation in agriculture after successfully validating its flexibility, applicability and relevance as a tool. The CEII tool is then applied to empirically measure the extent of environmental impacts of High Yield Variety (HYV) rice cultivation in three districts of north-western Bangladesh for a single crop year (October, 2012-September, 2013). Results reveal that 27 to 69 per cent of the theoretical maximum level of environmental damage is created due to HYV rice cultivation with significant regional variations in the CEII scores, implying that policy interventions are required in environmentally critical areas in order to sustain agriculture in Bangladesh.

  13. Influence of chemical composition on the refractive index thermal coefficient of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joseph B., Jr.; Robb, Paul N.; Sigler, Robert D.; Abramov, Alexander P.; Petrova, Maria V.; Plyakhin, Audrei G.; Tolstoy, Michael N.

    1996-11-01

    Liquids have been shown to be very effective in the design of apochromatic lenses. The incorporation of abnormal liquids is complicated by their large thermal coefficients of refractive index (dn/dT). To make a glass-liquid design thermally stable, two liquids with different dn/dT and dispersions are typically used. This paper, which extends previously reported investigations of liquid dn/dT dependencies in the visible spectrum (SPIE Volume 2512, 1995), explores the dependence of dn/DT, abnormal dispersion, and composition for a number of liquids. The optical property measurements were made at the Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, in collaboration with the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, California.

  14. Performance evaluation of River Basin Organizations to implement integrated water resources management using composite indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Ayala, Jordi; Juízo, Dinis

    In the Southern African Development Community region, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) principles and tools are being implemented through the existing regional framework for water resources development and management. The IWRM approach is applied at river basin level seeking a balance between the economic efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability in water resources management and development. This paper uses composite indexes to analyze the performance of River Basin Organizations (RBOs) as key implementing agents of the IWRM framework. The assessment focuses on three RBOs that fall under the Regional Water Administration for Southern Mozambique (ARA-Sul) jurisdiction, namely: Umbeluzi, Incomati and Limpopo River Basin Management Units. The analysis focus on the computation of a set of multidimensional key performance indicators developed by Hooper (2010) but adapted to the Mozambican context. This research used 24 out of 115 proposed universal key performance indicators. The indicators for this case study were selected based on their suitability to evaluate performance in line with the legal and institutional framework context that guides the operations of RBOs in Mozambique. Finally these indicators were integrated in a composite index, using an additive and multiplicative aggregation method coupled with the Analytic Hierarchy Process technique employed to differentiate the relative importance of the various indicators considered. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of the methodology developed to analyze the RBOs performance and proved useful in identifying the main performance areas in need of improvement for better implementation of IWRM at river basin level in Mozambique. This information should support both the IWRM framework adaptation to local context and the implementation at river basin level in order to improve water governance.

  15. Soaking Induced Changes in Chemical Composition, Glycemic Index and Starch Characteristics of Basmati Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Kale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to determine the qualitative changes in basmati rice (Pusa Basmati 1121, PB1121 during soaking at 40 °C to 80 °C. Soaking temperature had significant effect (α = 0.01 on chemical composition, glycemic index and starch characteristics of rice. Starch content, apparent amylose content, crude protein content and crude fat content in un-soaked rice were found to be 73.24%, 27.26%, 8.79% and 2.56%, respectively, but differences in these traits were observed after soaking. Amylose to amylopectin ratio (Am/Ap decreased from 0.59 to 0.52 (soaked at 80 °C. Crude fibre and crude ash contents increased after soaking. The mineral composition (K, P, S, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn in soaked rice was found to be 16.46% higher than un-soaked rice at the same degree of polishing. Glycemic index of un-soaked rice was found to be 58.41, but decreased to 54.31 after soaking at 80 °C. Pasting properties, scanning electron microscope images, and X-ray diffractograms suggested partial gelatinization of starch in the temperature range of 60 °C to 80 °C. Based on qualitative changes in rice (apparent amylose content, Am/Ap ratio and crystallinity rate, it was concluded that intermediate soaking temperatures (60 °C to 70 °C would be useful for soaking of PB1121.

  16. Final height and body mass index among adult survivors of childhood brain cancer: childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, James G; Ness, Kirsten K; Stovall, Marilyn; Wolden, Suzanne; Punyko, Judy A; Neglia, Joseph P; Mertens, Ann C; Packer, Roger J; Robison, Leslie L; Sklar, Charles A

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to compare final height and body mass index (BMI) between adult survivors of childhood brain cancer and age- and sex-matched population norms, 2) to quantify the effects of treatment- and cancer-related factors on the risk of final height below the 10th percentile (adult short stature) or having a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) or more (obesity). Treatment records were abstracted and surveys completed by 921 adults aged 20-45 yr who were treated for brain cancer as children and were participants in the multicenter Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Nearly 40% of childhood brain cancer survivors were below the 10th percentile for height. The strongest risk factors for adult short stature were young age at diagnosis and radiation treatment involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA). The multivariate odds ratio for adult short stature among those 4 yr of age or younger at diagnosis, relative to ages 10-20 yr, was 5.67 (95% confidence interval, 3.6-8.9). HPA radiation exposure increased the risk of adult short stature in a dose-response fashion (trend test, P obesity. Except for patients treated with surgery only, survivors of childhood brain cancer are at very high risk for adult short stature, and this risk increases with radiation dose involving the HPA. We did not find a corresponding elevated risk for obesity.

  17. Body mass index, PAM50 subtype, recurrence, and survival among patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes Feliciano, Elizabeth M; Kwan, Marilyn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Chen, Wendy Y; Weltzien, Erin K; Castillo, Adrienne L; Sweeney, Carol; Bernard, Philip S; Caan, Bette J

    2017-07-01

    Studies of obesity and survival among patients with breast cancer produce conflicting results, possibly because of heterogeneity by molecular subtype. This study examined whether the association of body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis with breast cancer recurrence and survival varied across subtypes defined by PAM50 (Prediction Analysis of Microarray 50) gene expression. Included were 1559 Kaiser Permanente Northern California members ages 18 to 79 years who had PAM50 assays and were diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I through III breast cancer from 1996 to 2013. Patients reported weight and height. Cox regression models were adjusted for age, menopause, race/ethnicity, stage, and chemotherapy. Over a median of 9 years (maximum, 19 years), 378 women developed recurrent disease, and 312 died from breast cancer. Overall, BMI was not associated with breast cancer recurrence or survival when controlling for subtype (eg, the hazard ratio per 5 kg/m(2) of BMI was 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.15] for breast cancer-specific death). However, associations varied by subtype. Among women with luminal A cancers, those who had class II/III obesity, but not class I obesity or overweight, had worse outcomes. When women who had a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) were compared with those who had a BMI from 18.5 to breast cancer-specific death and 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.54) for recurrence. There was no association within luminal B, basal-like or human epidermal growth factor over-expressing subtypes. Among patients who had accurately classified breast cancer subtypes based on gene expression, a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) was adversely associated with outcomes only among those who had luminal A cancers. Research is needed into whether tailoring recommendations for weight management to tumor characteristics will improve outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:2535-42. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Elevated Prostate Health Index (phi and Biopsy Reclassification During Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darian Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate Health Index (phi has been FDA approved for decision-making regarding prostate biopsy. Phi has additionally been shown to positively correlate with tumor volume, extraprostatic disease and higher Gleason grade tumors. Here we describe a case in which an elevated phi encouraged biopsy of a gentleman undergoing active surveillance leading to reclassification of his disease as high risk prostate cancer.

  19. The development of a value based pricing index for new drugs in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, George; Truter, Ilse; Lubbe, Martie S

    2011-06-01

    Worldwide, prices for cancer drugs have been under downward pressure where several governments have mandated price cuts of branded products. A better alternative to government mandated price cuts would be to estimate a final price based on drug performance, cost effectiveness and a country's ability to pay. We developed a global pricing index for new cancer drugs in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that encompasses all of these attributes. A pharmacoeconomic model was developed to simulate mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus a 'new drug' that improves survival by 1.4, 3 and 6months, respectively. Cost and utility data were obtained from cancer centres and oncology nurses (n=112) in Canada, Spain, India, South Africa and Malaysia. Multivariable analysis was then used to develop the pricing index, which considers survival benefit, per capita GDP and income dispersion (as measured by the Gini coefficient) as predictor variables. Higher survival benefits were associated with elevated drug prices, especially in higher income countries such as Canada. For Argentina with a per capita GDP of $15,000 and a Gini coefficient of 51, the index estimated that for a drug which provides a 4month survival benefit in mCRC, the value based price would be $US 630 per dose. In contrast, the same drug in a wealthier country like Norway (per capita GDP=$50,000) could command a price of $US 2,775 per dose. The application of this index to estimate a price based on cost effectiveness and the wealth of a nation would be important for opening dialogue between the key stakeholders and a better alternative to government mandated price cuts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Inflammatory-Nutritional Index: assessing nutritional status and prognosis in gastrointestinal and lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Alberici Pastore; Silvana Paiva Orlandi; Maria Cristina Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic capacity of the Inflammatory-Nutritional Index (INI) in gastrointestinal and lung cancer patients. Methods: Longitudinal study, including patients from a chemotherapy service in Brazil, between July 2008 and May 2010. INI (Albumin/CRP) and nutritional status (by Subjective Global Assessment - SGA) were evaluated. Risk INI was defined as lower than 0.35. The mean follow-up of survival was 1.6 year. Statistical analyses were performed using Stata 11.1™. Res...

  1. Clearness index estimation for spectral composition of direct and global solar radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahoma, U.A. [National Research Inst. of Astronomy and Geophysics, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt)

    2001-07-01

    Measurements of cloudless direct, global, and diffuse solar radiations, taken over a one year period at Helwan, are analyzed in terms of global index and diffuse fraction for clear-sky conditions. The dependence of the diffuse fraction on the global index was represented by a polynomial. These results support the use of routine instantaneous surface meteorological data to calculate global and diffuse radiations on a horizontal surface in the absence of any other radiation measurements. The spectral composition of the global solar-radiation was found to be 4.3% UV band, 32.5% band range 250-630 nm, 13.74% red band, 52.75% infrared band and 29.7% diffuse solar-radiation. The spectral distribution of direct solar-radiation ratio of the extraterrestrial solar radiation was found to be: 0.69% green and blue band, 47.5% yellow and orange band 45% red band, and 52.7% infra-red band. (author)

  2. Body image, body mass index, and body composition in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Veronica M; Milhausen, Robin R; Buchholz, Andrea C

    2012-01-01

    Associations were examined between body image and body mass index (BMI) in comparison with body composition in healthy weight, overweight, and obese young adults. Weight and height were determined, and the percentage of fat mass (%FM) and percentage of fat-free mass (%FFM) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 75 male and 87 female young adults (21.1 ± 1.9 years; 25.2 ± 4.4 kg/m² [mean ± standard deviation]). Body image was measured using the three subscales Weight Esteem, Appearance Esteem, and External Attribution of the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA). Body mass index and %FM were highly correlated (r for males = 0.74, r for females = 0.82; both pbody image, particularly Weight Esteem. After adjustment for physical activity, BMI and %FM (and %FFM, although in the opposite direction) were associated with each BESAA subscale: %FM, %FFM, and BMI explained 12% to 14% of the variance in Appearance Esteem for both sexes, 33% to 41% in Weight Esteem in women and 16% to 18% in men, and 8% to 10% in External Attribution in women (all pbody image decreases, particularly in women.

  3. Socioeconomic and Environmental Performance: A Composite Index and Comparative Application to the USA and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanilio Rodolpho Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an analytical framework to provide a measure of overall performance which involves both socioeconomic activities and environmental sustainability using a recent Index of well-being. The composite indicator, created by Medrano-B & Teixeira (2013, is associated with the so called “Magic Square”, a diagram stimulated by the work of Kaldor (1971. From this starting point, we introduce a set of four variables to measure their total impact on the sustainable development of regions. They are: human development index, per capita carbon dioxide, drinkable water and sanitation, and intensity of renewable energy measured as a fraction of the total generated energy. This formal approach is applied to the comparative performance of the USA and China from 2002 to 2012. As expected, environmental, socioeconomic and institutional indicators affect the level of welfare. This being the case, an important lesson to be learned is that careful regulation and policy actions, not just proposals, are required to implement a sustainable and acceptable quality of life. In this article we complete the argument by suggesting that a new paradigm is required to fulfill our desirable objectives, and get more out of our intellectual effort, capabilities and political influence.

  4. Healthy Eating Index/Alternative Healthy Eating Index and Breast Cancer Mortality and Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmasoumi, Makan; Karimbeiki, Razieh; Vosoughi, Nooshin; Feizi, Awat; Ghiasvand, Reza; Barak, Farzane; Miraghajani, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The effects of overall diet quality instead of single nutrients after breast cancer diagnosis on mortality have been a growing area of research interest. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the relationship between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)/the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and risk of breast cancer mortality or survival rates as a primary outcome, and some related inflammatory factors, as secondary outcomes among postdiagnosed women. Methods: This study methodology was performed based on the Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis statement recommendation and had been registered at PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42015015605). The systematic search was conducted in the electronic databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, Cochrane, and Google before July 2016. Researches that had not reported risk of breast cancer mortality or survival rates separately were excluded from the study. Similarly, this review excluded studies which only had examined the HEI or AHEI without reporting their association with the risk of mortality or survival rates. Results: After primary search, of 643 studies identified, 4 studies including eligible criteria were selected for the final assessment. All selected studies had been conducted in the USA and used self-report food-frequency questionnaire for diet quality assessment. In two studies HEI-2005, in one study AHEI, and in another study AHEI-2010 were applied. Meta-analysis result showed no significant association between these indexes and risk of breast cancer mortality/survival among women with this malignancy [relative risk: (RR) 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69–1.56; P = 0.87]. Conclusions: Regarding the adherence HEI/AHEI, we found no association between mentioned indexes and risk of mortality or survival from breast cancer in women with breast cancer. However, evidence in this field is limited

  5. Healthy eating index/alternative healthy eating index and breast cancer mortality and survival: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makan Pourmasoumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The effects of overall diet quality instead of single nutrients after breast cancer diagnosis on mortality have been a growing area of research interest. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the relationship between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI/the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI and risk of breast cancer mortality or survival rates as a primary outcome, and some related inflammatory factors, as secondary outcomes among postdiagnosed women. Methods: This study methodology was performed based on the Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis statement recommendation and had been registered at PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42015015605. The systematic search was conducted in the electronic databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, Cochrane, and Google before July 2016. Researches that had not reported risk of breast cancer mortality or survival rates separately were excluded from the study. Similarly, this review excluded studies which only had examined the HEI or AHEI without reporting their association with the risk of mortality or survival rates. Results: After primary search, of 643 studies identified, 4 studies including eligible criteria were selected for the final assessment. All selected studies had been conducted in the USA and used self-report food-frequency questionnaire for diet quality assessment. In two studies HEI-2005, in one study AHEI, and in another study AHEI-2010 were applied. Meta-analysis result showed no significant association between these indexes and risk of breast cancer mortality/survival among women with this malignancy [relative risk: (RR 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.69–1.56; P = 0.87]. Conclusions: Regarding the adherence HEI/AHEI, we found no association between mentioned indexes and risk of mortality or survival from breast cancer in women with breast cancer. However, evidence in this

  6. Height, weight, and body mass index associations with gastric cancer subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, M Constanza; Freedman, Neal D; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Abnet, Christian C; Rabkin, Charles S

    2014-01-01

    Although excess body weight has been associated with cancers of the gastric cardia, relationships with gastric cancer at other anatomic subsites are not well defined. Furthermore, subsite-specific associations with attained height have not been fully assessed. In 1995-1996, 483,700 Whites enrolling in the multi-state NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study self-reported height and weight. Gastric cancers occurring through 31 December 2006 were ascertained from regional population-based registries. We used Cox regression models to estimate cancer hazard ratios (HRs) for sex-specific tertiles of height and weight and for body mass index (BMI) categories of the World Health Organization. One thousand incident cancers (48 % localized to the cardia, 4 % fundus, 6 % corpus, 3 % greater curvature, 6 % lesser curvature, 10 % antrum, 2 % pylorus, 5 % overlapping lesion, and 16 % unspecified) occurred an average of 5.4 years after enrollment. After controlling for effects of age, sex, education, and smoking, we found an inverse association between height and total noncardia cancers (i.e., fundus, corpus, greater and lesser curvatures, antrum, and pylorus), with HRs vs. tertile 1 of 0.65 and 0.71 for tertiles 2 and 3, respectively (p trend = 0.016). Trends were consistent for individual noncardia subsites. In contrast, although weight and BMI were each associated with risk of cardia cancer, neither was associated with total noncardia cancer nor individual subsites. Noncardia gastric cancer is associated with short stature but not with high body weight or obesity. The excess risk for shorter adults would be consistent with the known association of chronic H. pylori infection with growth retardation during childhood.

  7. Family history, body mass index and survival in Japanese patients with stomach cancer: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yuko; Kawai, Masaaki; Fujiya, Tsuneaki; Suzuki, Masaki; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Yamanami, Hideaki; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Nishino, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-15

    Family history and nutritional status may affect the long-term prognosis of stomach cancer, but evidence is insufficient and inconsistent. To clarify the prognostic factors of stomach cancer, we conducted a prospective study of 1,033 Japanese patients with histologically confirmed stomach cancer who were admitted to a single hospital between 1997 and 2005. Family history of stomach cancer and pretreatment body mass index (BMI) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Clinical data were retrieved from a hospital-based cancer registry. All patients were completely followed up until December, 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated according to family history in parents and siblings and BMI category. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 403 all-cause and 279 stomach cancer deaths were documented. Although no association with family history was observed in the patients overall, analysis according to age group found an increased risk of all-cause death associated with a history in first degree relatives (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.93-2.78, p = 0.09) and with a parental history (HR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.06-3.26) among patients aged under 60 years at diagnosis. BMI was related to all-cause and stomach cancer death among patients aged 60 and over, showing a J-shaped pattern (HR of all-cause death = 2.28 for BMI stomach cancer, especially parental history, may affect mortality among younger stomach cancer patients, whereas nutritional status may be a prognostic factor in older patients.

  8. Alterations of body mass index and body composition in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsukawa, Y; Misumi, M; Yamada, M; Masunari, N; Oyama, H; Nakanishi, S; Fukunaga, M; Fujiwara, S

    2013-08-01

    Obesity, underweight, sarcopenia and excess accumulation of abdominal fat are associated with a risk of death and adverse health outcomes. Our aim was to determine whether body mass index (BMI) and body composition, assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), are associated with radiation exposure among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Adult Health Study of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. We examined 2686 subjects (834 men and 1852 women), aged 48-89 years (0-40 years at A-bomb exposure), for BMI analysis. Among them, 550 men and 1179 women underwent DXA in 1994-1996 and were eligible for a body composition study. After being adjusted for age and other potential confounding factors, A-bomb radiation dose was associated significantly and negatively with BMI in both sexes (P=0.01 in men, P=0.03 in women) and appendicular lean mass (Pbomb radiation exposure. We will need to conduct further studies to evaluate whether these alterations affect health status.

  9. A NEW CLASSIFICATION OF ROMANIAN COUNTIES BASED ON A COMPOSITE INDEX OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Gheorghe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dealing with the problems concerning the improvement of regional classifications by using a composite index of economic development which encompasses four individual indicators: GDP/capita, labour productivity, FDIs and life expectancy. Our aim is to offer a better methodology and a multi-sided image on the regional development, from the perspective of two major factors of influence: Romania’s accession to EU and the recent economic crisis. A special attention should be paid to the hierarchical position of each influence factor. Depending on the specific factor mix, we try to draw conclusions regarding the relationship between economic resilience and vulnerability of each regional economy. The new approach based on the composite index’s computation has the advantage of providing a unique answer on problems such as unclear hierarchies or even contradictory results emerging from different classifications that use separate indicators. The study is covering the 2001-2012 period, divided into two sub-periods: 2001-2006 (pre-accession and 2007-2012 (post-accession.

  10. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycaemic load, glycaemic index and ovarian cancer risk in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bo; Moorman, Patricia G; Alberg, Anthony J; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michele L; Funkhouser, Ellen; Peters, Edward S; Schwartz, Ann G; Terry, Paul; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Bandera, Elisa V

    2016-02-28

    Epidemiological evidence regarding the association between carbohydrate intake, glycaemic load (GL) and glycaemic index (GI) and risk of ovarian cancer has been mixed. Little is known about their impact on ovarian cancer risk in African-American women. Associations between carbohydrate quantity and quality and ovarian cancer risk were investigated among 406 cases and 609 controls using data from the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES). AACES is an ongoing population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer in African-Americans in the USA. Cases were identified through rapid case ascertainment and age- and site-matched controls were identified by random-digit dialling. Dietary information over the year preceding diagnosis or the reference date was obtained using a FFQ. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% CI adjusted for covariates. The OR comparing the highest quartile of total carbohydrate intake and total sugar intake v. the lowest quartile were 1·57 (95% CI 1·08, 2·28; P trend=0·03) and 1·61 (95% CI 1·12, 2·30; P trendcancer (OR 1·18 for each 10 units/4184 kJ (1000 kcal); 95% CI 1·04, 1·33). No associations were observed for starch or GI. Our findings suggest that high intake of total sugars and GL are associated with greater risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women.

  11. Assessment value of quantitative indexes of pancreatic CT perfusion scanning for malignant degree of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Xia Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the assessment value of the quantitative indexes of pancreatic CT perfusion scanning for malignant degree of pancreatic cancer.Methods:A total of 58 patients with space-occupying pancreatic lesions were divided into 20 patients with pancreatic cancer and 38 patients with benign pancreatic lesions after pancreatic CT perfusion. Patients with pancreatic cancer received palliative surgery, and the cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue specimens were collected during operation. The differences in pancreatic CT perfusion scanning parameter values and serum tumor marker levels were compared between patients with pancreatic cancer and patients with benign pancreatic lesions, mRNA expression levels of malignant molecules in pancreatic cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue were further determined, and the correlation between pancreatic CT perfusion scanning parameter values and malignant degree of pancreatic cancer was analyzed.Results:CT perfusion scanning BF, BV and Per values of patients with pancreatic cancer were lower than those of patients with benign pancreatic lesions; serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 levels were higher than those of patients with benign pancreatic lesions (P<0.05); mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL andsurvivin in pancreatic cancer tissue samples were higher than those in para-carcinoma tissue samples, and mRNA expression levels ofP53 andBax were lower than those in para-carcinoma tissue samples (P<0.05); CT perfusion scanning parameters BF, BV and Per values of patients with pancreatic cancer were negatively correlated with CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 levels in serum as well as mRNA expression levels ofBcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivinin pancreatic cancer tissue, and positively correlated with mRNA expression levels ofP53andBaxin pancreatic cancer tissue (P<0.05).Conclusions:Pancreatic CT perfusion scanning is a reliable way to judge the malignant degree of pancreatic cancer and plays a positive role in guiding clinical

  12. Anthropometric Measures, Body Mass Index and Pancreatic Cancer: a Pooled Analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Alan A.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Kooperberg, Charles; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Steplowski, Emily; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gross, Myron D.; Jacobs, Eric J.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Bamlet, William R.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Bingham, Sheila A.; Boeing, Heiner; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clipp, Sandra; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Kraft, Peter; Lynch, Shannon M.; Manjer, Jonas; Manson, JoAnn E.; McTiernan, Anne; McWilliams, Robert R.; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Palli, Domenico; Rohan, Thomas E.; Slimani, Nadia; Thomas, Gilles; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Patel, Alpa V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pooled data were analyzed from the NCI Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between pre-diagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2,170 cases and 2,209 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), as well as conventional BMI categories: underweight (<18.5 kg/m2), normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), obese (30.0-34.9 kg/m2), and severely obese (≥35.0 kg/m2). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results Among all subjects, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs. lowest BMI quartile = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.12-1.58, Ptrend < 0.001). Among men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs. lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI = 1.04-1.69, Ptrend <0.03). Among women, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest quartile of BMI was 1.34 (95% CI = 1.05-1.70, Ptrend = 0.01). Increased WHR was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer among women (adjusted OR for the highest vs. lowest quartile = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.31-2.69, Ptrend = 0.003) but less so in men. Conclusion The findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women. PMID:20458087

  13. Associations between body mass index and lymph node metastases of patients with papillary thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changhua; Wang, Liang; Chen, Wanjun; Zou, Shujuan; Yang, Aiju

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies suggest that obesity is a risk of thyroid cancer, especially papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). However, the associations of obesity and clinic–pathological features, especially the association of body mass index (BMI) and lymph node metastasis of thyroid cancer are unclear. Seven hundred ninety-six primary patients with PTC were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. The relationships between BMI and clinic-pathological features of PTC were evaluated by logistic regression models based on the 5-point increase in BMI and BMI quartiles (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obesity). The 5-point increase in BMI was strongly associated with extra-thyroidal invasion [odds ratio (OR) 2.201, P thyroidal invasion, advanced TNM staging, and multifocality. Further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:28248875

  14. Body mass index and body composition among rescue firefighters personnel in Selangor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Nor Atiqah; Sedek, Razalee; Teh, Arnida Hani

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem in general population and there is no exception for firefighters. This disorder is definitely a burden for firefighters as they needed to be physically fit in order to work in dangerous situation and extinguishing fires. The purposes of this study were to determine physical characteristics and body composition among Malaysian Firefighters (MF) and to explore their association. This cross-sectional study involved 330 rescue firefighters aged between 20-50 years old from nine different districts in Selangor conducted between August and November 2015. Anthropometric measurements included height, weight and waist circumference (WC). Body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance. The mean height, weight, body mass index (BMI), WC and body fat percentage were 169.4±5.3 cm, 74.5±12.2 kg, 25.9±3.82 kg/m2, 90.7±48.3 cm and 25.8±6.2 % respectively. The results also showed that 0.6% of them were underweight, 41.5% were normal, 44.8% were overweight and 13% were obese. The percentage of 34.8% firefighters with WC values of more than 90 cm means that they were at greater risk to have cardiovascular and diabetes disease. Body composition analysis showed that 75.5% of the subjects have high body fat level, 19.7% subjects were in healthy range but only 4.8% were considered as lean subjects. BMI was highly correlated with weight (r=0.917, peducated and have longer duration of services. It can be concluded that more than half of the firefighter personnel were either overweight or obese and 35% of them were at greater risk of having non-communicable diseases. This study provides useful information and serves as a source of reference for planning health related program for MF personnel to prevent non-communicable disease among firefighters population.

  15. The Practicability of a Novel Prognostic Index (PI Model and Comparison with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI in Stage I-III Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Surgical Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahuai Wen

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated the prognostic value of various laboratory parameters in cancer patients. This study was to establish a prognostic index (PI model for breast cancer patients based on the potential prognostic factors.A retrospective study of 1661 breast cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 2002 and December 2008 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center was conducted. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression model was performed to determine the independent prognostic factors and a prognostic index (PI model was devised based on these factors. Survival analyses were used to estimate the prognostic value of PI, and the discriminatory ability of PI was compared with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI by evaluating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC.The mean survival time of all participants was 123.6 months. The preoperative globulin >30.0g/L, triglyceride >1.10mmol/L and fibrinogen >2.83g/L were identified as risk factors for shorter cancer-specific survival. The novel prognostic index model was established and enrolled patients were classified as low- (1168 patients, 70.3%, moderate- (410 patients, 24.7% and high-risk groups (83 patients, 5.0%, respectively. Compared with the low-risk group, higher risks of poor clinical outcome were indicated in the moderate-risk group [Hazard ratio (HR: 1.513, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.169-1.959, p = 0.002] and high-risk group (HR: 2.481, 95%CI: 1.653-3.724, p< 0.001.The prognostic index based on three laboratory parameters was a novel and practicable prognostic tool. It may serve as complement to help predict postoperative survival in breast cancer patients.

  16. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

  17. Effect of Body Mass Index on Overall Survival of Pancreatic Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu-Qi; Yang, Jing; Du, Peng; Xu, Ting; Zhuang, Xiao-Hui; Shen, Jia-Qing; Xu, Chun-Fang

    2016-04-01

    Although obesity has been identified as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the important question of whether obesity influences the prognosis of pancreatic cancer has not been explicated thoroughly. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and survival outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.Studies that described the relationship between BMI and overall survival (OS) of pancreatic cancer were searched in PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Library Databases from the earliest available date to May 12, 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) for OS in each BMI category from individual studies were extracted and pooled by a random-effect model. Dose-response meta-analysis was also performed to estimate summary HR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for every 5-unit increment. Publication bias was evaluated by Begg funnel plot and Egger linear regression test.Ten relevant studies involving 6801 patients were finally included in the meta-analysis. Results showed that obesity in adulthood significantly shortened OS of pancreatic cancer patients (HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.17-1.41), whereas obesity at diagnosis was not associated with any increased risk of death (HR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.78-1.42). For every 5-kg/m increment in adult BMI, the summary HR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.05-1.18) for death risk of pancreatic cancer. However, no dose-response relationship was found in the BMI at diagnosis. Egger regression test and Begg funnel plot both revealed no obvious risk of publication bias.In conclusion, increased adult BMI is associated with increased risk of death for pancreatic cancer patients, which suggested that obesity in adulthood may be an important prognostic factor that indicates an abbreviated survival from pancreatic cancer. More studies are needed to validate this finding, and the mechanism behind the observation should be evaluated in further studies.

  18. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H. E.; Brandt, Piet A. van den; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J.

    2015-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40–7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m2, compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m2. Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found. PMID:26634678

  19. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-12-04

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40-7.82) for subjects with a BMI risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found.

  20. Second Primary Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Three Years After Successfully Treated Index Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Nandy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Development of a second primary malignancy after an index esophageal cancer is a rare event, primarily due to short survival of patients with esophageal cancer. However, the number of long-term esophageal cancer survivors has been increasing due to advances in early detection and therapy. Case report We report herein a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma that developed three years after a successfully treated early-stage adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. A 70-year-old Caucasian male presented with vague complaints of nausea, vomiting and abdominal distention, with subsequent development of jaundice. A computed tomography scan of abdomen revealed a 2.9 cm soft tissue mass in the head of the pancreas and the patient underwent a Whipple’s procedure, with pathology confirming the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Three years previously, the patient was successfully treated for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus via minimally invasive esophagogastrectomy. Despite chemoradiotherapy for localized disease and subsequent systemic chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer, the patient eventually succumbed to his illness. Conclusion We discuss the association between esophageal cancer and subsequent second malignancies, along with implications for surveillance and therapy.

  1. Body mass index and obesity- and diabetes-associated genotypes and risk for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongwei; Dong, Xiaoqun; Hassan, Manal; Abbruzzese, James L; Li, Donghui

    2011-05-01

    The genetic factors predisposing individuals with obesity or diabetes to pancreatic cancer have not been identified. To investigate the hypothesis that obesity- and diabetes-related genes modify the risk of pancreatic cancer. We genotyped 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms of fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), nuclear receptor family 5 member 2 (NR5A2), AMPK, and ADIPOQ genes in 1,070 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1,175 cancer-free controls. Information on risk factors was collected by personal interview. Adjusted ORs (AOR) and 95% CIs were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. The PPARγ P12A GG genotype was inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (AOR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07-0.62). Three NR5A2 variants that were previously identified in a genome-wide association study were significantly associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer, AORs ranging from 0.57 to 0.79. Two FTO gene variants and one ADIPOQ variant were differentially associated with pancreatic cancer according to levels of body mass index (BMI; P(interaction) = 0.0001, 0.0015, and 0.03). For example, the AOR (95% CI) for FTO IVS1-2777AC/AA genotype was 0.72 (0.55-0.96) and 1.54 (1.14-2.09) in participants with a BMI of less than 25 or 25 kg/m(2) or more, respectively. We observed no significant association between AMPK genotype and pancreatic cancer and no genotype interactions with diabetes or smoking. Our findings suggest the PPARγ P12A GG genotype and NR5A2 variants may reduce the risk for pancreatic cancer. A positive association of FTO and ADIPOQ gene variants with pancreatic cancer may be limited to persons who are overweight. The discovery of genetic factors modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer may help to identify high-risk individuals for prevention efforts. ©2011 AACR.

  2. Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Women’s Health Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Evidence implicating hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in the etiology of colorectal cancer suggests that a diet characterized by a high glycemic index and load may increase the risk of this disease, but previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. We assessed the association between intake of total carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of individual diets, and risk of developing colorectal cancer among 158,800 participants in the Women’...

  3. [Body mass index and cancer incidence:a prospective cohort study in northern China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lanwei; Li, Ni; Wang, Gang; Su, Kai; Li, Fang; Yang, Lin; Ren, Jiansong; Chang, Sheng; Chen, Shuohua; Wu, Shouling; He, Jie; Dai, Min

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the association and its strength between body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) and cancer incidence in a large-scale population-based cohort study. A dynamic cohort was established on May 1, 2006. Baseline information on demography, lifestyle, anthropometry such as body height and weight, were collected during the first interview, and cancer incidence, mortality and other related outcome information were obtained through active follow-up every two years and passive follow-up every year. Cancer cases diagnosed within 1 year follow-up period were excluded. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs)and 95% confidence interval (CI) between BMI and cancer incidence after adjusted for age group, education level, tobacco smoking (smokers and non-smokers), alcohol consumption (drinkers or non-drinkers) and HBsAg status (positive or negative, for liver cancer only) when appropriate. Repeated analysis was carried out on male lung cancer, male liver cancer and female breast cancer, stratified by tobacco smoking, HBsAg status and menopausal status respectively. By December 31, 2011, a total of 133 273 subjects, including 106 630 (80.01%)males and 26 643(19.99%)females were enrolled in the cohort. There were 570 531.02 person-years of follow-up and 4.28-year of average follow-up period. According to the Guidelines for Prevention and Control of Overweight and Obesity in Chinese Adults, study subjects were divided into groups as: underweight (BMIobese(BMI≥28.0 kg/m(2)). In males, 2 387 (2.24%) were underweight, 45 090(42.29%)were normal weight, 43 774 (41.05%) were overweight and 15 379 (14.42%) were obese. Meanwhile, in females, 858 (3.22%)were underweight, 14 037 (52.69%) were normal weight, 8 507 (31.93%) were overweight and 3 241 (12.16%) were obese. A total of 1 647 incident cancer cases among different cancers were collected during the follow-up, including 1 348 in men and 299 in women. Results from

  4. Sleep duration and cancer risk: time to use a "sleep-years" index?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, Thomas C

    2012-09-01

    With a focus on melatonin, a recent paper in the Journal investigated the hypothesis that endometrial cancer might be associated with the duration, and ultimately, amount of sleep. The authors found that "[s]elf-reported sleep duration may not adequately represent melatonin levels." The authors also concluded that there was "weak evidence of an association between sleep duration and endometrial cancer risk." Overall, these are interesting observations because primarily experimental and mechanistic research from many angles supports the study's notion that inappropriate sleep may be a determinant of cancer risk. To find out whether this is so in man, rather than assigning study individuals to fixed or average "baseline sleep categories" i.e., ≤5, 6, 7, 8, ≥9 h of habitual sleep in the present study, the accumulated amount of sleep over decades should be reconstructed in retrospective or constructed in prospective studies. To achieve this end, future epidemiological studies may want to use a sleep-years index [SYI]. This simple exposure parameter promises to be a sensible, feasible, and affordable way to approximate cumulative time spent at sleep in critical time windows over many years which we should expect to be relevant for the development of cancer. The SYI could be tested and used in observational studies which promise to be comparable and can be merged. This commentary provides roots of the index and explains why and how it should be used and how it could be interpreted in rigorous studies of biologically plausible links between sleep, on the one hand, and the development of internal cancers, on the other. This commentary also points out limitations of interpreting the SYI. It is emphasized that, where possible, the SYI should be assessed independently of (a) other sleep facets--such as quality--and of (b) known or suspected cancer risk factors. The respective contribution of (a) and (b) to risk must then be assessed during the analyses. Overall, the

  5. Body mass index and colon cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthur, Nisa M; Bolen, Shari; Gudzune, Kimberly; Brancati, Frederick L; Clark, Jeanne M

    2012-05-01

    Obesity is associated with increased colon cancer mortality and lower rates of mammography and Pap testing. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether obesity is associated with lower rates of colon cancer screening. We searched the PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases. Two investigators reviewed citations, abstracts, and articles independently. Two investigators abstracted study information sequentially and evaluated quality independently using standardized forms. We included all studies in our qualitative syntheses. We used random effects meta-analyses to combine those studies providing screening results by the following body mass index (BMI) categories: Normal, 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) (reference); overweight, 25-29.9 kg/m(2); class I obesity, 30-34.9 kg/m(2); class II obesity, 35-39.9 kg/m(2); and class III obesity, ≥ 40 kg/m(2). Of 5,543 citations, we included 23 articles. Almost all studies were cross-sectional and ascertained BMI and screening through self-report. BMI was not associated with colon cancer screening overall. The subgroup of obese white women reported lower rates of colon cancer screening compared with those with a normal BMI with combined ORs (95% CI) of 0.87 (0.82-0.93), 0.80 (0.65-0.99), and 0.73 (0.58-0.94) for class I, II, and III obesity, respectively. Results were similar among white men with class II obesity. Overall, BMI was not associated with colon cancer screening. Obese white men and women may be less likely to undergo colon cancer screening compared with those with a normal BMI. Further investigation of this disparity may reduce the risk of obesity-related colon cancer death.

  6. A pooled analysis of body mass index and pancreatic cancer mortality in african americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Traci N; Kitahara, Cari M; Sonderman, Jennifer; Patel, Alpa V; Harvey, Chinonye; Knutsen, Synnøve F; Park, Yikyung; Park, Song Yi; Fraser, Gary E; Jacobs, Eric J; Purdue, Mark P; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Blot, William J; Palmer, Julie R; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States and both incidence and mortality are highest in African Americans. Obesity is also disproportionately high in African Americans, but limited data are available on the relation of obesity to pancreatic cancer in this population. Seven large prospective cohort studies pooled data from African American participants. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from self-reported height and weight at baseline. Cox regression was used to calculate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for levels of BMI relative to BMI 18.5-24.9, with adjustment for covariates. Primary analyses were restricted to participants with ≥5 years of follow-up because weight loss before diagnosis may have influenced baseline BMI in cases who died during early follow-up. In follow-up of 239,597 participants, 897 pancreatic cancer deaths occurred. HRs were 1.08 (95% CI, 0.90-1.31) for BMI 25.0 to 29.9, 1.25 (95% CI, 0.99-1.57) for BMI 30.0 to 34.9, and 1.31 (95% CI, 0.97-1.77) for BMI ≥35.0 among those with ≥5 years of follow-up (Ptrend = 0.03). The association was evident among both sexes and was independent of a history of diabetes. A stronger association was observed among never-smokers (BMI ≥30 vs. referent: HR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.02-2.03) than among smokers (HR = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.87-1.54; Pinteraction = 0.02). The findings suggest that obesity is independently associated with increased pancreatic cancer mortality in African Americans. Interventions to reduce obesity may also reduce risk of pancreatic cancer mortality, particularly among never-smokers. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services.

  8. Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to colorectal cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Shikany, James M; Beresford, Shirley A A; Caan, Bette; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Rohan, Thomas E

    2008-12-01

    Evidence implicating hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in the etiology of colorectal cancer suggests that a diet characterized by a high glycemic index and load may increase the risk of this disease, but previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. We assessed the association between intake of total carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of individual diets, and risk of developing colorectal cancer among 158,800 participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). We used a GI/GL database developed specifically for the WHI food-frequency questionnaire. Over an average of 7.8 years of follow-up, 1,476 incident cases of colorectal cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between dietary factors classified by quintiles and risk of colorectal cancer, with adjustment for covariates. Total carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and intake of sugars and fiber showed no association with colorectal cancer. Analyses by cancer subsite also yielded null results, with the exception of a borderline positive association between glycemic load and rectal cancer (HR for the highest versus lowest quintile 1.84, 95% confidence interval 0.95-3.56, p for trend 0.05). Analyses stratified by tertiles of body mass index and physical activity showed no evidence of effect modification by these factors. Results of this large study do not support of a role of a diet characterized by high glycemic index or load in colorectal carcinogenesis in postmenopausal women.

  9. Face Validity of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Symptom Index (FACT- B into Formal Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loulou Kobeissi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer affects over one million women annually and is the most common global malignancy among women. Extensive improvements have taken place in the management of breast cancer in recent years and a higher percentage of women are cured from this disease. A proper assessment of the quality of life of women with breast cancer is an essential component in disease management. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- Breast Symptom Index has been commonly used and well-validated among English speaking populations as well as other populations. To date, no formal translation and evaluation of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index exists in Arabic. Therefore, this study intends to translate, adapt and face-validate the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index into Arabic, specifically in the context of the Lebanese culture. Methods: We conducted forward and backward translation in Arabic, combined with face validity by clinicians. This was followed by pre-testing to ensure the instrument’s adequacy and cultural sensitivity conducted by the administration of face-to-face interviews with individual breast cancer patients (n=33 and two focus groups (4 women/group to evaluate the relevance and appropriateness of each item and words used in the questionnaire. Results: Study results reinforced the value of the Arabic translated version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index in capturing the quality of life of women with breast cancer in Lebanon. Conclusion: The instrument was perceived to be adequate, appropriate for use, culturally sensitive, simple as well as exhaustive. Suggestions have been made to enrich the instruments’ ability to incorporate other quality of life dimensions not captured, as well to enhance the cultural specificity of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast System Index, when administered among Lebanese women diagnosed with

  10. Association between body composition and body mass index in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Kitano, Takao; Kuchiki, Tsutomu; Okazaki, Hideki; Shibata, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    The National Nutrition Survey of Japan indicated a trend toward a decreasing body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) among young Japanese women. Current studies suggest that not-high BMI often does not correlate with not-high body fat percentage. Recently, the classification of BMI in adult Asians was proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. The addition of an "at risk of overweight" category, BMI as 23.0-24.9, was intended to prevent chronic diseases. We investigated the association between body fat percentage (BF%) and BMI to evaluate the screening performance of BMI focused on individual preventive medicine. The subjects consisted of 605 female college students. The subjects' ages (y), heights (cm), body weights (kg), BMIs, and BF percents with underwater weighing expressed as the means +/- SD were 19.6 +/- 0.5, 158.7 +/- 5.6, 53.8 +/- 7.2, 21.3 +/- 2.4, and 24.9 +/- 4.9, respectively. We defined high BF% as +/- 85th percentile of BF% (29.8%). High-BF% individuals are often not classified into BMI > or = 23.0 because their BMI readings are very broad (18.4-31.7). In comparison to the screening performances (specificity and sensitivity), BMI > or = 23.0 (85.3% and 52.1%, respectively), rather than BMI > or = 25.0 (96.7% and 29.8%, respectively), is recommended for the mass evaluation of fatness. For this reason, the BMI "at risk of overweight" category is characterized as the threshold of increasing the appearance ratio of high-BF% individuals. In conclusion, the BMI > or = 25.0 kg/m2 category is determined as high BF%, regardless of body composition measurement for mass evaluation as a result of quite high specificity. Even so, body composition measurement is necessitated by the individual evaluation of fatness focused on preventive medicine because BMI performed a poor representation of body composition, especially BMI < 25.0 kg/m2 individuals.

  11. Effects of carbohydrate quantity and glycemic index on resting metabolic rate and body composition during weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To examine the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate and glycemic index (GI) on changes in body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and metabolic adaptation during and after weight loss. Methods: Adults with obesity (n = 91) were randomized to one of four provided-food diets f...

  12. Comparison of the effectiveness of body mass index and body fat percentage in defining body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonasegaran, Arvin Raj; Nabila, Fatin Nabila; Shuhada, Nurul Shuhada

    2012-06-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has limited diagnostic performance due to its inability to discriminate between fat and lean mass. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of body fat percentage (BFP) against BMI in defining body composition. A cross-sectional study was conducted on students aged 17-30 years in Melaka, Malaysia. Basic anthropometric measurements were acquired using a manual weighing scale, measuring tape and a fixed stadiometer. BFP was calculated using the United States Navy formula. Data was tabulated and analysed using Epi Info and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Pearson's correlation coefficient and Kappa values were used. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of the 490 subjects recruited, 43% of males and 24.6% of females were found to be overweight, while 14.3% of males and 7.8% of females were obese, when calculated using BMI. However, 8.9% of males and 22.8% of females were considered obese based on the BFP. BFP plays a more important role in distinguishing between healthy and obese individuals, as it has a greater ability to differentiate between lean mass and fat mass compared to BMI.

  13. Benchmarking the Higher Education Institutions in Egypt using Composite Index Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Rashad M El-Hefnawy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Egypt has the largest and most significant higher education system in the Middle East and North Africa but it had been continuously facing serious and accumulated challenges. The Higher Education Institutions in Egypt are undergoing important changes involving the development of performance, they are implementing strategies to enhance the overall performance of their universities using ICT, but still the gap between what is existing and what is supposed to be for the self-regulation and improvement processes is not entirely clear to face these challenges. The using of strategic comparative analysis model and tools to evaluate the current and future states will affect the overall performance of universities and shape new paradigms in development of Higher Education System (HES, several studies have investigated the evaluation of universities through the development and use of ranking and benchmark systems In this paper, we provide a model to construct unified Composite Index (CI based on a set of SMART indictors emulate the nature of higher education systems in Egypt. The outcomes of the proposed model aim to measure overall performance of universities and provide unified benchmarking method in this context. The model was discussed from theoretical and technical perspectives. Meanwhile, the research study was conducted with 40 professors from 19 renowned universities in Egypt as education domain experts.

  14. Characteristics of the volatility in the Korea composite stock price index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Yong

    2009-09-01

    We empirically analyze the time series of the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) from March of 1992 to February of 2007 using methods from the hydrodynamic turbulence. To this end, we focus on characteristics of the return and volatility, which are respectively the price change and a measure of the financial market fluctuation over a time interval. With these, we show that the non-Gaussian probability distribution of the return can be modeled by the convolution of the conditional probability distribution of the return given the volatility and the distribution of the volatility per se. From this model, we suggest that the non-Gaussian characteristic of the return results from the fluctuation of the volatility. That is, a large return is partly, if not entirely, due to the market fluctuation in a long time scale influencing the fluctuation in a short time scale via net information flow. We further show that the volatility has a multi-fractal property, which resembles the multifractality of the energy dissipation in the turbulence.

  15. Development of a preliminary composite disease activity index in psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a preliminary composite psoriatic disease activity index (CPDAI) for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Five domains were assessed and specific instruments were employed for each domain to determine the extent of domain involvement and the effect of that involvement on quality of life\\/function. Disease activity for each domain was then graded from 0 to 3 giving a CPDAI range of 0-15. Patient and physician global disease activity measures were also recorded and an independent physician was asked to indicate if treatment change was required. Bivariate correlation analysis was performed. Factor, tree analysis and standardised response means were also calculated. RESULTS: Significant correlation was seen between CPDAI and both patient (r = 0.834) and physician (r = 0.825) global disease activity assessments (p = 0.01). Tree analysis revealed that 96.3% of patients had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were greater than 6; no patient had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were less than 5. CONCLUSION: CPDAI correlates well with patient and physician global disease activity assessments and is an effective tool that clearly distinguishes those who require a treatment change from those who do not.

  16. Effect of body mass index on the survival of patients with early-stage small cell lung cancer after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kolesnik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is an important medico-social problem. It is connected with high level of incidence and mortality of lung cancer. Nowadays we know that obesity has significant influence on cancer development, including lung cancer. Multivariate analysis confirmed that histological type of tumour, kind of operation and body mass index (BMI influence on prognosis in patients with early stages of mall cell lung cancer. So, now we can use BMI along with other significant prognostic criteria for detection of unfavorable prognostic group of patients.

  17. Dietary fiber, carbohydrates, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to breast cancer prognosis in the HEAL cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. METHODS: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  18. Dietary Fiber, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Breast Cancer Prognosis in the HEAL Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. Methods: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  19. Body mass index, physical activity and quality of life of ovarian cancer survivors: Time to get moving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Smits, E.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Hughes, G.; Talaat, A.; Pollard, A.; Bouwman, F.; Massuger, L.F.; Bekkers, R.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI), physical activity (PA) and the quality of life (QoL) of ovarian cancer survivors. METHODS: We performed a two-centre cross-sectional study of women who had been treated for ovarian cancer between January 2007 and December 2014 at

  20. Body mass index is not a predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in Dutch men diagnosed with prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Roermond, van J.G.; Aben, K.K.; Luijtgaarden, van de M.W.; Karthaus, H.F.; Vierssen Trip, van O.B.; Kampman, E.; Witjes, A.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the eVect of body mass index (BMI) on clinical and pathological characteristics at time of diagnosis and on risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy among Dutch men diagnosed with prostate cancer. Methods In total, 1,116 prostate cancer patients with known BMI,

  1. Dietary fiber, carbohydrates, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to breast cancer prognosis in the HEAL cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. METHODS: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  2. Dietary Fiber, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Breast Cancer Prognosis in the HEAL Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. Methods: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  3. A new clinically applicable age-specific comorbidity index for preoperative risk assessment of ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Mette Calundann; Sperling, Cecilie Dyg; Antonsen, Sofie Leisby

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a new feasible comorbidity index based on self-reported information suited for preoperative risk assessment of ovarian cancer patients. METHODS: The study was based on patient self-reported data from ovarian cancer patients registered in the Danish Gynecological...

  4. Dietary Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and Carbohydrate and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Dietary glycemic load (GL), glycemic index (GI), and carbohydrate could be associated with breast cancer risk by influencing long-term blood glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined associations between GL, GI, and carbohydrate and incident breast cancer in 148,767 Women’s Heath Initiative (WHI) participants. Dietary variables were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline. Self-reported breast cancers during follow-up were confirmed by medical records revie...

  5. Cancer incidence and mortality are associated with human development index and health setups in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Ruqiya; Faisal, Faisal

    2017-06-29

    This study aimed to analyse the correlation between cancer incidence and mortality and the Human Development Index (HDI) in Africa. Furthermore, to analyse the variations in cancer Mortality to Incidence Ratio (MIR) based on health care systems in African countries. Cancer incidence and mortality data for 53 countries were obtained from GLOBOCAN database. Country-wise data on National-HDI were obtained from Human Development Report 2015. Health System Attainment (HSA) data were acquired from World Health Report 2000. The parametric data were analysed by Pearson-correlation and Linear-regression analysis for the effect of HDI and HSA on MIR in African Countries. One-way ANOVA was used to test the differences of MIR in each HDI group. All analyses were performed in SPSS version 20. An inverse correlation was revealed by cancer MIR with both HDI (r=-0.897, p<0.001) and HSA (r=-0.750, p<0.001). A significantly low MIR was reported from high HDI countries compared to medium and low HDI countries by one-way ANOVA analysis (p<0.001). Linear regression analysis also reported a negative effect of MIR with both HDI (adjusted R(2)=0 0.801, β=-0.897, p<0.001) and HSA (adjusted R(2)=0.554, β=-0.750, p<0.001). Based on their HDIs, different African countries has different health system attainments, which is the cause of variations in MIR in these countries. To control their cancer burden, these low and medium HDI countries should focus on improvement of their economic status and policies making, regarding the provision of better health systems to the masses. Copyright © 2017 National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidence and mortality of kidney cancers, and human development index in Asia; a matter of concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabsalmani, Masoumeh; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Hadadian, Fatemeh; Towhidi, Farhad; Vafaee, Kamran; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of kidney cancer have steadily increased by 2%- 3% per decade worldwide, and an increased risk of kidney cancer has been observed in many Asian countries. The information on the incidence and mortality of a disease and its distribution is essential for better planning for prevention and further studies. This study aimed to assess the incidence and mortality of kidney cancer and their correlation with the human development index (HDI) in Asia. This ecological study was based on GLOBOCAN data Asia for assessment the correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) with HDI and its details that include life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling and gross national income (GNI) per capita. We use of correlation bivariate method for assessment the correlation between ASIR and ASMR with HDI and its components. A total of 121 099 kidney cancer cases were recorded in Asian countries in 2012.Overall, 80 080 cases (66.12%) were males. Sex ratio was 1.95. The three countries with the highest number of new patients were china (66 466 cases), Japan (16 830 cases), India(9658 cases), respectively. Positive correlation were seen between HDI and ASIR of kidney cancer 0.655 (P = 0.001), and HDI and ASMR of kidney cancer 0.285 (P = 0.055). A positive relationship between ASIR and the HDI was seen. The relationship is due to risk factors in countries with high development such as older age, smoking, hypertension, obesity, and diet. However, ASMR showed no significant relationship with HDI.

  7. Relationship of prediagnostic body mass index with survival after colorectal cancer: Stage-specific associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Chan, Andrew T; Slattery, Martha L; Potter, John D; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey; Phipps, Amanda; Nan, Hongmei; Harrison, Tabitha; Rohan, Thomas E; Qi, Lihong; Hou, Lifang; Caan, Bette; Kroenke, Candyce H; Strickler, Howard; Hayes, Richard B; Schoen, Robert E; Chong, Dawn Q; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A

    2016-09-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but is inconsistently associated with CRC survival. In 6 prospective studies participating in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), 2,249 non-Hispanic white CRC cases were followed for a median 4.5 years after diagnosis, during which 777 died, 554 from CRC-related causes. Associations between prediagnosis BMI and survival (overall and CRC-specific) were evaluated using Cox regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, study and smoking status (current/former/never). The association between BMI category and CRC survival varied by cancer stage at diagnosis (I-IV) for both all-cause (p-interaction = 0.03) and CRC-specific mortality (p-interaction = 0.04). Compared to normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) ), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stage I disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages II-IV disease. Similarly, obesity (BMI ≥30) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stages I-II disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages III-IV disease. These results suggest the relationship between BMI and survival after CRC diagnosis differs by stage at diagnosis, and may emphasize the importance of adequate metabolic reserves for colorectal cancer survival in patients with late-stage disease.

  8. Body mass index and risk of lung cancer among never, former, and current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Llewellyn; Brinton, Louise A; Spitz, Margaret R; Lam, Tram Kim; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Freedman, Neal D; Gierach, Gretchen L

    2012-05-16

    Although obesity has been directly linked to the development of many cancers, many epidemiological studies have found that body mass index (BMI)--a surrogate marker of obesity--is inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer. These studies are difficult to interpret because of potential confounding by cigarette smoking, a major risk factor for lung cancer that is associated with lower BMI. We prospectively examined the association between BMI and the risk of lung cancer among 448 732 men and women aged 50-71 years who were recruited during 1995-1996 for the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. BMI was calculated based on the participant's self-reported height and weight on the baseline questionnaire. We identified 9437 incident lung carcinomas (including 415 in never smokers) during a mean follow-up of 9.7 years through 2006. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with adjustment for lung cancer risk factors, including smoking status. To address potential bias due to preexisting undiagnosed disease, we excluded potentially unhealthy participants in sensitivity analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. The crude incidence rate of lung cancer over the study follow-up period was 233 per 100 000 person-years among men and 192 per 100 000 person-years among women. BMI was inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer among both men and women (BMI ≥35 vs 22.5-24.99 kg/m(2): HR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.94 and HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.61 to 0.87, respectively). The inverse association was restricted to current and former smokers and was stronger after adjustment for smoking. Among smokers, the inverse association persisted even after finely stratifying on smoking status, time since quitting smoking, and number of cigarettes smoked per day. Sensitivity analyses did not support the possibility that the inverse association was due to

  9. Use of the Charlson Combined Comorbidity Index To Predict Postradiotherapy Quality of Life for Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlgren, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wahlgren@telia.com [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Levitt, Seymour [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Kowalski, Jan [Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, Sten; Brandberg, Yvonne [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of pretreatment comorbidity on late health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores after patients have undergone combined radiotherapy for prostate cancer, including high-dose rate brachytherapy boost and hormonal deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: Results from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire survey of 158 patients 5 years or more after completion of therapy were used from consecutively accrued subjects treated with curative radiotherapy at our institution, with no signs of disease at the time of questionnaire completion. HRQoL scores were compared with the Charlson combined comorbidity index (CCI), using analysis of covariance and multivariate regression models together with pretreatment factors including tumor stage, tumor grade, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment, diabetes status, cardiovascular status, and age and Charlson score as separate variables or the composite CCI. Results: An inverse correlation between the two HRQoL domains, long-term global health (QL) and physical function (PF) scores, and the CCI score was observed, indicating an impact of comorbidity in these function areas. Selected pretreatment factors poorly explained the variation in functional HRQoL in the multivariate models; however, a statistically significant impact was found for the CCI (with QL and PF scores) and the presence of diabetes (with QL and emotional function). Cognitive function and social function were not statistically significantly predicted by any of the pretreatment factors. Conclusions: The CCI proved to be valid in this context, but it seems useful mainly in predicting long-term QL and PF scores. Of the other variables investigated, diabetes had more impact than cardiovascular morbidity on HRQoL outcomes in prostate cancer.

  10. Relation between Breast Cancer and High Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

  11. Development of a composite soil degradation assessment index for cocoa agroecosystems in southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenrele Adeniyi, Sunday; de Clercq, Willem Petrus; van Niekerk, Adriaan

    2017-08-01

    Cocoa agroecosystems are a major land-use type in the tropical rainforest belt of West Africa, reportedly associated with several ecological changes, including soil degradation. This study aims to develop a composite soil degradation assessment index (CSDI) for determining the degradation level of cocoa soils under smallholder agroecosystems of southwestern Nigeria. Plots where natural forests have been converted to cocoa agroecosystems of ages 1-10, 11-40, and 41-80 years, respectively representing young cocoa plantations (YCPs), mature cocoa plantations (MCPs), and senescent cocoa plantations (SCPs), were identified to represent the biological cycle of the cocoa tree. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0 to 20 cm in each plot and analysed in terms of their physical, chemical, and biological properties. Factor analysis of soil data revealed four major interacting soil degradation processes: decline in soil nutrients, loss of soil organic matter, increase in soil acidity, and the breakdown of soil textural characteristics over time. These processes were represented by eight soil properties (extractable zinc, silt, soil organic matter (SOM), cation exchange capacity (CEC), available phosphorus, total porosity, pH, and clay content). These soil properties were subjected to forward stepwise discriminant analysis (STEPDA), and the result showed that four soil properties (extractable zinc, cation exchange capacity, SOM, and clay content) are the most useful in separating the studied soils into YCP, MCP, and SCP. In this way, we have sufficiently eliminated redundancy in the final selection of soil degradation indicators. Based on these four soil parameters, a CSDI was developed and used to classify selected cocoa soils into three different classes of degradation. The results revealed that 65 % of the selected cocoa farms are moderately degraded, while 18 % have a high degradation status. The numerical value of the CSDI as an objective index of soil degradation

  12. Development of a composite soil degradation assessment index for cocoa agroecosystems in southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Adeniyi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa agroecosystems are a major land-use type in the tropical rainforest belt of West Africa, reportedly associated with several ecological changes, including soil degradation. This study aims to develop a composite soil degradation assessment index (CSDI for determining the degradation level of cocoa soils under smallholder agroecosystems of southwestern Nigeria. Plots where natural forests have been converted to cocoa agroecosystems of ages 1–10, 11–40, and 41–80 years, respectively representing young cocoa plantations (YCPs, mature cocoa plantations (MCPs, and senescent cocoa plantations (SCPs, were identified to represent the biological cycle of the cocoa tree. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0 to 20 cm in each plot and analysed in terms of their physical, chemical, and biological properties. Factor analysis of soil data revealed four major interacting soil degradation processes: decline in soil nutrients, loss of soil organic matter, increase in soil acidity, and the breakdown of soil textural characteristics over time. These processes were represented by eight soil properties (extractable zinc, silt, soil organic matter (SOM, cation exchange capacity (CEC, available phosphorus, total porosity, pH, and clay content. These soil properties were subjected to forward stepwise discriminant analysis (STEPDA, and the result showed that four soil properties (extractable zinc, cation exchange capacity, SOM, and clay content are the most useful in separating the studied soils into YCP, MCP, and SCP. In this way, we have sufficiently eliminated redundancy in the final selection of soil degradation indicators. Based on these four soil parameters, a CSDI was developed and used to classify selected cocoa soils into three different classes of degradation. The results revealed that 65 % of the selected cocoa farms are moderately degraded, while 18 % have a high degradation status. The numerical value of the CSDI as an objective

  13. Index-based dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Susan E; Guinter, Mark; Zheng, Jiali; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States. Various a priori dietary patterns that take into account diet complexity have been associated with CRC risk. This systematic review augments the evidence for an association between CRC risk and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) and the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), and provides new evidence for a novel Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII). Human studies published in English after 31 December 2008 were reviewed. Five case-control studies and 7 prospective cohort studies conducted in the United States and Europe were identified. Five of the studies examined the MDS, 4 examined the HEI, and 4 examined the DII. Comparing highest to lowest score groups, higher MDSs were associated with an 8-54% lower CRC risk, and higher HEI scores were associated with a 20-56% lower CRC risk. More proinflammatory diet scores were associated with a 12-65% higher CRC risk compared with more anti-inflammatory diets in studies that used the DII. The results reported by sex suggested similar associations for men and women. This review builds upon the evidence supporting the association between higher overall diet quality and lower risk of CRC. Increasing scores of MDS and HEI and anti-inflammatory DII scores are characterized by high intake of plant-based foods and low intake of animal products. Future studies in more diverse populations and with consistent scoring calculations are recommended.

  14. Chemical composition and glycemic index of Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; De Menezes Wenzel, Elizabete; Genovese, Maria Inés; Colli, Célia; De Souza Gonçalves, Alessandra; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2004-06-02

    The seeds of Parana pine (Araucaria brasiliensis syn. Araucaria angustifolia), named pinhão, are consumed after cooking and posterior dehulling, or they are used to prepare a flour employed in regional dishes. Native people that live in the South of Brazil usually consume baked pinhão. As a result of cooking, the white seeds become brown on the surface due to the migration of some tinted compounds present in the seed coat. In this work, the proximate composition, minerals, flavonoids, and glycemic index (GI) of cooked and raw pinhão seeds were compared. No differences in moisture, lipids, soluble fiber, and total starch after boiling were found. However, the soluble sugars and P, Cu, and Mg contents decreased, probably as a consequence of leaching in the cooking water. Also, the boiling process modified the profile of the phenolic compounds in the seeds. No flavonols were detected in raw pinhão seeds. The internal seed coat had a quercetin content five times higher than that of the external seed coat; also, quercetin migrated into the seed during cooking. The internal seed coat had a high content of total phenolics, and seeds cooked in normal conditions (with the seed coat) showed a total phenolics content five times higher than that of seeds cooked without the seed coat. Cooking was then extremely favorable to pinhão seeds bioactive compounds content. The carbohydrate availability was evaluated in a short-term assay in humans by the GI. The GI of pinhão seeds cooked with the coat (67%) was similar to that of the seeds cooked without a coat (62%) and lower than bread, showing that cooking does not interfere with starch availability. The low glycemic response can be partly due to its high content of resistant starch (9% of the total starch).

  15. Quantification of emphysema: a composite physiologic index derived from CT estimation of disease extent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sujal R.; Hansell, David M.; Walker, Amanda; MacDonald, Sharon L.S.; Chabat, Francois; Wells, Athol U. [Royal Brompton Hospital (SRD, DMH, MW, SLSM, FC), Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); King' s College Hospital (SRD), Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton Hospital, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit (AUW), London (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    The combination of functional indices best reflecting the extent of emphysema is not known. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) studies of 106 patients with emphysema [men=71; median age=61 (range=26-86 years)] were reviewed and the extent of emphysema was quantified: (a) visually (emphysema{sub vis}) and (b) by automated estimation (emphysema{sub auto}). Functional-morphologic relationships were compared for the two scoring systems, and a composite physiologic index (CPI) (providing the best fit of functional indices against emphysema extent) was derived. Emphysema{sub vis} and emphysema{sub auto} were strongly correlated (r=0.90; p<0.0005), but the extent of emphysema{sub vis} was consistently greater (p<0.00005). Emphysema{sub vis} correlated most strongly with indices of gas transfer [percent predicted single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (Dl{sub co}) and alveolar volume (K{sub co}); r=-0.70, both p<0.0005]. The combination of physiologic indices most representative of emphysema extent on CT (using visual or automated methods) consisted of K{sub co} and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) levels. The equation explanatory power was higher for visual scoring [emphysema{sub vis}=96.8-(0.67 x % predicted K{sub co})-(0.41 x % predicted FEV{sub 1}); equation r {sup 2}=0.57] than automated estimation (equation r {sup 2}=0.48). Weighted combinations of K{sub co} and FEV{sub 1} levels provide a CPI best reflecting morphologic emphysema extent. CPI has the potential to refine the stratification of patients in epidemiological and therapeutic studies. (orig.)

  16. Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, dietary composition, and lifestyle among Swedish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Roswall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies examining diet scores in relation to health outcomes are gaining ground. Thus, control for dietary factors not part of the score, and lifestyle associated with adherence, is required to allow for a causal interpretation of studies on diet scores and health outcomes. Objective: The study objective is to describe and investigate dietary composition, micronutrient density, lifestyle, socioeconomic factors, and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations across groups defined by their level of adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (HNFI. The paper examines both dietary components included in the HNFI as well as dietary components, which are not part of the HNFI, to get a broad picture of the diet. Design: The study is cross-sectional and conducted in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort. We included 45,277 women, aged 29–49 years at baseline (1991–1992. The HNFI was defined by six items: wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, cabbages, root vegetables and fish/shellfish, using data from a food frequency questionnaire. Proportions, means and standard deviations were calculated in the entire cohort and by adherence groups. Results: Women scoring high on the HNFI had a higher energy intake, compared to low adherers. They had a higher intake of fiber and a higher micronutrient density (components of the HNFI, but also a higher intake of items not included in the HNFI: red/processed meats, sweets, and potatoes. They were on average more physically active and less likely to smoke. Conclusions: Adherence to the HNFI was associated with a generally healthier lifestyle and a high intake of health-beneficial components. However, it was also associated with a higher energy intake and a higher intake of foods without proven health benefits. Therefore, future studies on the HNFI and health outcomes should take into account potential confounding of dietary and lifestyle factors associated with the HNFI.

  17. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is inversely associated with body mass index in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Donald P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between vitamin D deficiency and obesity in healthy populations and different disease states remains unsettled with studies reporting conflicting findings. Moreover, current dietary recommendations for vitamin D do not take into account a person's body mass index (BMI. We investigated the relationship between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OHD] and BMI in cancer. Methods A consecutive case series of 738 cancer patients. Serum 25(OHD was measured at presentation to the hospital. The cohort was divided into 4 BMI groups (underweight: 30.0 kg/m2. Mean 25(OHD was compared across the 4 BMI groups using ANOVA. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship between BMI and 25(OHD. Results 303 were males and 435 females. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.6 years. The mean BMI was 27.9 kg/m2 and mean serum 25(OHD was 21.9 ng/ml. Most common cancers were lung (134, breast (131, colorectal (97, pancreas (86 and prostate (45. Obese patients had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels (17.9 ng/ml as compared to normal weight (24.6 ng/ml and overweight (22.8 ng/ml patients; p 2 increase in BMI was significantly associated with 0.42 ng/ml decline in serum 25(OHD levels. Conclusions Obese cancer patients (BMI >= 30 kg/m2 had significantly lower levels of serum 25(OHD as compared to non-obese patients (BMI 2. BMI should be taken into account when assessing a patient's vitamin D status and more aggressive vitamin D supplementation should be considered in obese cancer patients.

  18. The Application of Complex PSA and Its Relative Indexes in the Detection of Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZhaohui; WUJianmin; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the diagnostic value of complex PSA(cPSA),the calculated free/total PSA(f/t PSA) raio and total PSA(tPSA)in the differentiation of prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia.Methods:The tPSA,cPSA and fPSA were measured using the Bayer ACS-180 chemiluminescence immuno-assay.152 patients(21 with prostate cancer and 131 with benign prostate hyperplasia proven by tissue pathology)whose serum total PSA ranged from 0.2-20.0ng/ml were accessed from July 2001 to May 2002 consecutively.The correlation between tPSA and cPSA was analyzed.The re-ceiver operator characteristic curves(ROC curve)were generated by plotting the sensitivity versus specificity.Areas under the curve were calculated for each assay.Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the ability of the indices as independent varia-bles to predict prostate cancer.Results:In the experimental group,the areas under the ROC curve of cPSA ,tPSA and fPSA/tPSA ratio were 0.811,0.799 and 0.376 respectively.The specificity for tPSA,fPSA/tPSA ratio and cPSA were 62%,57% and 4.7%,respectively,at cotoff yield-ing 95% sensitivity.Serum cPSA concentration was determined to be the best index among the three through logistic regression analy-sis.Conclusion:The serum levels of cPSA and tPSA are better indices than f/tPSA in the differentiation of prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia.At the same level of sensitivity,cPSA has a higher specificity than tPSA.Serum cPSA may be a better indicator in the prediction of prostate cancer of early stage.

  19. Formation of droplets of alternating composition in microfluidic channels and applications to indexing of concentrations in droplet-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo; Tice, Joshua D; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2004-09-01

    For screening the conditions for a reaction by using droplets (or plugs) as microreactors, the composition of the droplets must be indexed. Indexing here refers to measuring the concentration of a solute by addition of a marker, either internal or external. Indexing may be performed by forming droplet pairs, where in each pair the first droplet is used to conduct the reaction, and the second droplet is used to index the composition of the first droplet. This paper characterizes a method for creating droplet pairs by generating alternating droplets, of two sets of aqueous solutions in a flow of immiscible carrier fluid within PDMS and glass microfluidic channels. The paper also demonstrates that the technique can be used to index the composition of the droplets, and this application is illustrated by screening conditions of protein crystallization. The fluid properties required to form the steady flow of the alternating droplets in a microchannel were characterized as a function of the capillary number Ca and water fraction. Four regimes were observed. At the lowest values of Ca, the droplets of the two streams coalesced; at intermediate values of Ca the alternating droplets formed reliably. At even higher values of Ca, shear forces dominated and caused formation of droplets that were smaller than the cross-sectional dimension of the channel; at the highest values of Ca, coflowing laminar streams of the two immiscible fluids formed. In addition to screening of protein crystallization conditions, understanding of the fluid flow in this system may extend this indexing approach to other chemical and biological assays performed on a microfluidic chip.

  20. A body shape index has a good correlation with postoperative complications in gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Bang Wool; Joo, Jungnam; Yoon, Hong Man; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Lee, Jun Ho

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between obesity and surgical complications has been controversial. A Body Shape Index (ABSI) is a newly developed anthropometric index based on waist circumference adjusted for height and weight. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between ABSI and surgical complications. From November 2001 to September 2012, 4,813 patients underwent curative resection for gastric cancer. ABSI was defined as waist circumference divided by (BMI(2/3)height(1/2)). Data of clinicopathologic characteristics and morbidity were collected by retrospective review. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariable analyses to determine whether ABSI was independently associated with postoperative complications. The incidence of overall surgical complications was 13.4 %, and the most common complication was ileus (2.8 %). In the multivariable analysis, ABSI was an independent factor for overall complications [odds ratio (OR), 1.22; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.48; P = 0.041). However, BMI showed no statistical significance (OR, 1.03; 95 % CI 1.00-1.06; P = 0.063). In the subgroup analyses, ABSI was significantly associated with overall complications regarding open gastrectomy (OR, 1.26; 95 % CI 1.01-1.57; P = 0.039). Regarding laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy, ABSI had no significant effect on overall complications (P = 0.844). ABSI shows good correlation with surgical complications in patients with gastric cancer. Further studies are needed for the various clinical roles of ABSI, and the results could be helpful to determine the effect of abdominal obesity on gastric cancer surgery and the clinical usefulness of ABSI.

  1. Study of the Composition and Spectral Characteristics of a HDG-Prism Disperse System (GRISM) by Refractive Index Phase Matching

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Chon-Gyu; Im, Song-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The composition and characteristics of a GRISM gained by refractive index matching between a refractive index modulation type HDG and a prism is investigated, the HDG being built by processing silver halide emulsion with halide vapor. The GRISM has been stable under external influences like humidity or ultraviolet light exposure. The mercury atomic spectrum obtained by a GRISM based on a HDG with a spatial frequency of 600mm-1 shows yellow dual lines with the wavelength difference of 2.1nm sufficiently separated.

  2. Prognosis Prediction for Postoperative Esophageal Cancer Patients Using Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Okamoto, Yuko; Kawai, Akimasa; Ueno, Daisuke; Kubota, Hisako; Murakami, Haruaki; Higashida, Masaharu; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2017-07-20

    Preoperative nutritional status may impact surgical outcome and prognosis. We evaluated the predictive value of Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (O's-PNI) of surgical outcome following esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients. In total, 144 patients undergoing esophagectomy for esophageal cancer from April 2010 to May 2015 were evaluated, retrospectively. Eighty-four patients were enrolled in this study. O's-PNIs were calculated before surgery, discharge, and 1, 2, and 6 mo after discharge. The relationship between O's-PNI and occurrence of complications as classified by the Clavien-Dindo (C-D) classification, length of hospital stay, and survival time was investigated. The mean O's-PNI for patients with complications of more than Grade 2 by the C-D classification was 37.4, which was significantly lower than that for Grades 0 or 1 (40.5, P = 0.0094). A negative correlation was obtained between O's-PNI and hospital stay length (P = 0.0006), whereas a positive correlation was obtained for O's-PNI at 6 mo postsurgery and overall survival (P = 0.0171, P = 0.0201). O's-PNI may represent a useful indicator of the occurrence of complications and length of hospital stay, and may influence overall survival at 6 mo postsurgery. Nutritional management during the perioperative period could therefore contribute to satisfactory outcomes following esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients.

  3. The Prognostic Nutritional Index Predicts Survival and Identifies Aggressiveness of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Chang, Hye Jung; Suh, Jungho; Ahn, Jin; Shin, Jeong; Hur, Joon-Young; Kim, Gou Young; Lee, Sookyung; Park, Sora; Lee, Sanghun

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status has been associated with long-term outcomes in cancer patients. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is calculated by serum albumin concentration and absolute lymphocyte count, and it may be a surrogate biomarker for nutritional status and possibly predicts overall survival (OS) of gastric cancer. We evaluated the value of the PNI as a predictor for disease-free survival (DFS) in addition to OS in a cohort of 314 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgical resection. There were 77 patients in PNI-low group (PNI ≤ 47.3) and 237 patients in PNI-high group (PNI > 47.3). With a median follow-up of 36.5 mo, 5-yr DFS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 83.6% and 5-yr OS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 88.4%, respectively (DFS, P < 0.0001; OS, P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, the only predictors for DFS were PNI, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and perineural invasion, whereas the only predictors for OS were PNI, age, TNM stage, and perineural invasion. In addition, the PNI was independent of various inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the PNI is an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS, and provides additional prognostic information beyond pathologic parameters.

  4. Cancer cachexia in the age of obesity: skeletal muscle depletion is a powerful prognostic factor, independent of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa; Birdsell, Laura; Macdonald, Neil; Reiman, Tony; Clandinin, M Thomas; McCargar, Linda J; Murphy, Rachel; Ghosh, Sunita; Sawyer, Michael B; Baracos, Vickie E

    2013-04-20

    Emerging evidence suggests muscle depletion predicts survival of patients with cancer. At a cancer center in Alberta, Canada, consecutive patients with cancer (lung or GI; N = 1,473) were assessed at presentation for weight loss history, lumbar skeletal muscle index, and mean muscle attenuation (Hounsfield units) by computed tomography (CT). Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Concordance (c) statistics were used to test predictive accuracy of survival models. Body mass index (BMI) distribution was 17% obese, 35% overweight, 36% normal weight, and 12% underweight. Patients in all BMI categories varied widely in weight loss, muscle index, and muscle attenuation. Thresholds defining associations between these three variables and survival were determined using optimal stratification. High weight loss, low muscle index, and low muscle attenuation were independently prognostic of survival. A survival model containing conventional covariates (cancer diagnosis, stage, age, performance status) gave a c statistic of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.79), whereas a model ignoring conventional variables and including only BMI, weight loss, muscle index, and muscle attenuation gave a c statistic of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.88 to 0.95; P obese, overweight, normal weight, or underweight, in contrast to patients who had none of these features, who survived 28.4 months (95% CI, 24.2 to 32.6; P cancer who are cachexic by the conventional criterion (involuntary weight loss) and by two additional criteria (muscle depletion and low muscle attenuation) share a poor prognosis, regardless of overall body weight.

  5. Human development index is associated with mortality-to-incidence ratios of gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi-Da; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Wei; Bai, Xue-Li; Liang, Ting-Bo

    2013-08-28

    To identify the role of human development in the incidence and mortality rates of gastrointestinal cancers worldwide. The age-standardized incidence and mortality rates for gastrointestinal cancers, including cancers of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and colorectum, were obtained from the GLOBOCAN 2008 database and United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) report. The human development index (HDI) data were calculated according to the 2011 Human Development Report. We estimated the mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) at the regional and national levels, and explored the association of the MIR with development levels as measured by the HDI using a modified "drug dose to inhibition response" model. Furthermore, countries were divided into four groups according to the HDI distribution, and the MIRs of the four HDI groups were compared by one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test. State-specific MIRs in the United States were predicted from the estimated HDI using the fitted non-linear model, and were compared with the actual MIRs calculated from data in the USCS report. The worldwide incidence and mortality rates of gastrointestinal cancers were as high as 39.4 and 54.9 cases per 100000 individuals, respectively. Linear and non-linear regression analyses revealed an inverse correlation between the MIR of gastrointestinal cancers and the HDI at the regional and national levels (β < 0; P = 0.0028 for regional level and < 0.0001 for national level, ANOVA). The MIR differed significantly among the four HDI areas (very high HDI, 0.620 ± 0.033; high HDI, 0.807 ± 0.018; medium HDI, 0.857 ± 0.021; low HDI, 0.953 ± 0.011; P < 0.001, one-way ANOVA). Prediction of the MIRs for individual United States states using best-fitted non-linear models showed little deviation from the actual MIRs in the United States. Except for 28 data points (9.93% of 282), the actual MIRs of all gastrointestinal cancers were mostly located in the prediction

  6. Effect of base monomer's refractive index on curing depth and polymerization conversion of photo-cured resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kou; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Nemoto, Kimiya; Okada, Tamami; Ikemi, Takuji

    2005-09-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of the transmitted amount of visible light through a resin composite on the curing depth and polymerization conversion. Transmitted amount of visible light was strongly dependent on the magnitude of refractive index difference that existed between the resin and silica filler. More specifically, the differences arose from the type of base monomer used. The transmitted amount of visible light exhibited a good correlation with the curing depth and Knoop hardness ratio of the bottom surface against the top surface of the resin composite. To improve the polymerization conversion of the cavity floor, it is important to reduce the refractive index difference that exists between the base resin and silica filler.

  7. Impact of body mass index on perioperative outcomes and survival after resection for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Aslam; Spolverato, Gaya; Kim, Yuhree; Poultsides, George A; Fields, Ryan C; Bloomston, Mark; Cho, Clifford S; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos; Maithel, Shishir K; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-05-01

    Among patients undergoing resection for gastric cancer, the impact of body mass index (BMI) on outcomes is not well understood. We sought to define the impact of non-normal BMI on short- and long-term outcomes after gastric cancer resection. We identified 775 patients who underwent gastrectomy for adenocarcinoma between 2000 and 2012 from the multi-institutional US Gastric Cancer Collaborative. Clinicopathologic characteristics, operative details, and oncologic outcomes were collected, and patients were stratified according to BMI. Most patients in the cohort were classified as having normal BMI (n = 338, 43.6%), followed by overweight (n = 229, 29.6%), obese (n = 153, 19.7%), and underweight (n = 55, 7.1%). After stratifying by BMI, there were no significant differences in the incidence of postoperative blood transfusions, perioperative morbidity, postoperative infectious complications, length of stay, perioperative 30-d in-hospital death, or readmission across groups (all P > 0.05). BMI did not impact overall or recurrence-free survival after stratifying by stage (all P > 0.05). However, underweight patients with low preoperative albumin levels had worse overall survival (OS) compared with that of patients of normal BMI. BMI did not impact perioperative morbidity, recurrence-free, or OS in patients undergoing gastric resection for adenocarcinoma. Underweight patients with BMI cancer. These high-risk patients should have their nutritional status optimized both before and after gastrectomy in an attempt to modify this risk factor and, in turn, achieve better outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Validation of the prostate health index in a predictive model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchís-Bonet, A; Barrionuevo-González, M; Bajo-Chueca, A M; Pulido-Fonseca, L; Ortega-Polledo, L E; Tamayo-Ruiz, J C; Sánchez-Chapado, M

    2017-08-12

    To validate and analyse the clinical usefulness of a predictive model of prostate cancer that incorporates the biomarker «[-2] pro prostate-specific antigen» using the prostate health index (PHI) in decision making for performing prostate biopsies. We isolated serum from 197 men with an indication for prostate biopsy to determine the total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), the free PSA fraction (fPSA) and the [-2] proPSA (p2PSA). The PHI was calculated as p2PSA/fPSA×√tPSA. We created 2 predictive models that incorporated clinical variables along with tPSA or PHI. The performance of PHI was assessed with a discriminant analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves, internal calibration and decision curves. The areas under the curve for the tPSA and PHI models were 0.71 and 0.85, respectively. The PHI model showed a better ability to discriminate and better calibration for predicting prostate cancer but not for predicting a Gleason score in the biopsy ≥7. The decision curves showed a greater net benefit with the PHI model for diagnosing prostate cancer when the probability threshold was 15-35% and greater savings (20%) in the number of biopsies. The incorporation of p2PSA through PHI in predictive models of prostate cancer improves the accuracy of the risk stratification and helps in the decision-making process for performing prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Body mass index and body surface area and their associations with outcomes in stage II and III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Sina; Kennecke, Hagen F; Woods, Ryan; Lim, Howard J; Speers, Caroline; Brown, Carl J; Gill, Sharlene; Renouf, Daniel J; Cheung, Winson Y

    2013-06-01

    Our study aims were to measure the associations between body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) with outcomes for stage II and III colon cancer and to evaluate if the effect of obesity is modified by disease stage and receipt of adjuvant therapy. Using a prospective cohort of stage II and III colon cancer patients who were referred between 2001 and 2005, we compared 3-year relapse-free survival (3-year RFS), 5-year cancer-specific survival (5-year CSS), and 5-year overall survival (5-year OS) rates among different BMI and BSA categories. Cox proportional-hazards models were constructed to explore the relationships between different body compositions and outcomes while adjusting for confounders. Postoperative height and weight were used to classify 913 patients as normal weight (n = 424, BMI obese (n = 170, BMI >30 kg/m(2)). Using Mosteller formula, 684 subjects had normal BSA (≤ 2.0 m(2)) and 229 had high BSA (>2.0 m(2)). Obese subjects experienced similar 3-year RFS (61.9 vs. 66.5 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.51), 5-year CSS (65.6 vs. 72.4 vs. 68.0 %, p = 0.22), and 5-year OS (60.8 vs. 64.0 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.69) when compared to overweight subjects and those with normal BMIs, respectively. Likewise, individuals with high BSA had similar outcomes as those with normal BSA (66.2 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.64 for 3-year RFS, 70.3 vs. 68.6 %, p = 0.62 for 5-year CSS, and 64.5 vs. 61.9 %, p = 0.48 for 5-year OS). In Cox models, advanced age, male gender, stage III disease, and poor performance status correlated with inferior RFS, CSS, and OS, but BMI and BSA did not. Obesity as measured by either BMI or BSA was not associated with differences in outcomes in stage II and III colon cancer.

  10. [Body mass index and the risk of lung cancer incidence in smokers: a prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Xie, S H; Wang, G; Su, K; Feng, X S; Lyu, Z Y; Guo, L W; Chen, S H; Chang, S; Chen, Y H; Ren, J S; Shi, J F; Yang, W J; Cui, H; Wu, S L; Dai, M; Li, N; He, J

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effect of baseline body mass index (BMI) on the risk of lung cancer incidence in male smokers. All the male employees and retirees of the Kailuan Group were recruited in the Chinese Kailuan Male Cohort Study, and they had been experienced routine physical examinations every two years since May, 2006. Up to 31st December 2011, a total of 3 rounds physical examinations had been completed. A total of 42 718 male smokers candidates from the Chinese Kailuan Male Cohort Study were enrolled in the present study. The date of entering this study was defined as that of taking first check-up, and the date of end-of-observation was defined as that of cancer diagnosis, death or end of follow-up (31 December 2011). Information on demographics, lifestyle such as smoking, alcohol consumption, anthropometries such as height and weight, as well as the information of newly-diagnosed cancer cases, were collected at the baseline investigation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to investigate the association between levels of the baseline BMI and risk of lung cancer. Of the 42 718 male smokers, there were 181 998.09 person-years of follow-up, taking 4.26 years of average follow-up period. During follow-up, 234 new lung cancer cases were identified among the 42 718 male smokers and the crude incidence density was 128.57/100 000. After the factors adjustment for age, education level, alcohol consumption, physical activity, work environment and cumulative smoking levels (pack-years), compared with subjects of normal BMI group, hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals of lung cancer for subjects of underweight, overweight, and obesity were 1.63 (0.79-3.37), 0.79 (0.57-1.09) and 0.50 (0.27-0.91), respectively. After the facotors adjustment for age, education level, alcohol consumption, physical activity, work environment and cumulative smoking levels (pack-years), compared with subjects of normal BMI, hazard ratio and 95% confidence

  11. A pooled analysis of body mass index and pancreatic cancer mortality in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Traci N.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Sonderman, Jennifer; Patel, Alpa V.; Harvey, Chinonye; Knutsen, Synnøve F.; Park, Yikyung; Park, Song Yi; Fraser, Gary E.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Purdue, Mark P.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Blot, William J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Kolonel, Laurence N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the U.S. and both incidence and mortality are highest in African Americans. Obesity is also disproportionately high in African Americans, but limited data are available on the relation of obesity to pancreatic cancer in this population. Methods Seven large prospective cohort studies pooled data from African American participants. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from self-reported height and weight at baseline. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for levels of BMI relative to BMI 18.5–24.9, with adjustment for covariates. Primary analyses were restricted to participants with ≥5 years of follow-up because weight loss prior to diagnosis may have influenced baseline BMI in cases who died during early follow-up. Results In follow-up of 239,597 participants, 897 pancreatic cancer deaths occurred. HRs were 1.08 (95% CI, 0.90–1.31) for BMI 25.0–29.9, 1.25 (95% CI, 0.99–1.57) for BMI 30.0–34.9, and 1.31 (95% CI, 0.97–1.77) for BMI ≥35.0 among those with ≥5 years of follow-up (Ptrend = 0.03). The association was evident among both sexes and was independent of a history of diabetes. A stronger association was observed among never-smokers (BMI ≥30 vs. referent: HR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.02–2.03) than among smokers (HR = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.87–1.54; Pinteraction = 0.02). Conclusion The findings suggest that obesity is independently associated with increased pancreatic cancer mortality in African Americans. Impact Interventions to reduce obesity may also reduce risk of pancreatic cancer mortality, particularly among never-smokers. PMID:25017247

  12. Body mass index and risk of head and neck cancer by race: the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Jessica L; Gaudet, Mia M; Weissler, Mark C; Funkhouser, William K; Olshan, Andrew F

    2014-02-01

    Most studies, primarily conducted in populations of European ancestry, reported increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) associated with leanness (body mass index [BMI] 30 kg/m(2), respectively), compared with normal weight (18.5 to Cancer Epidemiology Study is a population-based, racially diverse case-control study of 1289 incident HNC cases (330 African Americans) and 1361 controls (261 African Americans). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for associations between BMI 1 year prediagnosis and HNC risk stratified by race and adjusted for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, and education. Multiplicative interaction between BMI and race was evident (Pint = .00007). Compared with normal weight, ORs for leanness were increased for African Americans (OR, 3.91; 95% CI, 0.72-21.17) and whites (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.60-3.65). For overweight and obesity, ORs were decreased in African Americans (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.32-0.83 and OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.28-0.79, respectively) but in not whites. The increased risk associated with leanness was greater for smokers than nonsmokers (Pint = .02). These data, which require replication, suggest that leanness is associated with increased HNC risk among African Americans to a greater extent than whites and overweight and obesity is associated with decreased HNC risk only among African Americans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of temporary filling material for index fabrication in Class IV resin composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Duck-Su; Choi, Kyoung-Kyu

    2013-05-01

    When a patient with a fractured anterior tooth visits the clinic, clinician has to restore the tooth esthetically and quickly. For esthetic resin restoration, clinician can use 'Natural Layering technique' and an index for palatal wall may be needed. In this case report, we introduce pre-restoration index technique on a Class IV defect, in which a temporary filling material is used for easy restoration. Chair-side index fabrication for Class IV restoration is convenient and makes a single-visit treatment possible.

  14. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  15. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sinead M; Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O; Armstrong, John

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  16. Incidence and mortality of kidney cancer and its relationship with HDI (Human Development Index) in the world in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Maryam; Pakzad, Reza; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Kidney cancer is among the cancers that have the highest growth rate in all age and racial groups in the world and is as the most deadly type of urinary tract cancer. Since awareness about this cancer incidence status and mortality is essential for better planning, this study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality rate of kidney cancer and its relationship with the development index in the world in 2012. This study was an ecological study conducted based on GLOBOCAN project of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the countries in the world. The correlation between Standardized Incidence Rates (SIRs) and Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) of kidney cancer with HDI and its components was assessed using SPSS18. In total, 337,860 incidence cases (213,924 were men and 123,936 women) and 143,406 deaths (90,802 cases in men and 52,604 in women) of kidney cancer were recorded in 2012. A positive correlation of 0.731 was seen between SIR of kidney cancer and HDI (p≤0.001). Also, a negative correlation of 0.627 was seen between SMR of kidney cancer and HDI (p≤0.001). The incidence and mortality rate of kidney cancer is higher in developed countries. A significant positive correlation has been seen between the standardized incidence and mortality rate of kidney cancer with the Human Development Index and its components. We need more studies to examine variation in incidence and mortality of kidney cancer and its related factors in the world.

  17. Body mass index and up-to-date colorectal cancer screening among Marylanders aged 50 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menis, Mikhail; Kozlovsky, Bernard; Langenberg, Pat; Zhan, Min; Dwyer, Diane M; Israel, Ebenezer; Groves, Carmela; Hopkins, Annette; Steinberger, Eileen K

    2006-07-01

    Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk for developing and dying from colorectal cancer. Studies suggest that overweight and obese women are more likely to avoid or delay cancer screening. Our objective was to determine whether overweight or obese adults aged 50 years and older living in Maryland in 2002 were less likely to be up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening than normal and underweight adults. The relationship between body mass index and colorectal cancer screening was evaluated based on responses from 3436 participants aged 50 years and older to the Maryland Cancer Survey 2002, a population-based random-digit-dial telephone survey. The survey contains self-reported information on colorectal cancer screening, height, weight, and potential confounders. Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for age, sex, race, employment, marital status, education, area of residence, and health-care-related variables. Overall, 64.9% of Marylanders aged 50 and older were up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening. Compared with normal and underweight individuals, overweight individuals had similar odds of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.83-1.33). Obese individuals had slightly lower odds, but this difference was not statistically significant (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.65-1.09). Recommendation by a health care provider for colorectal cancer screening was strongly associated with up-to-date colorectal cancer screening (OR, 36.7; 95% CI, 28.7-47.0). Our study shows no statistically significant association between body mass index levels and up-to-date colorectal cancer screening. We recommend that physicians and other health care providers increase up-to-date colorectal cancer screening rates in the population by referring their patients for appropriate screening.

  18. Composite Habitat Suitability Index for Greater Sage-grouse in Nevada and northeastern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster represents a continuous surface of sage-grouse habitat suitability index (HSI) values for Nevada. HSIs were calculated for spring, summer, and winter...

  19. A risk of malignancy index in preoperative diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马水清; 沈铿; 郎景和

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of a risk of malignancy index (RMI), based on serum CA125 level, ultrasound findings and menopausal status, to discriminate benign from malignant pelvic mass. Methods One hundred and forty women with pelvic masses, at age 30 of years or more were admitted to the Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 1998 and June 1999. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of serum CA125 level, ultrasound findings and the menopausal status in diagnosis of ovarian cancer were evaluated separately or combined into the RMI. Results RMI was more accurate than any individual criterion in diagnosing cancer. Using an RMI cutoff level of 200 to indicate malignancy, the RMI derived from this data set gave a sensitivity of 87.3%, a specificity of 84.4%, and a positive predictive value of 82.1%. Conclusions RMI is able to correctly discriminate malignant from benign pelvic mass. It can be introduced easily into clinical practice to facilitate the selection of patients for primary surgery.

  20. Prostate cancer gene expression signature of patients with high body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharad, Shashwat; Srivastava, Anjali; Ravulapalli, Suma; Parker, Patrick; Chen, Yongmei; Li, Hua; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Dobi, Albert

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate prostate cancer gene expression signatures associated with elevated body mass index (BMI). Global gene expression profiles of prostate tumor cells and matching normal epithelial cells were compared between patients with features of normal- and high BMI at the time of radical prostatectomy. Knowledge-based analyses revealed an association of high BMI with altered levels of lipid metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis genes, such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) and insulin-induced gene 1 (INSIG1), respectively, in prostate tumor cells. These genes were connected to known pathways of tumorigenesis revealed by the v-maf (musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma) oncogene homolog (MAF), notch receptor ligand, jagged 1 (JAG1), and the alanyl aminopeptidase (ANPEP/CD13) genes. This study highlighted that SCD1, a known target of statins, may play a mechanistic role in the recently noted beneficial effects of statin treatment in reducing biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. An additional finding of our study is that some of the obesity related genes were upregulated in tumor-matched normal cells within the high BMI group, when compared to normal cells within the normal BMI cohort. PMID:21060327

  1. Doppler ultrasound measurement of resistance index in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Cen, Son; Kang, Xin-Li; Wang, Wei Fu; Wang, Yang; Chen, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the second leading cause of cancer diagnosis worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of PCa is critical since the long-term prognosis is excellent in patients with tumors confined to the prostate gland. The current meta-analysis investigates the diagnostic value of resistive index (RI) measurement using color Doppler ultrasound in patients with PCa. Electronic literature databases were exhaustively searched for relevant studies published prior to May 31, 2014. Nine studies met our predetermined inclusion criteria for the present meta-analysis. The methodologic quality of the selected studies was independently assessed by 2 reviewers based on Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Our meta-analysis results showed that RI values were significantly higher in malignant prostate tissues compared to normal prostate tissues (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12~0.73, p = 0.007) and benign prostate tissues (SMD 0.41, 95% CI 0.26~0.56, p<0.001). Subgroup analysis based on the diagnostic instruments used revealed that RI values were accurate in diagnosis of PCa when compared between malignant tissue vs normal tissue and malignant tissue vs benign tissue (all p<0.05). Taken together, our findings support the potential clinical applications of RI values in diagnosis of PCa.

  2. Development and application of a short- /long-term composited drought index in the upper Huaihe River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Li, Q.; Lu, G.; Wang, H.; Li, P.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate and reliable drought monitoring is of primary importance for drought mitigation and reduction of social-ecological vulnerability. The aim of the paper was to propose a short-term/long-term composited drought index (CDI) which could be widely used for drought monitoring and early warning in China. In the study, the upper Huaihe River basin above the Xixian gauge station, which has been hit by severe droughts frequently in recent decades, was selected as the case study site. The short-term CDI was developed by the Principle Component Analysis of the self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (sc-PDSI), the 1- and 3-month Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), Z Index (ZIND), the Soil Moisture Index (SMI) with the long-term CDI being formulated by use of the self-calibrating Palmer Hydrology Drought Index (sc-PHDI), the 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month SPEI, the Standardized Streamflow Index (SSI), the SMI. The sc-PDSI, the PHDI, the ZIND, the SPEI on a monthly time scale were calculated based on the monthly air temperature and precipitation, and the monthly SMI and SSI were computed based on the simulated soil moisture and runoff by the distributed Xinanjiang model. The thresholds of the short-term/long-term CDI were determined according to frequency statistics of different drought indices. Finally, the feasibility of the two CDIs was investigated against the scPDSI, the SPEI and the historical drought records. The results revealed that the short-term/long-term CDI could capture the onset, severity, persistence of drought events very well with the former being better at identifying the dynamic evolution of drought condition while the latter better at judging the changing trend of drought over a long time period.

  3. Role of body mass index in colon cancer patients in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih-Chien Chin; Yi-Hung Kuo; Chien-Yuh Yeh; Jinn-Shiun Chen; Reiping Tang; Chung-Rong Changchien; Jeng-Yi Wang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the characteristics and overall outcome of colon cancer in Taiwan.METHODS:From January 1995 to July 2003,2138 patients with colon cancer were enrolled in this study.BMI categories (in kg/m2) were established according to the classification of the Department of Health of Taiwan.Postoperative morbidities and mortality,and survival analysis including overall survival (OS),diseasefree survival (DFS),and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were compared across the BMI categories.RESULTS:There were 164 (7.7%) underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2),1109 (51.9%) normal-weight (BMI =18.5-23.9 kg/m2),550 (25.7%) overweight (BMI =24.0-26.9 kg/m2),and 315 (14.7%) obese (BMI ≥27 kg/m2) patients.Being female,apparently anemic,hypoalbuminemic,and having body weight loss was more likely among underweight patients than among the other patients (P < 0.001).Underweight patients had higher mortality rate (P =0.007) and lower OS (P < 0.001) and DFS (P =0.002) than the other patients.OS and DFS did not differ significantly between normal-weight,overweight,and obese patients,while CSS did not differ significantly with the BMI category.CONCLUSION:In Taiwan,BMI does not significantly affect colon-CSS.Underweight patients had a higher rate of surgical mortality and a worse OS and DFS than the other patients.Obesity does not predict a worse survival.

  4. Weight, height, body mass index and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahdaninia Mariam

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many women in Iran have a relatively high body mass index. To investigate whether the condition contributes to excess breast cancer cases, a case-control study was conducted to assess the relationships between anthropometric variables and breast cancer risk in Tehran, Iran. Methods All incident cases of breast cancer in the Iranian Centre for Breast Cancer (ICBC were identified through the case records. Eligible cases were all postmenopausal women with histological confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer during 1996 to year 2000. Controls were randomly selected postmenopausal women attending the ICBC for clinical breast examination during the same period. The body mass index (BMI was calculated based on weights and heights as measured by the ICBC nursing staff. Both tests for trend and logistic regression analysis were performed to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals as measures of relative risk. Results In all, 116 breast cancer cases and 116 controls were studied. There were no significant differences between cases and control with regard to most independent variables studied. However, a significant difference was observed between cases and controls indicating that the mean BMI was higher in cases as compared to controls (P = 0.004. Performing logistic regression analysis while controlling for age, age at menopause, family history of breast cancer and parity, the results showed that women with a BMI in the obese range had a three fold increased risk of breast cancer [odds ratio (OR = 3.21, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.15–8.47]. Conclusion The results suggest that obesity in postmenopausal women could increase risk of breast cancer and it merits further investigation in populations such as Iran where it seems that many women are short in height, and have a relatively high body mass index.

  5. Associations of body mass index, smoking, and alcohol consumption with prostate cancer mortality in the Asia Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowke, Jay H; McLerran, Dale F; Gupta, Prakash C; He, Jiang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ramadas, Kunnambath; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Inoue, Manami; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Koh, Woon-Puay; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Ichiro; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yuan, Jian-Min; Tanaka, Hideo; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Chen, Chien-Jen; Sugawara, Yumi; Yoo, Keun-Young; Ahsan, Habibul; Pan, Wen-Harn; Pednekar, Mangesh; Gu, Dongfeng; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Sauvaget, Catherine; Sawada, Norie; Wang, Renwei; Kakizaki, Masako; Tomata, Yasutake; Ohishi, Waka; Butler, Lesley M; Oze, Isao; Kim, Dong-Hyun; You, San-Lin; Park, Sue K; Parvez, Faruque; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Chen, Yu; Lee, Jung Eun; Grant, Eric; Rolland, Betsy; Thornquist, Mark; Feng, Ziding; Zheng, Wei; Boffetta, Paolo; Sinha, Rashmi; Kang, Daehee; Potter, John D

    2015-09-01

    Many potentially modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer are also associated with prostate cancer screening, which may induce a bias in epidemiologic studies. We investigated the associations of body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), smoking, and alcohol consumption with risk of fatal prostate cancer in Asian countries where prostate cancer screening is not widely utilized. Analysis included 18 prospective cohort studies conducted during 1963-2006 across 6 countries in southern and eastern Asia that are part of the Asia Cohort Consortium. Body mass index, smoking, and alcohol intake were determined by questionnaire at baseline, and cause of death was ascertained through death certificates. Analysis included 522,736 men aged 54 years, on average, at baseline. During 4.8 million person-years of follow-up, there were 634 prostate cancer deaths (367 prostate cancer deaths across the 11 cohorts with alcohol data). In Cox proportional hazards analyses of all cohorts in the Asia Cohort Consortium, prostate cancer mortality was not significantly associated with obesity (body mass index >25: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85, 1.36), ever smoking (HR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.21), or heavy alcohol intake (HR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.74, 1.35). Differences in prostate cancer screening and detection probably contribute to differences in the association of obesity, smoking, or alcohol intake with prostate cancer risk and mortality between Asian and Western populations and thus require further investigation.

  6. Assessment of sarcopenia and changes in body composition after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and associations with clinical outcomes in oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Connie [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); Imaging 2, Level 1, Lambeth Wing, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Andrew; Gossage, James; Mason, Robert [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mitchell-Hay, Rosalind; Griffin, Nyree [Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hynes, Orla [Department of Dietetics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Maisey, Nick; Ross, Paul; Gaya, Andrew [Department of Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Department of Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    Sarcopenia and changes in body composition following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may affect clinical outcome. We assessed the associations between CT body composition changes following NAC and outcomes in oesophageal cancer. A total of 35 patients who received NAC followed by oesophagectomy, and underwent CT assessment pre- and post-NAC were included. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous fat to muscle ratio (FMR) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VA/SA) were derived from CT. Changes in FM, FFM, FMR, VA/SA and sarcopenia were correlated to chemotherapy dose reductions, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), circumferential resection margin (CRM), pathological chemotherapy response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Nine (26 %) patients were sarcopenic before NAC and this increased to 15 (43 %) after NAC. Average weight loss was 3.7 % ± 6.4 (SD) in comparison to FM index (-1.2 ± 4.2), FFM index (-4.6 ± 6.8), FMR (-1.2 ± 24.3) and VA/SA (-62.3 ± 12.7). Changes in FM index (p = 0.022), FMR (p = 0.028), VA/SA (p = 0.024) and weight (p = 0.007) were significant univariable factors for CRM status. There was no significant association between changes in body composition and survival. Loss of FM, differential loss of VA/SA and skeletal muscle were associated with risk of CRM positivity. (orig.)

  7. High body mass index and cancer risk-a Mendelian randomisation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Smith, George Davey;

    2016-01-01

    108,812 individuals from the general population, we found that observationally high BMI was associated with lower risk of lung and skin cancer overall and with higher risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, but not with other types of cancer. BMI increasing alleles were not associated with risk...... of follow-up (range 0-37), 8002 developed non-skin cancer, 3347 non-melanoma skin cancer, 1396 lung cancer, 637 other smoking related cancers, 1203 colon cancer, 159 kidney cancer, 1402 breast cancer, 1062 prostate cancer, and 2804 other cancers. Participants were genotyped for five genetic variants...... associated with BMI. Two Danish general population studies, the Copenhagen General Population and the Copenhagen City Heart Study. In observational analyses, overall risk of non-melanoma skin cancer was 35 % (95 % confidence interval 28-42 %) lower and risk of lung cancer 32 % (19-43 %) lower in individuals...

  8. Assessing the scientific research productivity of Puerto Rican cancer researchers: bibliometric analysis from the Science Citation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, William A; Suárez-Balseiro, Carlos; Suárez, Erick; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Santiago-Rodríguez, Eduardo J; Ortiz, Ana P

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of cancer scientific production in Puerto Rico is largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to characterize trends in cancer-related research publications by authors affiliated to Puerto Rican institutions in recent decades. Manuscripts were retrieved from the Science Citation Index (SCI) database from 1982 to 2009. Search criterions were that the author's affiliation field contained some institution located in Puerto Rico and that the manuscripts were related to cancer research (according to keywords from the National Cancer Institute' cancer definition). Indexes measured in our analysis included number and type of manuscript, scientific collaboration, author's affiliation, and journal visibility. All the analyses were conducted using ProCite for bibliographic information management and STATA and SEER Joinpoint for the statistical inquiry. From 1982-2009, cancer-related papers authored by scientists located in Puerto Rico came to 451. Over the last three decades the scientific production underwent significant growth (APC = 6.4%, p scientific production in Puerto Rico underwent constant growth during the last three decades. A complete understanding of citing, publishing, and collaboration patterns in Puerto Rico is critical to researchers, policy makers, and health-care professionals in order to make informed decisions about cancer research priorities.

  9. Gut microbiota composition associated with alterations in cardiorespiratory fitness and psychosocial outcomes among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jesseca A; Ptacek, Travis S; Carter, Stephen J; Liu, Nianjun; Kumar, Ranjit; Hyndman, LaKeshia; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Morrow, Casey D; Rogers, Laura Q

    2017-05-01

    In this proof-of-concept pilot study, our purpose was to determine correlations between gut microbiota composition and alterations in cardiorespiratory fitness and psychosocial outcomes among post-primary treatment breast cancer survivors (BCS). Composition of the gut microbiota in BCS (n = 12) was assessed at baseline (M0) and at the end of 3 months (M3) using Illumina MiSeq DNA Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Gut microbiota composition was analyzed using the QIIME bioinformatics software and represented through diversity metrics and taxa analyses. Cardiorespiratory fitness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep dysfunction were assessed at M0 and M3 via the submaximal treadmill test, Fatigue Symptom Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively. Increased fatigue interference in BCS was associated with increased mean within-sample Shannon diversity (organism richness and evenness) (p = 0.009). Weighted UniFrac analysis (shifts in taxa relative abundance) revealed significant differences in between-sample (beta) diversity for changes in fatigue interference (p = 0.01) and anxiety (p = 0.022), with a trend observed for fatigue intensity and sleep dysfunction (p diversity differences for cardiorespiratory fitness (p = 0.026). Prior to false discovery correction (FDR), changes in fitness, fatigue, anxiety, and sleep dysfunction were associated with the frequency of certain gut bacteria genera (e.g., Faecalibacterium, Prevotella, Bacteroides) (p < 0.05). Correlations may exist between alterations in gut microbiota composition and longitudinal changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, fatigue, and anxiety in BCS. Further research examining the role of the microbiota-gut-brain axis in exercise-induced effects on psychosocial outcomes in BCS is warranted.

  10. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. METHODS: We searched the PubMed database for

  11. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. METHODS: We searched the PubMed database for prospecti

  12. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk : a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.M.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. Methods We searched the PubMed database for prospective

  13. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    .... We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic...

  14. Global burden of cancer attributable to high body-mass index in 2012: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Graham; Renehan, Prof Andrew G; Stevens, Gretchen A; Ezzati, Prof Majid; Ferlay, Jacques; Miranda, J. Jaime; Romieu, Isabelle; Dikshit, Rajesh; Forman, David; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Excess body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of cancer. To inform public health policyand future research, we estimated the global burden of cancer attributable to excess BMI. Methods Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were derived using relative risks and BMI estimates in adults by age, sex and country. Assuming a10-year lag-period, PAFs were calculated using BMI estimates in 2002. GLOBOCAN2012 was used to compute numbers of new cancer cases attributable to excess BMI. In an alternative scenario, we computed the proportion of potentially avoidable cancers assuming that populations maintained their BMI-level observed in 1982. Secondary analyses were performed to test the model and estimate the impactof hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and smoking. Findings Worldwide, we estimated that 481,000 or 3·6% of all new cancer cases in 2012 were attributable to excess BMI. PAFs were greater in women compared with men (5·4% versus 1·9%). The burden was concentrated in countries with very high and high human development index (HDI, PAF: 5·3% and 4·8%) compared with countries with moderate and low HDI (PAF: 1·6% and 1·0%). Corpus uteri, post-menopausal breast and colon cancers accounted for approximately two-thirds (64%) of excess BMI attributable cancers. One fourth (~118,000) of all cases related to excess BMI in 2012 could be attributed to the rising BMI since 1982. Interpretation These findings further underpin the need for a global effort to abate the rising trends in population-level excess weight. Assuming that the relationship between excess BMI and cancer is causal and the current pattern of population weight gain continues, this will likely augment the future burden of cancer. Funding World Cancer Research Fund, Marie Currie Fellowship, the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia and US NIH. PMID:25467404

  15. Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index, and carbohydrate and risk of breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M; Redden, David T; Neuhouser, Marian L; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Rohan, Thomas E; Simon, Michael S; Liu, Simin; Lane, Dorothy S; Tinker, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Dietary glycemic load (GL), glycemic index (GI), and carbohydrate could be associated with breast cancer risk by influencing long-term blood glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined associations between GL, GI, and carbohydrate and incident breast cancer in 148,767 Women's Heath Initiative (WHI) participants. Dietary variables were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline. Self-reported breast cancers during follow-up were confirmed by medical records review. Cox proportional hazards regression modeled time to breast cancer within quintiles of GL, GI, and carbohydrate. There were 6,115 total breast cancers after a median follow-up of 8.0 yr. We observed no associations between GL, GI, or carbohydrate and total incident breast cancer, with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the highest vs. lowest quintiles of 1.08, 0.92-1.29 (P for trend = 0.27); 1.01, 0.91-1.12 (P = 0.74); and 0.95, 0.80-1.14 (P = 0.98), respectively. There was a trend toward significance for the positive association between GL and in situ cancers (1.40, 0.94-2.13; P = 0.07). Although there was no evidence of associations between GL, GI, or carbohydrate and total breast cancer risk in WHI participants, the suggestion of an association between GL and risk of in situ cancers requires further investigation.

  16. Engineering high refractive index sensitivity through the internal and external composition of bimetallic nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alison F; Harvey, Samantha M; Skrabalak, Sara E; Weiner, Rebecca G

    2016-10-14

    High refractive index sensitivity (RIS) of branched Au-Pd nanocrystals (NCs) is engineered through lowering the dielectric dispersion at the NC resonant wavelength with internal or external atomic % Pd. To our knowledge, these NCs display the highest ensemble RIS measurement for colloids with LSPR maximum band positions ≤900 nm, and these results are corroborated with FDTD computations.

  17. Developing a composite index of spatial accessibility across different health care sectors: A German example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Martin; Koller, Daniela; Vogt, Verena; Sundmacher, Leonie

    2016-02-01

    The evolving lack of ambulatory care providers especially in rural areas increasingly challenges the strict separation between ambulatory and inpatient care in Germany. Some consider allowing hospitals to treat ambulatory patients to tackle potential shortages of ambulatory care in underserved areas. In this paper, we develop an integrated index of spatial accessibility covering multiple dimensions of health care. This index may contribute to the empirical evidence concerning potential risks and benefits of integrating the currently separated health care sectors. Accessibility is measured separately for each type of care based on official data at the district level. Applying an Improved Gravity Model allows us to factor in potential cross-border utilization. We combine the accessibilities for each type of care into a univariate index by adapting the concept of regional multiple deprivation measurement to allow for a limited substitutability between health care sectors. The results suggest that better health care accessibility in urban areas persists when taking a holistic view. We believe that this new index may provide an empirical basis for an inter-sectoral capacity planning.

  18. NIVAH: A Composite Index Measuring Violence and Harm in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh-Smith, James; Gross, Heidi; Wollman, Neil; Yoder, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    The "National Index of Violence and Harm" (NIVAH) tracks levels of violence and harm in the United States and identifies trends over the study period 1995-2003. NIVAH is comprised of nineteen variables in the areas of interpersonal, intrapersonal, institutional and structural violence and harm as experienced by people in the U.S. Two…

  19. Impact of Body Mass Index on Complications and Survival after Surgery for Esophageal and Gastro-Esophageal-Junction Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhlikava, Iryna; Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2017-01-01

    and gastro-esophageal-junction cancer in a Danish population. Material and Methods: We identified 285 consecutive patients, who underwent curative-intended treatment for esophageal and gastro-esophageal-junction cancer in the period 2003–2010. We manually reviewed the electronic medical records of all......: 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (body mass index: 25–29.9 kg/m2), and obese (body mass index ⩽ 30 kg/m2). Results: Median age at surgery was 65 years (range: 27–84 years), of which 207 (72.6%) were males. Patients with the lowest body mass index and the obese patients seemed to have a higher frequency...... with esophageal and gastro-esophageal-junction cancers not receiving neoadjuvant oncological treatment....

  20. Dietary inflammatory index and odds of colorectal cancer in a case-control study from Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R; Steck, Susan E; Hofseth, Lorne J; Shehadah, Ihab; Bani-Hani, Kamal E; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed; Heath, Dennis; Tayyem, Reema

    2017-07-01

    Dietary components that promote inflammation of the colon have been suggested to be risk factors in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). The possible link between inflammatory potential of diet and CRC has been investigated in several developed or Western countries. Despite the fact that dietary choices in the Middle East differ markedly from those in the West, results have not been reported from any study conducted in a Middle-Eastern population. We examined the association between dietary inflammatory index (DII) scores and CRC in a case-control study conducted in Jordan. This study included 153 histopathologically confirmed CRC cases and 202 disease-free control subjects' frequency matched on age, sex, and occupation. Data were collected between January 2010 and December 2012, using interviewer-administered questionnaires. DII scores were computed from dietary data reported using a food frequency questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, sex, education, physical activity, body mass index, smoking, and family history of CRC. Subjects with higher DII scores were at increased odds of CRC, with the DII being used both as a continuous variable (ORcontinuous = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.13-1.85; 1-unit increase corresponding to ≈20% of its range in the current study) and as a categorical variable (ORtertile 3 vs tertile 1 = 2.13, 95%CI: 1.23-3.72). Our results, based on a Jordanian population, add to the growing literature indicating that a pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased odds of CRC.

  1. Spatio-temporal variations in biochemical composition, condition index and percentage edibility of the clam, Paphia malabarica (Chemnitz) from estuarine regions of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagvenkar, S.S.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Biochemical compositions, condition index (CI) and percentage edibility (PE) of an estuarine clam, Paphia malabarica, were studied from two estuarine regions of Goa during March 2009 to March 2010. Relationships between nutritive components...

  2. Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) predicts risk of distant metastases in primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew R; Soria, D; Powe, D G; Nolan, C C; Aleskandarany, M; Szász, M A; Tőkés, A M; Ball, G R; Garibaldi, J M; Rakha, E A; Kulka, J; Ellis, I O

    2016-05-01

    The Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) is based on the assessment of biological class combined with established clinicopathologic prognostic variables providing improved patient outcome stratification for breast cancer superior to the traditional NPI. This study aimed to determine prognostic capability of the NPI+ in predicting risk of development of distant disease. A well-characterised series of 1073 primary early-stage BC cases treated in Nottingham and 251 cases from Budapest were immunohistochemically assessed for cytokeratin (Ck)5/6, Ck18, EGFR, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, HER2, HER3, HER4, Mucin 1 and p53 expression. NPI+ biological class and prognostic scores were assigned using individual algorithms for each biological class incorporating clinicopathologic parameters and investigated in terms of prediction of distant metastases-free survival (MFS). The NPI+ identified distinct prognostic groups (PG) within each molecular class which were predictive of MFS providing improved patient outcome stratification superior to the traditional NPI. NPI+ PGs, between series, were comparable in predicting patient outcome between series in luminal A, basal p53 altered and HER2+/ER+ (p > 0.01) tumours. The low-risk groups were similarly validated in luminal B, luminal N, basal p53 normal tumours (p > 0.01). Due to small patient numbers the remaining PGs could not be validated. NPI+ was additionally able to predict a higher risk of metastases at certain distant sites. This study may indicate the NPI+ as a useful tool in predicting the risk of metastases. The NPI+ provides accurate risk stratification allowing improved individualised clinical decision making for breast cancer.

  3. Prognostic significance of Ki67 proliferation index, HIF1 alpha index and microvascular density in patients with non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berghoff, A.S. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Ilhan-Mutlu, A.; Preusser, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Woehrer, A.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Hackl, M. [Austrian National Cancer Registry, Statistics Austria, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, K. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Melchardt, T. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital Salzburg, Third Medical Department, Salzburg (Austria); Dome, B. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Heinzl, H. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Vienna (Austria); Birner, P. [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center CNS Tumors Unit, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Survival upon diagnosis of brain metastases (BM) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is highly variable and established prognostic scores do not include tissue-based parameters. Patients who underwent neurosurgical resection as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed NSCLC BM were included. Microvascular density (MVD), Ki67 tumor cell proliferation index and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) index were determined by immunohistochemistry. NSCLC BM specimens from 230 patients (151 male, 79 female; median age 56 years; 199 nonsquamous histology) and 53/230 (23.0 %) matched primary tumor samples were available. Adjuvant whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) was given to 153/230 (66.5 %) patients after neurosurgical resection. MVD and HIF-1 alpha indices were significantly higher in BM than in matched primary tumors. In patients treated with adjuvant WBRT, low BM HIF-1 alpha expression was associated with favorable overall survival (OS), while among patients not treated with adjuvant WBRT, BM HIF-1 alpha expression did not correlate with OS. Low diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment score (DS-GPA), low Ki67 index, high MVD, low HIF-1 alpha index and administration of adjuvant WBRT were independently associated with favorable OS. Incorporation of tissue-based parameters into the commonly used DS-GPA allowed refined discrimination of prognostic subgroups. Ki67 index, MVD and HIF-1 alpha index have promising prognostic value in BM and should be validated in further studies. (orig.) [German] Die Ueberlebensprognose von Patienten mit zerebralen Metastasen eines nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) ist sehr variabel. Bisher werden gewebsbasierte Parameter nicht in die prognostische Beurteilung inkludiert. Neurochirurgische Resektate zerebraler NSCLC-Metastasen wurden in dieser Studie untersucht. Die Gefaessdichte (''microvascular density'', MVD), der Ki67-Proliferationsindex sowie der HIF-1α-Index wurden mittels

  4. Impact of indexing resting metabolic rate against fat-free mass determined by different body composition models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForgia, J; van der Ploeg, G E; Withers, R T; Gunn, S M; Brooks, A G; Chatterton, B E

    2004-08-01

    To examine the differences arising from indexing resting metabolic rate (RMR) against fat-free mass (FFM) determined using two-, three- and four-compartment body composition models. All RMR and body composition measurements were conducted on the same day for each subject following compliance with premeasurement protocols. Data were generated from measurements on 104 males (age 32.1+/-12.1 y (mean+/-s.d.); body mass 81.15+/-12.85 kg; height 179.5+/-6.5 cm; body fat 20.6+/-7.6%). Body density (BD), total body water (TBW) and bone mineral mass (BMM) were measured by hydrodensitometry, deuterium dilution and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), respectively. These measures were used to determine two (hydrodensitometry: BD; hydrometry: TBW)-, three (BD and TBW)- and four- compartment (BD, TBW and BMM) FFM values. DXA also provided three compartment derived FFM values. RMR was measured using open circuit indirect calorimetry. Three (body fat group: lean, moderate, high) x five (body composition determination: hydrodensitometry, hydrometry, three-compartment, DXA, four-compartment) ANOVAs were conducted on FFM and RMR kJ.kg FFM(-1).d(-1). Within-group comparisons revealed that hydrodensitometry and DXA were associated with significant (P or =0.68) different from criterion values intraindividual differences were large (FFM: -1.5 to 2.9 kg; RMR: -6.0 to 3.2 kJ.kg FFM(-1).d(-1)). The relationship between RMR kJ.kg FFM(-1).d(-1) and exercise status would best be investigated using three (BD, TBW)- or four (BD, TBW, BMM)-compartment body composition models to determine FFM. Other models either significantly underestimate indexed RMR (hydrodensitometry, DXA) or display large intraindividual differences (hydrometry) compared with four-compartment derived criterion values. Australian Research Council (small grants scheme).

  5. Is infant body mass index associated with adulthood body composition trajectories? An exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W; Choh, A C; Lee, M; Towne, B; Czerwinski, S A; Demerath, E W

    2017-02-01

    Infant body mass index (BMI) is increasingly used as a marker of obesity risk based on its association with young-adulthood BMI. The aim of this study is to test the association of infant BMI with young-adulthood fat mass and fat-free mass, and how this association changes during advancing adulthood. Body mass index Z-score at age 9 months was measured in 350 White, non-Hispanic Fels Longitudinal Study participants. This exposure was entered into multilevel models to test its association with trajectories describing 2665 BMI observations and 1388 observations of fat mass index (FMI, kg m(-2) ) and fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg m(-2) ) between ages 20 and 60 years. Partitioning young-adulthood BMI into its fat and fat-free components, infant BMI Z-score was associated with FFMI (β = 0.745; 95% confidence interval = 0.367 to 1.124) but not FMI (0.528; -0.055 to 1.110) at age 20 years. Greater infant BMI Z-score was associated with slower age-related increases in all outcomes, such that (looking at 10-year intervals) only FFMI at age 30 years was related to infant BMI Z-score (0.338; 0.119, 0.557). Focus on infant BMI reduction for adulthood obesity prevention warrants caution as high infant BMI values are associated with greater lean mass, which is protective against ageing changes. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  6. Formal selection of measures for a composite index of NICU quality of care: Baby-MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, J; Gould, JB; Zupancic, JAF; Stark, AR; Wall, KM; Kowalkowski, MA; Mei, M; Pietz, K; Thomas, EJ; Petersen, LA

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically rate measures of care quality for very low birth weight infants for inclusion into Baby-MONITOR, a composite indicator of quality. Study Design Modified Delphi expert panelist process including electronic surveys and telephone conferences. Panelists considered 28 standard neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) quality measures and rated each on a 9-point scale taking into account pre-defined measure characteristics. In addition, panelists grouped measures into six domains of quality. We selected measures by testing for rater agreement using an accepted method. Result Of 28 measures considered, 13 had median ratings in the high range (7 to 9). Of these, 9 met the criteria for inclusion in the composite: antenatal steroids (median (interquartile range)) 9(0), timely retinopathy of prematurity exam 9(0), late onset sepsis 9(1), hypothermia on admission 8(1), pneumothorax 8(2), growth velocity 8(2), oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age 7(2), any human milk feeding at discharge 7(2) and in-hospital mortality 7(2). Among the measures selected for the composite, the domains of quality most frequently represented included effectiveness (40%) and safety (30%). Conclusion A panel of experts selected 9 of 28 routinely reported quality measures for inclusion in a composite indicator. Panelists also set an agenda for future research to close knowledge gaps for quality measures not selected for the Baby-MONITOR. PMID:21350429

  7. VALIDITY OF SINGLE VARIABLES AND COMPOSITE INDEXES FOR MEASURING DISEASE-ACTIVITY IN RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHEIJDE, DMFM; VANTHOF, MA; VANRIEL, PLCM; VANLEEUWEN, MA; VANRIJSWIJK, MH; VANDEPUTTE, LBA

    1992-01-01

    There is no agreement as to which variable best mirrors disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and no studies have been performed on the validity of disease activity variables. In this study the validity of 10 commonly used single variables and three composite indices was tested. All patients

  8. Cisplatin for small cell lung cancer: Associated publications in Science Citation Index Expanded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan; Nakazawa, Kensuke; Sato, Shinya; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kurishima, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    This study was conducted to explore a bibliometric approach to quantitatively assess current research trends in cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), using related literature in the Science Citation Index Expanded database from 1992 to 2011. Articles were analyzed by the scientific output and research performances of countries and institutions. The distribution of key words in the article title and author-selected keywords were used to evaluate research trends. It was observed that the number of articles devoted to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC did not increase with time. The USA and Japan were the top two countries with the highest number of articles devoted to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC. In both countries, the number of articles did not increase with time, and a decreasing trend was identified in the USA over the last 10 years. This study demonstrates trends in cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC. The clinical application of novel drugs is required for successful SCLC treatment.

  9. Quantifying the Role of Circulating Unconjugated Estradiol in Mediating the Body Mass Index-Breast Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Catherine; Fuhrman, Barbara J; Boyd-Morin, Jennifer; Genkinger, Jeanine M; Gail, Mitchell H; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) and circulating estrogen levels each increase postmenopausal breast cancer risk, particularly estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) tumors. Higher BMI also increases estrogen production. We estimated the proportion of the BMI-ER(+) breast cancer association mediated through estrogen in a case-control study nested within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Participants included 143 women with invasive ER(+) breast cancer and 268 matched controls, all postmenopausal and never having used hormone therapy at baseline. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure 15 estrogens and estrogen metabolites in baseline serum. We calculated BMI from self-reported height and weight at baseline. We estimated the mediating effect of unconjugated estradiol on the BMI-ER(+) breast cancer association using Aalen additive hazards and Cox regression models. All estrogens and estrogen metabolites were statistically significantly correlated with BMI, with unconjugated estradiol most strongly correlated [Pearson correlation (r) = 0.45]. Approximately 7% to 10% of the effect of overweight, 12% to 15% of the effect of obesity, and 19% to 20% of the effect of a 5 kg/m(2) BMI increase on ER(+) breast cancer risk was mediated through unconjugated estradiol. The BMI-breast cancer association, once adjusted for unconjugated estradiol, was not modified by further adjustment for two metabolic ratios statistically significantly associated with both breast cancer and BMI. Circulating unconjugated estradiol levels partially mediate the BMI-breast cancer association, but other potentially important estrogen mediators (e.g., bioavailable estradiol) were not evaluated. Further research is required to identify mechanisms underlying the BMI-breast cancer association. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Childhood Height and Body Mass Index Were Associated with Risk of Adult Thyroid Cancer in a Large Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitahara, Cari M; Gamborg, Michael; Berrington de González, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Taller stature and obesity in adulthood have been consistently associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, but few studies have investigated the role of childhood body size. Using data from a large prospective cohort, we examined associations for height and body mass index (BMI) at ages 7...... to 13 years with risk of thyroid cancer in later life. The study population included 321,085 children from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, born between 1930 and 1989 in Copenhagen, Denmark, with measurements of height and weight from 7 to 13 years of age. These data were linked...... with the Danish Cancer Registry to identify incident thyroid cancer cases (1968-2010). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for age- and sex-specific height and BMI SD scores (SDS) using proportional hazards models stratified by birth cohort and sex. During follow-up (median = 38...

  11. A Modified Nottingham Prognostic Index for Breast Cancer Patients Diagnosed in Denmark 1978-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Mouridsen, Henning T.; Væth, Michael;

    2001-01-01

    Stage of disease is a predictor of breast cancer survival. We used data from the Danish Cancer Register amd the Daniish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group to study stage distribution in 0-69-years-old Danish breast cancer patients diagnosed in 1978-1994. We constructed a modified Nottingham Prognostic...

  12. Annual Equivalent Value, Benefit Cost Ratio, and Composite Performance Index as Valuation Appraisal Support of Teakwood Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiharto Soeleman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Teak (Tectona grandis L.f is a premium high-value hardwood species being viewed as the most preferred species for investment opportunity. Recently, there has been a gradual move away from state control of teakwood plantation toward the participation of private enterprises. Several enterprises offer investment opportunity of teakwood plantation in which one of the main selling points being offered is a quick harvesting schedule. A quick harvesting time, however, might not provide the best outcome to the investors. This research exercise and compare the valuation appraisal of different harvesting schedules. The research focused on project planning, enterprise budget, financial projection, and valuation measurements to arrive at overall appraisal. To avoid any possible bias of individual investor's preference on common valuation criteria such as total investment, net cash flow (NCF, net present value (NPV, internal rate of return (IRR, profit on investment (P/I, and payback period (PBP, 3 otherS criteria namely benefit cost ratio (BCR, annual equivalent value (AEV, and composite performance index (CPI have been applied to arrive at a more fair valuation. It is concluded that the longer the harvesting schedule, the better valuation outcome could be achieved, and therefore, investors should critically review any investment proposal in accordance to their preference on valuation criteria. Keywords : annual equivalent value, benefit cost ratio, composite performance index, valuation appraisal

  13. Optically transparent bionanofiber composites with low sensitivity to refractive index of the polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Masaya; Handa, Keishin; Nakagaito, Antonio Norio; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2005-12-01

    Transparent polymers were reinforced by bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers, which are 10×50nm ribbon-shaped fibers. They exhibited high luminous transmittance at a fiber content as high as 60 wt %, and low sensitivity to a variety of refractive indices of matrix resins. Due to the nanofiber size effect, high transparency was obtained against a wider distribution of refractive index of resins from 1.492 to 1.636 at 20 °C. The optical transparency was also surprisingly insensitive to temperature increases up to 80 °C. As such, BC nanofibers appear to be viable candidates for optically transparent reinforcement.

  14. Body mass index and body composition scaling to height in children and adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Sochung

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity prevalence has been increased and known to be related to various diseases and mortality in adult and body mass index (BMI) has been widely used as a screening tool in children with obesity. It is important to understand what BMI is and its limitations. BMI is a measure of weight adjusted for height. Weight scales to height with a power of about 2, is the basis of BMI (weight/height2) as the scaling of body weight to height across adults provides powers rounded to 2. BMI has ...

  15. [Value of cardiopulmonary risk index in predicting postoperative short-term prognosis in patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yueqing; Gao, Chengxin; Bai, Hao; Liao, Meilin

    2002-06-20

    To determine the value of preoperative cardiopulmonary risk index (CPRI) in predicting the short-term prognosis after lung resection in patients with lung cancer. Preoperative clinical data were used to generate a cardiac risk index (CRI) and a pulmonary risk index (PRI). And the value of cardiopulmonary risk index (CPRI) consisting of CRI and PRI in predicting postoperative prognosis was estimated in patients who underwent lung resection at Shanghai Chest Hospital in 1999. A total of 625 consecutive patients were studied. Postoperative complications occurred in 49 patients (7.8%), including 8 deaths within 30 days of operation. In the total group, CRI, PRI and CPRI scores ranged from 1 to 3, 0 to 5 and 1 to 7, respectively. There were 489 patients with CPRI CPRI≥4. Using CPRI≥4 as a threshold for predicting postoperative complications, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate were 75.5%, 82.8% and 82.2% respectively. The preoperative CPRI is one of the important indexes in predicting the short-term postoperative prognosis for patients with lung cancer. However, it can not completely predict all of postoperative risks, and should be used together with other factors.

  16. Drought Assessment by a Short-/Long-Term Composited Drought Index in the Upper Huaihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixiu Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and reliable drought monitoring is of primary importance for drought mitigation and reduction of social-ecological vulnerability. The aim of the paper was to propose a multiscale composited drought index (CDI which could be widely used for drought monitoring and early warning in China. In the study, the upper Huaihe River basin above the Xixian gauge station, which has been hit by severe droughts frequently in recent decades, was selected as the case study site. The newly built short-term/long-term CDI comprehensively considered three natural forms of drought (meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural by selection of different variables that are related to each drought type. The short-term/long-term CDI was developed using the Principle Component Analysis of related drought components. The thresholds of the short-term/long-term CDI were determined according to frequency statistics of different drought indices. Finally, the feasibility of the two CDI was investigated against the self-calibrating Palmer drought severity index, the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index, and the historical drought records. The results revealed that the short-term/long-term CDI could capture the onset, severity, and persistence of drought events very well with the former being better at identifying the dynamic evolution of drought condition and the latter better at judging the changing trend of drought over a long time period.

  17. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index comparing light curing and self-curing composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Gaby Neves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, in vitro, the shear bond strength of self-curing (ConciseTM - 3M and Alpha Plast - DFL and light-curing composites (TransbondTM XT - 3M and Natural Ortho - DFL used in orthodontics bonding, associated to Morelli metal brackets, with further analysis of adhesive remnant index (ARI and enamel condition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM. METHODS: Forty human premolars, just extracted and stored in physiologic solution 0.9 % were used. Randomly, these samples were divided in four groups: G1 group, the brackets were bonded with ConciseTM - 3M composite; in G2 group, Alpha Plast - DFL composite was used; in G3 group, TransbondTM XT - 3M was used; in G4 group, Natural Ortho - DFL composite was used. These groups were submitted to shear strength tests in universal testing machine, at 0.5 mm per minute speed. RESULTS: Statistical difference between G3 and G4 groups was recorded, as G4 showing higher strength resistance than G3. In the other hand, there were no statistical differences between G1, G2 and G3 and G1, G2 and G4 groups. ARI analysis showed that there was no statistical difference between the groups, and low scores were recorded among then. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed the debonding spots and the enamel surface integrity. CONCLUSIONS: Shear bond strength was satisfactory and similar between the composites, however Natural Ortho - DFL revealed best comparing to TransbondTM XT - 3M.

  18. Beyond the body mass index: tracking body composition in the pathogenesis of obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M J; Lagerpusch, M; Enderle, J; Schautz, B; Heller, M; Bosy-Westphal, A

    2012-12-01

    Body composition is related to various physiological and pathological states. Characterization of individual body components adds to understand metabolic, endocrine and genetic data on obesity and obesity-related metabolic risks, e.g. insulin resistance. The obese phenotype is multifaceted and can be characterized by measures of body fat, leg fat, liver fat and skeletal muscle mass rather than by body mass index. The contribution of either whole body fat or fat distribution or individual fat depots to insulin resistance is moderate, but liver fat has a closer association with (hepatic) insulin resistance. Although liver fat is associated with visceral fat, its effect on insulin resistance is independent of visceral adipose tissue. In contrast to abdominal fat, appendicular or leg fat is inversely related to insulin resistance. The association between 'high fat mass + low muscle mass' (i.e. 'sarcopenic adiposity') and insulin resistance deserves further investigation and also attention in daily clinical practice. In addition to cross-sectional data, longitudinal assessment of body composition during controlled under- and overfeeding of normal-weight healthy young men shows that small decreases and increases in fat mass are associated with corresponding decreases and increases in insulin secretion as well as increases and decreases in insulin sensitivity. However, even under controlled conditions, there is a high intra- and inter-individual variance in the changes of (i) body composition; (ii) the 'body composition-glucose metabolism relationship' and (iii) glucose metabolism itself. Combining individual body components with their related functional aspects (e.g. the endocrine, metabolic and inflammatory profiles) will provide a suitable basis for future definitions of a 'metabolically healthy body composition'. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  19. Impact of consumption of vegetable, fruit, grain, and high glycemic index foods on aggressive prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Jill; Cheng, Iona; Witte, John S

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common but complex disease, and distinguishing modifiable risk factors such as diet for more aggressive disease is extremely important. Previous work has detected intriguing associations between vegetable, fruit, and grains and more aggressive prostate cancer, although these remain somewhat unclear. Here we further investigate such potential relationships with a case-control study of 982 men (470 more aggressive prostate cancer cases and 512 control subjects). Comparing the highest to lowest quartiles of intake, we found that increasing intakes of leafy vegetables were inversely associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.96; P trend = 0.02], as was higher consumption of high carotenoid vegetables (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.04; P trend = 0.04). Conversely, increased consumption of high glycemic index foods were positively associated with risk of aggressive disease (OR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.57; P trend = 0.02). These results were driven by a number of specific foods within the food groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that diets high in vegetables and low in high glycemic index foods decrease risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

  20. Body mass index and waist circumference in relation to lung cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kim, Mimi; Hunt, Julie R; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Rohan, Thomas E

    2008-07-15

    Investigators in several epidemiologic studies have observed an inverse association between body mass index (BMI) and lung cancer risk, while others have not. The authors used data from the Women's Health Initiative to study the association of anthropometric factors with lung cancer risk. Over 8 years of follow-up (1998-2006), 1,365 incident lung cancer cases were ascertained among 161,809 women. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios adjusted for covariates. Baseline BMI was inversely associated with lung cancer in current smokers (highest quintile vs. lowest: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42, 0.92). When BMI and waist circumference were mutually adjusted, BMI was inversely associated with lung cancer risk in both current smokers and former smokers (HR = 0.40 (95% CI: 0.22, 0.72) and HR = 0.61 (95% CI: 0.40, 0.94), respectively), and waist circumference was positively associated with risk (HR = 1.56 (95% CI: 0.91, 2.69) and HR = 1.50 (95% CI: 0.98, 2.31), respectively). In never smokers, height showed a borderline positive association with lung cancer. These findings suggest that in smokers, BMI is inversely associated with lung cancer risk and that waist circumference is positively associated with risk.

  1. Body Composition in Relation to Clinical Outcomes in Renal Cell Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Alina; Kampman, Ellen; Knijnenburg, Nathalja C.; Mulders, Peter F.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Baracos, Vickie E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Several studies suggest that body composition (ie, body proportions of muscle and fat defined by computed tomography) is associated with clinical outcomes of several cancer types, including renal cell cancer (RCC). Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence

  2. Relationship between body mass index and the risk of early gastric cancer and dysplasia regardless of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Hyun Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung Ho; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hee Man; Lee, Dong Ho

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is known to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cardia cancer but not with noncardia cancer. In terms of gastric dysplasia, few studies have evaluated its relationship with obesity. In addition, no study on the relationship between obesity and the risk of gastric cancer has analyzed the status of Helicobacter pylori infection. A case-control study was designed to investigate the relationship between obesity and the risk of gastric cancer and dysplasia adjusted for the status of H. pylori infection in Koreans. Nine hundred ninety-eight gastric cancer patients, 313 gastric dysplasia patients, and 1,288 subjects with normal endoscopic findings were included. As gender differences could be the largest confounding factor, the risk of gastric cancer and dysplasia with an increasing body mass index (BMI) was analyzed in men and women, separately, and was adjusted for age, smoking, drinking, family history of gastric cancer, H. pylori infection, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and serum pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio. Obesity (BMI 25 kg/m(2) or greater but less than 30 kg/m(2)) was associated with increased risk of early gastric cancer [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.657; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.086-2.528; P = 0.019] and well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (aOR 1.566; 95 % CI 1.011-2.424; P = 0.044) compared with normal BMI status (BMI Obesity was related to gastric dysplasia (aOR 2.086; 95 % CI 1.011-4.302; P = 0.047) in women. The effect of obesity on gastric cancer showed a gender difference. That is, in men it was related to increased risk of early gastric cancer and well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, but it was associated with gastric dysplasia in women regardless of H. pylori infection in Korea. Further research into this difference is necessary.

  3. [A meta-analysis of body mass index and the risk of lung cancer in the Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Lu, Jianbang; Sun, Xibin

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the association between obesity and the risk of lung cancer and evaluate a dose-response relationship between body mass index (BMI) and incidence risk of lung cancer in the Chinese population. A systematic literature search for BMI and incidence risk of lung cancer in the Chinese population, as well as through the reference lists of retrieved articles. The literature databases including Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar. Time range was from the founding of each database to September 2014 and a total of 93 research papers were collected. Meta-analysis was conducted to calculate pooled odds ratio and corresponding 95% CI. Generalized least-squares regression methods were used to make a dose-response meta-analysis between BMI and incidence risk of lung cancer. Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis, with a number of 2 351 lung cancer cases. Results showed that obesity was inversely associated with lung cancer incidence (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.59-0.79) (heterogeneity test: I² = 0, P = 0.594). The association did not change with stratification by study design, sex, smoking status, BMI measurement method and study population. A linear dose-response association between BMI and risk of lung cancer was visually significant, and lung cancer risk would be reduced 21% for per 5 kg/m² BMI increase (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.71-0.89) (heterogeneity test: q = 22.43, P = 0.002). The results of this meta-analysis indicated that higher BMI was a protective factor against lung cancer, but smoking may play a stronger role as a confounding factor for the most important role with lung cancer incidence.

  4. Impact of body mass index on breast cancer in accordance with the life-stage of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko eSuzuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of epidemiological evidence suggests that the impact of body weight on breast cancer risk should be heterogeneous throughout the life stage of women. At birth, high weight has been positively associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.While, the body mass index (a relative body weight; BMI kg/m2 has been inversely associated with breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. The inverse trend had been observed in both Western and Asian population, with a relatively lower percentage of obesity and higher percentage of leanness, suggested that the inverse trend could be explained not only due to the protective impact due to obesity, but also the increased risk of breast cancer due to leanness.Among postmenopausal women, however, an elevated BMI has been positively associated with the development of breast cancer, particularly in the cases of estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and progesterone receptor positive (PR+ tumors. Currently, the mechanisms underlying the heterogeneous impacts between BMI on breast cancer risk and the life stage of women remain poorly understood. We reviewed several proposed biological mechanisms that may contribute to the various impacts of relative body weight on breast cancer risk across life-stage. We also discussed the impact of BMI upon the outcome of endocrine therapy, particularly for aromatase inhibitor, in breast cancer patients. To prevent breast cancer incidence and recurrence, the desirable BMI of women may differ throughout their life-stage. To define the underlying mechanism for the various impacts of BMI in the context of breast cancer across various female life stages, further studies will be required.

  5. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of colorectal cancer: results from the EPIC-Italy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieri, S; Krogh, V; Agnoli, C; Ricceri, F; Palli, D; Masala, G; Panico, S; Mattiello, A; Tumino, R; Giurdanella, M C; Brighenti, F; Scazzina, F; Vineis, P; Sacerdote, C

    2015-06-15

    A carbohydrate-rich diet, resulting in high blood glucose and insulin, has been hypothesized as involved in colorectal cancer etiology. We investigated dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), in relation to colorectal cancer, in the prospectively recruited EPIC-Italy cohort. After a median 11.7 years, 421 colorectal cancers were diagnosed among 47,749 recruited adults. GI and GL were estimated from validated food frequency questionnaires. Multivariable Cox modeling estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for associations between colorectal cancer and intakes of total, high GI and low GI carbohydrate and GI and GL. The adjusted HR of colorectal cancer for highest versus lowest GI quartile was 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.78; p trend 0.031. Increasing high GI carbohydrate intake was also significantly associated with increasing colorectal cancer risk (HR 1.45; 95% CI 1.04-2.03; p trend 0.034), whereas increasing low GI carbohydrate was associated with reducing risk (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98; p trend 0.033). High dietary GI and high GI carbohydrate were associated with increased risks of cancer at all colon sites (HR 1.37; 95% CI 1.00-1.88, HR 1.80; 95% CI 1.22-2.65, respectively), whereas high GI carbohydrate and high GL were associated with increased risk of proximal colon cancer (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.18-3.16, HR 2.01; 95% CI 1.08-3.74, respectively). After stratification for waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), cancer was significantly associated with GI, and high GI carbohydrate, in those with high WHR. These findings suggest that high dietary GI and high carbohydrate intake from high GI foods are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  6. The Effects of Compliance with Nutritional Counselling on Body Composition Parameters in Head and Neck Cancer Patients under Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopanci Bicakli, D; Ozkaya Akagunduz, O; Meseri Dalak, R; Esassolak, M; Uslu, R; Uyar, M

    2017-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) has been associated with increased risk of malnutrition in cancer patients, particularly in those with head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of compliance of patients with individual dietary counselling on body composition parameters in HNC patients under RT. Material and Methods. Sixty-nine consecutive patients (mean age: 61.0 ± 13.8) were prospectively followed. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was performed to determine body composition parameters before, in the middle of, and at the end of RT. All patients received nutritional counselling and majority of them (94.6%) received oral nutritional supplement (ONS) during RT or chemoradiotherapy. If a patient consumed ≥75% of the recommended energy and protein intake via ONS and regular food, he/she was considered to be "compliant" (n = 18), while those who failed to meet this criteria were considered to be "noncompliant" (n = 30). Results. Body mass index, weight, fat percentage, fat mass, fat free mass, and muscle mass did not decrease significantly over time in compliant patients, but in noncompliant patients, all of these indices decreased significantly from baseline compared to the end of treatment (p cancer patients considered as compliant with nutritional counselling than noncompliant ones during RT period.

  7. Molecular cycloencapsulation augments solubility and improves therapeutic index of brominated noscapine in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Jitender; Baruah, Bharat; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Abdalla, Mohamed O; Yates, Clayton; Turner, Timothy; Rangari, Vijay; Hamelberg, Donald; Aneja, Ritu

    2012-05-07

    We have previously shown that a novel microtubule-modulating noscapinoid, EM011 (9-Br-Nos), displays potent anticancer activity by inhibition of cellular proliferation and induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells and preclinical mice models. However, physicochemical and cellular barriers encumber the development of viable formulations for future clinical translation. To circumvent these limitations, we have synthesized EM011-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes to improve solubility and enhance therapeutic index of EM011. Phase solubility analysis indicated that EM011 formed a 1:1 stoichiometric complex with β-CD and methyl-β-CD, with a stability constant (K(c)) of 2.42 × 10(-3) M and 4.85 × 10(-3) M, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested the penetrance of either a O-CH(2) or OCH(3)-C(6)H(4)-OCH(3) moiety of EM011 in the β-CD or methyl-β-CD cavity. In addition, multifarious techniques, namely, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and computational studies validated the cage complex of EM011 with β-CD and methyl-β-CD. Moreover, rotating frame overhauser enhancement spectroscopy showed that the H(a) proton of the OCH(3)-C(6)H(4)-OCH(3) moiety was in close proximity with H3 proton of the β-CD or methyl-β-CD cavity. Furthermore, we found that the solubility of EM011 in phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4) was enhanced by ~11 fold and ~21 fold upon complexation with β-CD and methyl-β-CD, respectively. The enhanced dissolution of the drug CD-complexes in aqueous phase remarkably decreased their IC(50) to 28.5 μM (9-Br-Nos-β-CD) and 12.5 μM (9-Br-Nos-methyl-β-CD) in PC-3 cells compared to free EM011 (~200 μM). This is the first report to demonstrate the novel construction of cylcodextrin-based nanosupramolecular vehicles for enhanced delivery of EM011 that warrants in vivo evaluation for the superior management of prostate cancer.

  8. A composite autonomic index as unitary metric for heart rate variability: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Roberto; Malacarne, Mara; Solaro, Nadia; Pagani, Massimo; Lucini, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    This study addresses whether a unitary cardiac autonomic nervous system index (ANSI), obtained combining multiple metrics from heart rate variability (HRV) into a radar plot could provide an easy appreciation of autonomic performance in a clinical setting. Data are standardized using percentile ranking of autonomic proxies from a relatively large reference population (n = 1593, age 39 ± 13 years). Autonomic indices are obtained from autoregressive spectral analysis of (ECG derived) HRV at rest and during standing up. A reduced ANSI (using RR, RR variance and rest-stand difference of LFnu) is then constructed as a radar plot, quantified according to its combined area and tested against different risk subgroups. With growing risk profile, there is a marked reduction of the rank value of ANSI, quantified individually by the radar plot area. The practical usefulness of the approach was tested in small groups of additional subjects putatively characterized by elevated or poor autonomic performance. Data show that elite endurance athletes are characterized by elevated values of ANSI (80·6 ± 14·9, P values (DM1 = 37·0 ± 18·9 and DM2 = 26·8 ± 23·3, P = 0·002), and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) represent a nadir (17 ± 20, P < 0·001). This observational study shows the feasibility of testing simpler metrics of cardiac autonomic regulation based on a multivariate unitary index in a preventive setting. This simple approach might foster a wider application of HRV in the clinical arena, and permit an easier appreciation of autonomic performance. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  9. Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk According to Postmenopausal Estrogen-Progestin Use and Hormone Receptor Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsell, Mark F.; Sprague, Brian L.; Berry, Donald A.; Chisholm, Gary; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2014-01-01

    To assess the joint relationships among body mass index, menopausal status, and breast cancer according to breast cancer subtype and estrogen-progestin medication use, we conducted a meta-analysis of 89 epidemiologic reports published in English during 1980–2012 identified through a systematic search of bibliographic databases. Pooled analysis yielded a summary risk ratio of 0.78 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67, 0.92) for hormone receptor–positive premenopausal breast cancer associated with obesity (body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)2) ≥30 compared with Obesity was associated with a summary risk ratio of 1.39 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.70) for receptor-positive postmenopausal breast cancer. For receptor-negative breast cancer, the summary risk ratios of 1.06 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.60) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.78, 1.22) associated with obesity were null for both premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively. Elevated postmenopausal breast cancer risk ratios associated with obesity were limited to women who never took estrogen-progestin therapy, with risk ratios of 1.42 (95% CI: 1.30, 1.55) among never users and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.42) among users; too few studies were available to examine this relationship according to receptor subtype. Future research is needed to confirm whether obesity is unrelated to receptor-negative breast cancer in populations of postmenopausal women with low prevalence of hormone medication use. PMID:24375928

  10. Mendelian randomization study of body mass index and colorectal cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Aaron P.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Slattery, Martha L.; Chan, Andrew T.; Locke, Adam E.; Kahali, Bratati; Justice, Anne E.; Pers, Tune H.; Gallinger, Steven; Hayes, Richard B; Baron, John A.; Caan, Bette J.; Ogino, Shuji; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Du, Mengmeng; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Thornquist, Mark; Duggan, David J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M.; Seminara, Daniela; Song, Mingyang; Wu, Kana; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; White, Emily; Hsu, Li; Campbell, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Background High body mass index (BMI) is consistently linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) for men, whereas the association is less clear for women. As risk estimates from observational studies may be biased and/or confounded, we conducted a Mendelian randomization study to estimate the causal association between BMI and CRC. Methods We used data from 10,226 CRC cases and 10,286 controls of European ancestry. The Mendelian randomization analysis used a weighted genetic risk score, derived from 77 genome-wide association study identified variants associated with higher BMI, as an instrumental variable (IV). We compared the IV odds ratio (IV-OR) with the OR obtained using a conventional covariate-adjusted analysis. Results Individuals carrying greater numbers of BMI-increasing alleles had higher CRC risk (per weighted allele OR, 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–1.57). Our IV estimation results support the hypothesis that genetically influenced BMI is directly associated with risk for CRC (IV-OR per 5 kg/m2, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.13–2.01). In the sex-specific IV analyses higher BMI was associated with higher risk of CRC among women (IV-OR per 5 kg/m2, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.26–2.61). For men, genetically influenced BMI was not associated with CRC (IV-OR per 5 kg/m2, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.73–1.92). Conclusions High BMI was associated with increased CRC risk for women. Whether abdominal obesity, rather than overall obesity, is a more important risk factor for men requires further investigation. Impact Overall, conventional epidemiologic and Mendelian randomization studies suggest a strong association between obesity and the risk of CRC. PMID:25976416

  11. Fatty Acid Synthase Polymorphisms, Tumor Expression, Body Mass Index, Prostate Cancer Risk, and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Paul L.; Ma, Jing; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Lis, Rosina; Fedele, Giuseppe; Fiore, Christopher; Qiu, Weiliang; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Finn, Stephen; Penney, Kathryn L.; Eisenstein, Anna; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giovannucci, Edward; Loda, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Fatty acid synthase (FASN) regulates de novo lipogenesis, body weight, and tumor growth. We examined whether common germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FASN gene affect prostate cancer (PCa) risk or PCa-specific mortality and whether these effects vary by body mass index (BMI). Methods In a prospective nested case-control study of 1,331 white patients with PCa and 1,267 age-matched controls, we examined associations of five common SNPs within FASN (and 5 kb upstream/downstream, R2 > 0.8) with PCa incidence and, among patients, PCa-specific death and tested for an interaction with BMI. Survival analyses were repeated for tumor FASN expression (n = 909). Results Four of the five SNPs were associated with lethal PCa. SNP rs1127678 was significantly related to higher BMI and interacted with BMI for both PCa risk (Pinteraction = .004) and PCa mortality (Pinteraction = .056). Among overweight men (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), but not leaner men, the homozygous variant allele carried a relative risk of advanced PCa of 2.49 (95% CI, 1.00 to 6.23) compared with lean men with the wild type. Overweight patients carrying the variant allele had a 2.04 (95% CI, 1.31 to 3.17) times higher risk of PCa mortality. Similarly, overweight patients with elevated tumor FASN expression had a 2.73 (95% CI, 1.05 to 7.08) times higher risk of lethal PCa (Pinteraction = .02). Conclusion FASN germline polymorphisms were significantly associated with risk of lethal PCa. Significant interactions of BMI with FASN polymorphisms and FASN tumor expression suggest FASN as a potential link between obesity and poor PCa outcome and raise the possibility that FASN inhibition could reduce PCa-specific mortality, particularly in overweight men. PMID:20679621

  12. MIB1/Ki-67 labelling index can classify grade 2 breast cancer into two clinically distinct subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Aleskandarany, Mohammed A.; Rakha, Emad A.; MacMillan, R. Douglas; Desmond G. Powe; Ellis, Ian O.; Green, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Histological grade is recognized as one of the strongest prognostic factors in operable breast cancer (BC). Although grade 1 and grade 3 tumours are biologically and clinically distinct, grade 2 tumours bear considerable difficulty in outcome prediction and planning therapies. Several attempts such as genomic grade index have been performed to subclassify grade 2 into two subgroups with clinical relevance. Here, we present evidence that the routinely evaluable immunohistoc...

  13. Developing and comparing two different prognostic indexes for predicting disease-free survival of nonmetastatic breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    TOKATLI, Zehra Füsun; Türe, Mevlüt; Ömürlü, İmran Kurt; ALAS, Ruşen Çoşar; Uzal, Mustafa Cem

    2011-01-01

    To determine 2 different prognostic indexes (PI) for the differentiation of subgroups of nonmetastatic breast cancer patients with the Cox regression analysis and survival tree (ST) methods and the additional usage of the Kaplan-Meier estimates to investigate the predictive power of these methods. Materials and methods: Prognostic factors data were collected for 410 patients. The Cox regression analysis examines the relationship of the survival distribution and covariates. The ST method is ...

  14. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards o...

  15. Premorbid body mass index and mortality in patients with lung cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arjun; Majumder, Kaustav; Arora, Nivedita; Mayo, Helen G; Singh, Preet Paul; Beg, Muhammad S; Hughes, Randall; Singh, Siddharth; Johnson, David H

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to assess the association between premorbid obesity, measured using body mass index (BMI) and lung cancer-related mortality, through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Observational studies reporting statistical measures of association between premorbid BMI categories and lung cancer-related mortality were included in our study. We estimated hazard ratios (aHR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), comparing lung cancer-related mortality across BMI categories. The main outcome measure was lung cancer-related mortality in obese (BMI≥30kg/m(2)) and overweight participants (BMI 25.0-29.9kg/m(2)), compared with normal BMI participants. We included 14 studies (including 2 pooled cohort studies) comprising 3,008,137 cancer-free participants at inception, reporting 28,592 lung cancer-related deaths. On meta-analysis, we observed a significantly lower lung cancer-related mortality in overweight (aHR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.68-0.85) and obese (aHR, 0.68, 95% CI; 0.57-0.81) participants as compared to participants with normal BMI, with considerable heterogeneity; after excluding one study with large effect size, a more conservative and consistent association was observed between BMI and lung cancer-related mortality (overweight vs. normal BMI: aHR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.79-0.90; obese vs. normal BMI: aHR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.75-0.87), with moderate heterogeneity. Were similar in men vs. women, non-smokers vs. smokers, and Western vs Asia-Pacific populations. Based on meta-analysis, we observed an independent protective association between premorbid obesity and lung cancer-related mortality. This association was observed across sex, smoking status and geographic region. Further studies are needed to prospectively study this association. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Associations between body mass index and molecular subtypes as well as other clinical characteristics of breast cancer in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei-Yu; Ou, Hui-Ying; Wang, Shou-Man; Wu, Yu-Hui; Yan, Guo-Jiao; Tang, Li-Li

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown a positive association between body mass index (BMI) and the development of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women; however, the associations between BMI groups and molecular subtypes have yet to be well defined in premenopausal breast cancer patients. A total of 2465 female breast cancer patients diagnosed at our institution were recruited for this study. Clinicopathologic information (including age, body height and weight, as well as tumor subtypes and stages) was collected; analyses of these characteristics and the associations between them were performed. A total of 1951 cases were included in the study. The mean age was 47.3 years, the majority of patients were of normal weight, premenopausal, had stage 2 cancer, and did not present with positive nodes. The prevalence of the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+, and triple-negative subtypes were 57.8%, 11.6%, 6.1%, and 24.5%, respectively. There were significant differences in the clinicopathologic features among BMI groups in premenopausal patients. The case-only odds ratio (OR) analysis revealed that normal weight patients tended to have luminal B cancer (OR = 1.4, P = 0.206), and overweight and obese patients tended to have triple-negative cancer in premenopausal patients (OR = 2.8, OR = 3.7, respectively; P < 0.001). IN CHINESE WOMEN, BREAST CANCER CAME WITH THESE CHARACTERISTICS: young mean age (premenopause), luminal A subtype, and the majority of them were within a normal weight range. In premenopausal patients, underweight patients tended to have luminal A, lower human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ expression, stage 1 and no positive node cancer. However, overweight and obese patients tended to have a triple-negative, stage 3, and lymph node metastatic cancer.

  17. Body Mass Index and Cancer Screening in Older American Indian and Alaska Native Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla; McDonald, Leander R.; Ludtke, Richard L.; Allery, Alan J.; Bogart, T. Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Ramsey, Scott D.; Buchwald, Dedra S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Regular screenings are important for reducing cancer morbidity and mortality. There are several barriers to receiving timely cancer screening, including overweight/obesity. No study has examined the relationship between overweight/obesity and cancer screening among American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Purpose: To describe the…

  18. Positive Effect of Higher Adult Body Mass Index on Overall Survival of Digestive System Cancers Except Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High body mass index (BMI has been inconsistently associated with overall survival (OS of digestive system cancers (DSCs. This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate whether high BMI was associated with DSCs prognosis. 34 studies were accepted, with a total of 23,946 DSC cases. Hazard ratios (HRs with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for OS in BMI categories from individual studies were extracted and pooled by random-effect model. The overall HR of DSCs except pancreatic cancer for OS of adult overweight cases was 0.76 (95% CI = 0.67–0.85. DSC individuals except pancreatic cancer with adult obesity were at decreased risk for OS (HR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.72–0.98. Among DSC patients except pancreatic cancer, the overall HR for the highest versus the lowest BMI category was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.71–0.92. Additionally, comparing the highest and lowest BMI categories, the combined HR of pancreatic cancer was 1.22 (95% CI = 1.01–1.43. Our meta-analysis suggested an increased OS among adult overweight and obese DSC survivors except pancreatic cancer. Overweight and obesity in adulthood may be important prognostic factors that indicate an increased survival from DSC patients except pancreatic cancer.

  19. Prospective investigation of body mass index, colorectal adenoma, and colorectal cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I; de González, Amy Berrington; Coleman, Helen G; Schoen, Robert E; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Obesity has consistently been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men. Whether body mass index (BMI) differentially influences the risk across the stages of colorectal cancer development remains unclear. We evaluated the associations of BMI with colorectal adenoma incidence, adenoma recurrence, and cancer in the context of a large screening trial, in which cases and controls had an equal chance for disease detection. We prospectively evaluated the association between baseline BMI and the risk of incident distal adenoma (1,213 cases), recurrent adenoma (752 cases), and incident colorectal cancer (966 cases) among men and women, ages 55 to 74 years, randomly assigned to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adenoma incidence and recurrence, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence, using multivariable-adjusted models. Compared with normal-weight men (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)), obese men (≥ 30 kg/m(2)) had significantly higher risk of incident adenoma (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.65) and colorectal cancer (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.89) and a borderline increased risk of recurrent adenoma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.98 to 2.30). No associations were observed for either adenoma or cancer in women. Data from this large prospective study suggest that obesity is important throughout the natural history of colorectal cancer, at least in men, and colorectal cancer prevention efforts should encourage the achievement and maintenance of a healthy body weight in addition to regular screenings.

  20. Causal nexus of foreign stock prices on the Philippine stocks exchange composite index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo C. Castro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the predictive relationship existing between the Philippine Stocks Exchange Index (PSEI and the foreign stock markets. historical data of the daily closing prices of the stock markets (s&p500 of the united states, Nikkei of Japan, Sensex of India, Shcomp of China, STI of Singapore, KLSE of Malaysia, and HKSE of hong kong covering January 4, 2002 to January 29, 2016 (n=3,411 observations were estimated using the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS regression equation, having the PSEI of the Philippines as the predicted variable. It was found out that the foreign stock markets are highly correlated with the PSE. Moreover, OLS regression revealed that an increase of the daily closing prices of s&p500 of United States, Nikkei of Japan, Sensex of India and STI of Singapore increases the value of the PSEI but decreases upon the appreciation of Shcomp of china and the HKSE of Hong Kong. Meanwhile, KLSE of Malaysia yielded no statistical significance towards the PSEI.

  1. Comparison of simple additive weighting (SAW) and composite performance index (CPI) methods in employee remuneration determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlitasari, L.; Suhartini, D.; Benny

    2017-01-01

    The process of determining the employee remuneration for PT Sepatu Mas Idaman currently are still using Microsoft Excel-based spreadsheet where in the spreadsheet there is the value of criterias that must be calculated for every employee. This can give the effect of doubt during the assesment process, therefore resulting in the process to take much longer time. The process of employee remuneration determination is conducted by the assesment team based on some criterias that have been predetermined. The criteria used in the assessment process are namely the ability to work, human relations, job responsibility, discipline, creativity, work, achievement of targets, and absence. To ease the determination of employee remuneration to be more efficient and effective, the Simple Additive Weighting (SAW) method is used. SAW method can help in decision making for a certain case, and the calculation that generates the greatest value will be chosen as the best alternative. Other than SAW, also by using another method was the CPI method which is one of the calculating method in decision making based on performance index. Where SAW method was more faster by 89-93% compared to CPI method. Therefore it is expected that this application can be an evaluation material for the need of training and development for employee performances to be more optimal.

  2. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  3. Associations between body mass index and molecular subtypes as well as other clinical characteristics of breast cancer in Chinese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen FY

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fei-Yu Chen, Hui-Ying Ou, Shou-Man Wang, Yu-Hui Wu, Guo-Jiao Yan, Li-Li Tang Department of Breast Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha City, Hunan Province, People's Republic of China Background: Several studies have shown a positive association between body mass index (BMI and the development of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women; however, the associations between BMI groups and molecular subtypes have yet to be well defined in premenopausal breast cancer patients. Methods: A total of 2465 female breast cancer patients diagnosed at our institution were recruited for this study. Clinicopathologic information (including age, body height and weight, as well as tumor subtypes and stages was collected; analyses of these characteristics and the associations between them were performed. Results: A total of 1951 cases were included in the study. The mean age was 47.3 years, the majority of patients were of normal weight, premenopausal, had stage 2 cancer, and did not present with positive nodes. The prevalence of the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+, and triple-negative subtypes were 57.8%, 11.6%, 6.1%, and 24.5%, respectively. There were significant differences in the clinicopathologic features among BMI groups in premenopausal patients. The case-only odds ratio (OR analysis revealed that normal weight patients tended to have luminal B cancer (OR = 1.4, P = 0.206, and overweight and obese patients tended to have triple-negative cancer in premenopausal patients (OR = 2.8, OR = 3.7, respectively; P < 0.001. Conclusion: In Chinese women, breast cancer came with these characteristics: young mean age (premenopause, luminal A subtype, and the majority of them were within a normal weight range. In premenopausal patients, underweight patients tended to have luminal A, lower human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ expression, stage 1 and no positive node cancer. However

  4. A tumor DNA complex aberration index is an independent predictor of survival in breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Rueda, Oscar M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina; Turashvili, Gulisa; Shah, Sohrab; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Yuan, Yinyin; Ng, Charlotte K; Dunning, Mark J; Dicks, Ed; Provenzano, Elena; Sammut, Stephen; McKinney, Steven; Ellis, Ian O; Pinder, Sarah; Purushotham, Arnie; Murphy, Leigh C; Kristensen, Vessela N; Brenton, James D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Aparicio, Samuel; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Complex focal chromosomal rearrangements in cancer genomes, also called "firestorms", can be scored from DNA copy number data. The complex arm-wise aberration index (CAAI) is a score that captures DNA copy number alterations that appear as focal complex events in tumors, and has potential prognostic value in breast cancer. This study aimed to validate this DNA-based prognostic index in breast cancer and test for the first time its potential prognostic value in ovarian cancer. Copy number alteration (CNA) data from 1950 breast carcinomas (METABRIC cohort) and 508 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (TCGA dataset) were analyzed. Cases were classified as CAAI positive if at least one complex focal event was scored. Complex alterations were frequently localized on chromosome 8p (n = 159), 17q (n = 176) and 11q (n = 251). CAAI events on 11q were most frequent in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases and on 17q in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) cases. We found only a modest correlation between CAAI and the overall rate of genomic instability (GII) and number of breakpoints (r = 0.27 and r = 0.42, p cancer specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer progression free survival (PFS) were used as clinical end points in Cox proportional hazard model survival analyses. CAAI positive breast cancers (43%) had higher mortality: hazard ratio (HR) of 1.94 (95%CI, 1.62-2.32) for BCSS, and of 1.49 (95%CI, 1.30-1.71) for OS. Representations of the 70-gene and the 21-gene predictors were compared with CAAI in multivariable models and CAAI was independently significant with a Cox adjusted HR of 1.56 (95%CI, 1.23-1.99) for ER+ and 1.55 (95%CI, 1.11-2.18) for ER- disease. None of the expression-based predictors were prognostic in the ER- subset. We found that a model including CAAI and the two expression-based prognostic signatures outperformed a model including the 21-gene and 70-gene signatures but excluding CAAI. Inclusion of CAAI in the clinical

  5. Body composition, somatotype and risk of premenopausal breast cancer: a case-control study in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronco AL

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze detailed anthropometric characterisation for risk of breast cancer (BC in premenopausal Uruguayan women, a case-control study was carried out at the Pereira Rossell Women’s Hospital, Montevideo, where 253 incident BC cases and 497 frequency-matched healthy controls were interviewed on menstrual and reproductive story, and a series of body measurements were performed to calculate body composition and somatotype. Odds ratio (OR’s coefficients were taken as estimates of relative risk derived from unconditional logistic regression. Results show a positive association for the fat fraction (OR for highest quartile =4.19, 95% CI (95% Confidence Interval 2.70-6.50 as well as for the fat-to-muscle ratio (OR=4.68, 95% CI 2.98-7.36. Muscle fraction was inversely associated with risk (OR=0.53 95% CI 0.36-0.78. High endomorphism was the only somatotype variable associated to the disease risk (OR=1.69, 95% CI 1.13-2.54, however, losing its association when fat amount was included in the regression model. Stratified analyses by body mass index (BMI levels, bone weight, age groups and number of live births also showed risk increases for the highest fat fractions, displaying significant linear trends. Albeit most of the literature reports a putative slight protective effect for a high BMI in premenopausal women, our results suggest that fat fraction, amount and distribution might play a role as predisposing factors for premenopausal BC.

  6. Composite Match Index with Application of Interior Deformation Field Measurement from Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Images of Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penglin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas a variety of different feature-point matching approaches have been reported in computer vision, few feature-point matching approaches employed in images from nonrigid, nonuniform human tissues have been reported. The present work is concerned with interior deformation field measurement of complex human tissues from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR volumetric images. To improve the reliability of matching results, this paper proposes composite match index (CMI as the foundation of multimethod fusion methods to increase the reliability of these various methods. Thereinto, we discuss the definition, components, and weight determination of CMI. To test the validity of the proposed approach, it is applied to actual MR volumetric images obtained from a volunteer’s calf. The main result is consistent with the actual condition.

  7. Composition index of n-alkanes and paleoenvironmental study in sediments of the Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Bing; Zhou Huaiyang; Wang Zipan; Lu Douding

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports different concentration patterns of n-alkanes distribution in the sediments from the Chukchi Sea, the Bering Sea in the Arctic. Factor statistical analysis method is used for studying the source of n-alkanes and paleoenviroment. The result shows that n-alkanes is in the range of nC15~nC33 and n-alkane distribution patterns are characterized by two modes. The first mode belongs to the higher molecular with MH being nC25~ nC27, CPI> 1 and with remarkable odd-even dominance.They are of terrigenous plant origin. The second one belongs to lower carbon range with MH being nC17 ~nC20, CPI> 1 and with indistinct odd-even dominance. Therefore they are contributed by marine biological inputs. The contribution of land origin is larger than that of marine source. Pr/Ph is lower than 1 in the investigated area, which indicates the depositional environment of reducing reaction with lower oxygen. The result of factor analysis has good agreement with composition characteristics of n-alkanes in the sediment.

  8. The effect of composition on the bond structure and refractive index of silicon nitride deposited by HWCVD and PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlaan, V.; Verkerk, A.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Van der Werf, C.H.M.; Bakker, R.; Houweling, Z.S.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80.000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Romijn, I.G.; Borsa, D.M.; Weeber, A.W. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Luxembourg, S.L.; Zeman, M. [DIMES, Delft University of Technology, Delf (Netherlands); Dekkers, H.F.W. [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) is a material with many applications and can be deposited with various deposition techniques. Series of SiNx films were deposited with HWCVD, RF PECVD,MWPECVD and LF PECVD. The atomic densities are quantified using RBS and ERD. The influence of the atomic densities on the Si-N and Si-Si bond structure is studied. The density of N-N bonds is found to be negligible. New Si-N FTIR proportionality factors are determined which increase with increasing N/Si ratio from 1.2 x 10{sup 19} cm-1 for Si rich films (N/Si=0.2) to 2.4 x 10{sup 19}cm-1 for N rich films (N/Si=1.5). The peak position of the Si-H stretching mode in the FTIR spectrum is discussed using the chemical induction model. It is shown that especially for Si-rich films the hydrogen content affects the Si-H peak position. The influence of the composition on the refractive index of the films is discussed on the basis of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation and the Kramers-Kronig relation. The decreasing refractive index with increasing N/Si ratio is primarily caused by an increase of the band gap.

  9. Prospective study of body mass index, height, physical activity and incidence of bladder cancer in US men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holick, Crystal N; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J; Michaud, Dominique S

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated prospectively the association between body mass index (BMI), height, recreational physical activity and the risk of bladder cancer among US adults. Data were used from 2 ongoing cohorts, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study, with 3,542,012 years of follow-up and 866 incident bladder cancer cases (men = 507; women = 359) for the anthropometric analysis and 1,890,476 years of follow-up and 706 incident bladder cancer cases (men = 502; women = 204) for the physical activity analysis. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between BMI, height, physical activity and bladder cancer risk adjusting for age, pack-years of cigarette smoking and current smoking. Estimates from each cohort were pooled using a random-effects model. We observed no association between baseline BMI and bladder cancer risk, even when we compared a BMI of > or =30 kg/m(2) to a BMI of 18-22.9 kg/m(2) [pooled multivariate (MV) RR, 1.16; 95% CI: 0.89-1.52]. A weak, but statistically significant, association was observed for the same comparison after excluding bladder cancer cases diagnosed within the first 4 years of follow-up (pooled MV RR, 1.33; 95% CI: 1.01-1.76). Height was not related to bladder cancer risk (pooled MV RR, 0.82; 95% CI: 0.65-1.03, top vs. bottom quintile). Total recreational physical activity also was not associated with the risk of bladder cancer (pooled MV RR, 0.97; 95% CI: 0.77-1.24, top vs. bottom quintile). Our findings do not support a role for BMI, height or physical activity in bladder carcinogenesis.

  10. Body Composition as a Prognostic Factor of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Toxicity and Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmela, Carolina; Velho, Sónia; Agostinho, Lisa; Branco, Francisco; Santos, Marta; Santos, Maria Pia Costa; Oliveira, Maria Helena; Strecht, João; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Baracos, Vickie E

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in locally advanced gastric cancer, but it is associated with significant toxicity. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been studied in several types of cancers and have been reported to be associated with higher chemotherapy toxicity and morbi-mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia/sarcopenic obesity in patients with gastric cancer, as well as its association with chemotherapy toxicity and long-term outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed using an academic cancer center patient cohort diagnosed with locally advanced gastric cancer between January 2012 and December 2014 and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We analyzed body composition (skeletal muscle and visceral fat index) in axial computed tomography images. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 68±10 years, and 33 patients (69%) were men. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 22 patients (46%), and treatment was terminated early owing to toxicity in 17 patients (35%). Median follow-up was 17 months. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were found at diagnosis in 23% and 10% of patients, respectively. We observed an association between termination of chemotherapy and both sarcopenia (P=0.069) and sarcopenic obesity (P=0.004). On multivariate analysis, the odds of treatment termination were higher in patients with sarcopenia (odds ratio=4.23; P=0.050). Patients with sarcopenic obesity showed lower overall survival (median survival of 6 months [95% confidence interval {CI}=3.9-8.5] vs. 25 months [95% CI=20.2-38.2]; log-rank test P=0.000). Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were associated with early termination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer; additionally, sarcopenic obesity was associated with poor survival.

  11. Effects of carbohydrate quantity and glycemic index on resting metabolic rate and body composition during weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Roberts, Susan B; Schaefer, Ernst J; Gleason, Joi A; Fuss, Paul; Rasmussen, Helen; Saltzman, Edward; Das, Sai Krupa

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate and glycemic index (GI) on changes in body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and metabolic adaptation during and after weight loss. Adults with obesity (n = 91) were randomized to one of four provided-food diets for 17 weeks. Diets differed in percentage energy from carbohydrate (55% or 70%) and GI (low or high) but were matched for protein, fiber, and energy. Body weight, body composition, RMR, and metabolic adaptation (measured RMR-predicted RMR) were measured during weight loss and subsequent weight stability. No effect of dietary carbohydrate content or GI on body weight loss or percentage of weight lost as fat mass (FM) was observed. Measured RMR was significantly lower (-226 kJ/day [95% CI: -314 to -138 kJ/day], P weight loss, but this difference was attenuated after 5 weeks of weight stability. Metabolic adaptation did not differ by dietary carbohydrate content or GI and was not associated with weight regain 12 months later. Moderate-carbohydrate and low-GI diets did not preferentially reduce FM, preserve lean mass, or attenuate metabolic adaptation during weight loss compared to high-carbohydrate and high-GI diets. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  12. Adding glycaemic index and glycaemic load functionality to DietPLUS, a Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Sangeetha; Wai, Tony Ng Kock; Arshad, Fatimah

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the methodology to add glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) functionality to food DietPLUS, a Microsoft Excel-based Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator. Locally determined GI values and published international GI databases were used as the source of GI values. Previously published methodology for GI value assignment was modified to add GI and GL calculators to the database. Two popular local low GI foods were added to the DietPLUS database, bringing up the total number of foods in the database to 838 foods. Overall, in relation to the 539 major carbohydrate foods in the Malaysian Food Composition Database, 243 (45%) food items had local Malaysian values or were directly matched to International GI database and another 180 (33%) of the foods were linked to closely-related foods in the GI databases used. The mean ± SD dietary GI and GL of the dietary intake of 63 women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus, calculated using DietPLUS version3 were, 62 ± 6 and 142 ± 45, respectively. These values were comparable to those reported from other local studies. DietPLUS version3, a simple Microsoft Excel-based programme aids calculation of diet GI and GL for Malaysian diets based on food records.

  13. Development and validation of a prognostic index for fracture risk in older men undergoing prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Steed, Tisheeka R.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Dearing, Natalie; Concato, John; Tinetti, Mary E.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer have an increased risk for fractures. Given uncertainty as to whether specific clinical factors can identify men at increased risk, we sought to develop a prognostic index for risk of fracture in this population. Materials and methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify men who received ADT or RT after being diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in 2007-2009. Cox proportional hazards models tested the association of potential risk factors with fracture. In a derivation group, hazard ratios were used to assign points for factors independently related to fracture. The prognostic index was then applied to a validation group. Results The sample of 5,824 men had a median age of 73.0 years; 82.9% were white and 8.6% had a fracture within 2 years of treatment for prostate cancer. The Cox model identified 8 variables (age, race, hormone treatment, Elixhauser score, anxiety, Parkinson's, fall-inducing medications and disability status) independently associated with fracture. In the derivation cohort, 4.3% of the sample experienced a fracture in the low-risk group, 8.9% in the intermediate group, and 19.2% in the high-risk group (C statistic, 0.749). The index was applied to the validation cohort (C statistic, 0.782). Conclusion The prognostic index can help to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. This underscores the importance of identifying risk factors for fracture, given the substantial variation in fracture risk in men treated with ADT or RT. PMID:25240918

  14. Development and validation of a prognostic index for fracture risk in older men undergoing prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Steed, Tisheeka R; Soulos, Pamela R; Dearing, Natalie; Concato, John; Tinetti, Mary E; Gross, Cary P

    2014-10-01

    Men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer have an increased risk for fractures. Given uncertainty as to whether specific clinical factors can identify men at increased risk, we sought to develop a prognostic index for risk of fracture in this population. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify men who received ADT or RT after being diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in 2007-2009. Cox proportional hazards models tested the association of potential risk factors with fracture. In a derivation group, hazard ratios were used to assign points for factors independently related to fracture. The prognostic index was then applied to a validation group. The sample of 5824 men had a median age of 73.0 years; 82.9% were white and 8.6% had a fracture within 2 years of treatment for prostate cancer. The Cox model identified 8 variables (age, race, hormone treatment, Elixhauser score, anxiety, Parkinson's, fall-inducing medications and disability status) independently associated with fracture. In the derivation cohort, 4.3% of the sample experienced a fracture in the low-risk group, 8.9% in the intermediate group, and 19.2% in the high-risk group (C statistic, 0.749). The index was applied to the validation cohort (C statistic, 0.782). The prognostic index can help to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. This underscores the importance of identifying risk factors for fracture, given the substantial variation in fracture risk in men treated with ADT or RT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Bimodality Index: A Criterion for Discovering and Ranking Bimodal Signatures from Cancer Gene Expression Profiling Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Identifying genes with bimodal expression patterns from large-scale expression profiling data is an important analytical task. Model-based clustering is popular for this purpose. That technique commonly uses the Bayesian information criterion (BIC for model selection. In practice, however, BIC appears to be overly sensitive and may lead to the identification of bimodally expressed genes that are unreliable or not clinically useful. We propose using a novel criterion, the bimodality index, not only to identify but also to rank meaningful and reliable bimodal patterns. The bimodality index can be computed using either a mixture model-based algorithm or Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques.Results: We carried out simulation studies and applied the method to real data from a cancer gene expression profiling study. Our findings suggest that BIC behaves like a lax cutoff based on the bimodality index, and that the bimodality index provides an objective measure to identify and rank meaningful and reliable bimodal patterns from large-scale gene expression datasets. R code to compute the bimodality index is included in the ClassDiscovery package of the Object-Oriented Microarray and Proteomic Analysis (OOMPA suite available at the web site http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/Software/OOMPA.

  16. The effects of induced hypogonadism on arterial stiffness, body composition, and metabolic parameters in males with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J C; Bennett, S; Evans, L M; Kynaston, H G; Parmar, M; Mason, M D; Cockcroft, J R; Scanlon, M F; Davies, J S

    2001-09-01

    Sex hormones appear to play a pivotal role in determining cardiovascular risk. Androgen deprivation therapy for males with prostate cancer results in a hypogonadal state that may have important, but as yet undetermined, effects on the vasculature. We studied the effects of androgen deprivation therapy on large artery stiffness in 22 prostate cancer patients (mean age, 67 +/- 8 yr) over a 6-month period. Arterial stiffness was assessed using pulse-wave analysis, a technique that measures peripheral arterial pressure waveforms and generates corresponding central aortic waveforms. This allows determination of the augmentation of central pressure resulting from wave reflection and the augmentation index, a measure of large artery stiffness. Body compositional changes were assessed using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Fasting lipids, glucose, insulin, testosterone, and estradiol were measured. After a 3-month treatment period, the augmentation index increased from 24 +/- 6% (mean +/- SD) at baseline to 29 +/- 9% (P = 0.003) despite no change in peripheral blood pressure. Timing of wave reflection was reduced from 137 +/- 7 to 129 +/- 10 msec (P = 0.003). Fat mass increased from 20.2 +/- 9.4 to 21.9 +/- 9.6 kg (P = 0.008), whereas lean body mass decreased from 63.2 +/- 6.8 to 61.5 +/- 6.0 kg (P = 0.016). There were no changes in lipids or glucose during treatment. Median serum insulin rose from 11.8 (range, 5.6-49.1) to 15.1 (range, 7.3-83.2) mU/liter at 1 month (P = 0.021) and to 19.3 (range, 0-85.0 mU/liter by 3 months (P = 0.020). There was a correlation between the changes in fat mass and insulin concentration over the 3-month period (r = 0.56; P = 0.013). In a subgroup of patients whose treatment was discontinued after 3 months, the augmentation index decreased from 31 +/- 7% at 3 months to 29 +/- 5% by 6 months, in contrast to patients receiving continuing treatment in whom the augmentation index remained elevated at 6 months compared with baseline (P = 0

  17. The Effects of Compliance with Nutritional Counselling on Body Composition Parameters in Head and Neck Cancer Patients under Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hopanci Bicakli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radiotherapy (RT has been associated with increased risk of malnutrition in cancer patients, particularly in those with head and neck cancer (HNC. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of compliance of patients with individual dietary counselling on body composition parameters in HNC patients under RT. Material and Methods. Sixty-nine consecutive patients (mean age: 61.0±13.8 were prospectively followed. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA was performed to determine body composition parameters before, in the middle of, and at the end of RT. All patients received nutritional counselling and majority of them (94.6% received oral nutritional supplement (ONS during RT or chemoradiotherapy. If a patient consumed ≥75% of the recommended energy and protein intake via ONS and regular food, he/she was considered to be “compliant” (n=18, while those who failed to meet this criteria were considered to be “noncompliant” (n=30. Results. Body mass index, weight, fat percentage, fat mass, fat free mass, and muscle mass did not decrease significantly over time in compliant patients, but in noncompliant patients, all of these indices decreased significantly from baseline compared to the end of treatment (p<0.001. Hand grip strength did not differ significantly between the two groups at baseline and over time in each group. When retrospectively evaluated, heavy mucositis was less commonly observed in compliant than noncompliant patients (11.1% versus 88.9%, resp. (p<0.009. Conclusion. We conclude that body composition parameters were better in head and neck cancer patients considered as compliant with nutritional counselling than noncompliant ones during RT period.

  18. Body mass index at diagnosis and survival among colon cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials of adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicrope, Frank A; Foster, Nathan R; Yothers, Greg; Benson, Al; Seitz, Jean Francois; Labianca, Roberto; Goldberg, Richard M; Degramont, Aimery; O'Connell, Michael J; Sargent, Daniel J

    2013-04-15

    Although obesity is an established risk factor for developing colon cancer, its prognostic impact and relation to patient sex in colon cancer survivors remains unclear. The authors examined the prognostic and predictive impact of the body mass index (BMI) in patients with stage II and III colon carcinoma (N = 25,291) within the Adjuvant Colon Cancer Endpoints (ACCENT) database. BMI was measured at enrollment in randomized trials of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Association of BMI with the time to recurrence (TTR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were determined using Cox regression models. Statistical tests were 2-sided. During a median follow-up of 7.8 years, obese and underweight patients had significantly poorer survival compared with overweight and normal-weight patients. In a multivariable analysis, the adverse prognostic impact of BMI was observed among men but not among women (Pinteraction = .0129). Men with class 2 and 3 obesity (BMI ≥ 35.0 kg/m(2) ) had a statistically significant reduction in DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.33; P = .0297) compared with normal-weight patients. Underweight patients had a significantly shorter TTR and reduced DFS (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.28; P Obesity and underweight status were associated independently with inferior outcomes in patients with colon cancer who received treatment in adjuvant chemotherapy trials. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  19. Mitochondria-Targeting Magnetic Composite Nanoparticles for Enhanced Phototherapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ranran; Peng, Haibao; Tian, Ye; Shen, Shun; Yang, Wuli

    2016-09-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are promising cancer treatment modalities in current days while the high laser power density demand and low tumor accumulation are key obstacles that have greatly restricted their development. Here, magnetic composite nanoparticles for dual-modal PTT and PDT which have realized enhanced cancer therapeutic effect by mitochondria-targeting are reported. Integrating PTT agent and photosensitizer together, the composite nanoparticles are able to generate heat and reactive oxygen species (ROS) simultaneously upon near infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. After surface modification of targeting ligands, the composite nanoparticles can be selectively delivered to the mitochondria, which amplify the cancer cell apoptosis induced by hyperthermia and the cytotoxic ROS. In this way, better photo therapeutic effects and much higher cytotoxicity are achieved by utilizing the composite nanoparticles than that treated with the same nanoparticles missing mitochondrial targeting unit at a low laser power density. Guided by NIR fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging, then these results are confirmed in a humanized orthotropic lung cancer model. The composite nanoparticles demonstrate high tumor accumulation and excellent tumor regression with minimal side effect upon NIR laser exposure. Therefore, the mitochondria-targeting composite nanoparticles are expected to be an effective phototherapeutic platform in oncotherapy.

  20. Validity of Three Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Indexes for Breast Cancer Patients With Radiosurgically Treated Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: BCD06275@nifty.com [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center E, Tokyo (Japan); Kawabe, Takuya [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Higuchi, Yoshinori [Department of Neurosurgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Sato, Yasunori [Clinical Research Center, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Barfod, Bierta E. [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan); Kasuya, Hidetoshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center E, Tokyo (Japan); Urakawa, Yoichi [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: We tested the validity of 3 recently proposed prognostic indexes for breast cancer patients with brain metastases (METs) treated radiosurgically. The 3 indexes are Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (DS-GPA), New Breast Cancer (NBC)-Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA), and our index, sub-classification of RPA class II patients into 3 sub-classes (RPA class II-a, II-b and II-c) based on Karnofsky performance status, tumor number, original tumor status, and non-brain METs. Methods and Materials: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using our database of 269 consecutive female breast cancer patients (mean age, 55 years; range, 26-86 years) who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) alone, without whole-brain radiation therapy, for brain METs during the 15-year period between 1996 and 2011. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the absolute risk of each event. Results: Kaplan-Meier plots of our patient series showed statistically significant survival differences among patients stratified into 3, 4, or 5 groups based on the 3 systems (P<.001). However, the mean survival time (MST) differences between some pairs of groups failed to reach statistical significance with all 3 systems. Thus, we attempted to regrade our 269 breast cancer patients into 3 groups by modifying our aforementioned index along with the original RPA class I and III, (ie, RPA I+II-a, II-b, and II-c+III). There were statistically significant MST differences among these 3 groups without overlap of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between any 2 pairs of groups: 18.4 (95% CI = 14.0-29.5) months in I+II-a, 9.2 in II-b (95% CI = 6.8-12.9, P<.001 vs I+II-a) and 5.0 in II-c+III (95% CI = 4.2-6.8, P<.001 vs II-b). Conclusions: As none of the new grading systems, DS-GPS, BC-RPA and our system, was applicable to our set of radiosurgically treated patients for comparing survivals after GKRS, we slightly modified our system for breast cancer

  1. Inverse correlation between body mass index and clinical outcomes in men with advanced castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Susan; Ou, San-San; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Small, Eric J

    2007-10-01

    Obesity has a variety of adverse health outcomes, but to the authors' knowledge, the effect of obesity on outcome in patients with advanced prostate cancer is not known. For this reason, the correlation between an elevated body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic, castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC) was evaluated. A total of 1226 men with CRPC who were enrolled in 9 prospective clinical trials conducted by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) for the treatment of metastatic disease were considered. Eligible patients had progressive prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy (with documented castrate levels of testosterone); an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2; and adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function. Patients were classified based on BMI as normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and mildly to severely obese (> or =30 kg/m(2)). Approximately 24% of the patients had a normal BMI, 43% were overweight, and 33% were mildly to severely obese. On multivariable analysis, BMI was found to be a statistically significant predictor of overall survival and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Compared with men with normal BMIs, the hazard ratios for death for overweight men and mildly to severely obese men were 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68-0.93; P = .001) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.68-0.94; P = .010), respectively. In patients with metastatic CRPC, obesity (as defined by an elevated BMI) appears to have a protective effect against overall mortality and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Alternatively, a higher BMI may reflect different cancer biology (ie, the lack of cachexia-producing substances). Further studies to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms behind these clinical observations are needed.

  2. Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and breast cancer risk: results from a Swedish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingjun; Roswall, Nina; Sandin, Sven; Ström, Peter; Adami, Hans-Olov; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2015-06-01

    A healthy Nordic dietary pattern has shown beneficial effects in relation to several chronic diseases. However, no study has evaluated the association between a healthy Nordic food index (HNFI) and risk of breast cancer. We conducted a prospective cohort study including 44,296 women, aged 29-49 at baseline in 1991-1992, who completed a food frequency questionnaire at baseline, and have been followed up ever since, through the Swedish Cancer Registry and Cause of Death Registry. Each woman was assigned a HNFI score ranging from 0 to 6. We calculated multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Poisson regression models with attained age as the underlying timescale. The association between the HNFI and risk of breast cancer was assessed both overall, by menopausal status and by hormone receptor status. A total of 1,464 breast cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up time of 20 years. A higher adherence to the HNFI was not associated with a lower risk of breast cancer overall, nor of varied hormone receptor status, or when we examining premenopausal and postmenopausal women separately. The multivariable RRs (95% CI) for breast cancer per 1-point increment in the HNFI were 1.02 (95% CI 0.98-1.06) for all women, 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.08) for premenopausal women, and 1.02 (95% CI 0.97-1.07) for postmenopausal women. Adherence to a HNFI was not associated with breast cancer incidence in this cohort of relatively young women, regardless of menopausal status or hormone receptor status.

  3. Educational differences in postmenopausal breast cancer--quantifying indirect effects through health behaviors, body mass index and reproductive patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Lange, Theis; Andersen, Ingelise; Diderichsen, Finn; Keiding, Niels; Prescott, Eva; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Tjønneland, Anne; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2013-01-01

    Studying mechanisms underlying social inequality in postmenopausal breast cancer is important in order to develop prevention strategies. Standard methods for investigating indirect effects, by comparing crude models to adjusted, are often biased. We applied a new method enabling the decomposition of the effect of educational level on breast cancer incidence into indirect effects through reproductive patterns (parity and age at first birth), body mass index and health behavior (alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and hormone therapy use). The study was based on a pooled cohort of 6 studies from the Copenhagen area including 33,562 women (1,733 breast cancer cases) aged 50-70 years at baseline. The crude absolute rate of breast cancer was 399 cases per 100,000 person-years. A high educational level compared to low was associated with 74 (95% CI 22-125) extra breast cancer cases per 100,000 person-years at risk. Of these, 26% (95% CI 14%-69%) could be attributed to alcohol consumption. Similar effects were observed for age at first birth (32%; 95% CI 10%-257%), parity (19%; 95%CI 10%-45%), and hormone therapy use (10%; 95% CI 6%-18%). Educational level modified the effect of physical activity on breast cancer. In conclusion, this analysis suggests that a substantial number of the excess postmenopausal breast cancer events among women with a high educational level compared to a low can be attributed to differences in alcohol consumption, use of hormone therapy, and reproductive patterns. Women of high educational level may be more vulnerable to physical inactivity compared to women of low educational level.

  4. Mendelian Randomization Study of Body Mass Index and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrift, Aaron P.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike;

    2015-01-01

    the causal association between BMI and colorectal cancer. Methods: We used data from 10,226 colorectal cancer cases and 10,286 controls of European ancestry. The Mendelian randomization analysis used a weighted genetic risk score, derived from 77 genome-wide association study–identified variants associated...

  5. Recreational physical activity, body mass index, and survival in women with colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, J.; Phipps, A.I.; Neuhouser, M.L.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Thomson, C.A.; Irwin, M.L.; Lane, D.S.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Hou, L.; Jackson, R.D.; Kampman, E.; Newcomb, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that physical inactivity and obesity are risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer. However, controversy exists regarding the influence of these factors on survival in colorectal cancer patients. We evaluated the impact of recreational physical activity and

  6. Birth weight, childhood body mass index, and height in relation to mammographic density and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Bihrmann, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    High breast density, a strong predictor of breast cancer may be determined early in life. Childhood anthropometric factors have been related to breast cancer and breast density, but rarely simultaneously. We examined whether mammographic density (MD) mediates an association of birth weight...

  7. Dietary carbohydrate, fibre, glycaemic index, glycaemic load and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giles, Graham G; Simpson, Julie A; English, Dallas R; Hodge, Allison M; Gertig, Dorota M; MacInnis, Robert J; Hopper, John L

    2006-01-01

    ...) in a prospective study of 324 breast cancers diagnosed in 12,273 post‐menopausal women. Although an increase of 1 standard deviation in carbohydrate was marginally associated with risk of breast cancer, relative risk (RR) 1.31 (95% CI, 0.98, 1.75...

  8. Recreational physical activity, body mass index, and survival in women with colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, J.G.J.; Phipps, A.I.; Neuhouser, M.L.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Thomson, C.A.; Irwin, M.L.; Lane, D.S.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Hou, L.; Jackson, R.D.; Kampman, E.; Newcomb, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous studies have shown that physical inactivity and obesity are risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer. However, controversy exists regarding the influence of these factors on survival in colorectal cancer patients. We evaluated the impact of recreational

  9. Body mass index and survival after diagnosis of invasive breast cancer: a study based on the Japanese National Clinical Database-Breast Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Masaaki; Tomotaki, Ai; Miyata, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Niikura, Naoki; Anan, Keisei; Hayashi, Naoki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Ishida, Takanori; Masuoka, Hideji; Iijima, Kotaro; Masuda, Shinobu; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Seigo; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have reported the association between body mass index (BMI) and outcome among Asian breast cancer patients. We analyzed data for 20,090 female invasive breast cancer patients who had been followed-up for a median period of 6.7 years entered in the National Clinical Database-Breast Cancer Registry between 2004 and 2006. We used mainly the WHO criteria for BMI (kg/m(2) ) categories; cause, 937 breast cancer-specific deaths, and 2433 recurrences were observed. Obesity was associated with an increased risk of all-cause (HR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.16-1.83) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.11-1.93) for all patients, and with all-cause (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.13-1.92) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.13-2.20) for postmenopausal patients. Being underweight was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death for all (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.16-1.71) and for postmenopausal patients (HR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.15-1.84). With regard to subtype and menopausal status, obesity was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer-specific death for all cases of luminal B tumor (HR: 2.59; 95% CI: 1.51-4.43; Pheterogeneity of Luminal B vs. Triple negative = 0.016) and for postmenopausal patients with luminal B tumor (HR: 3.24; 95% CI: 1.71-6.17). Being obese or underweight is associated with a higher risk of death among female breast cancer patients in Japan.

  10. Body mass index and risk of second obesity-associated cancers after colorectal cancer: a pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Todd M; Park, Yikyung; Robien, Kim; Shiels, Meredith S; Black, Amanda; Sampson, Joshua N; Purdue, Mark P; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Andreotti, Gabriella; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Curtis, Rochelle E; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Morton, Lindsay M

    2014-12-10

    To determine whether prediagnostic body mass index (BMI) is associated with risk of second obesity-associated cancers in colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, and whether CRC survivors have increased susceptibility to obesity-associated cancer compared with cancer-free individuals. Incident first primary CRC cases (N = 11,598) were identified from five prospective cohort studies. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to examine associations between baseline (prediagnostic) BMI and risk of second obesity-associated cancers (postmenopausal breast, kidney, pancreas, esophageal adenocarcinoma, endometrium) in CRC survivors, and compared associations to those for first obesity-associated cancers in the full cohort. Compared with survivors with normal prediagnostic BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), those who were overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (30+ kg/m(2)) had greater risk of a second obesity-associated cancer (n = 224; overweight hazard ratio [HR], 1.39; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.92; obese HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.12; per 5-unit change in BMI HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.29). The magnitude of risk for developing a first primary obesity-associated cancer was similar (overweight HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.21; obese HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.56 to 1.66; per 5-unit change in BMI HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.24). Before diagnosis CRC patients were somewhat more likely than the overall cohort to be overweight (44% v 41%) or obese (25% v 21%). CRC survivors who were overweight or obese before diagnosis had increased risk of second obesity-associated cancers compared with survivors with normal weight. The risks were similar in magnitude to those observed for first cancers in this population, suggesting increased prevalence of overweight or obesity, rather than increased susceptibility, may contribute to elevated second cancer risks in colorectal cancer survivors compared with the general population. These results support emphasis of existing weight guidelines for this high

  11. The Effects of Compliance with Nutritional Counselling on Body Composition Parameters in Head and Neck Cancer Patients under Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya Akagunduz, O.; Meseri Dalak, R.; Esassolak, M.; Uyar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) has been associated with increased risk of malnutrition in cancer patients, particularly in those with head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of compliance of patients with individual dietary counselling on body composition parameters in HNC patients under RT. Material and Methods. Sixty-nine consecutive patients (mean age: 61.0 ± 13.8) were prospectively followed. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was performed to determine body composition parameters before, in the middle of, and at the end of RT. All patients received nutritional counselling and majority of them (94.6%) received oral nutritional supplement (ONS) during RT or chemoradiotherapy. If a patient consumed ≥75% of the recommended energy and protein intake via ONS and regular food, he/she was considered to be “compliant” (n = 18), while those who failed to meet this criteria were considered to be “noncompliant” (n = 30). Results. Body mass index, weight, fat percentage, fat mass, fat free mass, and muscle mass did not decrease significantly over time in compliant patients, but in noncompliant patients, all of these indices decreased significantly from baseline compared to the end of treatment (p patients (11.1% versus 88.9%, resp.) (p patients considered as compliant with nutritional counselling than noncompliant ones during RT period. PMID:28116152

  12. Prognostic differences of World Health Organization - assessed mitotic activity index and mitotic impression by quick scanning in invasive ductal breast cancer patients younger than 55 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaland, Ivar; van Diest, Paul J.; Janssen, Emiel A. M.; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Baak, Jan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation marker mitotic activity index is the strongest prognostic indicator in lymph node-negative breast cancer. The World Health Organization (WHO) 2003-defined procedure for determining WHO-mitotic activity index is often replaced by a quick scan mitotic impression. We evaluated the pro

  13. The role of body mass index, physical activity, and diet in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Kampman, E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of dietary and other lifestyle factors in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival is largely unknown. We conducted a review to summarize the evidence from epidemiologic studies that examined the association of body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and nutrition with colorectal cancer

  14. The role of body mass index, physical activity, and diet in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival: a review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Kampman, E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of dietary and other lifestyle factors in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival is largely unknown. We conducted a review to summarize the evidence from epidemiologic studies that examined the association of body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and nutrition with colorectal cancer

  15. The role of body mass index, physical activity, and diet in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Kampman, E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of dietary and other lifestyle factors in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival is largely unknown. We conducted a review to summarize the evidence from epidemiologic studies that examined the association of body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and nutrition with colorectal cancer

  16. The role of body mass index, physical activity, and diet in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival: a review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Kampman, E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of dietary and other lifestyle factors in colorectal cancer recurrence and survival is largely unknown. We conducted a review to summarize the evidence from epidemiologic studies that examined the association of body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and nutrition with colorectal cancer

  17. Diet Quality Index as a predictor of short-term mortality in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Jennifer D; Calle, Eugenia E; Flagg, Elaine W; Coates, Ralph J; Ford, Earl S; Thun, Michael J

    2003-06-01

    The Diet Quality Index (DQI) was developed to measure overall dietary patterns and to predict chronic disease risk. This study examined associations between DQI and short-term all-cause, all-circulatory-disease, and all-cancer mortality in the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a cohort of US adults aged 50-79 years enrolled in a prospective study. After 4 years of follow-up (1992-1996), there were 869 deaths among 63,109 women and 1,736 deaths among 52,724 men. All study participants reported being disease free at baseline in 1992-1993. In age-adjusted Cox models, a higher DQI, which was indicative of a poorer quality diet, was positively related to all-cause and all-circulatory-disease mortality rates in both women and men and to cancer mortality in men only. However, in fully adjusted Cox models, only circulatory disease mortality was clearly positively related to DQI and only in women (medium-low-quality diet vs. highest-quality diet: rate ratio = 1.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.89). Although trend tests indicated significant positive relations between DQI and all-cause mortality, effects were small (rate ratios cancer mortality. As currently constructed, the DQI may have limited ability to predict mortality.

  18. [Scientific production and cancer-related collaboration networks in Peru 2000-2011: a bibliometric study in Scopus and Science Citation Index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Huamaní, Charles; Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Samanez-Figari, César; González-Alcaide, Gregorio

    2013-03-01

    A bibliometric study was carried out to describe the scientific production on cancer written by Peruvians and published in international health journals, as well as to assess the scientific collaboration networks. It included articles on cancer written in Peru between the years 2000 and 2011 and published in health journals indexed in SCOPUS or Science Citation Index Expanded. In the 358 articles identified, an increase in the production was seen, from 4 articles in 2000 to 57 in 2011.The most studied types were cervical cancer (77 publications); breast cancer (53), and gastric cancer (37). The National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) was the most productive institution (121 articles) and had the highest number of collaborations (180 different institutions). 52 clinical trials were identified, 29 of which had at least one author from INEN. We can conclude that, cancer research is increasing in Peru, the INEN being the most productive institution, with an important participation in clinical trials.

  19. Body mass index in childhood and adult risk of primary liver cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berentzen, Tina Landsvig; Gamborg, Michael; Holst, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Childhood overweight increases the risk of early development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which may predispose to carcinogenesis. We investigated if childhood body size during school ages was associated with the risk of primary liver cancer in adults. METHODS: A cohort...... hepatitis, alcohol-related disorders, and biliary cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: Higher BMI in childhood increases the risk of primary liver cancer in adults. In view of the high case fatality of primary liver cancer, this result adds to the future negative health outcomes of the epidemic of childhood overweight...

  20. Brazilian healthy eating index revised (BHEI-R) of women before and during adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccatto, Vanessa; Faria Di Pietro, Patricia; Nogueira Previdelli, Agatha; Kunradi Vieira, Francilene Gracieli; Cesa Schiavon, Cecilia; Engel, Raquel; Lizane Cardoso, Alyne; Altenburg de Assis, Maria Alice; Gilberto Crippa, Carlos; Gonzalez Chica, David Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Different therapeutic modalities for cancer trigger side effects that affect the selection of food by changing dietary patterns. To evaluate changes in the diet quality of women in adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Sociodemographic, clinical and anthropometric data of 78 women were collected. The Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised and its components were obtained from food frequency questionnaire applied before and after the treatment. At baseline, participants were classified according to tertiles of diet quality. The score of the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised (BHEI-R) in the lowest tertile was 48.4 to 75.2 points, the second tertile was 75.7 to 81.8 points, and the upper tertile was 82.0 to 95.7 points. During treatment, of the women classified in the first tertile, 62% improved their diet score quality passing to the upper tertiles. Women classified in the second tertile, did not significantly alter the diet quality during the treatment, although 46% went to the third tertile. Patients classified in the third tertile significantly reduced the average score of the Index by 7.3 points during the treatment. Among these women, 38% and 20% decreased their score for the second and first tertiles respectively, where the reduction in the diet quality was due to reducing the score of components Total fruits, Total vegetables, Dark Green and orange vegetables and Legumes, Total grains and Solid fats, Alcohol and Added sugar. Dietary changes, which were observed after breast cancer diagnosis, significantly altered the quality of diet among the women participating in the study. Future nutrition interventions are important to aid in food choices during the treatment. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of body mass index on breast cancer during premenopausal and postmenopausal periods: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Cheraghi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is no universal consensus on the relationship between body mass index (BMI and breast cancer. This meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the overall effect of overweight and obesity on breast cancer risk during pre- and post-menopausal period. DATA SOURCES: All major electronic databases were searched until April 2012 including Web of Knowledge, Medline, Scopus, and ScienceDirect. Furthermore, the reference lists and related scientific conference databases were searched. REVIEW METHODS: All prospective cohort and case-control studies investigating the association between BMI and breast cancer were retrieved irrespective of publication date and language. Women were assessed irrespective of age, race and marital status. The exposure of interest was BMI. The primary outcome of interest was all kinds of breast cancers confirmed pathologically. Study quality was assessed using the checklist of STROBE. Study selection and data extraction were performed by two authors separately. The effect measure of choice was risk ratio (RR(i and rate ratio (RR(a for cohort studies and odds ratio (OR in case-control studies. RESULTS: Of 9163 retrieved studies, 50 studies were included in meta-analysis including 15 cohort studies involving 2,104,203 subjects and 3,414,806 person-years and 35 case-control studies involving 71,216 subjects. There was an inverse but non-significant correlation between BMI and breast cancer risk during premenopausal period: OR = 0.93 (95% CI 0.86, 1.02; RR(i = 0.97 (95% CI 0.82, 1.16; and RR(a = 0.99 (95% CI 0.94, 1.05, but a direct and significant correlation during postmenopausal period: OR = 1.15 (95% CI 1.07, 1.24; RR(i = 1.16 (95% CI 1.08, 1.25; and RR(a = 0.98 (95% CI 0.88, 1.09. CONCLUSION: The results of this meta-analysis showed that body mass index has no significant effect on the incidence of breast cancer during premenopausal period. On the other hand, overweight and obesity may have a minimal effect on

  2. The importance of tissue handling of surgically removed breast cancer for an accurate assessment of the Ki-67 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Reiki; Osako, Tomofumi; Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Fujisue, Mamiko; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Masahiro; Tashima, Rumiko; Toyozumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Aim Insufficient attention for the Ki-67 immunohistochemistry has been given to the importance of tissue handling for surgical breast cancer specimens. We sought to investigate the effect of fixation status on the Ki-67. Methods We examined the effect of fixative, time to and duration of fixation using surgical specimens, and finally, compared the paired Ki-67 index in the tumour between core needle and surgical specimen. Results The Ki-67 was significantly higher when 10% neutral buffered formalin was used (p=0.0276). Insufficient fixation caused a drastic reduction in the Ki-67 index (p=0.0177), but not significant in oestrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Sixteen hours delayed time to fixation also caused a reduction of the Ki-67 (p=0.0284), but not significant in ER. Prolonged fixation significantly led to a gradual reduction in the Ki-67 in a time-dependent manner, but not in both ER and HER2. Finally, cutting the tumour before fixation improved fixation status and consequently caused an increased level of the Ki-67 index (p=0.0181), which resulted in a strong correlation of the Ki-67 between core needle and surgical specimen (r=0.8595). Conclusions Tissue handling of surgical specimen is critical for assessing the Ki-67 compared with ER and HER2. We should pay more attention to tissue fixation status for the standard assessment of the Ki-67 index. PMID:26420767

  3. Beyond Body Mass Index: Using Anthropometric Measures and Body Composition Indicators to Assess Odds of an Endometriosis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hediger, Mary L; Chen, Zhen; Lauver, Diane R; Sun, Liping; Peterson, C Matthew; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2017-05-24

    Body mass index (BMI) and endometriosis have been inversely associated. To address gaps in this research, we examined associations among body composition, endometriosis, and physical activity. Women from 14 clinical sites in the Salt Lake City, Utah and San Francisco, California areas and scheduled for laparoscopy/laparotomy were recruited during 2007-2009. Participants (N = 473) underwent standardized anthropometric assessments to estimate body composition before surgery. Using a cross-sectional design, odds of an endometriosis diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]; 95% confidence interval [CI]) were calculated for anthropometric and body composition measures (weight in kg; height in cm; mid upper arm, waist, hip, and chest circumferences in cm; subscapular, suprailiac, and triceps skinfold thicknesses in mm; arm muscle and fat areas in cm(2); centripetal fat, chest-to-waist, chest-to-hip, waist-to-hip, and waist-to-height ratios; arm fat index; and BMI in kg/m(2)). Physical activity (metabolic equivalent of task-minutes/week) and sedentariness (average minutes sitting on a weekday) were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form. Measures were modeled continuously and in quartiles based on sample estimates. Adjusted models were controlled for age (years, continuous), site (Utah/California), smoking history (never, former, or current smoker), and income (below, within 180%, and above of the poverty line). Findings were standardized by dividing variables by their respective standard deviations. We used adjusted models to examine whether odds of an endometriosis diagnosis were moderated by physical activity or sedentariness. Inverse relationships were observed between endometriosis and standardized: weight (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.57-0.88); subscapular skinfold thickness (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.98); waist and hip circumferences (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.98 and aOR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.94, respectively); total

  4. The association between body mass index and immunohistochemical subtypes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Suleyman; Erdem, Gokmen U; Karatas, Fatih; Aytekin, Aydin; Sever, Ali R; Ozisik, Yavuz; Altundag, Kadri

    2017-04-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is defined as a poor prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer (BC). However, there are controversial results regarding the various effects of BMI on BC, hence the exact pathophysiology of the relation between obesity and BC is still under debate, and remains unclear. This paper aims to investigate the association between BMI at presentation and BC subtypes defined according to the immunohistochemical classification in both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients with BC. This study is a retrospective and explorative analysis of the 3767 female BC patients from a single center. All patients' BMI at the time of initial diagnosis and tumor demographics were recorded. BMI was stratified into 3 groups as normal-weighted (BMI BMI = 25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). Immunohistochemical classification of the tumors was categorized into 4 groups as follows; luminal-like, HER2/luminal-like, HER2-like, and triple-negative according to the ER/PR and HER2 status. Distribution of Immunohistochemical subtypes, tumor characteristics, and overall survival (OS) analysis were evaluated according to the BMI groups in both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients. Median BMI of premenopausal and postmenopausal patients was 25.5 (kg/m(2)) and 28.8 (kg/m(2)), respectively (P BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) compared to BMI BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) had less common luminal-like subtype (P = 0.033) and more frequently presented with higher tumor stage (P = 0.012) and tumor grade (P = 0.004) compared to patients with BMI BMI BMI ≥25 kg/m(2). Premenopausal obese patients with triple-negative (P = 0.001) and luminal-like subtype (P = 0.002) had significantly shorter OS duration compared to overweight counterparts. HER2/luminal-like subtype was found to be significantly greater in postmenopausal overweight patients (P = 0.005). However, BMI had no any other significant effect on survival and immunohistochemical subtypes in postmenopausal patients

  5. The impact of body mass index dynamics on survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Younak; Kim, Tae-Yong; Lee, Kyung-hun; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2014-07-01

    High body mass index (BMI) is linked to an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (PC). However, in patients with advanced PC (APC), especially those receiving palliative chemotherapy, the impact of BMI on survival has not been investigated fully. To assess changes in BMI during the course of APC and their impact on patient survival, specifically for those receiving palliative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients with APC, all of whom were treated with palliative chemotherapy, were enrolled during 2003-2010. Clinical characteristics and prognoses were analyzed. A total of 425 patients participated (median age, 60.1 years). At diagnosis of APC, patients' BMI distribution of patients was as follow: Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of body composition during weight change on resting energy expenditure and homeostasis model assessment index in overweight nonsmoking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, Maryam; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Schautz, Britta; Braun, Wiebke; Glüer, Claus-C; Müller, Manfred J

    2014-04-01

    Weight change affects resting energy expenditure (REE) and metabolic risk factors. The impact of changes in individual body components on metabolism is unclear. We investigated changes in detailed body composition to assess their impacts on REE and insulin resistance. Eighty-three healthy subjects [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m²) range: 20.2-46.8; 50% obese] were investigated at 2 occasions with weight changes between -11.2 and +6.5 kg (follow-up periods between 23.5 and 43.5 mo). Detailed body composition was measured by using the 4-component model and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging. REE, plasma thyroid hormone concentrations, and insulin resistance were measured by using standard methods. Weight loss was associated with decreases in fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) by 72.0% and 28.0%, respectively. A total of 87.9% of weight gain was attributed to FM. With weight loss, sizes of skeletal muscle, kidneys, heart, and all fat depots decreased. With weight gain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney masses, and several adipose tissue depots increased except for visceral adipose tissue (VAT). After adjustments for FM and FFM, REE decreased with weight loss (by 0.22 MJ/d) and increased with weight gain (by 0.11 MJ/d). In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, changes in skeletal muscle, plasma triiodothyronine, and kidney masses explained 34.9%, 5.3%, and 4.5%, respectively, of the variance in changes in REE. A reduction in subcutaneous adipose tissue rather than VAT was associated with the improvement of insulin sensitivity with weight loss. Weight gain had no effect on insulin resistance. Beyond a 2-compartment model, detailed changes in organ and tissue masses further add to explain changes in REE and insulin resistance.

  7. Body mass index and prostate cancer severity: do obese men harbor more aggressive disease on prostate biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamie, Karim; Oberfoell, Stephanie; Kwan, Lorna; Labo, Jessica; Wei, John T; Litwin, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    To examine the association of obesity with the prebiopsy prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, clinical stage, and D'Amico tumor risk in 2 independent cohorts of men with prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer from California's Improving Access, Counseling and Treatment for Californians with Prostate Cancer program and from a random sample of men treated at the University of Michigan. We performed multivariate analyses to examine the relationship of body mass index (BMI) with the prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, clinical stage, and D'Amico tumor risk, while controlling for demographics. The mean age was 61.5 years, and the median prebiopsy PSA level was 6.7 ng/mL. Greater than 70% of men were at least overweight. On univariate analysis, the BMI was not associated with prebiopsy PSA levels, Gleason score, or D'Amico tumor risk. On multivariate analysis, we found no association between BMI and log-transformed PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, or D'Amico risk. Advancing age was associated with a greater risk of a higher prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, and D'Amico tumor risk. Obese men with prostate cancer were no more likely to have a higher prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, or D'Amico risk than those of normal weight. Although we do not know whether the BMI affected the prebiopsy PSA values in those without a diagnosis of prostate cancer, our findings suggest that the BMI does not affect the interpretation of the prebiopsy PSA levels in those with cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Glycemic load, glycemic index, and pancreatic cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Lumey, L.H.; Brants, H.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent studies of pancreatic cancer suggest a role for hyperinsulinemia in carcinogenesis. Because insulin is secreted in response to elevated blood glucose concentrations, dietary factors that increase these concentrations may be important in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Objective: The ob

  9. Prognostic value of body mass index and change in body weight in postoperative outcomes of lung cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tatsuo; Toyazaki, Toshiya; Chiba, Naohisa; Ueda, Yuichiro; Gotoh, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    Nutritional status is associated with an effect on oncological outcomes. However, the effect of nutritional status on postoperative survival in lung cancer has not been well studied. We retrospectively analysed and evaluated the effect of preoperative body mass index (BMI) and changes in body weight on postoperative outcomes of lung cancer surgery. A total of 1311 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent surgery between January 2001 and December 2011 were included in this study. Preoperative body weight at 4-12 weeks prior to surgery was obtained in 737 patients and the ratio of change in body weight was calculated. The patients were classified into four groups as follows: underweight (BMI obese (BMI ≥ 30). Postoperative survival curves of the BMI groups showed that the underweight group had a poorer prognosis than the other groups, especially for disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.03). Univariate and adjusted survival analyses using Cox's proportional hazards regression model showed that low BMI was a significantly poor prognostic factor in overall survival (OS) (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02, respectively) and DFS (P lung cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Modelling body mass index and endometrial cancer risk in a pooled-analysis of three case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, M; Rumi, F; Bagnardi, V; Dal Maso, L; Zucchetto, A; Levi, F; La Vecchia, C; Tavani, A

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the relation between body mass index (BMI) and endometrial cancer risk, and to describe the shape of such a relation. Pooled analysis of three hospital-based case-control studies. Italy and Switzerland. A total of 1449 women with endometrial cancer and 3811 controls. Multivariate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were obtained from logistic regression models. The shape of the relation was determined using a class of flexible regression models. The relation of BMI with endometrial cancer. Compared with women with BMI 18.5 to BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) . The odds ratios were 1.10 (95% CI 1.09-1.12) and 1.63 (95% CI 1.52-1.75) respectively for an increment of BMI of 1 and 5 units. The relation was stronger in never-users of oral contraceptives (OR 3.35, 95% CI 2.78-4.03, for BMI ≥30 versus BMI ≥30 versus best fitted by a cubic model, although after the exclusion of the 5% upper and lower tails, it was best fitted by a linear model. The results of this study confirm a role of elevated BMI in the aetiology of endometrial cancer and suggest that the risk in obese women increases in a cubic nonlinear fashion. The relation was stronger in never-users of oral contraceptives and in women with diabetes. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. Cyclooxygenase 2 polymorphism and colorectal cancer: -765G>C variant modifies risk associated with smoking and body mass index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Li Xing; Zhen-Ning Wang; Li Jiang; Yong Zhang; Ying-Ying Xu; Juan Li; Yang Luo; Xue Zhang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) -765G>C polymorphism is associated with susceptibility of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to evaluate the risk of colorectal cancer in relation to environmental exposures and polymorphism.METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 137 patients with colorectal cancer and 199 cancer-free controls in northeast China. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI).RESULTS: The -765G>C polymorphism was not independently associated with CRC risk. However, risk associated with the polymorphism differed by smoking and body mass index (BMI). Smoking and BMI associated risks were stronger among those with -765GG genotype, showing that smokers had a 2.682-fold greater risk of CRC than nonsmokers (51/43 vs 68/126, P = 0.006). Compared to those with a normal body mass index (BMI 18.5-22.9), those with overweight (BMI 23-24.9) had a 3.909-fold higher risk of CRC (OR = 3.909, 95% CI = 2.081-7.344; P < 0.001), while those with obesity (BMI > 25) had a 2.031- fold higher risk of CRC (OR = 1.107, 95% CI = 1.107-3.726; P = 0.022).CONCLUSION: Although COX-2 -765G>C polymorphism is not associated with an increased risk of CRC, -765GG genotype appears to be related to an increased risk in the presence of smoking and higher BMI.

  12. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahavir; Jangra, Babita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards of General Surgery and Oncosurgery at Pt.B.D.Sharma, PGIMS Rohtak, Haryana. A total of 128 histopathologically confirmed new cases of breast cancer during the study period were taken as cases. Equal number of controls was selected by simple random sampling. Controls were matched for age with range of ±2 years. Subjects were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire after obtaining written informed consent. Data were analyzed by applying appropriate statistical tests using SPSS version 17. Results: Age group of the cases was 25 - 78 years, while that of the controls was 24 - 79 years. Proportion of cases and controls living in rural areas were more than those living in urban areas. A significant association of breast cancer cases was found with high BMI and high fat intake Conclusion: Obesity and high fat intake are the significant risk factors, which are modifiable. So women should be encouraged to take care of all these factors. Maximum cases presented in late stages so public awareness of this fatal disease must be developed. PMID:24455581

  13. Association between body mass index and risk of breast cancer among females of north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahavir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, breast cancer is most common cancer among women. In India and other developing countries, breast carcinoma ranks second only to cervical carcinoma among women. Although studies have been done globally, to find association between BMI and breast cancer, very few studies in India document any such association. Purpose: To find out the association between BMI and breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A Case-control study was done from August 2009 - July 2010 in the wards of General Surgery and Oncosurgery at Pt.B.D.Sharma, PGIMS Rohtak, Haryana. A total of 128 histopathologically confirmed new cases of breast cancer during the study period were taken as cases. Equal number of controls was selected by simple random sampling. Controls were matched for age with range of ±2 years. Subjects were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire after obtaining written informed consent. Data were analyzed by applying appropriate statistical tests using SPSS version 17. Results: Age group of the cases was 25 - 78 years, while that of the controls was 24 - 79 years. Proportion of cases and controls living in rural areas were more than those living in urban areas. A significant association of breast cancer cases was found with high BMI and high fat intake Conclusion: Obesity and high fat intake are the significant risk factors, which are modifiable. So women should be encouraged to take care of all these factors. Maximum cases presented in late stages so public awareness of this fatal disease must be developed.

  14. Assessment value of blood flow velocity and resistance index detection by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound on effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Bin Fan

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the assessment value of blood flow velocity and resistance index detection by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound on effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.Methods:A total of 78 cases of ovarian cancer patients receiving treatment in our hospital from September 2012 to May 2014 were included for study, all patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and before and after treatment, transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound (TVCDU) was used to record resistance index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI), the expression levels of serum tumor markers, illness-related indicators and apoptosis-related factors in circulating blood were detected, and the correlation between TVCDU monitoring indexes and ovarian cancer-related indicators was further analyzed.Results: PI value (1.13±0.12) and RI value (0.65±0.05) of ovarian cancer patients after treatment were significantly higher than PI value (0.72±0.06) and RI value (0.32±0.03) of ovarian cancer patients before treatment; serum HE4, CA153, CA125 and毬-HCG levels of ovarian cancer patients after treatment were lower than those before treatment; serum MSLN, CCL-18, FS, CL and Hpa levels of ovarian cancer patients after treatment were lower than those before treatment; after ovarian cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ADM, HIF-1毩, PCNA and bcl-2 gene expression levels were lower than those before treatment; RI and PI values of ovarian cancer patients were inversely proportional to the expression levels of HE4, CA153, CA125,毬-HCG, MSLN, CCL-18, FS, CL, Hpa, ADM, HIF-1毩, PCNA and bcl-2. Conclusion:Blood flow velocity and resistance index detection by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound can be used as a highly efficient means to evaluate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer, and it has positive significance in judging disease severity, guiding treatment and other aspects.

  15. Annual Equivalent Value, Benefit Cost Ratio, and Composite Performance Index as Valuation Appraisal Support of Teakwood Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiharto Soeleman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Teak (Tectona grandis L.f is a premium high-value hardwood species being viewed as the most preferred species for investment opportunity. Recently, there has been a gradual move away from state control of teakwood plantation toward the participation of private enterprises. Several enterprises offer investment opportunity of teakwood plantation in which one of the main selling points being offered is a quick harvesting schedule. A quick harvesting time, however, might not provide the best outcome to the investors. This research exercise and compare the valuation appraisal of different harvesting schedules. The research focused on project planning, enterprise budget, financial projection, and valuation measurements to arrive at overall appraisal. To avoid any possible bias of individual investor's preference on common valuation criteria such as total investment, net cash flow (NCF, net present value (NPV, internal rate of return (IRR, profit on investment (P/I, and payback period (PBP, 3 otherS criteria namely benefit cost ratio (BCR, annual equivalent value (AEV, and composite performance index (CPI have been applied to arrive at a more fair valuation. It is concluded that the longer the harvesting schedule, the better valuation outcome could be achieved, and therefore, investors should critically review any investment proposal in accordance to their preference on valuation criteria.

  16. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine men...

  17. Determinants & Sequelae of Altered Body Composition in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blijdorp (Karin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, approximately 600 children are diagnosed with cancer every year. Due to improvement of treatment, combining surgery, multi-agent chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, in addition to remarkable advances in supportive care, survival has increased substantially over the last d

  18. Effects of increasing carbon nanofiber density in polyurethane composites for inhibiting bladder cancer cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Melissa; Chun, Young Wook; Im, Yeon Min; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is a versatile elastomer that is commonly used in biomedical applications. In turn, materials derived from nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanofibers (CNFs), have received increasing attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. Recent studies have shown that the dispersion of CNFs in PU significantly enhances composite nanoscale surface roughness, tensile properties, and thermal stability. Although there have been studies concerning normal primary cell functions on such nanocomposites, there have been few studies detailing cancer cell responses. Since many patients who require bladder transplants have suffered from bladder cancer, the ideal bladder prosthetic material should not only promote normal primary human urothelial cell (HUC) function, but also inhibit the return of bladder cancerous cell activity. This study examined the correlation between transitional (UMUC) and squamous (or SCaBER) urothelial carcinoma cells and HUC on PU:CNF nanocomposites of varying PU and CNF weight ratios (from pure PU to 4:1 [PU:CNF volume ratios], 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4 composites to pure CNF). Composites were characterized for mechanical properties, wettability, surface roughness, and chemical composition by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and goniometry. The adhesion and proliferation of UMUC and SCaBER cancer cells were assessed by MTS assays. Cellular responses were further quantified by measuring the amounts of nuclear mitotic protein 22 (NMP-22), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Results demonstrated that both UMUC and SCaBER cell proliferation rates decreased over time on substrates with increased CNF in PU. In addition, with the exception of VEGF from UMUC (which was the same across all materials), composites containing the most CNF activated cancer cells (UMUC and SCaBER) the least, as shown by

  19. Panx3 links body mass index and tumorigenesis in a genetically heterogeneous mouse model of carcinogen-induced cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a primary factor influencing cancer development. However, understanding the relationship between these two complex traits has been confounded by both environmental and genetic heterogeneity. Analysis of QTL linked to tumorigenesis and BMI identified several loci associated with both phenotypes. Exploring these loci in greater detail revealed a novel relationship between the Pannexin 3 gene (Panx3) and both BMI and tumorigenesis. Panx3 is positively associated with BMI and is strongly tied to a lipid metabolism gene expression network.

  20. Body mass index: different nutritional status according to WHO, OPAS and Lipschitz classifications in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Barao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The body mass index (BMI is the most common marker used on diagnoses of the nutritional status. The great advantage of this index is the easy way to measure, the low cost, the good correlation with the fat mass and the association to morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To compare the BMI differences according to the WHO, OPAS and Lipschitz classification. METHODS: A prospective study on 352 patients with esophageal, gastric or colorectal cancer was done. The BMI was calculated and analyzed by the classification of WHO, Lipschitz and OPAS. RESULTS: The mean age was 62.1 ± 12.4 years and 59% of them had more than 59 years. The BMI had not difference between the genders in patients <59 years (P = 0.75, but over 59 years the BMI was higher in women (P<0.01. The percentage of undernourished was 7%, 18% and 21% (P<0.01 by WHO, Lipschitz and OPAS, respectively. The overweight/obesity was also different among the various classifications (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the patients with gastrointestinal cancer had more than 65 years. A different cut off must be used for this patients, because undernourished patients may be wrongly considered well nourished.

  1. Workplace stressors and lifestyle-related cancer risk factors among female physicians: assessment using the Occupational Stress Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Karen; Nedic, Olesja

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between work stressors and lifestyle-related cancer risk factors (LRCRF): smoking, obesity, sedentariness and alcohol consumption, among 112 female physicians in Novi Sad, a region of high LRCRF prevalence. The participation rate was 92.6%. Participants completed the physician-specific version of the Occupational Stress Index (OSI). Self-reported data concerning LRCRF and working conditions were cross-validated with medical records, as well as with worksite measurements and expert observations. A total of 35 (31.3%) of the physicians were current smokers and 10 (8.9%) were heavy smokers (>20 cigarettes/day); 23 (20.5%) had a body mass index (BMI) of 28 or more, and 11 (9.8%) were obese (BMI> or =30). Only 27 (24.1%) regularly engaged in recreational physical activity (PA). Slightly over 5% consumed alcohol daily. Altogether 15 (13.4%) had a low lifestyle-related cancer risk profile (not a current smoker, BMIobesity and/or sedentariness) and problems hampering patient care (smoking). There is an urgent need to lower the LRCRF among female physicians in this high risk region. Our findings suggest that diminishing the work stressor burden should be considered when developing intervention strategies aimed at these risk factors.

  2. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  3. Distribution of lymph node metastasis is a prognostic index in patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirotoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2006-04-01

    In the TNM classification of colorectal carcinoma, N-staging is dependent on the number of metastases; in the Japanese classification system, staging usually has been based on the distribution of metastases (N1, paracolic; N2, along the major vessels; N3, at the root of major vessels). The aim of our study was to examine whether the concept of the distribution of nodal metastasis could improve the TNM classification for colorectal cancer. We studied the survival rates of 485 and 136 patients with stage III colonic and rectal cancer, respectively, who underwent curative surgery between 1979 and 1998. The patients were categorized into 4 groups: group 1, TNM-N1 classified in J-N1; group 2, TNM-N2 in J-N1; group 3, TNM-N1 in J-N2-3; and group 4, TNM-N2 in J-N2-3. In the colon cancer arm, the 5-year survival rates of the patients in groups 1 to 4 were 74%, 51%, 52%, and 54%, respectively. There was a significant difference in survival rate between groups 1 and 3 (P = .0002). Thus, in colon cancer, nodal metastasis along the major vessels was a bad prognostic factor, even though the number of nodes that were involved was cancer arm, the 5-year survival rates of the patients in each group were 65%, 39%, 60%, and 32%, respectively. Only the number of nodal metastases was an independently significant prognostic variable. This study suggests that adding the concept of nodal distribution to the conventional TNM staging of colon cancer will improve the accuracy in the evaluation of the nodal status.

  4. Serum Vitamin D is Not Helpful for Predicting Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Compared with the Prostate Health Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Carsten; Lein, Michael; Matalon, Julia; Kilic, Ergin; Zhao, Zhongwei; Busch, Jonas; Jung, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer and for active surveillance compared to PHI (Prostate Health Index). Of 480 prospectively biopsied men 222 had prostate cancer and 258 had no evidence of malignancy. In all men prostate specific antigen was less than 20 ng/ml. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D, prostate specific antigen, free prostate specific antigen and -2proPSA using a commercially available immunoassay system. PHI was calculated according to the equation, -2proPSA/free prostate specific antigen × √PSA. We determined 25-hydroxyvitamin D using a 2-step competitive binding immunoenzymatic vitamin D assay. The 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were not associated with Gleason grade according to the 2014 ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology) consensus conference Gleason grading system. PHI values were higher with increasing Gleason grade. Median 25-hydroxyvitamin D did not differ between men with prostate cancer vs no evidence of malignancy (50.6 vs 48.2 nmol/l, p = 0.192) or in ISUP Gleason subgroups despite seasonal variations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. However, PHI values significantly differed between the subgroup with no evidence of malignancy and all Gleason subgroups (p ISUP Gleason grade 1) from those with aggressive prostate cancer (ISUP Gleason grades 2-5). It remains highly improbable that 25-hydroxyvitamin D could be used as decision or selection marker for aggressive prostate cancer or for active surveillance compared to accepted markers, as recently suggested. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relevance of Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cell Composition and Functionality for Disease Outcome in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, Rico D.; Sotiriou, Christos; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schroeder, Carolien P.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Not all breast cancer patients benefit from neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy, resulting in considerable undertreatment or overtreatment. New insights into the role of tumor-infiltrating immune cells suggest that their composition, as well as their functionality, might serve as a biomarker

  6. Changes in body composition after childhood cancer treatment : Impact on future health status - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, C. A. J.; Gietema, J. A.; Kamps, W. A.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Postma, A.

    Purpose: To describe data on changes in body composition in childhood cancer survivors. Underlying mechanisms in development of obesity are addressed, in order to discuss intervention strategies. Methods: A systematic literature search was undertaken with a number of search terms. Results: Female

  7. Changes in body composition after childhood cancer treatment : Impact on future health status - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, C. A. J.; Gietema, J. A.; Kamps, W. A.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Postma, A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe data on changes in body composition in childhood cancer survivors. Underlying mechanisms in development of obesity are addressed, in order to discuss intervention strategies. Methods: A systematic literature search was undertaken with a number of search terms. Results: Female su

  8. Composition of The Knee Index, a novel three-dimensional biomechanical index for knee joint load, in subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Andriacchi, Tom; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    index of joint load for the knee, in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods The contribution of frontal, sagittal and transversal plane knee moments to KI was investigated in 24 subjects (13 women, age: 58 ± 7.6 years, BMI: 27.1 ± 3.0) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee......Background Knee joint load is an important factor associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. To provide an overall understanding of knee joint loading, the Knee Index (KI) has been developed to include moments from all three planes (frontal, sagittal and transversal). However, before KI...... osteoarthritis according to the ACR criteria. Three dimensional gait analysis was performed. Subjects walked barefoot at self-selected walking speed. The first peak magnitude KI from all three planes were calculated using inverse dynamics. Results Frontal plane kinematics contributed with 59.3% (SD 25.6) of KI...

  9. Proteasome activity and subunit composition in endometrial hyperplasia and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Spirina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In endometrial hyperplasia the total proteasome activity was not changed however the 26S proteasome activity was increased in comparison with the normal tissues. In endometrial cancer the high total proteasome activity and activities of 26S and 20S proteasomes wer e revealed. The changes in proteasome activities were correlated with the decreased content of α1α2α3α5α6α7 proteasome subunits and increased con- tents of LMP2, LMP7 and PA28β proteasome subunits compared to that in nonaltered tissues. Low content of α1α2α3α5α6α7 proteasome subunits was revealed at the second stage of cancer patients in comparison with that at the first stage.

  10. High-Definition Reconstruction of Clonal Composition in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Fischer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The extensive genetic heterogeneity of cancers can greatly affect therapy success due to the existence of subclonal mutations conferring resistance. However, the characterization of subclones in mixed-cell populations is computationally challenging due to the short length of sequence reads that are generated by current sequencing technologies. Here, we report cloneHD, a probabilistic algorithm for the performance of subclone reconstruction from data generated by high-throughput DNA sequencing: read depth, B-allele counts at germline heterozygous loci, and somatic mutation counts. The algorithm can exploit the added information present in correlated longitudinal or multiregion samples and takes into account correlations along genomes caused by events such as copy-number changes. We apply cloneHD to two case studies: a breast cancer sample and time-resolved samples of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, where we demonstrate that monitoring the response of a patient to therapy regimens is feasible. Our work provides new opportunities for tracking cancer development.

  11. Food composition of the diet in relation to changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Romaguera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary factors such as low energy density and low glycemic index were associated with a lower gain in abdominal adiposity. A better understanding of which food groups/items contribute to these associations is necessary. OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the association of food groups/items consumption on prospective annual changes in "waist circumference for a given BMI" (WC(BMI, a proxy for abdominal adiposity. DESIGN: We analyzed data from 48,631 men and women from 5 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at baseline and after a median follow-up time of 5.5 years. WC(BMI was defined as the residuals of waist circumference regressed on BMI, and annual change in WC(BMI (ΔWC(BMI, cm/y was defined as the difference between residuals at follow-up and baseline, divided by follow-up time. The association between food groups/items and ΔWC(BMI was modelled using centre-specific adjusted linear regression, and random-effects meta-analyses to obtain pooled estimates. RESULTS: Higher fruit and dairy products consumption was associated with a lower gain in WC(BMI whereas the consumption of white bread, processed meat, margarine, and soft drinks was positively associated with ΔWC(BMI. When these six food groups/items were analyzed in combination using a summary score, those in the highest quartile of the score--indicating a more favourable dietary pattern--showed a ΔWC(BMI of -0.11 (95% CI -0.09 to -0.14 cm/y compared to those in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSION: A dietary pattern high in fruit and dairy and low in white bread, processed meat, margarine, and soft drinks may help to prevent abdominal fat accumulation.

  12. Pretreatment body mass index and head and neck cancer outcome: A review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, D.; Kampman, E.; Herpen, C.M.L. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity defined as BMI>/=25kg/m(2) is increasing, also among head and neck cancer patients. It is unknown whether the presence of high BMI influences disease-related mortality, overall survival and recurrence in these patients. METHODS: We reviewed

  13. Extremes in body mass index affect overall survival in women with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Leslie H; Jackson, Amanda L; Soo, Adrianne E; Orrey, Danielle C; Gehrig, Paola A; Kim, Kenneth H

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effect of BMI on pathologic findings, cancer recurrence and survival in cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study of cervical cancer patients treated from July 2000 to March 2013 was performed. BMI was calculated, and patients were classified by BMI. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included stage, histopathology, disease-specific survival (DSS) and recurrence free survival (RFS). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared using Cox proportional hazard ratios. Of 632 eligible patients, 24 (4%) were underweight, 191 (30%) were normal weight, 417 (66%) were overweight/obese. There was no difference in age (p=0.91), stage at presentation (p=0.91), grade (p=0.46), or histology (p=0.76) between weight categories. There were fewer White patients in the underweight (54%) and overweight/obese (58%) groups compared to the normal weight (71%) group (p=0.04). After controlling for prognostic factors, underweight and overweight/obese patients had worse median RFS than normal weight patients (7.6 v 25.0months, p=0.01 and 20.3 v 25.0months, p=0.03). Underweight patients also had worse OS (10.4 v 28.4months, p=0.031) and DSS (13.8 v 28.4months, p=0.04) compared to normal weight patients. Overweight/obese patients had worse OS than normal weight patients (22.2 v 28.4months, p=0.03) and a trend toward worse DSS (21.9 v 28.4months, p=0.09). Both extremes of weight (underweight and overweight/obesity) were associated with worse survival in patients with cervical cancer. Optimizing weight in cervical cancer patients may improve outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Body Mass Index and Weight Fluctuation on Lymphedema Risk in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammallo, Lauren S.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Singer, Marybeth; Horick, Nora K.; Skolny, Melissa N.; Specht, Michelle C.; O'Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for lymphedema in patients treated for breast cancer has become increasingly important given the current lack of standardization surrounding diagnosis and treatment. Reports on the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight change with lymphedema risk are conflicting. We sought to examine the impact of pre-operative BMI and post-treatment weight change on the incidence of lymphedema. Methods From 2005-2011, 787 newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients underwent prospective arm volume measurements with a Perometer pre- and post-operatively. BMI was calculated from same-day weight and height measurements. Lymphedema was defined as a relative volume change (RVC) of ≥10%. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between lymphedema risk and pre-operative BMI, weight change, and other demographic and treatment factors. Results By multivariate analysis, a pre-operative BMI ≥30 was significantly associated with an increased risk of lymphedema compared to a pre-operative BMI lymphedema compared to patients with a pre-operative BMIlymphedema (HR: 1.97, p = lymphedema, whereas a BMI of 25-lymphedema. Patients with a pre-operative BMI≥30 and those who experience large weight fluctuations during and after treatment for breast cancer should be considered at higher-risk for lymphedema. Close monitoring or early intervention to ensure optimal treatment of the condition may be appropriate for these patients. PMID:24122390

  15. Improving DNA double-strand repair inhibitor KU55933 therapeutic index in cancer radiotherapy using nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xi; Lara, Haydee; Wagner, Kyle T.; Saripalli, Srinivas; Hyder, Syed Nabeel; Foote, Michael; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina; Caster, Joseph M.; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-11-01

    Radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment. Because of its importance, there has been high interest in developing agents and strategies to further improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. DNA double-strand repair inhibitors (DSBRIs) are among the most promising agents to improve radiotherapy. However, their clinical translation has been limited by their potential toxicity to normal tissue. Recent advances in nanomedicine offer an opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the proof of principle by developing and evaluating nanoparticle (NP) formulations of KU55933, a DSBRI. We engineered a NP formulation of KU55933 using nanoprecipitation method with different lipid polymer nanoparticle formulation. NP KU55933 using PLGA formulation has the best loading efficacy as well as prolonged drug release profile. We demonstrated that NP KU55933 is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro using clonogenic assay and is more effective as a radiosensitizer than free KU55933 in vivo using mouse xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Western blots and immunofluorescence showed NP KU55933 exhibited more prolonged inhibition of DNA repair pathway. In addition, NP KU55933 leads to lower skin toxicity than KU55933. Our study supports further investigations using NP to deliver DSBRIs to improve cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  16. Short-term outcomes for laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for body mass index ≥30 patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xingmao; Liang, Jianwei; Hu, Junjie; Zeng, Weigen; Zhou, Zhixiang

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is known to be a preoperative risk factor for gastric cancer surgery. This study aimed to investigate the influence of obesity on the surgical outcomes of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for gastric cancer. The clinical data of 131 patients with gastric cancer from January 2010-December 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Perioperative outcomes were compared between 43 patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) (obese group) and 88 patients with a BMI obese group than for the nonobese group (234.1 ± 57.2 min versus 212.2 ± 43.5 min, P = 0.026). There were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, the number of retrieved lymph nodes, postoperative recovery, and postoperative complications (P > 0.05). During the follow-up period of 5 mo-49 mo (average, 36 mo), the overall survival rates were not significantly different between the two groups (80.0% [32/40] versus 81.9% [68/83], P > 0.05). The differences in recurrence and metastasis between the two groups were not statistically significant. Our analysis revealed that LADG can be safely performed in patients with BMI ≥30. The procedure was considered to be difficult but sufficiently feasible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Visceral obesity, body mass index and risk of complications after colon cancer resection: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Hamit; Heus, Colin; Verduin, Wouter M; Lak, Arjen; Doodeman, Hieronymus J; Bemelman, Willem A; Houdijk, Alexander P

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the influence of visceral obesity (VO), as measured by preoperative abdominal CT scan, in relation to body mass index (BMI) on the incidence of postoperative complications and duration of hospital stay after colon cancer surgery. Patients who underwent elective resection for colon cancer between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2013, and had a preoperative CT scan were entered in the study. Visceral fat area (VFA) was determined by using the preoperative CT scan at the L3-L4 level. The effect of VO, defined as a VFA of >100 cm², on postoperative complications and duration of hospital stay was analyzed. Of 564 included patients, 65% had VO. VO was associated with more anastomotic leakage (P = .04), pneumonia (P = .02), wound infection (P = .03), reoperations (P = .04), and longer duration of hospital stay (P = .05). Of patients with a BMI obese (BMI > 30 kg/m²) groups, the rate of VO was much higher (81% and 90%, respectively), but was not associated significantly with complications or comorbidity, except for cardiac comorbidity (P colon cancer surgery is most pronounced in patients with a BMI < 25 kg/m². Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity and reliability of the Korean version of the Speech Handicap Index in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S S; Choi, S H; Hong, J A; Hong, Y H; Jeong, N G; Lee, S Y; Sung, M-W; Hah, J H

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the cross-cultural adaptation of the Speech Handicap Index (SHI) for Korean subjects and to determine its reliability and utility in patients with oral cavity cancer. The Korean version of the SHI was administered to 50 healthy subjects and 56 patients with speech problems resulting from treatment for oral cavity cancers. The content and construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability were examined. Healthy subject and patient group scores were compared, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to determine discriminatory ability. The Korean version of the SHI had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.99) and test-retest reliability for the total and subscales: total (T) 0.98, speech (S) 0.99, and psychosocial (P) 0.97. Mean scores in the healthy group were 0.5 (T), 0.2 (S), and 0.2 (P), whereas those in the patient group were 34.3 (T), 16.6 (S), and 15.5 (P). The scores differed significantly between the groups (P<0.05). The Korean version of the SHI can be a useful tool to evaluate a patient's self-perception of their speech dysfunction in daily life and to better understand postoperative speech disorders in patients with oral cavity cancer.

  19. Risk of breast, endometrial, colorectal, and renal cancers in postmenopausal women in association with a body shape index and other anthropometric measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Xue, Xiaonan; Kamensky, Victor; Lane, Dorothy; Bea, Jennifer W; Chen, Chu; Qi, Lihong; Stefanick, Marcia L; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Rohan, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    A body shape index (ABSI) has been proposed as a possible improvement over waist circumference (WC) as a marker of abdominal adiposity because it removes the correlation of WC with body mass index (BMI) and with height. We assessed the association of ABSI with four obesity-related cancers compared to that of other anthropometric measures of adiposity. We used data from the Women's Health Initiative, a large cohort of postmenopausal women, recruited between 1993 and 1998 and followed until September 2013, to assess the associations of ABSI and other anthropometric measures with risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, colorectum, and kidney. The four comparison anthropometric measures were BMI, WC, waist circumference-to-height ratio (WHtR), and waist-hip ratio (WHR). Over a median of 12.7 years of follow-up, among 143,901 women, we identified 7,039 invasive breast cancers, 1,157 endometrial cancers, 1,908 colorectal cancers, and 376 kidney cancers. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the association of quintiles of the five measures with risk of the four cancers. Unlike the other anthropometric indices, ABSI was not associated with increased risk of breast or endometrial cancer. BMI and WC were comparable as predictors of breast and endometrial cancer, and these associations were unchanged after mutual adjustment. For colorectal and kidney cancers, ABSI was a significant predictor comparable to BMI; however, WC showed the strongest association with colorectal cancer, and WC, WHtR, and WHR all showed stronger associations with kidney cancer. In contrast to other anthropometric measures, ABSI showed no association with risk of breast or endometrial cancer and was more weakly associated with risk of colorectal and kidney cancers compared to more established measures of central adiposity.

  20. Obesity is underestimated using body mass index and waist-hip ratio in long-term adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Blijdorp

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity, represented by high body mass index (BMI, is a major complication after treatment for childhood cancer. However, it has been shown that high total fat percentage and low lean body mass are more reliable predictors of cardiovascular morbidity. In this study longitudinal changes of BMI and body composition, as well as the value of BMI and waist-hip ratio representing obesity, were evaluated in adult childhood cancer survivors. METHODS: Data from 410 survivors who had visited the late effects clinic twice were analyzed. Median follow-up time was 16 years (interquartile range 11-21 and time between visits was 3.2 years (2.9-3.6. BMI was measured and body composition was assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, Lunar Prodigy; available twice in 182 survivors. Data were compared with healthy Dutch references and calculated as standard deviation scores (SDS. BMI, waist-hip ratio and total fat percentage were evaluated cross-sectionally in 422 survivors, in who at least one DXA scan was assessed. RESULTS: BMI was significantly higher in women, without significant change over time. In men BMI changed significantly with time (ΔSDS = 0.19, P<0.001. Percentage fat was significantly higher than references in all survivors, with the highest SDS after cranial radiotherapy (CRT (mean SDS 1.73 in men, 1.48 in women, P<0.001. Only in men, increase in total fat percentage was significantly higher than references (ΔSDS = 0.22, P<0.001. Using total fat percentage as the gold standard, 65% of female and 42% of male survivors were misclassified as non-obese using BMI. Misclassification of obesity using waist-hip ratio was 40% in women and 24% in men. CONCLUSIONS: Sixteen years after treatment for childhood cancer, the increase in BMI and total fat percentage was significantly greater than expected, especially after CRT. This is important as we could show that obesity was grossly underestimated using BMI and waist-hip ratio.

  1. Study on the change of metabolic indexes and digestive enzymes of patients with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer during the perioperative period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Tao He; Jun Huang; Na Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence degree of laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer on the related body indexes during the perioperative period, including metabolic indexes and digestive enzymes.Methods:A total of 70 patients with gastric cancer who received treatment during the time of January 2014 to November 2015 in our hospital were divided into two groups by the method of random number table, 35 patients with gastric cancer in control group were treated with open radical gastrectomy, 35 patients with gastric cancer in observation group were treated with laparoscopic radical operation, then the proteometabolism and digestive enzymes indexes at different time before and after the operations of two groups were detected and compared.Results:The differences of detection results of two groups before the operation were not obvious, while the related indexes of proteometabolism of observation group at first, third, seventh and fourteenth day after the operation were all higher than those of control group, and the related indexes of digestive enzymes were all better than those of control group, which were all obviously different.Conclusion: The influence of laparoscopic radical gastrectomy on the fluctuation of the metabolic indexes and digestive enzymes of patients during the perioperative period are relatively smaller, and the postoperative recovery of patients are relatively better.

  2. Spatial and seasonal variations of leaf area index (LAI) in subtropical secondary forests related to floristic composition and stand characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Xiang, Wenhua; Pan, Qiong; Zeng, Yelin; Ouyang, Shuai; Lei, Pifeng; Deng, Xiangwen; Fang, Xi; Peng, Changhui

    2016-07-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is an important parameter related to carbon, water, and energy exchange between canopy and atmosphere and is widely applied in process models that simulate production and hydrological cycles in forest ecosystems. However, fine-scale spatial heterogeneity of LAI and its controlling factors have yet to be fully understood in Chinese subtropical forests. We used hemispherical photography to measure LAI values in three subtropical forests (Pinus massoniana-Lithocarpus glaber coniferous and evergreen broadleaved mixed forests, Choerospondias axillaris deciduous broadleaved forests, and L. glaber-Cyclobalanopsis glauca evergreen broadleaved forests) from April 2014 to January 2015. Spatial heterogeneity of LAI and its controlling factors were analysed using geostatistical methods and the generalised additive models (GAMs) respectively. Our results showed that LAI values differed greatly in the three forests and their seasonal variations were consistent with plant phenology. LAI values exhibited strong spatial autocorrelation for the three forests measured in January and for the L. glaber-C. glauca forest in April, July, and October. Obvious patch distribution pattern of LAI values occurred in three forests during the non-growing period and this pattern gradually dwindled in the growing season. Stem number, crown coverage, proportion of evergreen conifer species on basal area basis, proportion of deciduous species on basal area basis, and forest types affected the spatial variations in LAI values in January, while stem number and proportion of deciduous species on basal area basis affected the spatial variations in LAI values in July. Floristic composition, spatial heterogeneity, and seasonal variations should be considered for sampling strategy in indirect LAI measurement and application of LAI to simulate functional processes in subtropical forests.

  3. Polymeric composite devices for localized treatment of early-stage breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Soboyejo, Wole

    2017-01-01

    For early-stage breast cancers mastectomy is an aggressive form of treatment. Therefore, there is a need for new treatment strategies that can enhance the use of lumpectomy by eliminating residual cancer cells with limited side effects to reduce local recurrence. Although, various radiotherapy-based methods have been developed, residual cells are found in 20–55% of the time at the first operation. Furthermore, some current treatment methods result in poor cosmesis. For the last decade, the authors have been exploring the use of polymeric composite materials in single and multi-modal implantable biomedical devices for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. In this paper, the concept and working principles of the devices, as well as selected results from experimental and numerical investigations, are presented. The results show the potential of the biomedical implants for cancer treatment. PMID:28245288

  4. A Population-Based Study of Childhood Cancer Survivors’ Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echo L. Warner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Population-based studies are needed to estimate the prevalence of underweight or overweight/obese childhood cancer survivors. Procedure. Adult survivors (diagnosed ≤20 years were identified from the linked Utah Cancer Registry and Utah Population Database. We included survivors currently aged ≥20 years and ≥5 years from diagnosis (N=1060, and a comparison cohort selected on birth year and sex (N=5410. BMI was calculated from driver license data available from 2000 to 2010. Multivariable generalized linear regression models were used to calculate prevalence relative risks (RR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI of BMI outcomes for survivors and the comparison cohort. Results. Average time since diagnosis was 18.5 years (SD=7.8, and mean age at BMI for both groups was 30.5 (survivors SD=7.7, comparison SD=8.0. Considering all diagnoses, survivors were not at higher risk for being underweight or overweight/obese than the comparison. Male central nervous system tumor survivors were overweight (RR=1.12, 95% CI 1.01–1.23 more often than the comparison. Female survivors, who were diagnosed at age 10 and under, had a 10% higher risk of being obese than survivors diagnosed at ages 16–20 (P<0.05. Conclusion. While certain groups of childhood cancer survivors are at risk for being overweight/obese, in general they do not differ from population estimates.

  5. Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Skeie, Guri; Loft, Steffen; Overvad, Kim; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja

    2013-03-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.

  6. Prospective association between cancer risk and an individual dietary index based on the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenfeld, Mathilde; Julia, Chantal; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Méjean, Caroline; Ducrot, Pauline; Péneau, Sandrine; Deschasaux, Mélanie; Latino-Martel, Paule; Fezeu, Léopold; Hercberg, Serge; Touvier, Mathilde

    2015-11-28

    The Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System (FSA-NPS) constitutes the basis for the Five-Colour Nutrition Label suggested in France to be put on the front-of-pack of food products. At the individual level, a dietary index (FSA-NPS DI) has been derived and validated and corresponds to a weighted mean of all FSA-NPS scores of foods usually consumed by the individual, reflecting the nutritional quality of his/her diet. Our aim was to investigate the association between the FSA-NPS DI and cancer risk in a large cohort. This prospective study included 6435 participants to the SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants cohort (1994-2007) who completed at least six 24 h dietary records during the first 2 years of follow-up. FSA-NPS DI was computed for each subject (higher values representing lower nutritional quality of the diet). After a median follow-up of 12·6 years, 453 incident cancers were diagnosed. Associations were characterised by multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. The FSA-NPS DI was directly associated with overall cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR)for a 1-point increment=1·08 (95 % CI 1·01, 1·15), P trend=0·02; HRQ5 v. Q1=1·34 (95 % CI 1·00, 1·81), P trend=0·03). This association tended to be more specifically observed in subjects with moderate energy intake (≤median, HRfor a 1-point increment=1·10 (95 % CI 1·01-1·20), P trend=0·03). No association was observed in subjects with higher energy intake (P trend=0·3). Results were not statistically significant for breast and prostate cancer risks. For the first time, this study investigated the prospective association between the FSA-NPS individual score and cancer risk. The results suggest that unhealthy food choices may be associated with a 34 % increase in overall cancer risk, supporting the public health relevance of developing front-of-pack nutrition labels based on this score.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of risk of malignancy index in predicting complete tumor removal at primary debulking surgery for ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Håkansson, Fanny; Antonsen, Sofie L;

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer patients in whom complete tumor removal is impossible with primary debulking surgery (PDS) may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery. However, the task of performing a pre-operative evaluation of the feasibility of PDS is difficult. We aimed...... to investigate whether the risk of malignancy index (RMI) was a useful marker for this evaluation. RMI and surgical outcome were investigated in 164 patients, 49 of whom had no residual tumor after PDS. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.72 (confidence interval: 0.......64-0.80). The possibility of complete tumor removal decreased with increasing RMI and there was a tendency towards higher RMI in patients with residual tumor after PDS, but no single cut-off value of RMI produced useful clinical predictive values. In conclusion, RMI alone is not an optimal method to determine whether...

  8. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF THE BASELINE VALUES OF SERUM TESTOSTERONE AND FREE ANDROGEN INDEX IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Grigoryev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing incidence of prostate cancer (PC and its variable nature are an important problem today. PC is distinguished by its latent ability in many cases, which makes its screening difficult.Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is one of the most common tumor markers of PC, which are used for mass male screening. However, the detection rate of PC in men with normal PSA values is also very high. This promotes an active search for new markers and predictors of PC.The effect of androgens on hormonal carcinogenesis in the prostate suggests that the analysis of serum testosterone concentrations and free androgen index may be made in patients with low PSA levels in the early diagnosis and prognosis of PC.

  9. Educational Differences in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer - Quantifying Indirect Effects through Health Behaviors, Body Mass Index and Reproductive Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Lange, Theis; Andersen, Ingelise;

    2013-01-01

    of the effect of educational level on breast cancer incidence into indirect effects through reproductive patterns (parity and age at first birth), body mass index and health behavior (alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and hormone therapy use). The study was based on a pooled cohort of 6 studies from......-years at risk. Of these, 26% (95% CI 14%-69%) could be attributed to alcohol consumption. Similar effects were observed for age at first birth (32%; 95% CI 10%-257%), parity (19%; 95%CI 10%-45%), and hormone therapy use (10%; 95% CI 6%-18%). Educational level modified the effect of physical activity on breast...... educational level may be more vulnerable to physical inactivity compared to women of low educational level....

  10. 基于综合指数法的中国汽车市场综合指数模型设计%Research of China Auto Market Composite Index Model Based on Comprehensive Index Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕小峰; 钱志新; 张晓春; 程萌

    2013-01-01

    运用综合指数法构建了中国汽车市场综合指数模型,并结合因子分析法和层次分析法,从定性和定量相结合的角度进行了指数模型的构建和计算,使得指数的编制和发布更加科学、合理。运用该指数可以有效地把握汽车市场的综合发展趋势,并能简单直观地识别高峰和低谷,具有一定的预警作用,相关研究成果在实践中得到了很好地应用和推广。%China auto market composite index model is created based on the comprehensive index method .The analytic hierarchy process and factor analysis method are synthesized , and the index model is designed based on the qualitative and quantitative method .The trend can be analyzed in the automotive market , and has a certain role in early warning .The improved methods and model will make the index calculation more meaningful and more scientific .

  11. Seasonal variation in the condition index, meat yield and biochemical composition of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis (Linnaeus, 1758 from the Dardanelles, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Yildiz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Dardanelles between October 2007 and August 2009 when condition index, meat yield, biochemical compositions and environmental parameters of seawater were investigated and the study area was found to have available conditions for cultivation. Investigation of the study area showed a positive correlation in particular among condition index, seasonal variation of temperature, protein, fat and chlorophyll-a; a negative correlation was seen between them and carbohydrate value. It was clear from the two years study that the most ideal period for oyster harvest is April and August especially when condition index was maximum followed by a winter with no oyster yield is available in terms of the related processes involving oyster cultivation.

  12. Seasonal variation in the condition index, meat yield and biochemical composition of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis (Linnaeus, 1758 from the Dardanelles, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Acarlı

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Dardanelles between October 2007 and August 2009 when condition index, meat yield, biochemical compositions and environmental parameters of seawater were investigated and the study area was found to have available conditions for cultivation. Investigation of the study area showed a positive correlation in particular among condition index, seasonal variation of temperature, protein, fat and chlorophyll-a; a negative correlation was seen between them and carbohydrate value. It was clear from the two years study that the most ideal period for oyster harvest is April and August especially when condition index was maximum followed by a winter with no oyster yield is available in terms of the related processes involving oyster cultivation.

  13. Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Skeie, Guri; Loft, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects....... effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment........ The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom...... 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0...

  14. Effects of Human Development Index and Its Components on Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality: a Global Ecological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Salman; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh; Mansori, Kamyar; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Ayubi, Erfan

    2016-01-01

    Geographic disparity for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality according to the human development index (HDI) might be expected. This study aimed at quantifying the effect measure of association HDI and its components on the CRC incidence and mortality. In this ecological study, CRC incidence and mortality was obtained from GLOBOCAN, the global cancer project for 172 countries. Data were extracted about HDI 2013 for 169 countries from the World Bank report. Linear regression was constructed to measure effects of HDI and its components on CRC incidence and mortality. A positive trend between increasing HDI of countries and age-standardized rates per 100,000 of CRC incidence and mortality was observed. Among HDI components education was the strongest effect measure of association on CRC incidence and mortality, regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals) being 2.8 (2.4, 3.2) and 0.9 (0.8, 1), respectively. HDI and its components were positively related with CRC incidence and mortality and can be considered as targets for prevention and treatment intervention or tracking geographic disparities.

  15. The contralateral synchronous breast carcinoma: a comparison of histology, localization, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics with the primary index cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Diane M; Böttcher, Joachim; Baltzer, Pascal A T; Dietzel, Matthias; Vag, Tibor; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Camara, Oumar; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Kaiser, Werner A

    2010-04-01

    Women with unilateral breast carcinoma reveal an increased risk of suffering from malignancies in the contralateral breast. There is a controversy about the existence of bilateral phenotypic similarities. The aim of this investigation was to compare histologic findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters, and tumor localizations of synchronous bilateral carcinomas. MRI revealed in 42 of 875 women (4.8%) with primary index carcinomas a contralateral malignancy. Twenty-two of the 42 contralateral carcinomas could only be detected by MRI, not by clinical examination, X-ray mammography, or ultrasonography. In 875 patients, MRI therefore identified 22 (2.5%) otherwise occult contralateral cancers. To evaluate bilateral MRI similarities, multiple dynamic and morphologic parameters were evaluated. Of 42 bilateral cancer pairs, histologic tumor type was identical in 54.8% (correlation analysis, P types were bilaterally congruent on MRI (P analogies of tumor neoangiogenesis, histopathologic components, and infiltration in the surrounding stroma. Bilateral synchronous carcinomas may represent on each site distinct, but similar biologic entities, due to analogous influences of tumor developments.

  16. Study on the change of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Qiong Luo; LiangTang; Ping Xie; Yan-Mei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study and observe the change status of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer.Methods:A total of 72 patients with cervical cancer in our hospital from February 2014 to September 2015 were selected as the observation group, 72 healthy women at the same period were selected as the control group, then the HPV DNA virus content and constitution, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of two groups were analyzed and compared, and the detection results of observation group with stageⅠ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ andⅣ of cervical cancer were compared.Results:The rates of HPV DNA virus content and>500 in the observation group were all higher than those of control group, the circulating blood and tissue miR-21 were all higher than those of control group, while the circulating blood and tissue miR-126, miR-143 and miR-145 were all lower than those of control group, and the detection results of observation group with stageⅠ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ andⅣ of cervical cancer all had obvious differences, the differences were all significant.Conclusion:The changes of the status of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer are great, and the influence of cervical cancer stage for the detection results are great, so it has active guiding significance for the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  17. Expanding the therapeutic index of radiation therapy by combining in situ gene therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Teh, Bin S; Timme, Terry L; Fujita, Tetsuo; Satoh, Takefumi; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Vlachaki, Maria T; Amato, Robert J; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian J; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Thompson, Timothy C; Butler, E Brian

    2006-02-01

    The advances in radiotherapy (3D-CRT, IMRT) have enabled high doses of radiation to be delivered with the least possible associated toxicity. However, the persistence of cancer (local recurrence after radiotherapy) despite these increased doses as well as distant failure suggesting the existence of micro-metastases, especially in the case of higher risk disease, have underscored the need for continued improvement in treatment strategies to manage local and micro-metastatic disease as definitively as possible. This has prompted the idea that an increase in the therapeutic index of radiotherapy might be achieved by combining it with in situ gene therapy. The goal of these combinatorial therapies is to maximize the selective pressure against cancer cell growth while minimizing treatment-associated toxicity. Major efforts utilizing different gene therapy strategies have been employed in conjunction with radiotherapy. We reviewed our and other published clinical trials utilizing this combined radio-genetherapy approach including their associated pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo models. The use of in situ gene therapy as an adjuvant to radiation therapy dramatically reduced cell viability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. No significant worsening of the toxicities normally observed in single-modality approaches were identified in Phase I/II clinical studies. Enhancement of both local and systemic T-cell activation was noted with this combined approach suggesting anti-tumor immunity. Early clinical outcome including biochemical and biopsy data was very promising. These results demonstrate the increased therapeutic efficacy achieved by combining in situ gene therapy with radiotherapy in the management of local prostate cancer. The combined approach maximizes tumor control, both local-regional and systemic through radio-genetherapy induced cytotoxicity and anti-tumor immunity.

  18. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-09-11

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  19. An NIR-responsive and sugar-targeted polypeptide composite nanomedicine for intracellular cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Zhou, Linzhu; Su, Yue; Dong, Chang-Ming

    2014-10-25

    The upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP)-loaded polypeptide composite nanoparticles that present fast NIR-sensitivity and tunable sugar-targeting properties are fabricated, opening a new avenue for on-demand and targeted cancer therapy. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the nanoparticles dropped 4.7-fold or 3.1-fold compared to non-targeted or non-irradiated counterparts.

  20. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  1. Evaluation of an Optimal Cut-Off Point for the Ki-67 Index as a Prognostic Factor in Primary Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Rumiko; Nishimura, Reiki; Osako, Tomofumi; Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Masahiro; Fujisue, Mamiko; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Arima, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Ki-67 index is an important biomarker for indicating the proliferation of cancer cells and is considered to be an effective prognostic factor for breast cancer. However, a standard cut-off point for the Ki-67 index has not yet been established. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective study was to determine an optimal cut-off point in order to establish it as a more accurate prognostic factor. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Ki-67 index was performed on 4329 patients with primary breast cancer from August 1987 to March 2012. Out of this sample, there were 3186 consecutive cases from September 1997 with simultaneous evaluations of ER, PgR and HER2 status. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the factors related to OS. The hazard ratios (HR) and the p values were then compared to determine the optimal cut-off point for the Ki-67 index. The median Ki-67 index value was 20.5% (mean value 26.2%). The univariate analysis revealed that there was a statistically significant negative correlation with DFS and OS and the multivariate analysis revealed that the Ki-67 index value was a significant factor for DFS and OS. The top seven cut-off points were then carefully chosen based on the results of the univariate analysis using the lowest p-values and the highest HR as the main selection criteria. The multivariate analysis of the factors for OS showed that the cut-off point of 20% had the highest HR in all of the cases. However, the cutoff point of 20% was only a significant factor for OS in the Luminal/HER2- subtype. There was no correlation between the Ki-67 index value and OS in any of the other subtypes. These data indicate that the optimal cut-off point of 20% is the most effective prognostic factor for Luminal/HER2- breast cancer. PMID:26177501

  2. Process of changing the refractive index of a composite containing a polymer and a compound having large dipole moment and polarizability and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Peyghambarian, Nasser (Inventor); Kippelen, Bernard (Inventor); Volodin, Boris (Inventor); Hendrickx, Eric (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Fused ring bridge, ring locked dyes that form thermally stable photorfractive compositions. The fused ring bridge structures are .pi.-conjugated bonds in benzene-, naphthalene- or anthracene-derived fused ring systems that connect donor and acceptor groups. The donor and acceptor groups contribute to a high molecular dipole moment and linear polarizability anisotropy. The polarization characteristics of the dye molecules are stabilized since the bonds in the fused ring bridge are not susceptible to rotation, reducing the opportunity for photoisomerization. The dyes are compatible with polymeric compositions, including thermoplastics. The dyes are electrically neutral but have charge transport, electronic and orientational properties such that upon illumination of a composition containing the dye, the dye facilitates refractive index modulation and a photorefractive effect that can be utilized advantageously in numerous applications such as in optical quality devices and biological imaging.

  3. Food composition of the diet in relation to changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romaguera, Dora; Ängquist, Lars; Du, Huaidong

    2011-01-01

    Dietary factors such as low energy density and low glycemic index were associated with a lower gain in abdominal adiposity. A better understanding of which food groups/items contribute to these associations is necessary....

  4. Optimization of DRASTIC method by artificial neural network, nitrate vulnerability index, and composite DRASTIC models to assess groundwater vulnerability for unconfined aquifer of Shiraz Plain, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghapour, Mohammad Ali; Fadaei Nobandegani, Amir; Talebbeydokhti, Nasser; Bagherzadeh, Somayeh; Nadiri, Ata Allah; Gharekhani, Maryam; Chitsazan, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Extensive human activities and unplanned land uses have put groundwater resources of Shiraz plain at a high risk of nitrate pollution, causing several environmental and human health issues. To address these issues, water resources managers utilize groundwater vulnerability assessment and determination of protection. This study aimed to prepare the vulnerability maps of Shiraz aquifer by using Composite DRASTIC index, Nitrate Vulnerability index, and artificial neural network and also to compare their efficiency. The parameters of the indexes that were employed in this study are: depth to water table, net recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of the vadose zone, hydraulic conductivity, and land use. These parameters were rated, weighted, and integrated using GIS, and then, used to develop the risk maps of Shiraz aquifer. The results indicated that the southeastern part of the aquifer was at the highest potential risk. Given the distribution of groundwater nitrate concentrations from the wells in the underlying aquifer, the artificial neural network model offered greater accuracy compared to the other two indexes. The study concluded that the artificial neural network model is an effective model to improve the DRASTIC index and provides a confident estimate of the pollution risk. As intensive agricultural activities are the dominant land use and water table is shallow in the vulnerable zones, optimized irrigation techniques and a lower rate of fertilizers are suggested. The findings of our study could be used as a scientific basis in future for sustainable groundwater management in Shiraz plain.

  5. Differences in intensive care unit work environments among and within hospitals using subscales and a composite measure of the Revised Nursing Work Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; Mark, Barbara A; Yun, Sung-Cheol; June, Kyung Ja

    2011-12-01

    To examine variations in nurses' perceptions of their work environments among hospitals and intensive care units, and to compare analytic findings from using subscales and a composite measure of the Revised Nursing Work Index at the hospital and intensive care unit levels. A positive relationship has been found between the nurse work environment and outcomes for patients and nurses. Nurses' perceptions of their work environments have been analysed using different analytic approaches. A survey was conducted in August-October 2007 that included 817 staff nurses in 39 adult intensive care units of 15 hospitals in South Korea. Seven subscales of the Revised Nursing Work Index were identified from an exploratory factor analysis. The subscales and composite (mean of the seven subscales) for each hospital and intensive care unit were analysed using multilevel regression analyses and classified as good, moderate or poor environments. Considerable variations in the subscales were found among both hospitals and intensive care units. On the composite measure, 2 hospitals were rated as good, 10 moderate and 3 poor; 9 intensive care units were ranked as good, 24 moderate and 6 poor. Even intensive care units within hospitals exhibited variations in the subscales and composite. Most hospitals and intensive care units had mixed (i.e., good, moderate, poor) environments across the seven subscales and thus, subscales were not always congruent with the composite. Heterogeneity of the subscales and the composite measure, and the differences among intensive care units within hospitals imply that use of different analytic approaches may reveal different findings and perspectives of nurse work environments. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Frailty as determined by a comprehensive geriatric assessment-derived deficit-accumulation index in older patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Harvey Jay; Smith, David; Sun, Can-Lan; Tew, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Owusu, Cynthia; Klepin, Heidi D; Gross, Cary P; Lichtman, Stuart M; Gajra, Ajeet; Filo, Julie; Katheria, Vani; Hurria, Arti

    2016-12-15

    Frailty has been suggested as a construct for oncologists to consider in treating older cancer patients. Therefore, the authors assessed the potential of creating a deficit-accumulation frailty index (DAFI) from a largely self-administered comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). Five hundred patients aged ≥65 years underwent a CGA before receiving chemotherapy. A DAFI was constructed, resulting in a 51-item scale, and cutoff values were examined for patients in the robust/nonfrail (cutoff value, 0.0 cancer and can indicate the frailty status of the population. The frailty status so determined is associated both with outcomes likely because of chemotherapy toxicity and with those likely because of age-related physiologic and functional deficits and thus can be useful in the overall assessment of the patient. Cancer 2016;122:3865-3872. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedirko, V.; Lukanova, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopolou, A.; Trepo, E.; Noethlings, U.; Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boffetta, P.; Tjonneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Naska, A.; Adarakis, G.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, P. D.; Peeters, P. H.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Quiros, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Huerta, J. M.; Barricarte, A.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Crowe, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Chuang, S. C.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.; Werner, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellula

  8. Obesity Is Underestimated Using Body Mass Index and Waist-Hip Ratio in Long-Term Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijdorp, Karin; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Pieters, Rob; Boot, Annemieke M.; Delhanty, Patric J. D.; van der Lely, Aart-Jan; Neggers, Sebastian J. C. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Obesity, represented by high body mass index (BMI), is a major complication after treatment for childhood cancer. However, it has been shown that high total fat percentage and low lean body mass are more reliable predictors of cardiovascular morbidity. In this study longitudinal changes

  9. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Having performed analytical validation studies, we are now assessing the clinical utility of the upgraded automated Bone Scan Index (BSI) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength of the a...

  10. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yansong; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L

    2016-01-01

    Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environmental factors.

  11. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk : Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; Jenkins, Mark; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael E; Kabisch, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Koppert, Linetta B; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathi E; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perez, Jose I A; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shilin; Hall, Per; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environme

  12. Association between carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and body mass index in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Qin; Tan, Shu-Yun; Jiang, Yan-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been well recognized as tumor markers for colorectal cancer. Previous studies suggested that obesity is inversely associated with the screening of CEA and CA19-9 levels and may reduce screening sensitivity. This study was conducted to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with serum CEA and CA19-9 concentration in colorectal cancer patients. A total of 300 patients were enrolled in the study, selected from 2,950 consecutive colorectal cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment between August, 1994 and December, 2005. The association of BMI with CEA concentration, total circulating CEA mass and plasma volume was assessed by determining P-values for trends. The multivariate linear regression analysis was used to adjust for clinicopathological confounding factors to analyze the main outcome measures when CEA and CA19-9 had been log-transformed. Increased BMI was linearly correlated with a higher plasma volume. Using the stepwise method, the multiple regression model including BMI categories was reconstructed as follows: loge[CEA]=0.208+0.241[liver metastasis]+0.051 [differentiation]+0.092[TNM]; loge[CA19-9]=0.969+0.233 [gender]+0.141[ascites]+0.09[TNM]. The mean survival time in CEA(+)/CA19-9(-), CEA(+)/CA19-9(+), CEA(-)/CA19-9(-) and CEA(-)/CA19-9(+) patients was 84.8, 58.2, 100.6 and 74.7 months, respectively. The 1-/3-year survival rates in each group was 76.0/59.8, 66.2/43.5, 96.3/87.6 and 71.7/41.0, respectively. In conclusion, the decreased concentration of CEA and CA19-9 in patients of higher BMIs may be the result of the hemodilution effect. The BMI factor should be considered during the surveillance of colorectal cancer. In addition, patients with simultaneous positive expression of CEA and CA19-9 exhibited shorter survival time.

  13. 'Genome order index' should not be used for defining compositional constraints in nucleotide sequences - a case study of the Z-curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josić Krešimir

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Z-curve is a three dimensional representation of DNA sequences proposed over a decade ago and has been extensively applied to sequence segmentation, horizontal gene transfer detection, and sequence analysis. Based on the Z-curve, a "genome order index," was proposed, which is defined as S = a2+ c2+t2+g2, where a, c, t, and g are the nucleotide frequencies of A, C, T, and G, respectively. This index was found to be smaller than 1/3 for almost all tested genomes, which was taken as support for the existence of a constraint on genome composition. A geometric explanation for this constraint has been suggested. Each genome was represented by a point P whose distance from the four faces of a regular tetrahedron was given by the frequencies a, c, t, and g. They claimed that an inscribed sphere of radius r = 1/ contains almost all points corresponding to various genomes, implying that S r2. The distribution of the points P obtained by S was studied using the Z-curve. Results In this work, we studied the basic properties of the Z-curve using the "genome order index" as a case study. We show that (1 the calculation of the radius of the inscribed sphere of a regular tetrahedron is incorrect, (2 the S index is narrowly distributed, (3 based on the second parity rule, the S index can be derived directly from the Shannon entropy and is, therefore, redundant, and (4 the Z-curve suffers from over dimensionality, and the dimension stands for GC content alone suffices to represent any given genome. Conclusion The "genome order index" S does not represent a constraint on nucleotide composition. Moreover, S can be easily computed from the Gini-Simpson index and be directly derived from entropy and is redundant. Overall, the Z-curve and S are over-complicated measures to GC content and Shannon H index, respectively. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Claus Wilke, Joel Bader, Marek Kimmel and Uladzislau Hryshkevich (nominated by Itai Yanai.

  14. Average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer and the association with the marginalization index in Mexico in 2000 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Alberto Dávila Cervantes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to calculate average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer in Mexico in 2000 and 2010. Data on mortality in women aged between 20 and 84 years was obtained from the National Institute for Statistics and Geography. Age-specific mortality rates and average years of life lost, which is an estimate of the number of years that a person would have lived if he or she had not died prematurely, were estimated for both diseases. Data was disaggregated into five-year age groups and socioeconomic status based on the 2010 marginalization index obtained from the National Population Council. A decrease in average years of life lost due to cervical cancer (37.4% and an increase in average years of life lost due breast cancer (8.9% was observed during the period studied. Average years of life lost due to cervical cancer was greater among women living in areas with a high marginalization index, while average years of life lost due to breast cancer was greater in women from areas with a low marginalization index.

  15. Average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer and the association with the marginalization index in Mexico in 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Claudio Alberto Dávila; Botero, Marcela Agudelo

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer in Mexico in 2000 and 2010. Data on mortality in women aged between 20 and 84 years was obtained from the National Institute for Statistics and Geography. Age-specific mortality rates and average years of life lost, which is an estimate of the number of years that a person would have lived if he or she had not died prematurely, were estimated for both diseases. Data was disaggregated into five-year age groups and socioeconomic status based on the 2010 marginalization index obtained from the National Population Council. A decrease in average years of life lost due to cervical cancer (37.4%) and an increase in average years of life lost due breast cancer (8.9%) was observed during the period studied. Average years of life lost due to cervical cancer was greater among women living in areas with a high marginalization index, while average years of life lost due to breast cancer was greater in women from areas with a low marginalization index.

  16. Tobacco, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity, and the risk of head and neck cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian (PLCO) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashibe, Mia; Hunt, Jason; Wei, Mei; Buys, Saundra; Gren, Lisa; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy

    2013-07-01

    Estimation of attributable fractions for tobacco and alcohol, and investigation of the association between body mass index (BMI) and head and neck cancer risk have largely been in case-control studies. These aspects and physical activity need to be assessed as possible head and neck cancer risk/protective factors in a cohort study. In the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial, of the 101,182 study subjects, 177 individuals developed head and neck cancer. The proportion of head and neck cancer cases attributed to tobacco and/or alcohol was 66% (50.5% tobacco alone, 14.7% alcohol alone, 0.9% tobacco and alcohol combined). BMI was not associated with head and neck cancer risk, but increasing hours of physical activity per week was associated with a reduced head and neck cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.35-0.96). Cigarette smoking is clearly the most important head and neck cancer risk factor in this population. The reduced cancer risk due to physical activity was consistent with results from a pooled analysis of case-control studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Incremental criterion validity of WAIS-IV factor index scores: relationships with WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-4th Edition (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008a) factor index scores in predicting academic achievement on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-2nd Edition (WIAT-II; Psychological Corporation, 2002a) and on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-3rd Edition (WIAT-III; Wechsler, 2009a) beyond that predicted by the WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ). As with previous intelligence test incremental validity studies, the WAIS-IV FSIQ accounted for statistically significant and generally large portions of WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite score variance. WAIS-IV factor index scores combined to provide statistically significant increments in variance accounted for in most WIAT-II and WIAT-III subtest and composite scores over and above the FSIQ score; however, the effect sizes ranged from trivial to medium as observed in investigations with other intelligence tests (i.e., Glutting, Watkins, Konold, & McDermott, 2006; Youngstrom, Kogos, & Glutting, 1999). Individually, the WAIS-IV factor index scores provided trivial to small unique contributions to predicting WIAT-II and WIAT-III scores. This finding indicated that the FSIQ should retain primacy and greatest interpretive weight in WAIS-IV interpretation, as previously indicated by WAIS-IV subtest variance partitions form hierarchical exploratory factor analyses (Canivez & Watkins, 2010a, 2012b). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Comparing 3 dietary pattern methods--cluster analysis, factor analysis, and index analysis--With colorectal cancer risk: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, Jill; Wirfält, Elisabet; Flood, Andrew; Mitrou, Panagiota N; Krebs-Smith, Susan M; Kipnis, Victor; Midthune, Douglas; Leitzmann, Michael; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur; Subar, Amy F

    2010-02-15

    The authors compared dietary pattern methods-cluster analysis, factor analysis, and index analysis-with colorectal cancer risk in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP Diet and Health Study (n = 492,306). Data from a 124-item food frequency questionnaire (1995-1996) were used to identify 4 clusters for men (3 clusters for women), 3 factors, and 4 indexes. Comparisons were made with adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals, distributions of individuals in clusters by quintile of factor and index scores, and health behavior characteristics. During 5 years of follow-up through 2000, 3,110 colorectal cancer cases were ascertained. In men, the vegetables and fruits cluster, the fruits and vegetables factor, the fat-reduced/diet foods factor, and all indexes were associated with reduced risk; the meat and potatoes factor was associated with increased risk. In women, reduced risk was found with the Healthy Eating Index-2005 and increased risk with the meat and potatoes factor. For men, beneficial health characteristics were seen with all fruit/vegetable patterns, diet foods patterns, and indexes, while poorer health characteristics were found with meat patterns. For women, findings were similar except that poorer health characteristics were seen with diet foods patterns. Similarities were found across methods, suggesting basic qualities of healthy diets. Nonetheless, findings vary because each method answers a different question.

  19. [Clinical application value of prognostic nutritional index for predicting survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W J; Kang, Y M; Zhou, L; Chen, F F; Song, Y H; Zhang, C Q

    2017-02-23

    Objective: To explore the clinical application value of prognostic nutritional index(PNI) for predicting overall survival(OS) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: 123 patients with histologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study, and their clinical and laboratory data were reviewed. The PNI was calculated as 10×serum albumin value+ 5×total lymphocyte countin peripheral blood.Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify the potential prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Results: PNI of the 123 NSCLC patients was 46.24±6.56. PNI was significantly associated with age, weight loss and pleural effusion (P0.05). The median OS of the 123 patients was 19.5 months. The median OS in the higher PNI group (PNI≥46.24) and lower PNI group(PNI<46.24) were 25.2 months and 16.4 months, respectively.The 1-year survival rates were 80.6% and 63.9%, and 2-year survival rates were 54.8% and 19.6%, respectively (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed that PNI, age, dyspnea, and weight loss were related to the OS of the advanced NSCLC patients (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis identified PNI as an independent prognostic factor for OS of advanced NSCLC (P<0.001). Conclusion: PNI can be easily calculated, and may be used as a relatively new prognostic indicator for advanced NSCLC in clinical practice.

  20. Body Mass Index at Diagnosis and Breast Cancer Survival Prognosis in Clinical Trial Populations from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-30, B-31, B-34, and B-38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Reena S; Swain, Sandra M; Costantino, Joseph P; Rastogi, Priya; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Anderson, Stewart J; Tang, Gong; Geyer, Charles E; Lembersky, Barry C; Romond, Edward H; Paterson, Alexander H G; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has been associated with breast cancer outcomes. However, few studies used clinical trial settings where treatments and outcomes are consistently evaluated and documented. There are also limited data assessing how patient/disease characteristics and treatment may alter the BMI-breast cancer association. We evaluated 15,538 breast cancer participants from four NSABP protocols. B-34 studied early-stage breast cancer patients (N = 3,311); B-30 and B-38 included node-positive breast cancer patients (N = 5,265 and 4,860); and B-31 studied node-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer patients (N = 2,102). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate adjusted hazards ratios (HR) for risk of death and recurrence, and conducted separate analyses by estrogen receptor (ER) status and treatment group. In B-30, increased BMI was significantly related to survival. Compared with BMI BMI 25 to 29.9 and 1.18 for BMI ≥ 30 (P = 0.02). Separate analyses indicated the significant relationship was only in ER-positive disease (P = 0.002) and the subgroup treated with doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (P = 0.005). There were no significant trends across BMI for the other three trials. Similar results were found for recurrence. Increased BMI was significantly related to recurrence in B-30 (P = 0.03); and the significant relationship was only in ER-positive breast cancers (P = 0.001). Recurrence was also significant among ER-positive disease in B-38 (P = 0.03). In our investigation, we did not find a consistent relationship between BMI at diagnosis and breast cancer recurrence or death. This work demonstrates that the heterogeneity of breast cancer between different breast cancer populations and the different therapies used to treat them may modify any association that exists between BMI and breast cancer outcome. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Effect of Population Trends in Body Mass Index on Prostate Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Gulati, Roman; Zeliadt, Steve; Weiss, Noel; Kristal, Alan R.; Etzioni, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Concurrent with increasing prostate cancer incidence and declining prostate cancer mortality in the United States, the prevalence of obesity has been increasing steadily. Several studies have reported that obesity is associated with increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality, and it is thus likely that the increase in obesity has increased the burden of prostate cancer. In this study, we assess the potential effect of increasing obesity on prostate cancer incid...

  2. Assessment of Adequacy of Pain Management and Analgesic Use in Patients With Advanced Cancer Using the Brief Pain Inventory and Pain Management Index Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this cross-sectional, noninterventional, 6-month observational study was to assess the adequacy of pain management in patients with cancer admitted to the Oncology Department of Guru Gobind Singh Medical College in Faridkot, India. Methods and Materials: A total of 348 patients with cancer were recruited for evaluation of the prevalence of inadequate cancer pain management using the Brief Pain Inventory Pain Management Index. Results: The current study included 127 males (36.5% and 221 females (63.5%. The most prevalent cancer type was genitourinary; 268 patients (77% had inadequately managed pain. A significant correlation was observed between poorly managed pain and age groups, analgesic used, and body mass index. Conclusion: Our observation of inadequate pain management among 77% of patients indicates that pain management was insufficient in three quarters of the patients in this study. Accumulating data regarding the inadequacy of cancer pain management is crucial to improve symptom management. Better management of pain not only alleviates pain symptoms but also increases the quality of life for patients with cancer.

  3. INDEXING AND INDEX FUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAKAN SARITAŞ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of the efficient market hypothesis believe that active portfolio management is largely wasted effort and unlikely to justify the expenses incurred. Therefore, they advocate a passive investment strategy that makes no attempt to outsmart the market. One common strategy for passive management is indexing where a fund is designed to replicate the performance of a broad-based index of stocks and bonds. Traditionally, indexing was used by institutional investors, but today, the use of index funds proliferated among individual investors. Over the years, both international and domestic index funds have disproportionately outperformed the market more than the actively managed funds have.

  4. Food composition of the diet in relation to changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaguera, D.; Angquist, L.; Du, H.; Jakobsen, M.U.; Forouhi, N.G.; Halkjaer, J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; A, van der D.; Masala, G.; Steffen, A.; Palli, D.; Wareham, N.J.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Boeing, H.; Riboli, E.; Sorensen, T.I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary factors such as low energy density and low glycemic index were associated with a lower gain in abdominal adiposity. A better understanding of which food groups/items contribute to these associations is necessary. Objective: To ascertain the association of food groups/items consum

  5. Food composition of the diet in relation to changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaguera, D.; Angquist, L.; Du, H.; Jakobsen, M.U.; Forouhi, N.G.; Halkjaer, J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; A, van der D.; Masala, G.; Steffen, A.; Palli, D.; Wareham, N.J.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Boeing, H.; Riboli, E.; Sorensen, T.I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary factors such as low energy density and low glycemic index were associated with a lower gain in abdominal adiposity. A better understanding of which food groups/items contribute to these associations is necessary. Objective: To ascertain the association of food groups/items consum

  6. [The relevance of body composition in cancer patients: what is the evidence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronha, Ana Lúcia; Camilo, Maria Ermelinda; Ravasco, Paula

    2011-12-01

    In the past few years, there has been a growing interest on body composition changes of cancer patients. Muscle mass and fat mass are pointed out as the most important compartments from a physiological point of view, as their changes are the ones with the most impact on disease. The excess of fat mass is related with increased risk of incidence and recurrence of some types of cancer, and some studies identify it as a major contributing factor for increased morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Weight loss in cancer is frequent and is associated with symptoms, circulating pro-cachectic substances produced by the tumour, and/or hypermetabolism states, not compensated with adequate intake. Muscle mass depletion is the most worrying, and has been associated with decreased functional capacity, increased toxicity of anti-neoplastic treatments, longer length of stay and higher risk of nosocomial infections. In end stage disease, some patients may develop cancer cachexia, an irreversible condition highly associated with mortality. Of note that, lean body mass depletion may occur with excess fat mass (sarcopenic obesity), a condition that combines the health risks of obesity and those of sarcopenia. The high prevalence of malnutrition in cancer patients justifies its relevance. Many patients point it as a cause for the reduction of physical, cognitive, emotional and social functions, as well as anorexia, fatigue, dyspnoea, insomnia, gastrointestinal symptoms and worse Quality of Life. Additionally, body composition may be affected by nutrition, lifestyles and physical activity; therefore, any approach to the patient should include all these dimensions, with special emphasis on individualised nutritional intervention. Therefore, nutritional therapy should be adjuvant to any treatment, as it is essential in all stages of the disease: for its development, during the treatment(s) and in the follow-up period. The aim of nutritional intervention is to promote changes in

  7. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer: a review of the fascial composition of the abdominal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Makio; Kano, Nobuyasu

    2015-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has generally been performed for digestive diseases. Many patients with colon cancer undergo laparoscopic procedures. The outcomes of laparoscopic colectomy and open colectomy are the same in terms of the long-time survival. It is important to dissect the embryological plane to harvest the lymph nodes and to avoid bleeding during colon cancer surgery. To date, descriptions of the anatomy of the fascial composition have mainly involved observations unrelated to fundamental embryological concepts, causing confusion regarding the explanations of the surgical procedures, with various vocabularies used without definitions. We therefore examined the fascia of the abdominal space using a fascia concept based on clinical anatomy and embryology. Mobilization of the bilateral sides of the colon involves dissection between the fusion fascia of Toldt and the deep subperitoneal fascia. It is important to understand that the right fusion fascia of Toldt is divided into the posterior pancreatic fascia of Treitz dorsally and the anterior pancreatic fascia ventrally at the second portion of the duodenum. A comprehensive understanding of fascia composition between the stomach and transverse colon is necessary for dissecting the splenic flexure of the colon. As a result of these considerations of the fascia, more accurate surgical procedures can be performed for the excision of colon cancer.

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase and body mass index are prognostic factors in patients with recurrent small cell lung cancer receiving amrubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Minehiko; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tokui, Kotaro; Taka, Chihiro; Okazawa, Seisuke; Kambara, Kenta; Ichikawa, Tomomi; Yamada, Toru; Miwa, Toshiro; Kashii, Tatsuhiko; Matsui, Shoko; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2016-12-01

    Amrubicin monotherapy can be an effective treatment option for patients with recurrent small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We conducted this retrospective study to investigate the prognostic factors in patients with recurrent SCLC receiving amrubicin monotherapy. The associations between survival and clinical data, including the performance status, body mass index (BMI), plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, and plasma neuron-specific enolase level, were evaluated in patients with recurrent SCLC, and a subset analysis of patients with platinum-resistant disease was conducted. In all, 37 patients were evaluated. The median survival from the date of initiation of amrubicin monotherapy was 9.1 months (95% confidence interval 4.7-12.0 months). Multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazard model identified the plasma LDH level (p = 0.049), BMI (p = 0.031), and platinum resistance (p = 0.032) as independent factors associated with survival. The same associations were also observed in the subset of patients with platinum-resistant disease. Our findings suggest that the plasma LDH level and BMI may be useful prognostic factors in patients with SCLC receiving amrubicin monotherapy, including patients with platinum-resistant disease.

  9. Korean version of the functional assessment of cancer therapy (FACT)-vanderbilt cystectomy index (VCI): translation and linguistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myong; Lee, Hahn Ey; Kim, Sung Han; Cho, Sung Yong; Jeong, Seong Jin; Oh, Seung June; Cookson, Michael S; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2014-11-30

    To develop a Korean version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Vanderbilt Cystectomy Index (VCI) from the original English version, with subsequent linguistic validation in Korean patients who underwent radical cystectomy with urinary diversion. Translation and linguistic validation were carried out between January and May of 2013, which consisted of the following stages:(1) permission for translation;(2) forward translation;(3) reconciliation;(4) backward translation;(5) cognitive debriefing and(6) final proof-reading. During the forward translation phases,word as such as "bother","spend time", "support", "coping" and "concern" were adjusted to be more comprehensible to the target population. There conciled Korean version was accepted without certain objections because the original version and the backward translation were almost congruent except for minor differences in a subset of questions. The translation was tested using 5 Korean-speaking subjects. The subjects took an average of 8.2 minutes to complete the questionnaire, without difficulty and found the questionnaire clear and easy to understand. The panel discussed each of the issues raised by subjects and most terms were judged by the panel as to not require further changes because the overall comprehension levels were relatively high and because the translated terms were accurately rendered in the target languages. This report has demonstrated that despite translation difficulties, the linguistic validation of the FACT-VCI in the Korean language was successful. The next step is to assess the psychometric properties of the Korean version of FACT-VCI.

  10. Body mass index and risk of renal cell cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of published cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Furan; Xu, Yinghua

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is accepted as one of the major risk factors for renal cell cancer (RCC). However, conflicting results persist for the pooled risks based on the results from case-control and cohort studies combined, and the exact shape of the dose-response relationship has not been clearly defined yet. To help elucidate the role of obesity, PubMed and Embase databases were searched for published cohort studies on associations between body mass index (BMI) and risk of RCC. Random-effects models and dose-response meta-analyses were used to pool study results. Subgroup analyses were conducted by the available characteristics of studies and participants. Cohort studies (21) with 15,144 cases and 9,080,052 participants were identified. Compared to normal weight, the pooled relative risks and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals of RCC were 1.28(1.24-1.33) for preobesity and 1.77(1.68-1.87) for obesity, respectively. A nonlinear dose-response relationship was also found for RCC risk with BMI (p = 0.000), and the risk increased by 4% for each 1 kg/m(2) increment in BMI. There was no significant between-study heterogeneity among studies (I(2) = 35.6% for preobesity and I(2) = 44.2% for obesity, respectively). Subgroup analysis showed a basically consistent result with the overall analysis. These results suggest that increased BMI are associated with increased risk of RCC both for men and women. © 2014 UICC.

  11. Is Body Mass Index the Best Adiposity Measure for Prostate Cancer Risk? Results From a Veterans Affairs Biopsy Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrios-Rivera, Lourdes; Howard, Lauren; Frank, Jennifer; De Hoedt, Amanda; Beverly, Devon; Grant, Delores J; Hoyo, Cathrine; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    To test multiple adiposity measures and prostate cancer (PC) risk in men undergoing prostate biopsy. We hypothesized that body mass index (BMI), body fat, and waist circumference would be highly correlated, and all would be associated with aggressive PC, but not overall risk. A case (483)-control (496) study among men undergoing prostate biopsy from 2007 to 2016 was conducted at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Anthropometric and self-reported measurements were taken. Percent body fat was measured. Associations between adiposity measures and PC risk and high-grade PC (Gleason ≥7) were examined using logistic regression. BMI, percent body fat, and waist circumference were highly correlated (ρ ≥ .79) (P BMI (P = .011) was associated with overall PC risk, but percent body fat (P = .16) and waist circumference (P = .19) were not. However, all adiposity measurements were associated with high-grade disease (P BMI, body fat, and waist circumference were all highly correlated and associated with aggressive PC. This study supports the idea that higher adiposity is selectively associated with high-grade PC and reinforces the continued use of self-reported BMI as a measure of obesity in epidemiologic studies of PC. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Exploring disparities in incidence and mortality rates of breast and gynecologic cancers according to the Human Development Index in the Pan-American region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mesa, J; Werutsky, G; Michiels, S; Pereira Filho, C A S; Dueñas-González, A; Zarba, J J; Mano, M; Villarreal-Garza, C; Gómez, H; Barrios, C H

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether a country's Human Development Index (HDI) can help explain the differences in the country's breast cancer and gynecological cancer incidence and mortality rates in the Pan-American region. Ecological analysis. Pan-American region countries with publicly available data both in GLOBOCAN 2012 and the United Nations Development Report 2012 were included (n = 28). Incidence and mortality rates age-standardized per 100,000 were natural log-transformed for breast cancer, ovarian cancer, corpus uteri cancer, and cervical cancer. The mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) was calculated for each site. Pearson's correlation test and a simple linear regression were performed. The HDI showed a positive correlation with breast cancer and ovarian cancer incidence and mortality rates, respectively, and a negative correlation with cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. The HDI and corpus uteri cancer showed no association. MIR and the HDI showed a negative correlation for all tumor types except ovarian cancer. An increment in 1 HDI unit leads to changes in cancer rates: in breast cancer incidence β = 4.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.61; 5.45) P < 0.001, breast cancer mortality β = 1.76 (95% CI 0.32; 3.21) P = 0.019, and breast cancer-MIR β = -0.705 (95% CI 0.704; 0.706) P < 0.001; in cervical cancer incidence β = -3.28 (95% CI -4.78; -1.78) P < 0.001, cervical cancer mortality β = -4.63 (95% CI -6.10; -3.17) P < 0.001, and cervical cancer-MIR β = -1.35 (95% CI -1.83; -0.87) P < 0.001; in ovarian cancer incidence β = 3.26 (95% CI 1.78; 4.75) P < 0.001, ovarian cancer mortality β = 1.82 (95% CI 0.44; 3.20) P = 0.012, and ovarian cancer-MIR β = 5.10 (95% CI 3.22; 6.97) P < 0.001; in corpus uteri cancer incidence β = 2.37 (95% CI -0.33; 5.06) P = 0.83, corpus uteri cancer mortality β = 0.68 (95% CI -2.68; 2.82) P = 0.96, and corpus uteri cancer-MIR β = -2.30 (95% CI -3.19; -1.40) P < 0.001. A

  13. Poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide–chitosan composite particles for the treatment of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neha Arya, Dhirendra S Katti Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology – Kanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India Abstract: Tumor heterogeneity makes combination chemotherapy one of the preferred modes of treatment regimens. In this work, sequential exposure of two anticancer agents, paclitaxel (Tx followed by topotecan (TPT, was shown to have a synergistic effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line, NCI-H460. In order to improve patient compliance, the aforementioned concept was translated into a drug delivery system comprising of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA–chitosan composite particles. TPT-containing chitosan micro-/nanoparticles were prepared by the facile technique of electrospraying and encapsulated within PLGA microparticles using emulsion-solvent evaporation technique for delayed release of TPT. The formulation containing Tx- and TPT-loaded composite particles demonstrated synergism when exposed to NCI-H460 cellular aggregates (tumoroids generated in vitro. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated the potential of the formulation containing Tx and PLGA–chitosan (TPT-loaded composite particles for the treatment of lung cancer. Keywords: drug delivery system, solid tumor, paclitaxel, topotecan, sequential admini­stration

  14. Body composition, dietary composition, and components of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adults after a 12-week trial on dietary treatments focused on portion control, energy density, or glycemic index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanson Kathleen J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the rise in obesity and associated chronic diseases, it is critical to determine optimal weight management approaches that will also improve dietary composition and chronic disease risk factors. Few studies have examined all these weight, diet, and disease risk variables in subjects participating in recommended multi-disciplinary weight loss programs using different dietary strategies. Methods This study compared effects of three dietary approaches to weight loss on body composition, dietary composition and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS. In a 12-week trial, sedentary but otherwise healthy overweight and obese adults (19 M & 138 F; 38.7 ± 6.7 y; BMI 31.8 ± 2.2 who were attending weekly group sessions for weight loss followed either portion control, low energy density, or low glycemic index diet plans. At baseline and 12 weeks, measures included anthropometrics, body composition, 3-day food diaries, blood pressure, total lipid profile, HOMA, C-reactive protein, and fasting blood glucose and insulin. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Results All groups significantly reduced body weight and showed significant improvements in body composition (p  Conclusion Different dietary approaches based on portion control, low energy density, or low glycemic index produced similar, significant short-term improvements in body composition, diet compositin, and MetS components in overweight and obese adults undergoing weekly weight loss meetings. This may allow for flexibility in options for dietary counseling based on patient preference.

  15. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  16. Risk of Breast Cancer in Relation to Combined Effects of Hormone Therapy, Body Mass Index, and Alcohol Use, by Hormone-receptor Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Tjonneland, Anne; Keiding, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption, increased body mass index (BMI), and hormone therapy are risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, but their combined effects are not well understood. Because hormone therapy is effective for the relief of menopausal symptoms, the identification of "high...... therapy users across all BMI strata (P for interaction = 0.003). A markedly higher risk of breast cancer was also observed for alcohol combined with hormone therapy use compared with abstinent nonusers (P for interaction = 0.02). These effects were primarily restricted to ER-positive cases. Combined...... effects of hormone therapy/high BMI and hormone therapy/alcohol on serum estradiol and testosterone supported the hypothesis of a hormonal pathway linking these exposures to breast cancer. CONCLUSION: These analyses suggest an increased risk of breast cancer associated with hormone therapy use-a risk...

  17. Clinical Significance of the Prognostic Nutritional Index for Predicting Short- and Long-Term Surgical Outcomes After Gastrectomy: A Retrospective Analysis of 7781 Gastric Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Youn; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Kim, You-Na; Hong, Jung Hwa; Alshomimi, Saeed; An, Ji Yeong; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the predictive and prognostic significance of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) in a large cohort of gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy.Assessing a patient's immune and nutritional status, PNI has been reported as a predictive marker for surgical outcomes in various types of cancer.We retrospectively reviewed data from a prospectively maintained database of 7781 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy from January 2001 to December 2010 at a single center. From this data, we analyzed clinicopathologic characteristics, PNI, and short- and long-term surgical outcomes for each patient. We used the PNI value for the 10th percentile (46.70) of the study cohort as a cut-off for dividing patients into low and high PNI groups.Regarding short-term outcomes, multivariate analysis showed a low PNI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.505, 95% CI = 1.212-1.869, P cancer recurrence.

  18. Adherence to the Healthy Eating Index and Alternative Healthy Eating Index dietary patterns and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onvani, S; Haghighatdoost, F; Surkan, P J; Larijani, B; Azadbakht, L

    2017-04-01

    This meta-analysis investigated the association of diet quality indices, as assessed by HEI and AHEI, and the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. We used PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Google Scholar to search for eligible articles published before July 2015. A total of 12 cohort studies (38 reports) and one cross-sectional study (three reports) met the inclusion criteria and were included in our meta-analysis. The highest level of adherence to the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) was significantly associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality [relative risk (RR) = 0.77, 95% confidence intterval (CI) = 0.76-0.78], cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.74-0.80) and cancer mortality (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.81-0.86). Egger regression tests provided no evidence of publication bias. The present study indicates that high adherence to HEI and AHEI dietary patterns, indicating high diet quality, are associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality (as well as cardiovascular mortality and cancer mortality). © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; Jenkins, Mark; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael E; Kabisch, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Koppert, Linetta B; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathi E; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perez, Jose I A; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shilin; Hall, Per; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environmental factors. We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482). We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from 16,003 cases and 41,335 controls from the Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE) Project. Because most studies measured BMI after cancer diagnosis, we could not conduct a parallel analysis to adequately evaluate the association of measured BMI with breast cancer risk prospectively. In the BCAC data, genetically predicted BMI was found to be inversely associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR]  =  0.65 per 5 kg/m2 increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.75, p = 3.32 × 10-10). The associations were similar for both premenopausal (OR   =   0.44, 95% CI:0.31-0.62, p  =  9.91 × 10-8) and postmenopausal breast cancer (OR  =  0.57, 95% CI: 0.46-0.71, p  =  1.88 × 10-8). This association was replicated in the data from the DRIVE consortium (OR  =  0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.84, p   =   1.64 × 10-7). Single marker analyses identified 17 of the 84 BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in association with breast cancer risk at p BMI was associated with reduced breast

  20. Geographic Variability and the Association of Flavonoids, Glycemic Index, and Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Liver Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Baecker, Aileen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Liver cancer is the second most fatal cancer in the world. China is disproportionally affected, accounting for approximately 50% of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide. Major risk factors for liver cancer include chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections, aflatoxin B1 exposure, alcoholic consumption, and tobacco smoking. Objective and Methods: We aimed to update the fraction of liver cancer cases attributable to these known risk factors, as well as estimate attributable risk ...

  1. Quantitative changes in skin composition parameters due to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Danbee; Kim, Im-Ryung; Im, Young Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee; Ahn, Jin Seok; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Park, Hyeokgon; Kim, Eunjoo; Lee, Hae Kwang; Lee, Dong-Youn; Cho, Juhee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate objective changes in water content, sebum content, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and melanin due to breast cancer chemotherapy, and their association with subjective symptoms. Prospective cohort study of 61 patients 18 years of age or older with a postoperative diagnosis of stage I-III breast cancer, who received adjuvant chemotherapy between February and September 2012 at an outpatient breast cancer clinic in Korea. Objective skin parameters, measured using a noninvasive bioengineering device, and patient-reported dryness and dullness were assessed before chemotherapy, after two cycles of chemotherapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months after completion of chemotherapy. Water content (-6.5 %), sebum (-75.5 %), and TEWL (-22.4 %) significantly decreased during chemotherapy compared to pre-chemotherapy levels (all p values skin changes were similar in patients with or without hormone therapy. Most of patients reported dryness (57.9 %) and dullness (49.1 %) after chemotherapy, and patient-reported dryness was significantly associated with decreased sebum content. Chemotherapy-induced substantial changes in objective skin composition parameters. These changes persisted after 6 months from completion of chemotherapy and were associated with patient-reported symptoms. Additional research is needed to translate these findings into interventions for improving the dermatologic quality of life of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  2. The Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference as Predictors of Body Composition in Post CSCI Wheelchair Rugby Players (Preliminary Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwierzchowska Anna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The enforced sedentary lifestyle and muscle paresis below the level of injury are associated with adipose tissue accumulation in the trunk. The value of anthropometric indicators of obesity in patients with spinal cord injuries has also been called into question. We hypothesized that the Body Mass Index recommended by the WHO to diagnose obesity in general population has too low sensitivity in case of wheelchair rugby players.

  3. An index of forest management intensity based on assessment of harvested tree volume, tree species composition and dead wood origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiemo Kahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Forest management intensity often affects biodiversity, ecosystem processes and ecosystem services. To assess the influence of past management intensity on current ecosystem properties, management intensity must be quantified in a meaningful and reproducible approach. Here we developed the simple yet effective Forest Management Intensity index (ForMI, which is based only on inventory data of the living stand, stumps and dead wood. The ForMI is the sum of three components taking into account: 1. the proportion of harvested tree volume (Iharv, 2. the proportion of tree species that are not part of the natural forest community (Inonat and 3. the proportion of dead wood showing signs of saw cuts (Idwcut. Each component ranges between 0 (no sign of management and 1 (intensive management. Our analysis suggests that the ForMI can be used to assess management intensity in Central European forests for the last 30 to 40 years, depending on decay rates of stumps and dead wood. Our approach was tested using data of 148 forest plots of 1 ha in size in Germany. We found a significant distinction between plots that were previously described as managed and unmanaged as well as between plots comprising trees species of the natural forest community and those with additional, introduced coniferous tree species. We conclude that the index is applicable to a wide range of forest management types, but should not be misinterpreted as an index for old-growth structure.

  4. Vibration based structural health monitoring and the modal strain energy damage index algorithm applied to a composite T-beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, R.; Ooijevaar, T.H.; Warnet, L.; Boer, de A.; Akkerman, R.; Vasques, C.M.A.; Dias Rodrigues, J.

    2011-01-01

    A Finite Element based numerical model for a vibration based damage identification method for a 2.5D composite structure is discussed in this chapter. The linear dynamic response of an intact and a locally delaminated 16-layer unidirectional carbon fibre PEKK reinforced T-beam is analysed. A commerc

  5. The Association between Dietary Inflammatory Index and Risk of Colorectal Cancer among Postmenopausal Women: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabung, Fred K.; Steck, Susan E.; Ma, Yunsheng; Liese, Angela D.; Zhang, Jiajia; Caan, Bette; Hou, Lifang; Johnson, Karen C.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Shivappa, Nitin; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ockene, Judith K.; Hebert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inflammation is a process central to carcinogenesis, and in particular to colorectal cancer (CRC). Previously, we developed a dietary inflammatory index (DII) from extensive literature review to assess the inflammatory potential of diet. In the current study, we utilized this novel index in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) to prospectively evaluate its association with risk of CRC in postmenopausal women. Methods The DII was calculated from baseline food frequency questionnaires administered to 152,536 women aged 50–79 years without CRC at baseline between 1993 and 1998 and followed through September 30, 2010. Incident CRC cases were ascertained through a central physician adjudication process. Multiple covariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for colorectal, colon (proximal/distal locations), and rectal cancer risk, by DII quintiles(Q). Results During an average 11.3 years of follow-up, a total of 1,920 cases of colorectal cancer (1,559 colon and 361 rectal) were identified. Higher DII scores (representing a more pro-inflammatory diet) were associated with an increased incidence of colorectal cancer (HRQ5-Q1, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05, 1.43; Ptrend=0.02) and colon cancer, specifically proximal colon cancer (HRQ5-Q1, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.05, 1.67; Ptrend=0.01) but not distal colon cancer (HRQ5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.61, 1.18; Ptrend=0.63) or rectal cancer (HRQ5-Q1, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.84, 1.72; Ptrend=0.65). Conclusion Consumption of pro-inflammatory diets is associated with an increased risk of CRC, especially cancers located in the proximal colon. The absence of a significant association for distal colon cancer and rectal cancer may be due to the small number of incident cases for these sites. Interventions that may reduce the inflammatory potential of the diet are warranted to test our findings, thus provide more information for colon cancer prevention. PMID:25549833

  6. Statistical and Multidimensional Body Composition Parameter Analysis in Young Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topczewska Magdalena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the problem of assessing selected body compo- sition parameters after completion of antitumor therapy and comparing them with the same parameters of healthy children. A high percentage of overweight and obesity, as well as abnormal fat distribution in convalescents with cancer shows a significant adverse effect of therapy on body composition and suggests the need for early intervention in terms of diet and exercise, which would help patients to quickly achieve the proper parameters of body composition. Two main problems will be mentioned during the presented data analysis. Firstly, in each group there was a small number of observations. Because of this, the real differences between examined subgroups may have been omitted. Secondarily, many variables are correlated and are not normally distributed. Therefore, be- side the standard statistical tests to compare two groups, principal component analysis was applied to reduce the dimensions of the attribute space and to attempt to classify two groups of patients.

  7. Associations of body mass index with cancer incidence among populations, genders, and menopausal status: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Yang, Dong-Lin; Chen, Zhong-Zhu; Gou, Ben-Fu

    2016-06-01

    In order to further reveal the differences of association between body mass index (BMI) and cancer incidence across populations, genders, and menopausal status, we performed comprehensive meta-analysis with eligible citations. The risk ratio (RR) of incidence at 10 different cancer sites (per 5kg/m(2) increase in BMI) were quantified separately by employing generalized least-squares to estimate trends, and combined by meta-analyses. We observed significantly stronger association between increased BMI and breast cancer incidence in the Asia-Pacific group (RR 1.18:1.11-1.26) than in European-Australian (1.05:1.00-1.09) and North-American group (1.06:1.03-1.08) (meta-regression pmeta-regression pmeta-regression pmeta-regression pmeta-regression p<0.0001). Our results indicate that overweight or obesity is a strong risk factor of cancer incidence at several cancer sites. Genders, populations, and menopausal status are important factors effecting the association between obesity and cancer incidence for certain cancer types.

  8. Postmenopausal breast cancer risk and interactions between body mass index, menopausal hormone therapy use, and vitamin D supplementation: Evidence from the E3N cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeau, Claire; Fournier, Agnès; Mesrine, Sylvie; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine

    2016-11-15

    Experimental studies suggest protective effects of vitamin D on breast carcinogenesis, but epidemiological evidence is not conclusive. Body mass index (BMI) has been shown to modulate the effect of supplementation on the vitamin D status, but its potential influence on the relationship with breast cancer risk has been little studied. We investigated a potential interaction between BMI and vitamin D supplementation on breast cancer risk while considering an already reported interaction between vitamin D supplementation and menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use. Vitamin D supplementation was prospectively investigated in 57,403 postmenopausal women from the French E3N cohort including 2,482 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2008. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) for primary invasive breast cancer and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox models. Among MHT ever users, vitamin D supplementation was associated with decreased breast cancer risk, similarly across BMI strata (Phomogeneity  = 0.83). Among MHT never users, ever vitamin D supplementation was associated with increased postmenopausal breast cancer risk in women with baseline BMI breast cancer risk in MHT users, but draw attention on a potential risk in postmenopausal women not exposed to high exogenous or endogenous hormones, i.e. non-overweight MHT-non users, especially in the present context of increasing vitamin D supplement use and decreasing MHT use.

  9. Sexual dysfunction in women with cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis of studies using the Female Sexual Function Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Chiodini, Paolo; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    Cancer may impair sexual function in women. We provide an overview of studies that address Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) in women with cancer with a meta-analysis of observational studies that used a validated diagnostic tool. Searches included MEDLINE, Scopus, and Google Scholar for studies published from January 2000 to 31 December 2014. Every included study had to involve at least 30 cancer patients, to investigate FSD based on the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and to have been published in peer-review journals. Duplicate independent data extraction and quality assessment were performed. Data were pooled using a random effects model if statistical heterogeneity was present. The main outcomes were FSFI total score and FSD prevalence. FSFI is a 19-item self-report instrument for assessing key dimensions of female sexual function. A value less than 26.55 is consistent with FSD. Thirty-five studies met the inclusion criteria. Among these, 27 reported FSFI scores, and 16 FSD prevalence. Most studies (56 %) had low to moderate quality. The mean value of FSFI was lower than 20 at all cancer sites: 16.25 (pooled random effect, 95 % CI 14.91-17.58, I (2) = 14.5 %) for colorectal cancer, 18.11 (95 % CI 14.45-21.77, I (2) = 97.8 %) for gynecological cancer, and 19.58 (95 % CI 17.64-21.53, I (2) = 90.9 %) for breast cancer. FSD prevalence was higher than 60 % at all cancer sites, with the highest value for gynecological cancer (78.44 %, 95 % CI 68.36-88.52 %, I (2) = 94.1 %). Women with cancer showed low FSFI scores with a high prevalence of FSD.

  10. The association between change in body mass index and upper aerodigestive tract cancers in the ARCAGE project: multicenter case-control study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Park, Sungshim Lani

    2011-03-15

    Previous studies reported an inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers. Examining change in BMI over time may clarify these previous observations. We used data from 2,048 cases and 2,173 hospital- and population-based controls from ten European countries (alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility in Europe study) to investigate the relationship with BMI and adult change in BMI on UADT cancer risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for associations between BMI at three time intervals and BMI change on UADT cancer development, adjusting for center, age, sex, education, fruit and vegetable intake, smoking and alcohol consumption. We found an inverse relationship between UADT cancers and BMI at time of interview and 2 years before interview. No association was found with BMI at 30 years of age. Regarding BMI change between age 30 and 2 years before interview, BMI decrease (BMI change <-5%) vs. BMI stability (-5% ≤ BMI change <5%) showed no overall association with UADT cancers (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 0.89, 1.49). An increase in BMI (BMI change ≥+5%) was inversely associated with UADT cancers (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.89). BMI gain remained inversely associated across all subsites except for esophageal cancer. When stratified by smoking or by drinking, association with BMI gain was detected only in drinkers and smokers. In conclusion, BMI gain is inversely associated with UADT cancers. These findings may be influenced by smoking and\\/or drinking behaviors and\\/or the development of preclinical UADT cancers and should be corroborated in studies of a prospective nature.

  11. Higher body mass index increases the risk for biopsy-mediated detection of prostate cancer in Chinese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Bo Hu

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI and prostate cancer (PCa risk at biopsy in Chinese men.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,807 consecutive men who underwent initial multicore (≥10 prostate biopsy under transrectal ultrasound guidance between Dec 2004 and Feb 2014. BMI was categorised based on the Asian classification of obesity as follows: <18.5 (underweight, 18.5-22.9 (normal weight, 23-24.9 (overweight, 25-29.9 (moderately obese, and ≥30 kg/m2 (severely obese. The odds ratios (OR of each BMI category for risk of PCa and high-grade prostate cancer (HGPCa, Gleason score ≥4+3 detection were estimated in crude, age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted models. Prevalence ratios and accuracies of PSA predicted PCa were also estimated across BMI groups.In total, PCa was detected by biopsy in 750 (45.4% men, and HGPCa was detected in 419 (25.4% men. Compared with men of normal weight, underweight men and obese men were older and had higher prostate specific antigen levels. The risk of overall PCa detection via biopsy presented an obvious U-shaped relationship with BMI in crude analysis. Overall, 50.0%, 37.4%, 45.6% 54.4% and 74.1% of the men in the underweight, normal weight, overweight, moderately obese and severely obese groups, respectively, were diagnosed with PCa via biopsy. In multivariate analysis, obesity was significantly correlated with a higher risk of PCa detection (OR = 1.17, 95%CI 1.10-1.25, P<0.001. However, higher BMI was not correlated with HGPCa detection (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 0.97-1.09, P = 0.29. There were no significant differences in the accuracy of using PSA to predict PCa or HGPCa detection across different BMI categories.Obesity was associated with higher risk of PCa detection in the present Chinese biopsy population. No significant association was detected between obesity and HGPCa.

  12. Prostate volume index and chronic inflammation of the prostate type IV with respect to the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Antonio B; Novella, Giovanni; Molinari, Alberto; Terrin, Alessandro; Minja, Anila; De Marco, Vincenzo; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Cerruto, Maria A; Curti, Pierpaolo; Cavalleri, Stefano; Artibani, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (PCA) alter the normal growth patterns of zonal anatomy with changes of prostate volume (PV). Chronic inflammatory infiltrates (CII) type IV are the most common non-cancer diagnosis of the prostate after biopsy. To evaluate associations of both PV index (PVI), i.e. the ratio of transitional zone volume (TZV) to peripheral zone volume (PZV), and CII with PCA in patients undergoing biopsy. Between January 2007 and December 2008, 268 consecutive patients who underwent prostate biopsy were retrospectively evaluated. PV and TZV were measured by transrectal ultrasound. PZV was computed by subtracting the PV from the TZV. CII were evaluated according to standard criteria. Significant associations of PVI and the presence of CII (CII+) with PCA risk were assessed by statistical methods. We evaluated 251 patients after excluding cases with painful rectal examinations, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >20 μg/ml and metastases. The PCA detection rate was 41.1%. PVI was a negative independent predictor of PCA. A PVI ≤1.0 was directly [odds ratio (OR) = 2.36] associated with PCA, which was detected more frequently in patients with a PVI ≤1.0 (29.1%) than in those with a PVI >1.0 (11.9%). CII+ was inversely (OR = 0.57) and independently associated with PCA, which was detected less frequently in cases with CII (9.9%) than in those without CII (21.1%). Potential study limitations might relate to the fact that PV was not measured by prostatectomy specimens and there was PSA confounding for CII and PCA. Low values of PVI are directly associated with risk of PCA, which was almost 2.5 times higher in patients with a PVI ≤1.0. The PVI might be an effective parameter for clustering patients at risk of PCA. CII+ was inversely associated with risk of PCA and decreased the probability of detecting PCA by 43%. The role of the PVI and CII in PCA carcinogenesis needs further research. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. [Spatio-temporal variation of drought condition during 1961 to 2012 based on composite index of meteorological drought in Altay region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-feng; Bake, Batur; Li, Wei; Wei, Xiao-qin; Wozatihan, Jiayinaguli; Rasulov, Hamid

    2015-02-01

    Based on the daily meteorological data of seven stations in Altay region, China, this study investigated the temporal ( seasonal, inter-annual and decadal) and spatial variations of drought by using composite index of meteorological drought, as well as trend analysis, M-K abrupt analysis, wavelet analysis and interpolation tools in ArcGIS. The results indicated that the composite index of meteorological drought could reflect the drought condition in Altay region well. Although the frequency and the covered area of both inter-annual and seasonal droughts presented decreasing trends in the recent 52 a, the drought was still serious when considering the annual drought. The frequencies of inter-annual and spring droughts had no abrupt changes, whereas the frequencies of inter-summer, autumn and winter droughts had abrupt changes during the past 52 a. A significant periodic trend was also observed for the frequencies of inter-annual and seasonal droughts. The distribution of frequency and covered area suggested that the conditions of drought were heavily serious in Qinghe County, moderately serious in Altay City, Fuyun County, Buerjin County and Fuhai County, and slightly serious in Habahe County and Jimunai County.

  14. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  15. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  16. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  17. Body Mass Index and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Tan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To provide a quantitative assessment of the association between excess body weight, interpreted as increased body mass index (BMI, and the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC. METHODS: We identified eligible studies in Medline and EMBASE up to 1 February 2015, and reference lists of retrieved articles. Summary relative risks with their 95% confidence intervals were calculated in a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed according to study design, gender, geographic location, ascertainment of exposure and adjustment for confounders. RESUITS: A total of 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with “normal” weight, the summary relative risks of GBC were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04–1.25 for overweight individuals (BMI 25–30 kg/m2 and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.41–1.73 for obese individuals (BMI > 30 kg/m2. Obese women had a higher risk of GBC than men did (women: SRRs 1.67, 95% CI 1.38–2.02; men: SRRs 1.42, 95% CI 1.21–1.66, and there was significant association between overweight and GBC risk in women (SRRs 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.40, but not in men (SRRs 1.06, 95% CI 0.94–1.20. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that obesity is associated with an increased risk of GBC, especially in women. Overweight is associated with GBC risk only in women.

  18. Nottingham Prognostic Index Plus: Validation of a clinical decision making tool in breast cancer in an independent series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew R; Soria, Daniele; Stephen, Jacqueline; Powe, Desmond G; Nolan, Christopher C; Kunkler, Ian; Thomas, Jeremy; Kerr, Gillian R; Jack, Wilma; Cameron, David; Piper, Tammy; Ball, Graham R; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Rakha, Emad A; Bartlett, John Ms; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    The Nottingham Prognostic Index Plus (NPI+) is a clinical decision making tool in breast cancer (BC) that aims to provide improved patient outcome stratification superior to the traditional NPI. This study aimed to validate the NPI+ in an independent series of BC. Eight hundred and eighty five primary early stage BC cases from Edinburgh were semi-quantitatively assessed for 10 biomarkers [Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PgR), cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, CK7/8, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2, HER3, HER4, p53, and Mucin 1] using immunohistochemistry and classified into biological classes by fuzzy logic-derived algorithms previously developed in the Nottingham series. Subsequently, NPI+ Prognostic Groups (PGs) were assigned for each class using bespoke NPI-like formulae, previously developed in each NPI+ biological class of the Nottingham series, utilising clinicopathological parameters: number of positive nodes, pathological tumour size, stage, tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic counts. Biological classes and PGs were compared between the Edinburgh and Nottingham series using Cramer's V and their role in patient outcome prediction using Kaplan-Meier curves and tested using Log Rank. The NPI+ biomarker panel classified the Edinburgh series into seven biological classes similar to the Nottingham series (p > 0.01). The biological classes were significantly associated with patient outcome (p  0.01). The good PGs were similarly validated in Luminal B, Basal p53 normal, HER2+/ER- tumours and the poor PG in the Luminal N class (p > 0.01). Due to small patient numbers assigned to the remaining PGs, Luminal N, Luminal B, Basal p53 normal and HER2+/ER- classes could not be validated. This study demonstrates the reproducibility of NPI+ and confirmed its prognostic value in an independent cohort of primary BC. Further validation in large randomised controlled trial material is warranted.

  19. SLC6A3 and body mass index in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the contribution of the dopamine transporter to dopaminergic reward-related behaviors and anthropometry, we evaluated associations between polymorphisms at the dopamine transporter gene(SLC6A3 and body mass index (BMI, among participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening Trial. Methods Four polymorphisms (rs6350, rs6413429, rs6347 and the 3' variable number of tandem repeat (3' VNTR polymorphism at the SLC6A3 gene were genotyped in 2,364 participants selected from the screening arm of PLCO randomly within strata of sex, age and smoking history. Height and weight at ages 20 and 50 years and baseline were assessed by questionnaire. BMI was calculated and categorized as underweight, normal, overweight and obese (2, respectively. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of SLC6A3 genotypes and haplotypes were computed using conditional logistic regression. Results Compared with individuals having a normal BMI, obese individuals at the time of the baseline study questionnaire were less likely to possess the 3' VNTR variant allele with 9 copies of the repeated sequence in a dose-dependent model (** is referent; OR*9 = 0.80, OR99 = 0.47, ptrend = 0.005. Compared with individuals having a normal BMI at age 50, overweight individuals (A-C-G-* is referent; ORA-C-G-9 = 0.80, 95% CI 0.65–0.99, p = 0.04 and obese individuals (A-C-G-* is referent; ORA-C-G-9 = 0.70, 95% CI 0.49–0.99, p = 0.04 were less likely to possess the haplotype with the 3'variant allele (A-C-G-9. Conclusion Our results support a role of genetic variation at the dopamine transporter gene, SLC6A3, as a modifier of BMI.

  20. Body Mass Index Can Increase the Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yong; Ai, Min; Wang, Jun; Jin, Bo; Teng, Zhaowei; Wang, Yansheng; Li, Li

    2016-11-30

    BACKGROUND This study sought to appraise the association between raised body mass index (BMI) and the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC) by performing a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eligible cohort studies were selected by searching PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to May 26, 2016, and the reference lists of retrieved articles were also consulted. The information was screened by two authors separately. We used a fixed-effects model to calculate the overall pooled risk estimates. A random-effects model was used to identify heterogeneity. RESULTS The meta-analysis incorporated 14 cohort studies. Nine papers were deemed to be of high quality based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m²), the overall pooled relative risks (RR) of GBC was 1.45 (95% CI 1.30-1.61) for excess body weight individuals (BMI ≥25 kg/m²); 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.18) for overweight persons (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m²) and 1.69(95% CI 1.54-1.86) for obese folks (BMI ≥30 kg/m²). A higher risk of GBC was presented in obese women (women: RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-1.99; men: RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.25-1.79). And a positive relationship between overweight and GBC risk was also displayed in female (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.11-1.40), but not in male (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.93-1.11). The sensitivity analysis indicated stable results, and no publication bias was observed. CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies demonstrated that raised BMI has a dramatic association with risk of GBC, especially in women. But, no association between overweight and GBC in men was found.

  1. Genomic Grade Index (GGI: feasibility in routine practice and impact on treatment decisions in early breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Metzger-Filho

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Genomic Grade Index (GGI is a 97-gene signature that improves histologic grade (HG classification in invasive breast carcinoma. In this prospective study we sought to evaluate the feasibility of performing GGI in routine clinical practice and its impact on treatment recommendations. METHODS: Patients with pT1pT2 or operable pT3, N0-3 invasive breast carcinoma were recruited from 8 centers in Belgium. Fresh surgical samples were sent at room temperature in the MapQuant Dx™ PathKit for centralized genomic analysis. Genomic profiles were determined using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and GGI calculated using the MapQuant Dx® protocol, which defines tumors as low or high Genomic Grade (GG-1 and GG-3 respectively. RESULTS: 180 pts were recruited and 155 were eligible. The MapQuant test was performed in 142 cases and GGI was obtained in 78% of cases (n=111. Reasons for failures were 15 samples with <30% of invasive tumor cells (11%, 15 with insufficient RNA quality (10%, and 1 failed hybridization (<1%. For tumors with an available representative sample (≥ 30% inv. tumor cells (n=127, the success rate was 87.5%. GGI reclassified 69% of the 54 HG2 tumors as GG-1 (54% or GG-3 (46%. Changes in treatment recommendations occurred mainly in the subset of HG2 tumors reclassified into GG-3, with increased use of chemotherapy in this subset. CONCLUSION: The use of GGI is feasible in routine clinical practice and impacts treatment decisions in early-stage breast cancer. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01916837, http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01916837.

  2. Shanghai Composite Index Forecasting Based on Optimized GA Attribute Reduction%基于优化GA属性约简的上证指数预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严晓明

    2011-01-01

    结合粗糙集的相关理论,优化了GA属性约简方法,针对上证指数预测的具体问题,对遗传算法的初始种群和适应度函数进行改进,将上证指数10年间数据的58个属性构成的训练集进行属性约简,并应用参数优化后的SVM分别以属性约简前后的数据集对开盘指数进行回归预测.仿真结果表明,用该算法进行属性约简后,原始数据集中冗余属性对预测结果的影响下降,预测精度提高,建模时间也相应的减少,得到了较好的结果.%An optimized genetic algorithm tor attribute conduction which was based on rough set theories was proposed. Initial population and fitness function of the genetic algorithm were improved according to situation of Shanghai Composite Index forecasting. It performs application of attribute reduction with training set which retrieve 58 attributes data from Shanghai Composite Index in recent ten years. Then, it conducts regression prediction by using parameters optimized SVM to predict stock index on the original dataset and the simplified dataset. Emulation experiment results show that it has better predict precision and time consuming performance by using simplified dataset.

  3. Gluten-free snacks using plantain-chickpea and maize blend: chemical composition, starch digestibility, and predicted glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Silva, Pamela C; Rodriguez-Ambriz, Sandra L; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2015-05-01

    An increase in celiac consumers has caused an increasing interest to develop good quality gluten-free food products with high nutritional value. Snack foods are consumed worldwide and have become a normal part of the eating habits of the celiac population making them a target to improve their nutritive value. Extrusion and deep-frying of unripe plantain, chickpea, and maize flours blends produced gluten-free snacks with high dietary fiber contents (13.7-18.2 g/100 g) and low predicted glycemic index (28 to 35). The gluten-free snacks presented lower fat content (12.7 to 13.6 g/100 g) than those reported in similar commercial snacks. The snack with the highest unripe plantain flour showed higher slowly digestible starch (11.6 and 13.4 g/100 g) than its counterpart with the highest chickpea flour level (6 g/100 g). The overall acceptability of the gluten-free snacks was similar to that chili-flavored commercial snack. It was possible to develop gluten-free snacks with high dietary fiber content and low predicted glycemic index with the blend of the 3 flours, and these gluten-free snacks may also be useful as an alternative to reduce excess weight and obesity problems in the general population and celiac community.

  4. Do changes in body mass index percentile reflect changes in body composition in children? Data from the Fels Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Ellen W; Schubert, Christine M; Maynard, L Michele; Sun, Shumei S; Chumlea, W Cameron; Pickoff, Arthur; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Towne, Bradford; Siervogel, Roger M

    2006-03-01

    Our aim was to examine the degree to which changes in BMI percentile reflect changes in body fat and lean body mass during childhood and how age and gender affect these relationships. This analysis used serial data on 494 white boys and girls who were aged 8 to 18 years and participating in the Fels Longitudinal Study (total 2319 observations). Total body fat (TBF), total body fat-free mass (FFM), and percentage of body fat (%BF) were determined by hydrodensitometry, and then BMI was partitioned into its fat and fat-free components: fat mass index (FMI) and FFM index (FFMI). We calculated predicted changes (Delta) in FMI, FFMI, and %BF for each 10-unit increase in BMI percentile using mixed-effects models. FFMI had a linear relationship with BMI percentile, whereas FMI and %BF tended to increase dramatically only at higher BMI percentiles. Gender and age had significant effects on the relationship between BMI percentile and FFMI, FMI, and %BF. Predicted Delta%BF for boys 13 to 18 years of age was negative, suggesting loss of relative fatness for each 10-unit increase in BMI percentile. In this longitudinal study of white children, FFMI consistently increased with BMI percentile, whereas FMI and %BF had more complicated relationships with BMI percentile depending on gender, age, and whether BMI percentile was high or low. Our results suggest that BMI percentile changes may not accurately reflect changes in adiposity in children over time, particularly among male adolescents and children of lower BMI.

  5. Evaluation of an Optimal Cut-Off Point for the Ki-67 Index as a Prognostic Factor in Primary Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiko Tashima

    Full Text Available The Ki-67 index is an important biomarker for indicating the proliferation of cancer cells and is considered to be an effective prognostic factor for breast cancer. However, a standard cut-off point for the Ki-67 index has not yet been established. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective study was to determine an optimal cut-off point in order to establish it as a more accurate prognostic factor. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Ki-67 index was performed on 4329 patients with primary breast cancer from August 1987 to March 2012. Out of this sample, there were 3186 consecutive cases from September 1997 with simultaneous evaluations of ER, PgR and HER2 status. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the factors related to OS. The hazard ratios (HR and the p values were then compared to determine the optimal cut-off point for the Ki-67 index. The median Ki-67 index value was 20.5% (mean value 26.2%. The univariate analysis revealed that there was a statistically significant negative correlation with DFS and OS and the multivariate analysis revealed that the Ki-67 index value was a significant factor for DFS and OS. The top seven cut-off points were then carefully chosen based on the results of the univariate analysis using the lowest p-values and the highest HR as the main selection criteria. The multivariate analysis of the factors for OS showed that the cut-off point of 20% had the highest HR in all of the cases. However, the cutoff point of 20% was only a significant factor for OS in the Luminal/HER2- subtype. There was no correlation between the Ki-67 index value and OS in any of the other subtypes. These data indicate that the optimal cut-off point of 20% is the most effective prognostic factor for Luminal/HER2- breast cancer.

  6. Glycemic control and variability in association with body mass index and body composition over 18months in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Leah M; Gee, Benjamin; Liu, Aiyi; Nansel, Tonja R

    2016-10-01

    The impact of adiposity on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients has important implications for preventing complications. This study examined associations of glycemic outcomes with body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) and body composition in youth with type 1 diabetes. This is a secondary analysis of an 18-month randomized controlled dietary intervention trial (N=136, baseline age=12.3±2.5y, HbA1c=8.1±1.0% (65±11mmol/mol)). Measured height and weight every 3months were abstracted from medical records. Body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at baseline, 12 and 18months. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycemic variability assessed by masked 3-day continuous blood glucose monitoring (CGM) were obtained every 3months. 1,5-Anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) was assessed every 6months. Adjusted random effects models for repeated measures estimated associations of time-varying BMI and body composition with time-varying glycemic outcomes. There was no treatment effect on glycemic outcomes. HbA1c was not associated with BMI or body composition indicators. 1,5-AG was inversely associated with BMI and adiposity indicators (%fat, trunk fat mass and trunk %fat), adjusting for developmental covariates. Adiposity indicators were positively associated with %glucose >180mg/dL and >126mg/dL when adjusting for developmental covariates, and %glucose >126mg/dL when additionally adjusting for diabetes-related covariates. Fewer consistent relationships were observed for 3-day mean glucose and %glucose BMI and body composition variables were not associated with standard deviation of glycemic values or mean amplitude of glycemic excursions. The role of greater BMI and adiposity in diabetes management in youth with type 1 diabetes may relate specifically to increased hyperglycemic excursions. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Scaling of adult regional body mass and body composition as a whole to height: Relevance to body shape and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuna, John M; Peterson, Courtney M; Thomas, Diana M; Heo, Moonseong; Hong, Sangmo; Choi, Woong; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    Adult body mass (MB) empirically scales as height (Ht) squared (MB ∝ Ht(2) ), but does regional body mass and body composition as a whole also scale as Ht(2) ? This question is relevant to a wide range of biological topics, including interpretation of body mass index (BMI). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to quantify regional body mass [head (MH), trunk, arms, and legs] and whole-body composition [fat, lean soft tissue (LST), and bone mineral content (BMC)] in non-Hispanic (NH) white, NH black, Mexican American, and Korean adults participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 17,126) and Korean NHANES (n = 8,942). Regression models were developed to establish Ht scaling powers for each measured component with adjustments for age and adiposity. Exploratory analyses revealed a consistent scaling pattern across men and women of the four population groups: regional mass powers, head (∼0.8-1) body composition, LST (∼2.0-2.3) body mass scaled uniformly across the eight sex and population groups as Ht(∼2) , tall and short subjects differed in body shape (e.g., MH/MB ∝ Ht(-∼1) ) and composition. Adult human body shape and relative composition are a function of body size as represented by stature, a finding that reveals a previously unrecognized phenotypic heterogeneity as defined by BMI. These observations provide new pathways for exploring mechanisms governing the interrelations between adult stature, body morphology, biomechanics, and metabolism. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Analysis of margin index as a method for predicting residual disease after breast-conserving surgery in a European cancer center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, Jarlath C

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by appropriate adjuvant therapies is established as a standard treatment option for women with early-stage invasive breast cancers. A number of factors have been shown to correlate with local and regional disease recurrence. Although margin status is a strong predictor of disease recurrence, consensus is yet to be established on the optimum margin necessary. Margenthaler et al. recently proposed the use of a "margin index," combining tumor size and margin status as a predictor of residual disease after BCS. We applied this new predictive tool to a population of patients with primary breast cancer who presented to a symptomatic breast unit to determine its suitability in predicting those who require reexcision surgery. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of our breast cancer database from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2010 was performed, including all patients who underwent BCS. Of 531 patients who underwent BCS, 27.1% (144\\/531) required further reexcision procedures, and 55 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Margin index was calculated as: margin index = closest margin (mm)\\/tumor size (mm) x 100, with index >5 considered optimum. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients included, 31% (17\\/55) had residual disease. Fisher\\'s exact test showed margin index not to be a significant predictor of residual disease on reexcision specimen (P = 0.57). Of note, a significantly higher proportion of our patients presented with T2\\/3 tumors (60% vs. 38%). CONCLUSIONS: Although an apparently elegant tool for predicting residual disease after BCS, we have shown that it is not applicable to a symptomatic breast unit in Ireland.

  9. Analysis of Margin Index as a Method for Predicting Residual Disease After Breast-Conserving Surgery in a European Cancer Center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, Jarlath C

    2011-06-03

    INTRODUCTION: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by appropriate adjuvant therapies is established as a standard treatment option for women with early-stage invasive breast cancers. A number of factors have been shown to correlate with local and regional disease recurrence. Although margin status is a strong predictor of disease recurrence, consensus is yet to be established on the optimum margin necessary. Margenthaler et al. recently proposed the use of a "margin index," combining tumor size and margin status as a predictor of residual disease after BCS. We applied this new predictive tool to a population of patients with primary breast cancer who presented to a symptomatic breast unit to determine its suitability in predicting those who require reexcision surgery. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of our breast cancer database from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2010 was performed, including all patients who underwent BCS. Of 531 patients who underwent BCS, 27.1% (144\\/531) required further reexcision procedures, and 55 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Margin index was calculated as: margin index = closest margin (mm)\\/tumor size (mm) × 100, with index >5 considered optimum. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients included, 31% (17\\/55) had residual disease. Fisher\\'s exact test showed margin index not to be a significant predictor of residual disease on reexcision specimen (P = 0.57). Of note, a significantly higher proportion of our patients presented with T2\\/3 tumors (60% vs. 38%). CONCLUSIONS: Although an apparently elegant tool for predicting residual disease after BCS, we have shown that it is not applicable to a symptomatic breast unit in Ireland.

  10. Aged-Related Changes in Body Composition and Association between Body Composition with Bone Mass Density by Body Mass Index in Chinese Han Men over 50-year-old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mengmeng; Gu, Zhaoyan; Pei, Yu; Meng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Aging, body composition, and body mass index (BMI) are important factors in bone mineral density (BMD). Although several studies have investigated the various parameters and factors that differentially influence BMD, the results have been inconsistent. Thus, the primary goal of the present study was to further characterize the relationships of aging, body composition parameters, and BMI with BMD in Chinese Han males older than 50 years. Methods The present study was a retrospective analysis of the body composition, BMI, and BMD of 358 Chinese male outpatients between 50 and 89 years of age that were recruited from our hospital between 2009 and 2011. Qualified subjects were stratified according to age and BMI as follows: 50–59 (n = 35), 60–69 (n = 123), 70–79 (n = 93), and 80–89 (n = 107) years of age and low weight (BMI: BMI BMI BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2; n = 41). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to assess bone mineral content (BMC), lean mass (LM), fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), lumbar spine (L1-L4) BMD, femoral neck BMD, and total hip BMD. Additionally, the FM index (FMI; FM/height2), LM index (LMI; LM/height2), FFM index (FFMI; [BMC+LM]/height2), percentage of BMC (%BMC; BMC/[BMC+FM+LM] × 100%), percentage of FM (%FM; FM/[BMC+FM+LM] × 100%), and percentage of LM (%LM; LM/(BMC+FM+LM) × 100%) were calculated. Osteopenia or osteoporosis was identified using the criteria and T-score of the World Health Organization. Results Although there were no significant differences in BMI among the age groups, there was a significant decline in height and weight according to age (p body composition, there were no significant differences in %BMC but there was an increase in %FM (p BMI increased but there were declines in the detection rates of osteoporosis and osteopenia (both p BMI value of 1, a decline in BMI was an independent risk factor of osteoporosis or osteopenia, while an increase in BMI was a protective factor for BMD. At the same time

  11. Detecting post-fire burn severity and vegetation recovery using multitemporal remote sensing spectral indices and field-collected composite burn index data in a ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Vogelmann, J.E.; Rollins, M.; Ohlen, D.; Key, C.H.; Yang, L.; Huang, C.; Shi, H.

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to detect burn severity and vegetation recovery because of the relatively long time period required to capture the ecosystem characteristics. Multitemporal remote sensing data can providemultitemporal observations before, during and after a wildfire, and can improve the change detection accuracy. The goal of this study is to examine the correlations between multitemporal spectral indices and field-observed burn severity, and to provide a practical method to estimate burn severity and vegetation recovery. The study site is the Jasper Fire area in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota, that burned during August and September 2000. Six multitemporal Landsat images acquired from 2000 (pre-fire), 2001 (post-fire), 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2007 were used to assess burn severity. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized burn ratio (NBR), integrated forest index (IFI) and the differences of these indices between the pre-fire and post-fire years were computed and analysed with 66 field-based composite burn index (CBI) plots collected in 2002. Results showed that differences of NDVI and differences of EVI between the pre-fire year and the first two years post-fire were highly correlated with the CBI scores. The correlations were low beyond the second year post-fire. Differences of NBR had good correlation with CBI scores in all study years. Differences of IFI had low correlation with CBI in the first year post-fire and had good correlation in later years. A CBI map of the burnt area was produced using regression tree models and the multitemporal images. The dynamics of four spectral indices from 2000 to 2007 indicated that both NBR and IFI are valuable for monitoring long-term vegetation recovery. The high burn severity areas had a much slower recovery than the moderate and low burn areas. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  12. The impact of body mass index on radiotherapy technique in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer: a single-center dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Celik, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of body mass index on radiotherapy (RT) technique in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Twenty-seven consecutive patients were included in the study and divided into 3 groups with respect to their body mass index (normal weight, 18.5-24.9 kg/m; overweight, 25-29.9 kg/m; obese, 30-39.9 kg/m). Treatment plans using field-in-field (FIF) and 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) were compared for the doses in the planning target volume (PTV), organs-at-risk (OAR) volumes, dose homogeneity index, and monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique was superior to 3D-CRT with respect to the maximum and mean doses received by OAR and dose homogeneity index values. The subgroup analyses revealed that the maximum dose received by the right femur and the mean doses received by the rectum and bladder were significantly reduced only in obese patients (Ps = 0.021, 0.008, and 0.008, respectively). The FIF technique significantly reduced the PTV volumes irradiated with greater than 105% of the prescribed dose (P endometrial cancer patients. This advantage is more prominent in obese patients. Therefore, FIF technique represents an effective pelvic RT treatment option for obese patients in clinics that do not have access to or prefer an alternative to intensity-modulated RT.

  13. Relationship between Composition, Density and Refractive Index for Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses%重金属氟化玻璃密度、组分与折射率关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The density and the refractive index for various compositions of heavy metal fluoride (HMF) glasses, used to make low-loss optical wave-guides, have been measured by standard archimedes method and by using as Pulfrich refractometer respectively. The density as a function of composition is calculated considering the effective volume of the ions contained in the glass to be invariant. The refractive index as a function of composition is also calculated, based on the Lorenz-Lorentz equation, by computing the electronic polarizability of HMF glasses. All calculated results are in good agreement with the observed data.

  14. Combination of body mass index and oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 in prognosis prediction of patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Jiang, Shanshan; Lin, Yongbin; Yang, Han; Zhao, Zerui; Xie, Zehua; Lin, Yaobin; Long, Hao

    2015-09-08

    Lung cancer, especially non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), represents enormous challenges in continuously achieving treatment improvements. Besides cancer, obesity is becoming ever more prevalent. Obesity is increasingly acknowledged as a major risk factor for several types of common cancers. Significant mechanisms overlap in the pathobiology of obesity and tumorigenesis. One of these mechanisms involves oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), as a link between obesity and cancer. Additionally, body mass index (BMI) has been widely used in exploiting the role of obesity on a series of diseases, including cancer. Significantly, squamous NSCLC revealed to be divergent clinical and molecular phenotypes compared with non-squamous NSCLC. Consequently, OLR1 immunostaining score and BMI were assessed by Fisher's linear discriminant analysis to discriminate if progression-free survival (PFS) would exceed 2 years. In addition, the final model was utilized to calculate the discriminant score in each study participant. Finally, 131 patients with squamous NCSLC were eligible for analysis. And a prediction model was established for PFS based on these 2 markers and validated in a second set of squamous NCSLC patients. The model offers a novel tool for survival prediction and could establish a framework for future individualized therapy for patients with squamous NCSLC.

  15. Associations between dietary habits and body mass index with gut microbiota composition and fecal water genotoxicity: an observational study in African American and Caucasian American volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Rashmi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African Americans (AA suffer from an increased incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC. Environmental exposures including dietary habits likely contribute to a high burden of CRC, however, data on the dietary habits of AA is sparse. Diet might change the composition and the activities of the intestinal microbiota, in turn affecting fecal genotoxicity/mutagenicity that is thought to be associated with carcinogenesis. Methods We assessed dietary habits by food frequency questionnaire and by food records in 52 AA and 46 CA residents of the Eastern Shore of MD. Fecal microbiota composition was determined using 16S rRNA based methods and fecal genotoxicity measured using the Comet assay. Results AA reported an increased intake of heterocyclic amines and a decreased dietary intake of vitamins including vitamin D (p Conclusion Dietary habits of African Americans, including increased HCA intake and decreased vitamin D intake might at least partially contribute to CRC through modifications of gut microbiota composition that result in changes of the intestinal milieu.

  16. NOVEL HYDROXAMIC ACIDS HAVING HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITING ACTIVITY AND ANTI-CANCER COMPOSITION COMPRISING THE SAME AS AN ACTIVE INGREDIENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a pharmaceutical composition for anticancer including novel hydroxamic acid with histone deacetylase inhibiting activity as an active ingredient. Hydroxamic acid compound of the present invention has inhibitory activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and shows cyto...... cytotoxicity to a variety of cancer cells, being useful in strong anti-cancer drug.......The present invention relates to a pharmaceutical composition for anticancer including novel hydroxamic acid with histone deacetylase inhibiting activity as an active ingredient. Hydroxamic acid compound of the present invention has inhibitory activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and shows...

  17. Measured body mass index in adolescence and the incidence of pancreatic cancer in a cohort of 720,000 Jewish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Zohar; Kark, Jeremy D; Afek, Arnon; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Furman, Moshe; Gordon, Barak; Barchana, Micha; Liphshitz, Irena; Niv, Yaron; Shamiss, Ari

    2012-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of adolescent obesity affects adult health. We investigated the association of adolescent overweight with pancreatic cancer incidence in a cohort of 720,927 Jewish Israeli men. Body mass index (BMI) was measured during a general health examination at ages 16-19 between the years 1967 and 1995. Overweight was defined as BMI ≥ 85th percentile of the reference US-CDC distribution in adolescence. Pancreatic cancer was identified by linkage with the Israel National Cancer Registry up to 2006. The mean follow-up period was 23.3 ± 8.0 years. During 16.8 million person-years, 98 cases of pancreatic cancer were detected. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, overweight in adolescence predicted an increased risk of pancreatic cancer [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26-3.50, p = 0.005]. Compared with adolescents with 'normal' range BMI Z-scores (-1 to +1), adolescents with Z-scores > 1 showed significantly increased risk [HR, 2.28 (95% CI: 1.43-3.64), p = 0.001]. Lower education level (10 or less years of schooling vs. 11-12 years) was also associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer [HR 1.90 (95% CI: 1.27-2.86, p = 0.002)], whereas height, country of origin and immigration status were not. Adolescent overweight is substantially associated with pancreatic cancer incidence in young to middle-aged adults. Applying our point estimates to the 16.8% prevalence of excess weight in Israeli adolescents in the past decade suggests a population fraction of 15.5% (95% CI: 4.2-29.6%) for pancreatic cancer attributable to adolescent overweight in Israel.

  18. Prognostic microRNAs in cancer tissue from patients operated for pancreatic cancer--five microRNAs in a prognostic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Andersen, Klaus; Roslind, Anne;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) that can predict overall survival (OS) in non micro-dissected cancer tissues from patients operated for pancreatic cancer (PC).......The aim of the present study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) that can predict overall survival (OS) in non micro-dissected cancer tissues from patients operated for pancreatic cancer (PC)....

  19. Doxorubicin-mediated radiosensitivity in multicellular spheroids from a lung cancer cell line is enhanced by composite micelle encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Hong; Han, Min; Dong, Qi; Fu, Zhi-Xuan; Diao, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Hai; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Zheng, Shu; Gao, Jian-Qing; Wei, Qi-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of composite doxorubicinloaded micelles for enhancing doxorubicin radiosensitivity in multicellular spheroids from a non-small cell lung cancer cell line. Methods A novel composite doxorubicin-loaded micelle consisting of polyethylene glycolpolycaprolactone/Pluronic P105 was developed, and carrier-mediated doxorubicin accumulation and release from multicellular spheroids was evaluated. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry to study the accumulation and efflux of doxorubicin from A549 multicellular spheroids. Doxorubicin radiosensitization and the combined effects of irradiation and doxorubicin on cell migration and proliferation were compared for the different doxorubicin delivery systems. Results Confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantitative flow cytometry studies both verified that, for equivalent doxorubicin concentrations, composite doxorubicin-loaded micelles significantly enhanced cellular doxorubicin accumulation and inhibited doxorubicin release. Colony-forming assays demonstrated that composite doxorubicin-loaded micelles are radiosensitive, as shown by significantly reduced survival of cells treated by radiation + composite micelles compared with those treated with radiation + free doxorubicin or radiation alone. The multicellular spheroid migration area and growth ability verified higher radiosensitivity for the composite micelles loaded with doxorubicin than for free doxorubicin. Conclusion Our composite doxorubicin-loaded micelle was demonstrated to have radiosensitization. Doxorubicin loading in the composite micelles significantly increased its cellular uptake, improved drug retention, and enhanced its antitumor effect relative to free doxorubicin, thereby providing a novel approach for treatment of cancer. PMID:22679376

  20. Taste and smell function in testicular cancer survivors treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy in relation to dietary intake, food preference, and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJpma, Irene; Renken, Remco J; Gietema, Jourik A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Mensink, Manon G J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Ter Horst, Gert J; Reyners, Anna K L

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy can affect taste and smell function. This may contribute to the high prevalence of overweight and metabolic syndrome in testicular cancer survivors (TCS). Aims of the study were to evaluate taste and smell function and possible consequences for dietary intake, food preference, and body composition in TCS treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Fifty TCS, 1-7 years post-chemotherapy, and 50 age-matched healthy men participated. Taste and smell function were measured using taste strips and 'Sniffin' Sticks', respectively. Dietary intake was investigated using a food frequency questionnaire. Food preference was assessed using food pictures varying in taste (sweet/savoury) and fat or protein content. Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry was performed to measure body composition. Presence of metabolic syndrome and hypogonadism were assessed. TCS had a lower total taste function, a higher bitter taste threshold, higher Body Mass Index (BMI), and more (abdominal) fat than controls (p < 0.05). No differences in smell function and dietary intake were found. Testosterone level was an important determinant of body composition in TCS (p = 0.016). Although taste function was impaired in TCS, this was not related to a different dietary intake compared to controls. Lower testosterone levels were associated with a higher BMI, fat mass, and abdominal fat distribution in TCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Wide band negative magnetic permeability materials (NMPM) with composite metalsemiconductor structures based on the Drude model, and applications to negative-refractive index (NIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, A; Sibilia, C; Bertolotti, M

    2007-05-28

    Composite structures based on metal open rings and thin wires are well established, for obtaining efficient negative index materials (NIM), acting as metamaterials in the long wavelength regime. The main losses are due both to metal absorption and to the inner electric resistance of metals; to overcome this latter loss we propose a new metal-semiconductor structure dimensioned by direct synthesis method, which offers an almost perfect Drude-like effective magnetic permeability. The choice of particular semiconductor components allows to get a negative resistance for the current induced by the electromagnetic field, which cancels that of the metal but puts a limit to the spectral response of the metamaterial. We consider some parasite effects, such as bianisotropy and incorrect values of structural parameters, to see limitations and features of this new NIM technology.

  2. Addiction Severity Index (ASI) summary scores: comparison of the Recent Status Scores of the ASI-6 and the Composite Scores of the ASI-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Cécile M; Cacciola, John S; Alterman, Arthur I

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics and the validity of the Recent Status Scores (RSSs), the new summary scores generated by the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6), are compared to the fifth version of the ASI summary scores, the Composite Scores (CSs). A sample of 82 randomly selected patients from substance abuse treatment programs were interviewed with the ASI-6, the ASI-5 and were administered a validity battery of questionnaires that included measures corresponding to each of the ASI domains. Each ASI-6 RSS was significantly correlated with its corresponding ASI-5 CS. The intercorrelations among the RSSs are low and none of these correlations were statistically different from the intercorrelations among CSs. In five of the seven areas, the ASI-6 RSSs were more highly correlated to the corresponding validity measures than were the ASI-5 CSs. The ASI-6 offers more comprehensive content in its scales than do those derived with earlier ASIs.

  3. Adolescent body mass index and risk of colon and rectal cancer in a cohort of 1.79 million Israeli men and women: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Zohar; Kark, Jeremy D; Katz, Lior H; Twig, Gilad; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Leibovici Weissman, Yaara; Leiba, Adi; Lipshiez, Irena; Keinan Boker, Lital; Afek, Arnon

    2017-07-24

    This study examined the association between the body mass index (BMI) in late adolescence and the risk of colon and rectal cancer. This study analyzed a cohort of 1,087,358 Jewish men and 707,212 Jewish women who underwent health examinations at the ages of 16 to 19 years between 1967 and 2002 and were followed by linkage to the national cancer registry up to 2012. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer according to age- and sex-adjusted BMI percentiles from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (overweight, 85th percentile to obesity, ≥95th percentile). Over a median follow-up of 23 years, 2967 incidence cases of colorectal cancer, including 1977 among men (1403 in the colon and 574 in the rectum) and 990 among women (764 in the colon and 226 in the rectum), were identified. Overweight and obesity were associated with the risk for colon cancer among both men (HR for overweight, 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-1.84; HR for obesity, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.15-2.06; statistically significant from a BMI of 23.4 kg/m(2) [spline analysis]) and women (HR for overweight, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.22-1.93; HR for obesity, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.89-2.57; significant from a BMI of 23.6 kg/m(2) ). Obesity, but not overweight, was associated with a risk for rectal cancer among men (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.11-2.65; significant from a BMI of 29.6 kg/m(2) ) and women (HR, 2.03; 95% CI, 0.90-4.58; significant from a BMI of 30.6 kg/m(2) ). Being overweight or obese in adolescence was associated with an increased risk of subsequent colon cancers in men and women, whereas obesity was associated with rectal cancer. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Patient Acceptable Symptom State in Self-Report Questionnaires and Composite Clinical Disease Index for Assessing Rheumatoid Arthritis Activity: Identification of Cut-Off Points for Routine Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Salaffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide information on the value of Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS in rheumatoid arthritis (RA by the identification of PASS thresholds for patient-reported outcomes (PROs composite scores. Methods. The characteristics of RA patients with affirmative and negative assignment to PASS were compared. Contributors to physician response were estimated by logistic regression models and PASS thresholds by the 75th percentile and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve methods. Results. 303 RA patients completed the study. All PROs were different between the PASS (+ and PASS (− groups (p<0.0001. The thresholds with the 75th percentile approach were 2.0 for the RA Impact of Disease (RAID score, 2.5 for the PRO-CLinical ARthritis Activity (PRO-CLARA index, and 1.0 for the Recent-Onset Arthritis Disability (ROAD questionnaire. The cut-off values for Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI were in the moderate range of disease activity. Assessing the size of the logistic regression coefficients, the strongest predictors of PASS were the disease activity (p=0.0007 and functional state level (0.006. Conclusion. PASS thresholds were relatively high and many patients in PASS had moderate disease activity states according to CDAI. Factors such as disease activity and physical function may influence a negative PASS.

  5. Composite auditory evoked potentials index is not a good indicator of depth of anesthesia in propofol-fentanyl anesthesia: Randomized comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Nishiyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The composite auditory evoked potentials index (cAAI was considered a measure of overall balance between noxious stimulation, analgesia, and hypnosis; while bispectral index (BIS shows only hypnosis, and auditory evoked potentials index (AAI shows response to stimuli. The present study compared the performance of cAAI, BIS, and AAI in propofol-fentanyl anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients for abdominal surgery aged 30-65 years with ASA physical status I or II were randomly divided into three groups by an envelope method. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam, propofol, and fentanyl alongwith an epidural block. When hemodynamics were stable during surgery, propofol infusion rate was fixed at 4 mg/kg/h for 10 min, then increased to 6 mg/kg/h and kept it for 10 min. AAI (AEP version 1.4, cAAI (AEP version 1.6, or BIS (A-2000 was monitored in each 15 patients, and the performance of three indices was compared. Results: All three indices decreased significantly before intubation. Only the AAI increased significantly by intubation. During anesthesia except for at propofol 6 mg/kg/h, the cAAI was significantly higher than the AAI. Only the AAI was significantly lower at propofol 6 mg/kg/h than at 4 mg/kg/h. The cAAI had the largest and AAI had the smallest inter-individual variations. The cAAI was higher than the manufacturer′s recommended range of general anesthesia. Conclusion: In propofol-fentanyl anesthesia, AAI might be better to discriminate anesthetic depth than cAAI and BIS.

  6. The Impact of Diabetes on the Risk of Prostate Cancer Development according to Body Mass Index: A 10-year Nationwide Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Bong; Moon, Hyong Woo; Park, Young Hyun; Bae, Woong Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sae Woong; Han, Kyung-Do; Ha, U-Syn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the association between obesity and prostate cancer both with and without diabetic patients included in the analysis using nationally representative data of the Korean population from the National Health Insurance System (NHIS). Materials and Methods: Of the 424,712 participants who underwent health examinations in 2002-2008, 139,519 men ≥40 years old and without prostate cancer were followed from the beginning of 2002 to the end of 2012. Multivariate adjusted Cox regression analysis was conducted to examine the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between prostate cancer and body mass index (BMI) both with and without diabetes. Results: The HR for prostate cancer according to the existence of diabetes was stratified by BMI in both age- and multivariable-adjusted models. In the population without diabetes, the HR for prostate cancer significantly increased as BMI increased beyond the reference range in a model adjusted for age and multiple variables; however, the increase in the HR was small. In the population with diabetes, the HR for prostate cancer significantly increased as BMI increased from < 18.5 kg/m2 to within the reference range (18.5 to 22.9) in the multivariable-adjusted model. In addition, a marked decrease in HR in the population with BMI of < 18.5 kg/m2 was seen compared to the reference or higher BMI population. Conclusion: This population-based study shows the evidence of association between obesity and development of prostate cancer, and the risk increases vary according to the change of BMI category and the existence of diabetes. PMID:27877221