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Sample records for cancer hormone receptor

  1. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  2. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival in...

  3. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  4. The androgen receptor in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Lei Mao; Zhi-Qi Zhu; Charlie Degui Chen

    2009-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is responsive to hormone therapy that interferes with androgen receptor (AR) signalling.However,the effect is short-lived,as nearly all tumours progress to a hormone-refractory (HR) state,a lethal stage of the disease.Intuitively,the AR should not be involved because hormone therapy that blocks or reduces AR activity is not effective in treating HR turnouts.However,there is still a consensus that AR plays an essential role in HR prostate cancer (HRPC) because AR signalling is still functional in HR tumours.AR signalling can be activated in HR turnouts through several mechanisms.First,activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways can sensitize the AR to castrate levels of androgens.Also,mutations in the AR can change AR ligand specificity,thereby allowing it to be activated by non-steroids or anti-androgens.Finally,overexpression of the wild-type AR sensitizes itself to low concentrations of androgens.Therefore,drugs targeting AR signalling could still be effective in treating HRPC.

  5. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny-Maria Jönsson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, and androgen (AR receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer in an independent data set, hypothesizing that the expression levels and prognostic impact may differ between the subtypes. Results: Expression of PR or AR protein was associated with improved 5-year progression-free (P = .001 for both and overall survival (P < .001 for both, log-rank test. ERα and ERβ did not provide prognostic information. Patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR had the most favorable prognosis, and this effect was retained in multivariable analyses. Analyses of the corresponding genes using an independent data set revealed differences among the molecular subtypes, but no clear relationship between high coexpression of PGR and AR and prognosis. Conclusions: A favorable outcome was seen for patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR. Gene expression data suggested variable effects in the different molecular subtypes. These findings demonstrate a prognostic role for PR and AR in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer.

  6. Short-term outcome of primary operated early breast cancer by hormone and HER-2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Prognostic subgroup classification of operable breast cancers using cDNA clustering of breast cancer-related genes resembles the classification based on the combined immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of the hormone and HER-2 receptors. We here report the short-term disease-free interval (DFI) of operable breast cancers by their joint hormone receptor/HER-2 phenotype. Patients and methods Short-term follow-up (FU) of ...

  7. Hormone-receptor expression and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Köbel, Martin; Longacre, Teri A;

    2013-01-01

    Few biomarkers of ovarian cancer prognosis have been established, partly because subtype-specific associations might be obscured in studies combining all histopathological subtypes. We examined whether tumour expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) was associated ...

  8. Expression profile and prognostic role of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing interest has been devoted to the expression and possible role of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer, but most of these findings are controversial. In the present study, the expression profile of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer and their clinicopathological and prognostic value were determined in a large Chinese cohort. The mRNA and protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), estrogen receptor beta (ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR), and androgen receptor (AR) in primary gastric tumors and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 60 and 866 Chinese gastric cancer patients was detected by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry method, respectively. The expression profile of the four receptors was compared and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics were assessed by using Chi-square test. The prognostic value of the four receptors in gastric cancer was evaluated by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. The presence of ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR in both gastric tumors and normal tissues was confirmed but their expression levels were extremely low except for the predominance of ERβ. The four receptors were expressed independently and showed a decreased expression pattern in gastric tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues. The positive expression of the four receptors all correlated with high tumor grade and intestinal type, and ERα and AR were also associated with early TNM stage and thereby a favorable outcome. However, ERα and AR were not independent prognostic factors for gastric cancer when multivariate survival analysis was performed. Our findings indicate that the sex hormone receptors may be partly involved in gastric carcinogenesis but their clinicopathological and prognostic significance in gastric cancer appears to be limited

  9. Involvement of Ghrelin-Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor System in Pathoclinical Profiles of Digestive System Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang WANG; Weigang WANG; Wencai QIU; Youben FAN; Jun ZHAO; Yu WANG; Qi ZHENG

    2007-01-01

    Ghrelin receptor has been shown to be expressed along the human gastrointestinal tract.Recent studies showed that ghrelin and a synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist improved weight gain and lean body mass retention in a rat model of cancer cachexia by acting on ghrelin receptor, that is, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). This study aims to explore the expression and the distribution of ghrelin receptor in human gastrointestinal tract cancers and to investigate the possible involvement of the ghrelin-GHS-R system in human digestive cancers. Surgical human digestive cancer specimens were obtained from various portions of the gastrointestinal tract from different patients. The expression of ghrelin receptor in these tissues was detected by tissue microarray technique. Our results showed that ghrelin receptor was expressed in cancers throughout the gastrointestinal tract, mainly in the cytoplasm of mucosal layer cells.Its expression level possibly correlated with organ type, histological grade, tumor-nodes-metastases stage,and nutrition status (weight loss) of the patients. For the first time, we identified the distribution of ghrelin receptor in digestive system cancers. Our results implied that the ghrelin-GHS-R system might be involved in the pathoclinical profiles of digestive cancers.

  10. Ability of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 binding to LHRH receptor on human liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Liang Gong; Gang Zhao; Hong-Guang Zhao; Wen-Tian Lü; Guang-Wei Liu; Ping Zhu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the ability of recombinant toxin luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 (LHRH-PE40) anH binding to LHRH receptor(LHRHR) on the membrane surfa ogf hman liver cancer HEPG cells.METHODS: LHRH was beled by using 125I with enzymatic reaction. The affinity and receptor volume of LHRH-PE40and LHRH binding to LHRHR on the membrane surface of human liver cancer cells were measured with radioligand receptor assay.RESULTS:The specific activity of LHRH labeled with 125I was 2.7×104 kBq/μL, and its radiochemical purity reached to 99.2-99.7%. The binding of 125I to LHRH was maximal for 240 min in the warm cultivation, and this binding was stabilized. The inhibiting rates of 125I-LHRH and LHRH on the proliferation of human liver cancer HEPG cells were not significantly different. On the basis of the saturation curve of 125I-LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells, 125I-LHRH of 1×105 cpm was selected for radioligand receptor assay. The affinity constants (Kd) of LHRH-PE40and LHRH bively,and their receptor volumes were 0.37±0.15 μmol/g and0.42±0.13 μmol/g, respectively. The binding of LHRH-PE40to the membrane proteinof normal liver cells was not observed.CONCLUSION: The recombinant toxin LHRH-PE40 binding to the membrane surface of LHRHR of human liver cancer HEPG cells was very strong, while the specific binding of it to normal liver cells was not observed. The results provide an important experimental basis for the clinical application of LHRH-PE.

  11. Height, age at menarche and risk of hormone receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer: A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritte, R.; Lukanova, A.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Mesrine, S.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dossus, L.; Teucher, B.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Associations of breast cancer overall with indicators of exposures during puberty are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the associations of height, leg length, sitting height and menarcheal age with hormone receptor-defined malignancies. Within the European Prospe

  12. Steroid hormone receptor expression in ovarian cancer: progesterone receptor B as prognostic marker for patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is partially conflicting evidence on the influence of the steroid hormones estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) on the development of ovarian cancer (OC). The aim of this study was to assess the expression of the receptor isoforms ER-α/-β and PR-A/-B in OC tissue and to analyze its impact on clinical and pathological features and patient outcome. 155 OC patients were included who had been diagnosed and treated between 1990 and 2002. Patient characteristics, histology and follow-up data were available. ER-α/-β and PR-A/-B expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. OC tissue was positive for ER-α/-β in 31.4% and 60.1% and PR-A/-B in 36.2% and 33.8%, respectively. We identified significant differences in ER-β expression related to the histological subtype (p=0.041), stage (p=0.002) and grade (p=0.011) as well as PR-A and tumor stage (p=0.03). Interestingly, median receptor expression for ER-α and PR-A/-B was significantly higher in G1 vs. G2 OC. Kaplan Meier analysis revealed a good prognosis for ER-α positive (p=0.039) and PR-B positive (p<0.001) OC. In contrast, ER-β negative OC had a favorable outcome (p=0.049). Besides tumor grade and stage, Cox-regression analysis showed PR-B to be an independent prognostic marker for patient survival (p=0.009, 95% CI 0.251-0.823, HR 0.455). ER-α/-β and PR-A/-B are frequently expressed in OC with a certain variability relating to histological subtype, grade and stage. Univariate analysis indicated a favorable outcome for ER-α positive and PR-B positive OC, while multivariate analysis showed PR-B to be the only independent prognostic marker for patient survival. In conclusion, ER and PR receptors may be useful targets for a more individualized OC therapy

  13. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Denise A

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  14. A 67 kDa non-hormone binding estradiol receptor is present in human mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, G; Migliaccio, A; Bilancio, A; Pagano, M; Abbondanza, C; Auricchio, F

    1996-03-01

    The presence of large amounts of a 67 kDa estradiol receptor that does not bind hormone was observed in 8 to 37 human mammary tumors (34 malignant and 3 benign). This form of receptor was detected by its conversion to hormone binding receptor by an endogenous tyrosine kinase in vitro. All 8 tumors were malignant. In these, the incubation of cytosol with ATP was seen to cause a 1- to 5-fold increase in estradiol-specific binding sites. These sites bound estradiol with physiological affinity, and their appearance was associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of estradiol receptor. The enzyme converting the non-hormone binding receptor into the hormone binding receptor is largely present in cytosol and scarce in membranes. It has been extensively purified. It is a 67 kDa protein under denaturating conditions, binds calmodulin-Sepharose in a Ca2+-dependent manner, is stimulated by Ca2+ and calmodulin, phosphorylates exogenous actin, is activated by the estradiol-receptor complex. The enzyme interacts with antibodies directed against the carboxy-terminal and catalytic domains of c-src. Therefore, it is a putative new member of the large c-src-related kinase family. Human mammary cancers with significant amounts of 67 kDa non-hormone binding receptor show relatively low levels of hormone binding estradiol receptor. The presence of non-hormone binding receptor that can be activated by in vitro tyrosine phosphorylation suggests that functional interaction of estradiol receptor with tyrosine kinases is altered in malignant tumors and has bearing on loss of hormone dependence and progression of the mammary cancer malignancy. PMID:8598306

  15. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  16. Epigenetics of Estrogen Receptor Signaling: Role in Hormonal Cancer Progression and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Monica; Cortez, Valerie [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Vadlamudi, Ratna K., E-mail: vadlamudi@uthscsa.edu [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Estrogen receptor (ERα) signaling plays a key role in hormonal cancer progression. ERα is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that modulates gene transcription via recruitment to the target gene chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that ERα signaling has the potential to contribute to epigenetic changes. Estrogen stimulation is shown to induce several histone modifications at the ERα target gene promoters including acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation via dynamic interactions with histone modifying enzymes. Deregulation of enzymes involved in the ERα -mediated epigenetic pathway could play a vital role in ERα driven neoplastic processes. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic changes are reversible, and hence offer novel therapeutic opportunities to reverse ERα driven epigenetic changes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on mechanisms by which ERα signaling potentiates epigenetic changes in cancer cells via histone modifications.

  17. Epigenetics of Estrogen Receptor Signaling: Role in Hormonal Cancer Progression and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogen receptor (ERα) signaling plays a key role in hormonal cancer progression. ERα is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that modulates gene transcription via recruitment to the target gene chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that ERα signaling has the potential to contribute to epigenetic changes. Estrogen stimulation is shown to induce several histone modifications at the ERα target gene promoters including acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation via dynamic interactions with histone modifying enzymes. Deregulation of enzymes involved in the ERα -mediated epigenetic pathway could play a vital role in ERα driven neoplastic processes. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic changes are reversible, and hence offer novel therapeutic opportunities to reverse ERα driven epigenetic changes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on mechanisms by which ERα signaling potentiates epigenetic changes in cancer cells via histone modifications

  18. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) carcinoma cells. The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours). Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are potential therapeutic targets, may reflect a positive

  19. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi;

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the length of the THRA1 microsatellite, which resides in a noncoding portion of the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene, affects receptor expression and is linked to clinicopathological parameters in thyroid cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:...

  20. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  1. The effects of radiotherapy on the hormone receptor concentration and tumor growth in xenotransplanted human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of radiotherapy on tumor growth and hormone receptor concentration (estrogen-, progesteronreceptor) in xenotransplanted human breast cancer is observed. Tumor growth significantly is delayed under therapy during the first 35 days after radiation. Renewed growth follows after that time. After the first days of treatment the ER and PR concentration decreases considerably and finally reaches 40% respectively 30% of the pretreatment level for a period of approximately 35 days after the end of radiotherapy. In general radiation therapy seems to affect the PR stronger than the ER. After this period ER and PR levels increase again with the regrowing tumor. The results point out that radiotherapy reduces the concentration of ER and PR in human breast cancer. Therefore the assay of steroid receptors in human breast cancer after radiation therapy is useful in predicting hormone dependency and prognosis only when receptor concentrations are positive. (orig.)

  2. Endocrine therapy initiation among Medicaid-insured breast cancer survivors with hormone receptor-positive tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Stephanie Brooke; Kohler, Racquel Elizabeth; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine Elizabeth; Goyal, Ravi K.; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Moore, Alexis; Smith, Timothy W.; Melvin, Cathy L.; Muss, Hyman Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hormone receptor positive (HR+) cancers account for most breast cancer diagnoses and deaths. Among survivors with HR+ breast cancers, endocrine therapy (ET) reduces 5-year risk of recurrence by up to 40%. Observational studies in Medicare and privately-insured survivors suggest under-utilization of ET. We sought to characterize ET use in a low-income Medicaid-insured population in North Carolina. Methods Medicaid claims data were matched to state cancer registry records for survivors ages 18–64 diagnosed with stage 0-II HR+ breast cancer from 2003–2007, eligible for ET, and enrolled in Medicaid for at least 12 of 15 months post-diagnosis. We used multivariable logistic regression to model receipt of any ET medication during 15-months post-diagnosis controlling for age, race, tumor characteristics, receipt of other treatments, co-morbidity, residence, reason for Medicaid eligibility, involvement in the Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program (BCCCP), and diagnosis year. Results Of 222 women meeting inclusion criteria, only 50% filled a prescription for ET. Involvement in BCCCP and earlier year of diagnoses were associated with significantly higher odds of initiating guideline-recommended ET (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] for BCCCP: 3.76, 95%CI: 1.67–8.48; AOR for 2004 relative to 2007: 2.80, 95%CI: 1.03–7.62; AOR for 2005 relative to 2007: 2.11, 95%CI: 0.92–4.85). Conclusions Results suggest substantial under-utilization of ET in this population. Interventions are needed to improve timely receipt of ET and to better support survivors taking ET. Implications of cancer survivors Low-income survivors should be counseled on the importance of ET and offered support services to promote initiation and long-term adherence. PMID:24866922

  3. Methylation of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor: diagnostic marker of malignity in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methylation state of the gene promoter for the receptor of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in the diagnosis of thyroid tumors of epithelial origin was analyzed. The study was conducted in thyroid tissue obtained from paraffin blocks of different thyroid pathologies (papillary, follicular and undifferentiated carcinoma and follicular adenomas). The work was done by using the DNA modification technique with sodium bisulfite, and polymerase chain reaction was applied to analyze the gene methylation state. Methylation of the promoter for the gene of the TSH receptor was found in the papillary carcinomas (33 of 40; 82.5 %), in 10 undifferentiated carcinomas (100 %), and in 10 of the 15 follicular carcinomas analyzed (66.6 %). No methylation was observed in the 8 follicular adenomas under study. The methylation of the gene for the TSH receptor was proposed as a new diagnostic marker of malignity and as a basis for using demethylating agents together with radioiodine therapy in patients with thyroid cancer of epithelial origin that do not respond to therapy. (Author)

  4. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients. PMID:27178335

  5. Reproductive factors and risk of hormone receptor positive and negative breast cancer: a cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association of reproductive factors with hormone receptor (HR)-negative breast tumors remains uncertain. Within the EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationships of reproductive factors (menarcheal age, time between menarche and first pregnancy, parity, number of children, age at first and last pregnancies, time since last full-term childbirth, breastfeeding, age at menopause, ever having an abortion and use of oral contraceptives [OC]) with risk of ER-PR- (n = 998) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,567) breast tumors. A later first full-term childbirth was associated with increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors but not with risk of ER-PR- tumors (≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 1.47 [95% CI 1.15-1.88] ptrend < 0.001 for ER+PR+ tumors; ≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 0.93 [95% CI 0.53-1.65] ptrend = 0.96 for ER-PR- tumors; Phet = 0.03). The risk associations of menarcheal age, and time period between menarche and first full-term childbirth with ER-PR-tumors were in the similar direction with risk of ER+PR+ tumors (phet = 0.50), although weaker in magnitude and statistically only borderline significant. Other parity related factors such as ever a full-term birth, number of births, age- and time since last birth were associated only with ER+PR+ malignancies, however no statistical heterogeneity between breast cancer subtypes was observed. Breastfeeding and OC use were generally not associated with breast cancer subtype risk. Our study provides possible evidence that age at menarche, and time between menarche and first full-term childbirth may be associated with the etiology of both HR-negative and HR-positive malignancies, although the associations with HR-negative breast cancer were only borderline significant

  6. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yardley DA

    2016-01-01

    Denise A Yardley1,2 1Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Tennessee Oncology, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly ...

  7. Maintenance bevacizumab beyond first-line paclitaxel plus bevacizumab in patients with Her2-negative hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer: efficacy in combination with hormonal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on efficacy of bevacizumab (B) beyond first-line taxane -including regimen (BT) as first-line treatment are lacking. Although preclinical results that anti-angiogenic agents combined with hormonal therapy (HT) could be active, no clinical data exist about combination of maintenance Bevacizumab (mBev) with HT. Thirty-five patients who experienced a response after first-line BT, were given mBev at the dose of 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Among 30 pts with hormonal receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC), 20 (66.6%) received HT with mBev (mHTBev). Objective of the study was the outcome and safety of mBev and in two groups of patients receiving HT or not. Complete response and partial response was achieved/maintained in 4 (11.4%) and 13 (37.1%) patients, respectively (overall response rate: 48.5%). Clinical benefit was obtained on 23 patients (65.7%). Median of mBev PFS and clinical benefit were 6.8 months (95% CI: 0.8-12.7) and 17.1 months (95% CI :12.2-21.9), respectively. Median PFS of patients who received mHTBev was longer than mBev without HT (13 months and 4.1 months, respectively, p = 0.05). The most common severe toxicities were proteinuria (11.4%) and hypertension (8.5%). No additional toxicity was observed with HTBev. Maintenance bevacizumab with or without anti-hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer is tolerable and associated with long-term clinical outcome; these results encourage the strategy of prolonging bevacizumab until progression in combination with anti-hormonal agents

  8. Genetic variants in anti-Mullerian hormone and anti-Mullerian hormone receptor genes and breast cancer risk in Caucasians and African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hongmei; Dorgan, Joanne F; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) regulates ovarian folliculogenesis by signaling via its receptors, and elevated serum AMH levels are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. No previous studies have examined the effects of genetic variants in AMH-related genes on breast cancer risk. We evaluated the associations of 62 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AMH and its receptor genes, including AMH type 1 receptor (ACVR1) and AMH type 2 receptor (AMHR2), with the risk of breast cancer in the Women's Insights and Shared Experiences (WISE) Study of Caucasians (346 cases and 442 controls), as well as African Americans (149 cases and 246 controls). Of the 62 SNPs evaluated, two showed a nominal significant association (P for trend < 0.05) with breast cancer risk among Caucasians, and another two among African Americans. The age-adjusted additive odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) of those two SNPs (ACVR1 rs12694937[C] and ACVR1 rs2883605[T]) for the risk of breast cancer among Caucasian women were 2.33 (1.20-4.52) and 0.68 (0.47-0.98), respectively. The age-adjusted additive ORs (95% CI) of those two SNPs (ACVR1 rs1146031[G] and AMHR2 functional SNP rs2002555[G]) for the risk of breast cancer among African American women were 0.63 (0.44-0.92) and 1.67 (1.10-2.53), respectively. However, these SNPs did not show significant associations after correction for multiple testing. Our findings do not provide strong supportive evidence for the contribution of genetic variants in AMH-related genes to the risk of developing breast cancer in either Caucasians or African Americans. PMID:25379134

  9. Tolerability of Therapies Recommended for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    For women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, endocrine therapies, including the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen, the aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, and the selective estrogen receptor degrader fulvestrant, are recommended in clinical guidelines. The addition of targeted agents such as everolimus or palbociclib to aromatase inhibitors are also recommended as treatment options. Chemotherapy remains an option, although clinical guidelines have recommended these agents be reserved for patients with immediately life-threatening disease or if resistance to endocrine therapy is known or suspected. The present review has consolidated the tolerability profiles of the agents approved for use in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer based on phase III registration trial data. Endocrine therapies are generally well tolerated, although the addition of targeted therapies to aromatase inhibitors or fulvestrant appears to increase the proportion of patients experiencing adverse events, and palbociclib and chemotherapy appear to be more closely associated with serious adverse events, including neutropenia. PMID:27151773

  10. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  11. Rapid steroid hormone actions via membrane receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Nofrat; Verma, Anjali; Bivens, Caroline B; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2016-09-01

    Steroid hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological and developmental functions. Traditional steroid hormone signaling acts through nuclear and cytosolic receptors, altering gene transcription and subsequently regulating cellular activity. This is particularly important in hormonally-responsive cancers, where therapies that target classical steroid hormone receptors have become clinical staples in the treatment and management of disease. Much progress has been made in the last decade in detecting novel receptors and elucidating their mechanisms, particularly their rapid signaling effects and subsequent impact on tumorigenesis. Many of these receptors are membrane-bound and lack DNA-binding sites, functionally separating them from their classical cytosolic receptor counterparts. Membrane-bound receptors have been implicated in a number of pathways that disrupt the cell cycle and impact tumorigenesis. Among these are pathways that involve phospholipase D, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. The crosstalk between these pathways has been shown to affect apoptosis and proliferation in cardiac cells, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes as well as cancer cells. This review focuses on rapid signaling by 17β-estradiol and 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 to examine the integrated actions of classical and rapid steroid signaling pathways both in contrast to each other and in concert with other rapid signaling pathways. This new approach lends insight into rapid signaling by steroid hormones and its potential for use in targeted drug therapies that maximize the benefits of traditional steroid hormone-directed therapies while mitigating their less desirable effects. PMID:27288742

  12. Potential antitumor effects of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate in hormone receptor negative breast cancer patients with bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study evaluated, according to hormone receptor status, the antitumor effects of bisphosphonate especially on survival and disease progression in breast cancer patients with metastatic bone disease. Of 317 patients with initial bone metastasis and known breast cancer subtypes, 230 patients (72.6%) had hormone receptor (HR) positive tumors, and 87 patients (27.4%) had HR negative tumors. We assessed the primary outcome of overall survival (OS), after adjusting for other factors, comparing a group that received bisphosphonates (BPs) with a group that did not receive it. 87.8% of HR positive and 69.0% of HR negative patients received BPs with a median number of 17.7 cycles. Although BPs treatment made no survival benefit in HR positive group, HR negative patients showed a significant prolonged survival when they received BPs treatment (hazard ratio = 0.56 [95% CI 0.34 to 0.91], P = 0.019). In multivariate analysis, disease free interval > 2 years (P = 0.036), a sum of metastatic sites < 3 (P = 0.034), and BP treatments (P = 0.007) were significant factors for survival in HR negative patients. Bisphosphonate treatment can result in a survival benefit in metastatic breast cancer patients with HR negative tumors

  13. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and sulfotransferase polymorphisms, sex hormone concentrations, and tumor receptor status in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes are involved in removing sex hormones from circulation. Polymorphic variation in five UGT and SULT genes – UGT1A1 ((TA)6/(TA)7), UGT2B4 (Asp458Glu), UGT2B7 (His268Tyr), UGT2B15 (Asp85Tyr), and SULT1A1 (Arg213His) – may be associated with circulating sex hormone concentrations, or the risk of an estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) or progesterone receptor-negative (PR-) tumor. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios of an ER- or PR- tumor associated with polymorphisms in the genes listed above for 163 breast cancer patients from a population-based cohort study of women in western Washington. Adjusted geometric mean estradiol, estrone, and testosterone concentrations were calculated within each UGT and SULT genotype for a subpopulation of postmenopausal breast cancer patients not on hormone therapy 2–3 years after diagnosis (n = 89). The variant allele of UGT1A1 was associated with reduced risk of an ER- tumor (P for trend = 0.03), and variants of UGT2B15 and SULT1A1 were associated with non-statistically significant risk reductions. There was some indication that plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations varied by UGT2B15 and SULT1A1 genotypes; women with the UGT2B15 Asp/Tyr and Tyr/Tyr genotypes had higher concentrations of estradiol than women with the Asp/Asp genotype (P = 0.004). Compared with women with the SULT1A1 Arg/Arg and Arg/His genotypes, women with the His/His genotype had elevated concentrations of testosterone (P = 0.003). The risk of ER- breast cancer tumors may vary by UGT or SULT genotype. Further, plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations in breast cancer patients may differ depending on some UGT and SULT genotypes

  14. Nuclear receptors in early hormone refractory prostate cancer and their relationship to apoptosis-related proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Z.; Murray, P. G.; Maďarová, J.; Lukešová, M.; Hlobilková, A.; Řiháková, P.; Flavell, J. R.; Strnad, Miroslav; Student, V.; Vojtěšek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2002), s. 172-177. ISSN 0028-2685 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/02/0475 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Nuclear receptors * prostate cancer * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2002

  15. Endocrine therapy use among elderly hormone receptor-pos...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Clinical guidelines recommend that women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer receive endocrine therapy (selective estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase...

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, hormone receptor status, and breast cancer-specific mortality in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, E H; Tse, C-K; Olshan, A F; Carey, L A; Moorman, P G; Troester, M A

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies report a protective association between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer risk, a finding consistent with NSAID-mediated suppression of aromatase-driven estrogen biosynthesis. However, the association between NSAID use and breast cancer-specific mortality is uncertain and it is unknown whether this relationship differs by hormone receptor status. This study comprised 935 invasive breast cancer cases, of which 490 were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, enrolled between 1996 and 2001 in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Self-reported NSAID use in the decade prior to diagnosis was categorized by duration and regularity of use. Differences in tumor size, stage, node, and receptor status by NSAID use were examined using Chi-square tests. Associations between NSAID use and breast cancer-specific mortality were examined using age- and race-adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis. Tumor characteristics did not differ by NSAID use. Increased duration and regularity of NSAID use was associated with reduced breast cancer-specific mortality in women with ER-positive tumors (long-term regular use (≥8 days/month for ≥ 3 years) versus no use; hazard ratio (HR) 0.48; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.98), with a statistically significant trend with increasing duration and regularity (p-trend = 0.036). There was no association for ER-negative cases (HR 1.19; 95 %CI 0.50-2.81; p-trend = 0.891). Long-term, regular NSAID use in the decade prior to breast cancer diagnosis was associated with reduced breast cancer-specific mortality in ER-positive cases. If confirmed, these findings support the hypothesis that potential chemopreventive properties of NSAIDs are mediated, at least in part, through suppression of estrogen biosynthesis. PMID:25151293

  17. Patients’ preferences and willingness-to-pay for postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer treatments after failure of standard treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Ngorsuraches, Surachat; Thongkeaw, Klangjai

    2015-01-01

    Patients’ preferences increasingly play roles in cancer treatments. The objective of this study is to examine breast cancer patients’ preferences and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer treatments after failure of standard treatments. Four attributes, i.e. progression free survival (PFS), anemia, pneumonitis, and cost, and their levels of exemestane and exemestane plus everolimus from literature and patient interviews wer...

  18. Correlation of Hormone Receptors with Her 2/neu Protein Expression and the Histological Grade in Invasive Breast Cancers in a Cohort of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha ARAFAH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Data on hormone receptor and Her2/neu expression in breast cancers from Saudi Arabia and Gulf Region is sparse. We undertook this study to describe the patterns of hormone receptor and Her2/neu protein expression in breast carcinoma and compared them with the histological grade at a university hospital in Riyadh.Material and Method: We conducted a retrospective hormone receptor and Her2/neu study on 164 histologically confirmed invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast between the year 2002 and 2008. Immunohistochemical analysis for estrogen receptor, progestrone receptor and Her2/neu was done in all the cases. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH for Her2/neu gene amplification was performed in all 2+ cases and a few equivocal 1+ and 3+cases by immunohistochemistry. The results were then compared in a blinded fashion. Correlation between Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor and Her2/neu amplification and grade of tumour were calculated.Result: The prevalence of estrogen receptor, progestrone receptor and Her2/neu overexpression were 64.6%, 57.3% and 35.3% respectively. The expression of estrogen receptor and progestrone receptor were significantly correlated (p<0.001. There was also a significant negative correlation between expression of hormone receptor and Her2/neu amplification. The histological grade of the tumour was also significantly correlated to the expression of both estrogen receptor and progestrone receptor. However, the relationship between Her2/neu amplification and grade of tumour was not significant and many of the grade III tumours were Her2/neu negative. In addition Her2/neu gene amplification by FISH was observed in 84.6% of breast cancers that were 3+ and in 18.75% of the cases that were 2+ by immunohistochemistry.Conclusion: The revalence of estrogen receptor, progestrone receptor expression and Her2/neu amplification in breast cancers in Saudi Arabian population is similar to that reported internationally

  19. Risk of breast cancer in relation to combined effects of hormone therapy, body mass index, and alcohol use, by hormone-receptor status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Tjønneland, Anne; Keiding, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    ,789 women ages 50+ years (study period 1981 to 2009). Information on risk factors was obtained in baseline questionnaires. We performed analyses using the Aalen additive hazards model. Serum estradiol and testosterone measurements were obtained in a subsample of approximately 1000 women. RESULTS: During 392...... therapy users across all BMI strata (P for interaction = 0.003). A markedly higher risk of breast cancer was also observed for alcohol combined with hormone therapy use compared with abstinent nonusers (P for interaction = 0.02). These effects were primarily restricted to ER-positive cases. Combined...... effects of hormone therapy/high BMI and hormone therapy/alcohol on serum estradiol and testosterone supported the hypothesis of a hormonal pathway linking these exposures to breast cancer. CONCLUSION: These analyses suggest an increased risk of breast cancer associated with hormone therapy use-a risk that...

  20. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors' ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  1. CYP19A1 polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyland-Jones, Brian; Gray, Kathryn P; Abramovitz, Mark; Bouzyk, Mark; Young, Brandon; Long, Bradley; Kammler, Roswitha; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Biasi, Maria Olivia; Thürlimann, Beat; Lyng, Maria Bibi; Ditzel, Henrik J; Harvey, Vernon J; Neven, Patrick; Treilleux, Isabelle; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Maibach, Rudolf; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Pagani, Olivia; Viale, Giuseppe; Rae, James M; Regan, Meredith M

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms are associated with abnormal activity of aromatase and with musculoskeletal and bone side effects of aromatase inhibitors. DNA was isolated from tumor specimens of 4861 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in the BIG...

  2. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 protein expression in Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients correlates with cancer specific survival and increases after exposure to hormonal therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Dai; Yun-Yi Kong; Ding-Wei Ye; Chun-Guang Ma; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Xu-Dong Yao

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein expression and gene amplification in Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients and their potential value as prognostic factors. Methods: Immuno-histochemistry (IHC) was performed to investigate HER2 protein expression in prostate biopsy specimens from 104 Chinese metastatic prostate cancer patients. After 3-11 months of hormonal therapy, 12 patients underwent transure- thral resection of the prostate (TURP). HER2 protein expression of TURP specimens was compared with that of the original biopsy specimens. Of these, 10 biopsy and 4 TURP specimens with HER2 IHC staining scores ≥ 2+ were investigated for HER2 gene amplification status by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Of the 104 prostate biopsy specimens, HER2 protein expression was 0, 1+, 2+ and 3+ in 49 (47.1%), 45 (43.3%), 8 (7.7%) and 2 (1.9%) cases, respectively. There was a significant association between HER2 expression and Gleason score (P = 0.026). HER2 protein expression of prostate cancer tissues increased in 33.3% of patients after hormonal therapy. None of the 14 specimens with HER2 IHC scores > 2+ showed HER2 gene amplification. Patients with HER2 scores ≥ 2+ had a significantly higher chance of dying from prostate cancer than those with HER2 scores of 0 (P = 0.004) and 1+ (P = 0.034). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HER2 protein expression intensity was an independent predictor of cancer-related death (P = 0.039). Conclusion: An HER2 IHC score ≥ 2+ should be defined as HER2 protein overexpression in prostate cancer. Overexpression of HER2 protein in cancer tissue might suggest an increased risk of dying from prostate cancer. HER2 protein expression increases in some individual patients after hormonal therapy.

  3. Clinical implications of recent studies using mTOR inhibitors to treat advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Approximately 75% of breast cancer is hormone receptor-positive (HR+) and is managed with endocrine therapies. However, relapse or disease progression caused by primary or acquired endocrine resistance is frequent. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling is one of the molecular mechanisms leading to endocrine resistance. mTOR inhibitors that target the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway are the first of the targeted therapies to be evaluated in clinical trials to overcome endocrine resistance. Although the clinical trial with temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, did not show any benefit when compared with endocrine therapy alone, a Phase II clinical trial with sirolimus has been promising. Recently, everolimus was approved in combination with exemestane by the US Food and Drug Administration for treating postmenopausal women with advanced HR+ breast cancer, based on the results of a Phase III trial. Therefore, everolimus represents the first and only targeted agent approved for combating endocrine resistance

  4. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation. PMID:27241667

  5. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy is associated with comparable outcomes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, David M.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Roshan ePrabhu; Ruth eO'Regan; Amelia eZelnak; Carolina eFasola; Donna eMister; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We compared outcomes in post-menopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NAHT) or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT).Methods: We retrospectively identified post-menopausal women who received either NAHT or NACT for non-metastatic, non-inflammatory, ER+, Her2neu negative breast cancer from 2004 to 2011. We compared long-term rates of locoregional relapse free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS), ...

  6. Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy is Associated with Comparable Outcomes to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Post-Menopausal Women with Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, David M.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Prabhu, Roshan; O’Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Fasola, Carolina; Mister, Donna; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We compared outcomes in post-menopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NAHT) or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Methods: We retrospectively identified post-menopausal women who received either NAHT or NACT for non-metastatic, non-inflammatory, ER+, Her2neu negative breast cancer from 2004 to 2011. We compared long-term rates of locoregional relapse free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS),...

  7. Plant hormone receptors: new perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Spartz, Angela K.; William M Gray

    2008-01-01

    Plant growth and development require the integration of a variety of environmental and endogenous signals that, together with the intrinsic genetic program, determine plant form. Central to this process are several growth regulators known as plant hormones or phytohormones. Despite decades of study, only recently have receptors for several of these hormones been identified, revealing novel mechanisms for perceiving chemical signals and providing plant biologists with a much clearer picture of...

  8. Surgery Should Complement Endocrine Therapy for Elderly Postmenopausal Women with Hormone Receptor-Positive Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endocrine therapy (ET is an integral part of breast cancer (BC treatment with surgical resection remaining the cornerstone of curative treatment. The objective of this study is to compare the survival of elderly postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early-stage BC treated with ET alone, without radiation or chemotherapy, versus ET plus surgery. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study based on a prospective database. The medical records of postmenopausal BC patients referred to the surgical oncology service of two hospitals during an 8-year period were reviewed. All patients were to receive ET for a minimum of four months before undergoing any surgery. Results. Fifty-one patients were included and divided in two groups, ET alone and ET plus surgery. At last follow-up in exclusive ET patients (n=28, 39% had stable disease or complete response, 22% had progressive disease, of which 18% died of breast cancer, and 39% died of other causes. In surgical patients (n=23, 78% were disease-free, 9% died of recurrent breast cancer, and 13% died of other causes. Conclusions. These results suggest that surgical resection is beneficial in this group and should be considered, even for patients previously deemed ineligible for surgery.

  9. Proliferative response of human prostate cancer cell to hormone inhibited by androgen receptor antisense RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江军; 王洛夫; 方玉华; 靳风烁; 靳文生

    2004-01-01

    Background The failure of endocrine treatment for advanced prostate cancer might be related to aberrant activation of androgen receptor (AR). Prostate cancer cell line LNCaP contains AR that can be activated by androgen, estrogen and progesterone. This study was set to investigate the effects of antisense AR RNA on growth of LNCaP cultured in medium containing varied concentrations of R1881, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone, respectively. Methods LNCaP cells transfected with antisense AR RNA retroviral vector pL-AR-SN were designated as LNCaPas-AR. LNCaP cells containing empty vector pLXSN served as LNCaPNeo. LNCaP and LNCaPNeo were taken as controls. In vitro cell growth assay, proliferative cells of LNCaP and tranfected LNCaPs were counted by typan staining when they cultured with synthetic androgen R1881, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone, respectively. Results Growth of LNCaPas-AR was inhibited significantly (P<0.05) compared with that of LNCaP and LNCaPNeo at 1 nmol/L R1881, 10 nmol/L 17β-estradiol, and 1 nmol/L progesterone, respectively. No difference was seen between LNCaP and LNCaPNeo(P>0.05). Microscopic observation showed that LNCaP and LNCaPNeo cells grew well, but only few LNCaPas-AR cells were alive. Conclusions Our observations indicate that antisense AR RNA retroviral vector pL-AR-SN could change androgen-independent characteristics of LNCaP cells, which might shed some novel insights into the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  10. Epigenetic reactivation of estrogen receptor-α (ERα by genistein enhances hormonal therapy sensitivity in ERα-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptor-α (ERα-negative breast cancer is clinically aggressive and normally does not respond to conventional estrogen target-directed therapies. The soybean isoflavone, genistein (GE, has been shown to prevent and inhibit breast cancer and recent studies have suggested that GE can enhance the anticancer capacity of an estrogen antagonist, tamoxifen (TAM, especially in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. However, the role of GE in ERα-negative breast cancer remains unknown. Methods We have evaluated the in vitro and in vivo epigenetic effects of GE on ERα reactivation by using MTT assay, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay, western-blot assay, immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay, immunohistochemistry and epigenetic enzymatic activity analysis. Preclinical mouse models including xenograft and spontaneous breast cancer mouse models were used to test the efficacy of GE in vivo. Results We found that GE can reactivate ERα expression and this effect was synergistically enhanced when combined with a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA, in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. GE treatment also re-sensitized ERα-dependent cellular responses to activator 17β-estradiol (E2 and antagonist TAM. Further studies revealed that GE can lead to remodeling of the chromatin structure in the ERα promoter thereby contributing to ERα reactivation. Consistently, dietary GE significantly prevented cancer development and reduced the growth of ERα-negative mouse breast tumors. Dietary GE further enhanced TAM-induced anti-cancer efficacy due at least in part to epigenetic ERα reactivation. Conclusions Our studies suggest that soybean genistein can epigenetically restore ERα expression, which in turn increases TAM-dependent anti-estrogen therapeutic sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. The results from our studies reveal a novel therapeutic combination approach using bioactive

  11. Progesterone receptors – animal models and cell signalling in breast cancer: Implications for breast cancer of inclusion of progestins in hormone replacement therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Schairer, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Progestins are included in menopausal hormone replacement therapy to counteract the increased risk for endometrial cancer associated with estrogen replacement therapy. Studies of hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk and of changes in mammographic density according to different regimens of hormone replacement therapy suggest that, for the most part, estrogen–progestin replacement therapy has a more adverse effect on breast cancer risk than does estrogen replacement therapy. Many ...

  12. [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography can contribute to discriminate patients with poor prognosis in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Gwe Ahn

    Full Text Available Patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer typically show favorable survival. However, identifying individuals at high risk of recurrence among these patients is a crucial issue. We tested the hypothesis that [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET scans can help predict prognosis in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.Between April 2004 and December 2008, 305 patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer who underwent FGD-PET were enrolled. Patients with luminal B subtype were identified by positivity for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 or high Ki67 (≥14% according to criteria recently recommended by the St. Gallen panelists. The cut-off value of SUVmax was defined using the time-dependent receiver operator characteristic curve for recurrence-free survival (RFS.At a median follow up of 6.23 years, continuous SUVmax was a significant prognostic factor with a hazard ratio (HR of 1.21 (p = 0.021. The cut-off value of SUVmax was defined as 4. Patients with luminal B subtype (n = 82 or high SUVmax (n = 107 showed a reduced RFS (p = 0.031 and 0.002, respectively. In multivariate analysis for RFS, SUVmax carried independent prognostic significance (p = 0.012 whereas classification with immunohistochemical markers did not (p = 0.274. The Harell c-index was 0.729. High SUVmax was significantly associated with larger tumor size, positive nodes, HER2 positivity, high Ki67 (≥14%, high tumor grade, and luminal B subtype.Among patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, FDG-PET can help discriminate patients at high risk of tumor relapse.

  13. The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglia, Michelle L; Zheng, Wei; Li, Honglan; Yang, Gong; Gao, Jing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-08-15

    Soy food intake has previously been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence for subgroups of breast cancer, particularly by menopausal and hormone receptor status, is less consistent. To evaluate the role of hormone receptor and menopausal status on the association between soy food intake and breast cancer risk, we measured usual soy food intake in adolescence and adulthood via food frequency questionnaire in 70,578 Chinese women, aged 40-70 years, recruited to the Shanghai Women's Health Study (1996-2000). After a median follow-up of 13.2 years (range: 0.01-15.0), 1,034 incident breast cancer cases were identified. Using Cox models, we found that adult soy intake was inversely associated with breast cancer risk [hazard ratio (HR) for fifth versus first quintile soy protein intake = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI):0.63-0.97]. The association was predominantly seen in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.29-0.74). Analyses further stratified by hormone receptor status showed that adult soy intake was associated with significantly decreased risk of estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ breast cancer in postmenopausal women (HR = 0.72; 95% CI:0.53-0.96) and decreased risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.22-0.97). The soy association did not vary by human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) status. Furthermore, we found that high soy intake during adulthood and adolescence was associated with reduced premenopausal breast cancer risk (HR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88; comparing third vs. first tertile) while high adulthood soy intake was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer only when adolescent intake was low (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.91). Our study suggests that hormonal status, menopausal status and time window of exposure are important factors influencing the soy-breast cancer association. PMID:27038352

  14. Docetaxel, Carboplatin, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab With or Without Estrogen Deprivation in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Positive Operable or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Metformin increases survival in hormone receptor-positive, HER2-positive breast cancer patients with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Hyunwook; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hwa Jung; Lee, Sae Byul; Park, Hee Sung; Sohn, Guiyun; Lee, Yura; Koh, Beom Seok; Yu, Jong Han; Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Metformin use has recently been observed to decrease both the rate and mortality of breast cancer. Our study was aim to determine whether metformin use is associated with survival in diabetic breast cancer patients by breast cancer subtype and systemic treatment. Methods Data from the Asan Medical Center Breast Cancer Database from 1997 to 2007 were analyzed. The study cohort comprised 6,967 nondiabetic patients, 202 diabetic patients treated with metformin, and 184 diabetic pati...

  16. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression.

  17. Genetic features of thyroid hormone receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maha Rebaï; Imen Kallel; Ahmed Rebaï

    2012-12-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are prototypes of nuclear transcription factors that regulate the expression of target genes. These receptors play an important role in many physiological processes. Moreover, a dysfunction of these proteins is often implicated in several human diseases and malignancies. Here we report genetic variations and alterations of the TRs that have been described in the literature as well as their potential role in the development of some human diseases including cancers. The functional effects of some mutations and polymorphisms in TRs on disease susceptibility, especially on cancer risk, are now established. Therefore, further investigations are needed in order to use these receptors as therapeutic targets or as biological markers to decide on appropriate forms of treatment.

  18. Management of adverse events in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer treated with everolimus: observations from a phase III clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex, renal angiomyolipoma and tuberous sclerosis complex, and, in combination with exemestane, for hormone receptor-positive HER2-negative advanced breast cancer after failure of treatment with letrozole or anastrozole. Results from the phase III BOLERO-2 trial de...

  19. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and breast cancer risk according to menopause and hormone receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Ferrari, Pietro; González, Carlos A; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Bredsdorff, Lea; Overvad, Kim; Touillaud, Marina; Perquier, Florence; Fagherazzi, Guy; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Tikk, Kaja; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Dilis, Vardis; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Engeset, Dagrun; Menéndez, Virginia; Travier, Noémie; Molina-Montes, Esther; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Wallström, Peter; Sonestedt, Emily; Sund, Malin; Landberg, Rikard; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Travis, Ruth C; Scalbert, Augustin; Ward, Heather A; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary flavonoids and lignans and breast cancer (BC) risk is inconclusive, with the possible exception of isoflavones in Asian countries. Therefore, we investigated prospectively dietary total and subclasses of flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk according to menopause and hormonal receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The study included 334,850 women, mostly aged between 35 and 70 years from ten European countries. At baseline, country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used. A flavonoid and lignan food composition database was developed from the US Department of Agriculture, the Phenol-Explorer and the UK Food Standards Agency databases. Cox regression models were used to analyse the association between dietary flavonoid/lignan intake and the risk of developing BC. During an average 11.5-year follow-up, 11,576 incident BC cases were identified. No association was observed between the intake of total flavonoids [hazard ratio comparing fifth to first quintile (HRQ5-Q1) 0.97, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.90-1.04; P trend = 0.591], isoflavones (HRQ5-Q1 1.00, 95 % CI: 0.91-1.10; P trend = 0.734), or total lignans (HRQ5-Q1 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.93-1.11; P trend = 0.469) and overall BC risk. The stratification of the results by menopausal status at recruitment or the differentiation of BC cases according to oestrogen and progesterone receptors did not affect the results. This study shows no associations between flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk, overall or after taking into account menopausal status and BC hormone receptors. PMID:23572295

  20. Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β (TRβ) Mediates Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) Expression in Thyroid Cancer Cells: A Novel Signaling Pathway in Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Frances E; Tai, Phillip W L; Barnum, Michael S; Gillis, Noelle E; Evans, Katherine G; Taber, Thomas H; White, Jeffrey H; Tomczak, Jennifer A; Jaworski, Diane M; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulation of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)β is common in human cancers. Restoration of functional TRβ delays tumor progression in models of thyroid and breast cancers implicating TRβ as a tumor suppressor. Conversely, aberrant expression of the runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) is established in the progression and metastasis of thyroid, breast, and other cancers. Silencing of Runx2 diminishes tumor invasive characteristics. With TRβ as a tumor suppressor and Runx2 as a tumor promoter, a compelling question is whether there is a functional relationship between these regulatory factors in thyroid tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrated that these proteins are reciprocally expressed in normal and malignant thyroid cells; TRβ is high in normal cells, and Runx2 is high in malignant cells. T3 induced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in Runx2 expression. Silencing of TRβ by small interfering RNA knockdown resulted in a corresponding increase in Runx2 and Runx2-regulated genes, indicating that TRβ levels directly impact Runx2 expression and associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition molecules. TRβ specifically bound to 3 putative thyroid hormone-response element motifs within the Runx2-P1 promoter ((-)105/(+)133) as detected by EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation. TRβ suppressed Runx2 transcriptional activities, thus confirming TRβ regulation of Runx2 at functional thyroid hormone-response elements. Significantly, these findings indicate that a ratio of the tumor-suppressor TRβ and tumor-promoting Runx2 may reflect tumor aggression and serve as biomarkers in biopsy tissues. The discovery of this TRβ-Runx2 signaling supports the emerging role of TRβ as a tumor suppressor and reveals a novel pathway for intervention. PMID:27253998

  1. Strategies for Imaging Androgen Receptor Signaling Pathway in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Hormonal Manipulation and Radiation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravina Giovanni Luca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (Pca is a heterogeneous disease; its etiology appears to be related to genetic and epigenetic factors. Radiotherapy and hormone manipulation are effective treatments, but many tumors will progress despite these treatments. Molecular imaging provides novel opportunities for image-guided optimization and management of these treatment modalities. Here we reviewed the advances in targeted imaging of key biomarkers of androgen receptor signaling pathways. A computerized search was performed to identify all relevant studies in Medline up to 2013. There are well-known limitations and inaccuracies of current imaging approaches for monitoring biological changes governing tumor progression. The close integration of molecular biology and clinical imaging could ease the development of new molecular imaging agents providing novel tools to monitor a number of biological events that, until a few years ago, were studied by conventional molecular assays. Advances in translational research may represent the next step in improving the oncological outcome of men with Pca who remain at high risk for systemic failure. This aim may be obtained by combining the anatomical properties of conventional imaging modalities with biological information to better predict tumor response to conventional treatments.

  2. Is the biology of breast cancer changing? A study of hormone receptor status 1984-1986 and 1996-1997

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, S.B.F.; Mallon, E.A.; Edwards, J.; Campbell, F. M.; McGlynn, L M; Elsberger, B; Cooke, T G

    2009-01-01

    Using archived tumours, those from 1984–1986 and 1996–1997 underwent immunohistochemistry for hormone receptors and grade analysis. A significant shift towards more ER-positive and low-grade disease was found; this appears to reflect screening practices, but could still influence survival.

  3. 11q13 is a Susceptibility Locus for Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambrechts, Diether; Truong, Therese; Justenhoven, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    A recent two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified five novel breast cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9, 10 and 11. To provide more reliable estimates of the relative risk associated with these loci and investigate possible heterogeneity by subtype of breast cancer, we ge...

  4. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

  5. Data on alteration of hormone and growth factor receptor profiles over progressive passages of breast cancer cell lines representing different clinical subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Madhumathy G; Desai, Krisha; Prabhu, Jyothi S; Hari, P S; Remacle, Jose; Sridhar, T S

    2016-09-01

    Human breast cancers are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours consisting of several molecular subtypes with a variable profile of hormone, growth factor receptors and cytokeratins [1]. Here, the data shows immunofluorescence profiling of four different cell lines belonging to distinct clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Post revival, the cell lines were passaged in culture and immunophenotyping was done for ER, HER-2, AR and EGFR. Data for the markers from early passage (5th) through passages as late as 25 for the different cell lines is presented. PMID:27508248

  6. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources

    OpenAIRE

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Waterbor, John W.; Altekruse, Sean F.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for...

  7. Prognosis of breast cancer with low-positive hormonal receptors using epidermal growth factor receptor and cytokeratin 5/6 as indi-cators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianyi; Xue Jinqi; Zhang Wenhai; Zhang Yang; Jia Shi; Qian Songying

    2016-01-01

    Objective Less than a decade ago, ER-positive and PgR-positive diagnostic criteria decrease from 10%to 1%. Up to 20%of current immunohistochemical determinations of ER and PgR worldwide may be inaccu-rate. It is necessary to study patients whose tumors are between luminal A (LABC) and triple-negative (TNBC) breast cancer. Methods Survival analysis grouping by the level of positive hormone receptor, CK5/6 and EGFR, and en-docrine therapy was carried out in 206 patients whose tumors were junction zone between LABC and TNBC. Re-sults There were no significant differences between the low-positive (1%-9%) HR group and positive HR (10%-19%) group in overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). There was an apparent difference between the nor-mal-like group and basal-like group in OS and DFS, and between the patients with and without endocrine therapy. There were significant differences between death and tumor progression for EGFR and CK5/6, chemotherapy, and endocrine therapy. Conclusions We conclude that EGFR and CK5/6 are better prognostic indicators than the lev-el of positive HR in patients whose tumors are junction zone at the junction zone between LABC and TNBC. En-docrine therapy can be highly beneficial to these patients regardless of the positive HR level.

  8. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.; (SVIMR-A); (Chugai); (Melbourne)

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  9. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Waterbor, John W.; Altekruse, Sean F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for clustering by SEER registry of diagnosis. NH-Black women had greater area-level access to healthcare resources compared with women of other races. For instance, the average numbers of oncology hospitals per million population in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 8.1, 7.7, and 5.0 respectively; average numbers of medical doctors per million in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 100.7, 854.0, and 866.3 respectively; and average number of Ob/Gyn in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women was 155.6, 127.4, and 127.3, respectively (all p values cancer mortality compared with NH-White women even after adjusting for hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socioeconomic status, and area-level healthcare access. In addition, lower county-level socio-economic status and healthcare access measures were significantly and independently associated with stage at presentation, surgery, and radiation treatment as well as mortality after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and HR subtype. Although breast cancer HR subtype is a strong, important, and consistent predictor of breast cancer outcomes, we still observed significant and independent influences of area-level SES and HCA on breast cancer outcomes that deserve further study and may be critical to eliminating breast cancer outcome disparities. PMID:27255533

  10. A population-based study of Kurdish breast cancer in northern Iraq: Hormone receptor and HER2 status. A comparison with Arabic women and United States SEER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runnak Majid A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone receptor (HR and HER2 expression predict the therapeutic response and prognosis of breast cancer. In the Middle-East, breast cancer is diagnosed at a young age, and Arabic women are reported to have a low frequency of HR positive tumors. This study investigates HR and HER2 expression among Kurdish and Arabic women. Methods During 2008–2010, the Sulaimaniyah Directorate of Health records identified 514 Sulaimaniyah Kurdish women, 227 Kurdish women of other Governates, and 83 Arabic women with a first diagnosis of breast cancer. The breast cancers of 432 women had immunohistochemistry (IHC performed for estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR and HER2. Age specific and age standardized incidence rates were calculated for Sulaimaniyah Kurds. Results were compared with Egypt and with United States (US SEER data. Results The median patient age was 46 years and 60.4% were  Conclusions Compared to the US, low age standardized and age specific breast cancer incidence rates were found in Kurdish women; nevertheless, the proportional expression of HR and HER2 for both Kurds and Arabs was comparable to that of US white women. The great majority of the breast cancer was ER+/HER2- and should respond to anti-estrogen therapy.

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation of estradiol receptor by Src regulates its hormone-dependent nuclear export and cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, G; Giovannelli, P; Lombardi, M; De Rosa, C; Giraldi, T; de Falco, A; Barone, M V; Abbondanza, C; Migliaccio, A; Auricchio, F

    2012-11-15

    We report that in breast cancer cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of the estradiol receptor alpha (ERalpha) by Src regulates cytoplasmic localization of the receptor and DNA synthesis. Inhibition of Src or use of a peptide mimicking the ERalpha p-Tyr537 sequence abolishes ERalpha tyrosine phosphorylation and traps the receptor in nuclei of estradiol-treated MCF-7 cells. An ERalpha mutant carrying a mutation of Tyr537 to phenylalanine (ER537F) persistently localizes in nuclei of various cell types. In contrast with ERalpha wt, ER537F does not associate with Ran and its interaction with Crm1 is insensitive to estradiol. Thus, independently of estradiol, ER537F is retained in nuclei, where it entangles FKHR-driving cell cycle arrest. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that overexpression of ER537F in breast cancer cells enhances FKHR interaction with cyclin D1 promoter. This mutant also counteracts cell transformation by the activated forms of Src or PI3-K. In conclusion, in addition to regulating receptor localization, ERalpha phosphorylation by Src is required for hormone responsiveness of DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells. PMID:22266855

  12. Assessment of letrozole and tamoxifen alone and in sequence for postmenopausal women with steroid hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: the BIG 1-98 randomised clinical trial at 8·1 years median follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regan, Meredith M; Neven, Patrick; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita;

    2011-01-01

    Postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer have persistent, long-term risk of breast-cancer recurrence and death. Therefore, trials assessing endocrine therapies for this patient population need extended follow-up. We present an update of efficacy outcomes in the Breast...

  13. Trans-activation by thyroid hormone receptors: functional parallels with steroid hormone receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, C C; Evans, R M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormones are mediated through nuclear receptor proteins that modulate the transcription of specific genes in target cells. We previously isolated cDNAs encoding two different mammalian thyroid hormone receptors, one from human placenta (hTR beta) and the other from rat brain (rTR alpha), and showed that their in vitro translation products bind thyroid hormones with the characteritistic affinities of the native thyroid hormone receptor. We now demonstrate that both of th...

  14. Prognostic significance of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA expression in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most thoroughly studied systems in relation to its prognostic relevance in patients with breast cancer, is the plasminogen activation system that comprises of, among others, the urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA) and its main inhibitor, the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The study included a retrospective series of 87 patients with hormone-receptor positive and axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer. All patients received radiotherapy, adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy and five years of tamoxifen treatment. The median patient age was 54 and the median follow-up time was 79 months. Distant relapse occurred in 30 patients and 22 patients died from breast cancer during follow-up. We investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level as measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. uPA and PAI-1 gene expression was not found to be correlated with any of the established clinical and pathological factors. Metastasis-free Survival (MFS) and Breast Cancer specific Survival (BCS) were significantly shorter in patients expressing high levels of PAI-1 mRNA (p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001; respectively). In Cox multivariate analysis, the level of PAI-1 mRNA appeared to be the strongest prognostic factor for MFS (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 10.12; p = 0.0002) and for BCS (HR = 13.17; p = 0.0003). Furthermore, uPA gene expression was not significantly associated neither with MFS (p = 0.41) nor with BCS (p = 0.19). In a Cox-multivariate regression analysis, uPA expression did not demonstrate significant independent prognostic value. These findings indicate that high PAI-1 mRNA expression represents a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor for the development of metastases and for breast cancer specific survival in a population of hormone receptor- and lymph node-positive breast cancer

  15. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  17. Adjuvant Surgical Oophorectomy Plus Tamoxifen in Premenopausal Women With Operable Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: A Global Treatment Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    One third of annual new cases of breast cancer globally are now hormone receptor-positive tumors in premenopausal women from low- and middle-income countries. For this subgroup of women with breast cancer, high-income country guidelines suggest impractical and unaffordable adjuvant treatments. The balance of clinical trial evidence now suggests that surgical oophorectomy plus tamoxifen is a safe and practical treatment for these women in low- and middle-income countries. Additionally, new randomized trial data suggest that women in the second half of an anovulatory cycle benefit minimally from surgical oophorectomy done at this time, which implies that regularly cycling women will benefit more than has been shown from this procedure. Allred scoring of levels of hormone receptors is a practical and inexpensive approach to the assessment of magnitudes of response to oophorectomy plus tamoxifen. These circumstances suggest that more detailed consideration of this option should characterize clinical practice guidelines in high-income countries because of their global impact. PMID:27117241

  18. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and postmenopau......CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and...... postmenopausal women receiving different hormone therapies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationwide prospective cohort study including all Danish women aged 50 through 79 years from 1995 through 2005 through individual linkage to Danish national registers. Redeemed prescription data from the National Register of...... bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 909,946 women without hormone-sensitive cancer or bilateral oophorectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Ovarian cancer. RESULTS: In an average of 8.0 years of follow-up (7.3 million women-years), 3068 incident ovarian...

  19. The role of epidermal growth factor-like module containing mucin-like hormone receptor 2 in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Safaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are among the most diverse and ubiquitous proteins in all of biology. The epidermal growth factorseven span transmembrane (EGF-TM7 subfamily of adhesion GPCRs is a small subset whose members are mainly expressed on the surface of leukocytes. The EGF domains on the N-terminus add significant size to these receptors and they are considered to be among the largest members of the TM7 family. Although not all of their ligands or downstream targets have been identified, there is evidence implicating the EGF-TM7 family diverse processes such as cell adhesion, migration, inflammation, and autoimmune disease. Recent studies have identified expression of EGF-TM7 family members on human neoplasms including those of the thyroid, stomach, colon, and brain. Their presence on these tissues is not surprising given the ubiquity of GPCRs, but because their functional significance and pathways are not completely understood, they are of tremendous clinical and scientific interest. Current evidence suggests that expression of certain EGF-TM7 receptors is correlated with tumor grade, confers a more invasive phenotype, and increases the likelihood of metastatic disease. In this review, we will discuss the structure, function, and regulation of these receptors. We also describe the expression of these receptors in human cancers and explore their potential mechanistic significance.

  20. Thyroid hormone receptor β1 suppresses proliferation and migration by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Tian, Guangang; Yang, Qin; De, Gejing; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Yahui; Nie, Huizhen; Zhang, Yanli; Yang, Xiaomei; Li, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ1) is a ligand‑dependent transcription factor that belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors. TRβ1 has been found to act as a tumor suppressor in many solid tumors including breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, but its role in the progression of human colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, microarray data analysis revealed that TRβ1 mRNA was downregulated in CRC tumors compared with that in the normal counterparts in both The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets. Using a CRC tissue microarray (TMA), we confirmed that the expression of TRβ1 was decreased in human CRC tumor tissues in contrast to normal colorectal mucosal tissues. Notably, the TRβ1 expression was strongly correlated with tumor size (p=0.045). Furthermore, we found that CRC cell proliferation and migration were significantly inhibited by TRβ1 overexpression in vitro. Mechanistic studies indicated that activated phosphorylated Akt was clearly suppressed by TRβ1 in the CRC tissues and cells. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that TRβ1 plays a critical role in the progression of CRC via the PI3K/Akt pathway, and the TRβ1 gene may represent a novel target for CRC therapeutics. PMID:27431682

  1. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy is associated with comparable outcomes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Marcus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We compared outcomes in post-menopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER+ breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NAHT or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT.Methods: We retrospectively identified post-menopausal women who received either NAHT or NACT for non-metastatic, non-inflammatory, ER+, Her2neu negative breast cancer from 2004 to 2011. We compared long-term rates of locoregional relapse free survival (LRFS, distant metastasis free survival (DMFS, and overall survival (OS using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify patient and disease factors significantly associated with these endpoints. Results: We identified 99 patients in our study, including 27 who received NAHT and 72 who received NACT. There were no differences in 4-year LRFS, DMFS, or OS between groups. On Cox proportional hazards modeling, the type of systemic therapy (NAHT vs. NACT was not associated with OS. However, patients with progesterone receptor (PR positive disease had a 92% lower risk of death compared to patients with PR negative disease.Conclusions: Our data suggest that outcomes are not adversely affected by NAHT in post-menopausal women with ER+ breast cancer. Therefore, NAHT is a viable and potentially less toxic option than NACT in appropriately selected patients. Furthermore, although PR negative disease appears to be associated with poor prognosis, intensification of systemic treatment with chemotherapy may not be associated with improvement of disease-related outcomes in this patient population.

  2. Correlation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) receptor status with hormone receptors Oestrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor status and other prognostic markers in breast cancer: an experience at tertiary care hospital in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) positivity and to correlate its status in breast cancer patients with other prognostic markers. Methods: The comparative cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Histopathology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, from January 1 to October 31, 2010. It included all specimens of mastectomy and lumpectomy with axillary tissue. Incisional, trucut and wedge biopsies as well as all non-epithelial tumours were excluded. All samples were processed as per standard guidelines and were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. SPSS 10 was used for statistical analysis. Results: The age of the 100 cases in the study ranged from 20 to 82 years with a mean of 51+-17.6 years. Two (2%) of the patients were males. HER-2/neu over-expression increased with increasing tumour size, grade, lymph node metastasis and with oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor negativity. No significant correlation of HER-2/neu was seen with the age of patient and with the tumour type. Conclusions: The expression of HER-2/neu was associated with decrease in oestrogen receptor and progresterone receptor positivity, and increase in tumour size, high tumour grade and lymph node metastasis. (author)

  3. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Waterbor, John W; Altekruse, Sean F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for clustering by SEER registry of diagnosis. NH-Black women had greater area-level access to healthcare resources compared with women of other races. For instance, the average numbers of oncology hospitals per million population in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 8.1, 7.7, and 5.0 respectively; average numbers of medical doctors per million in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 100.7, 854.0, and 866.3 respectively; and average number of Ob/Gyn in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women was 155.6, 127.4, and 127.3, respectively (all p values <0.001). Regardless, NH-Black women (HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.36-1.43) and Hispanic women (HR 1.05, 95 % CI 1.03-1.08) had significantly higher breast cancer mortality compared with NH-White women even after adjusting for hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status, and area-level healthcare access. In addition, lower county-level socio-economic status and healthcare access measures were significantly and independently associated with stage at presentation, surgery, and radiation treatment as well as mortality after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and HR subtype. Although breast cancer HR subtype is a strong, important, and consistent predictor of breast cancer outcomes, we still observed significant and independent influences of area-level SES and HCA on breast cancer outcomes that deserve further study and may be critical to eliminating breast cancer outcome

  4. Alterations of the genes involved in the PI3K and estrogen-receptor pathways influence outcome in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab-containing neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapy with trastuzumab is widely used for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer, but a significant number of patients with the tumor fail to respond, or relapse. The mechanisms of recurrence and biomarkers that indicate the response to the chemotherapy and outcome are not fully investigated. Genomic alterations were analyzed using single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in 46 HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) 3+ or 2+/fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)+ breast cancers that were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cyclophosphamid, epirubicin, fluorouracil, and trastuzumab. Patients were classified into two groups based on presence or absence of alterations of 65 cancer-associated genes, and the two groups were further classified into four groups based on genomic HER2 copy numbers or hormone receptor status (HR+/−). Pathological complete response (pCR) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were compared between any two of the groups. The pCR rate was 54% in 37 patients, and the RFS rate at 3 years was 72% (95% CI, 0.55-0.89) in 42 patients. The analysis disclosed 8 tumors with nonamplified HER2 and 38 tumors with HER2 amplification, indicating the presence of discordance in tumors diagnosed using current HER2 testing. The 8 patients showed more difficulty in achieving pCR (P=0.019), more frequent relapse (P=0.018), and more frequent alterations of genes in the PI3K pathway (P=0.009) than the patients with HER2 amplification. The alterations of the PI3K and estrogen receptor (ER) pathway genes generally indicated worse RFS rates. The prognostic significance of the alterations was shown in patients with a HR+ tumor, but not in patients with a HR- tumor when divided. Alterations of the PI3K and ER pathway genes found in patients with a HR+ tumor with poor outcome suggested that crosstalk between the two pathways may be involved in resistance to the current chemotherapy with trastuzumab. We

  5. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  6. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  7. Tumour Fas ligand:Fas ratio greater than 1 is an independent marker of relative resistance to tamoxifen therapy in hormone receptor positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was to examine the prognostic and predictive significance of the apoptosis-related marker Fas ligand (FasL):Fas ratio in breast cancer. Tumour biopsies from 215 primary invasive breast cancer patients were examined for the expression of FasL and Fas mRNA transcripts by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Their prognostic and predictive impact on patient survival was determined in univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Using a cutoff value of 1, a FasL:Fas ratio greater than 1 was found to have significant prognostic value for disease-free survival among the total population (median follow up 54 months). It was associated with a significantly decreased disease-free survival (P = 0.022) and with a tendency toward increased mortality (P = 0.14) in univariate analysis. Hormone receptor positive women exclusively treated with tamoxifen (n = 86) and with a FasL:Fas ratio greater than 1 had a significantly decreased disease-free survival (P = 0.008) and overall survival (P = 0.03) in univariate Kaplan–Meier analysis. Furthermore, tumour size and FasL:Fas ratio were of independent predictive significance in the multivariate model for disease-free and overall survival in that subgroup. Among postmenopausal patients (n = 148) both of those factors retained independent prognostic significance in the multivariate model for disease-free survival. In contrast, FasL:Fas ratio had no significant predictive value in patients exclusively treated with chemotherapy. The data presented indicate that FasL:Fas ratio may be useful not only as a prognostic factor but also as a predictive factor for projecting response to the antioestrogen tamoxifen. The results strongly support a correlation between FasL:Fas ratio greater than 1 and lack of efficacy of tamoxifen in hormone receptor positive patients

  8. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells: Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) bind to estrogen receptors , preventing estrogen from binding. Examples of SERMs approved by the FDA are tamoxifen (Nolvadex®), ... called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs), inhibit an enzyme ...

  9. NUREBASE: database of nuclear hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Jorge; Perrière, Guy; Laudet, Vincent; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are an abundant class of ligand activated transcriptional regulators, found in varying numbers in all animals. Based on our experience of managing the official nomenclature of nuclear receptors, we have developed NUREBASE, a database containing protein and DNA sequences, reviewed protein alignments and phylogenies, taxonomy and annotations for all nuclear receptors. The reviewed NUREBASE is completed by NUREBASE_DAILY, automatically updated every 24 h. Both databases...

  10. Amplification of ESR1 may predict resistance to adjuvant tamoxifen in postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Vang; Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen; Müller, Sven;

    2010-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is the target of tamoxifen, but endocrine therapies do not benefit all patients with ER positive tumors. We therefore hypothesized that copy number changes in the ESR1 gene, encoding ER, confer resistance. Within a consecutive series of ER positive, postmenopausal...... patients allocated to 5 years tamoxifen, we identified 61 patients with recurrence less than 4 years and 48 patients without recurrence at least 7 years after initiation of adjuvant tamoxifen. Archival tissue containing primary tumor was collected from 97 patients (89%). Tumor samples were analyzed for ESR...... significantly associated with poor disease-free survival (P = 0.0054) and overall survival (P = 0.0004). This pilot study supports our hypothesis that ESR1 amplification is associated with a poorer outcome following adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen in ER positive early breast cancer. This study also revealed...

  11. Thyroid hormone receptor expression in cardiovascular disease and pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrara, Shiva

    1999-01-01

    The heart is a major target organ for thyroid hormone actions. Thyroid hormone exerts effects on the myocardium, which are mediated by specific nuclear receptors. The thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily. These receptors regulate gene expression by binding to the promotor region of target genes as monomers, homodimers or heterodimers depending on the thyroid hormone response element (TRE) and the presence or absence of th...

  12. Flavokawain B, a kava chalcone, exhibits robust apoptotic mechanisms on androgen receptor-negative, hormone-refractory prostate cancer cell lines and reduces tumor growth in a preclinical model

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yaxiong; Li, Xuesen; Liu, Zhongbo; Simoneau, Anne R; Xie, Jun; Zi, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Limited success has been achieved in extending the survival of patients with metastatic and hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). There is a strong need for novel agents in the treatment and prevention of HRPC. We have shown that flavokawain B (FKB), a kava chalcone, is about 4 to 12 fold more effective in reducing the cell viabilities of androgen receptor (AR)-negative, HRPC cell lines DU145 and PC-3 than AR–positive, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines LAPC4 and LNCaP, with mi...

  13. Endocrinology and hormone therapy in breast cancer: Selective oestrogen receptor modulators and downregulators for breast cancer – have they lost their way?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although tamoxifen has been an effective treatment for breast cancer, several novel anti-oestrogen compounds have been developed with a reduced agonist profile on breast and gynaecological tissues. These include selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs; both 'tamoxifen-like' and 'fixed-ring' SERMs) and selective oestrogen receptor downregulators (SERDs), although none has been proved superior in efficacy to tamoxifen in various advanced breast cancer trials. Thus, many have questioned whether a need for SERMs in breast cancer still exists, although chemoprevention remains a possible niche setting. In contrast, SERDs may have useful efficacy following aromatase inhibitors because of their unique mechanism of action, and clinical trials to determine their optimal use or sequence are ongoing

  14. Reverse phase protein array based tumor profiling identifies a biomarker signature for risk classification of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Sonntag

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A robust subclassification of luminal breast cancer, the most common molecular subtype of human breast cancer, is crucial for therapy decisions. While a part of patients is at higher risk of recurrence and requires chemo-endocrine treatment, the other part is at lower risk and also poorly responds to chemotherapeutic regimens. To approximate the risk of cancer recurrence, clinical guidelines recommend determining histologic grading and abundance of a cell proliferation marker in tumor specimens. However, this approach assigns an intermediate risk to a substantial number of patients and in addition suffers from a high interobserver variability. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify a quantitative protein biomarker signature to facilitate risk classification. Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA were used to obtain quantitative expression data for 128 breast cancer relevant proteins in a set of hormone receptor-positive tumors (n = 109. Proteomic data for the subset of histologic G1 (n = 14 and G3 (n = 22 samples were used for biomarker discovery serving as surrogates of low and high recurrence risk, respectively. A novel biomarker selection workflow based on combining three different classification methods identified caveolin-1, NDKA, RPS6, and Ki-67 as top candidates. NDKA, RPS6, and Ki-67 were expressed at elevated levels in high risk tumors whereas caveolin-1 was observed as downregulated. The identified biomarker signature was subsequently analyzed using an independent test set (AUC = 0.78. Further evaluation of the identified biomarker panel by Western blot and mRNA profiling confirmed the proteomic signature obtained by RPPA. In conclusion, the biomarker signature introduced supports RPPA as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery.

  15. [Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Walz, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The prostate cancer in its hormone-sensitive metastatic presentation is infrequent, it is either an initial presentation of the disease or an evolution after local treatment, without castration of the biological relapse. The surgical or biological castration remains the cornerstone of the treatment. The deadline of castration initiation and its modalities of administration, intermittent or continuous rest debated but consensual on the initiation is the appearance of the symptomatic disease. The chemotherapy by docetaxel in association with the castration increases significantly the survival of the patients having a high tumoral volume. The efficacy on the whole metastatic population requires additional analyses. Clinical prognostic factors as the bone localizations (axial or appendicular), the visceral involvement (liver, lung) are determining for the survival of these patients. Biological prognostic factors are in evaluation. Except the clodronate acid, which showed a survival improvement in the hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSMPC), the other treatments targeting the bone (zoledronic acid, rank-ligand inhibitor) demonstrated a benefit only in castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer (MCRPC). The management of local disease lets suggest a benefit to at least symptomatic disease, but it requires to be estimated prospectively in clinical trials. The new hormonal treatments targeting the androgen receptor in CPMRC are in evaluation in CPMHS. The objective is to increase the survival and the quality of life of the CPMHS and to delay the evolution towards the castration resistant metastatic disease. PMID:25609491

  16. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W.; Hinkle, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355–365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization...

  17. Detection of pAkt protein in imprint cytology of invasive breast cancer: Correlation with HER2/neu, hormone receptors, and other clinicopathological variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Vasou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Akt is a serine/threonine protein kinase and has emerged as a crucial regulator of widely divergent cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. Activation of Akt/protein kinase B has been positively associated with human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu overexpression in breast carcinoma and a worse outcome among endocrine treated patients. The Akt signaling pathway currently attracts considerable attention as a new target for effective therapeutic strategies. We therefore investigated the relationship between activation of Akt and clinicopathologic variables including hormone receptor and HER2/neu status. Methods: Archival tumor tissues from 100 patients with invasive breast carcinoma were analyzed by immunocytochemistry. This study describes the results of immunocytochemical pAkt expression in breast carcinoma imprints, prepared from cut surfaces of freshly removed tumors . Both nuclear and cytoplasmic expressions were evaluated for pAkt. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmic positive scores of 72% (72/100 and 42% (42/100, respectively, were found. Coexistence of nuclear and cytoplasmic staining was observed in 32 cases (32/100. Nuclear positive staining correlated with HER2/neu overexpression (P = 0.043 and was significantly associated with positive involvement of axillary lymph nodes (P = 0.013. No correlation was found between cytoplasmic pAkt rate and clinicopathological parameters, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor or HER2/neu expression. Conclusions: pAkt expression can be evaluated in cytological material and may add valuable information to current prognostic models for breast cancer. pAkt overexpression appears to be linked with potentially aggressive tumor phenotype in invasive breast carcinoma.

  18. A Molecular Case-Control Study on the Association of Melatonin Hormone and rs#10830963 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in its Receptor MTNR1B Gene with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia A Abd El Moneim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main function of the pineal hormone melatonin which is mediated via its two receptors, MTNR1A and MTNR1B, is to mediate dark signals in addition to anti-oxidation, immune system enhancement, protection from radiation, and anti-cancer functions. A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the MTNR1B gene is rs#10830963, which is well known as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study intends to figure out the role of melatonin and its receptor MTNR1B gene rs#10830963 polymorphism in breast cancer incidence, diagnosis and prognosis. Methods: This study included 43 females with breast cancer and 45 apparently normal healthy females. Restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR was used for amplification and genotyping of the MTNR1B gene rs#10830963 polymorphism in whole blood. Serum melatonin levels were measured using a ready-for-use radioimmunoassay kit. Results: For the MTNR1B gene rs#10830963 polymorphism, we observed a significantly higher GG genotype frequency among cases (72.1% than controls (13.3%, with a diagnostic sensitivity of 83.78% and specificity of 76.47%. The cases had a frequency of 11.6% for the CC genotype and 16.3% for the CG genotype which was significantly lower compared to controls that had a 44.4% frequency of the CC genotype and 42.2% frequency of the CG genotype. The GG genotype had a significant association with larger tumor volume (P=0.048. Serum melatonin levels were significantly lower among breast cancer patients than controls. Using the ROC curve analysis, serum melatonin showed a significant AUC (72.6%, P39.5 pg/ml. Conclusion: The risk for breast cancer incidence increased as the serum levels of melatonin decreased and in females homozygous for the G allele (GG genotype of the MTNR1B gene rs#10830963 polymorphism. The GG genotype was found to be associated with increased breast tumor volume as a marker of a poor prognosis breast cancer.

  19. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, Philippe; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, Guy

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cell...

  20. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers...

  1. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  2. Screening and association testing of common coding variation in steroid hormone receptor co-activator and co-repressor genes in relation to breast cancer risk: the Multiethnic Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only a limited number of studies have performed comprehensive investigations of coding variation in relation to breast cancer risk. Given the established role of estrogens in breast cancer, we hypothesized that coding variation in steroid receptor coactivator and corepressor genes may alter inter-individual response to estrogen and serve as markers of breast cancer risk. We sequenced the coding exons of 17 genes (EP300, CCND1, NME1, NCOA1, NCOA2, NCOA3, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, CARM1, FOXA1, MPG, NCOR1, NCOR2, CALCOCO1, PRMT1, PPARBP and CREBBP) suggested to influence transcriptional activation by steroid hormone receptors in a multiethnic panel of women with advanced breast cancer (n = 95): African Americans, Latinos, Japanese, Native Hawaiians and European Americans. Association testing of validated coding variants was conducted in a breast cancer case-control study (1,612 invasive cases and 1,961 controls) nested in the Multiethnic Cohort. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for allelic effects in ethnic-pooled analyses as well as in subgroups defined by disease stage and steroid hormone receptor status. We also investigated effect modification by established breast cancer risk factors that are associated with steroid hormone exposure. We identified 45 coding variants with frequencies ≥ 1% in any one ethnic group (43 non-synonymous variants). We observed nominally significant positive associations with two coding variants in ethnic-pooled analyses (NCOR2: His52Arg, OR = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.05–3.05; CALCOCO1: Arg12His, OR = 2.29; 95% CI, 1.00–5.26). A small number of variants were associated with risk in disease subgroup analyses and we observed no strong evidence of effect modification by breast cancer risk factors. Based on the large number of statistical tests conducted in this study, the nominally significant associations that we observed may be due to chance, and will need to be confirmed in other studies. Our findings suggest that common coding

  3. Screening and association testing of common coding variation in steroid hormone receptor co-activator and co-repressor genes in relation to breast cancer risk: the Multiethnic Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stallcup Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a limited number of studies have performed comprehensive investigations of coding variation in relation to breast cancer risk. Given the established role of estrogens in breast cancer, we hypothesized that coding variation in steroid receptor coactivator and corepressor genes may alter inter-individual response to estrogen and serve as markers of breast cancer risk. Methods We sequenced the coding exons of 17 genes (EP300, CCND1, NME1, NCOA1, NCOA2, NCOA3, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, CARM1, FOXA1, MPG, NCOR1, NCOR2, CALCOCO1, PRMT1, PPARBP and CREBBP suggested to influence transcriptional activation by steroid hormone receptors in a multiethnic panel of women with advanced breast cancer (n = 95: African Americans, Latinos, Japanese, Native Hawaiians and European Americans. Association testing of validated coding variants was conducted in a breast cancer case-control study (1,612 invasive cases and 1,961 controls nested in the Multiethnic Cohort. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for allelic effects in ethnic-pooled analyses as well as in subgroups defined by disease stage and steroid hormone receptor status. We also investigated effect modification by established breast cancer risk factors that are associated with steroid hormone exposure. Results We identified 45 coding variants with frequencies ≥ 1% in any one ethnic group (43 non-synonymous variants. We observed nominally significant positive associations with two coding variants in ethnic-pooled analyses (NCOR2: His52Arg, OR = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.05–3.05; CALCOCO1: Arg12His, OR = 2.29; 95% CI, 1.00–5.26. A small number of variants were associated with risk in disease subgroup analyses and we observed no strong evidence of effect modification by breast cancer risk factors. Based on the large number of statistical tests conducted in this study, the nominally significant associations that we observed may be due to chance, and will need to be confirmed in other

  4. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed fr...

  5. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  6. Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-conjugated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a decapeptide hormone released from the hypothalamus and shows high affinity binding to the LHRH receptors. It is reported that several cancer cells also express LHRH receptors such as breast, ovarian, prostatic, bladder and others. In this study, we linked B1, an anti-cancer peptide, to LHRH and its analogs to improve the activity against cancer cells with LHRH receptor. Biological evaluation revealed that TB1, the peptide contains triptorelin sequence, present favorable anti-cancer activity as well as plasma stability. Further investigations disclosed that TB1 trigger apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-cytochrome c-caspase apoptotic pathway, it also exhibited the anti-migratory effect on cancer cells. PMID:26058357

  7. Intake of whole grain products and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status and histology among postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Rikke; Olsen, Anja; Loft, Steffen;

    2009-01-01

    in intake of total whole grain products of 50 g per day the adjusted incidence rate ratio (95% confidence interval) was 1.01 (0.96-1.07). Intake of rye bread, oatmeal and whole grain bread was not associated with breast cancer risk. No association was observed between the intake of total or specific whole...

  8. Emerging roles of orphan nuclear receptors in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a subset of orphan nuclear receptors are amplified and prognostic for some human cancers. However, the specific roles of these orphan nuclear receptors in tumor progression and their utility as drug targets are not fully understood. In this review, we summarize recent progress in elucidating the direct and indirect involvement of orphan nuclear receptors in cancer as well as their therapeutic potential in a variety of human cancers. Furthermore, we contrast the role of orphan nuclear receptors in cancer with the known roles of estrogen receptor and androgen receptor in hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:24215441

  9. Epirubicin and docetaxel as neoadjuvant treatment of hormone receptor positive, HER-2 negative breast cancer: findings from two successive phase II studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the activity of the combination of epirubicin and docetaxel given in neoadjuvant setting for 4 and 8 cycles respectively in 2 successive series of patients with large operable or locally advanced, hormone receptor positive, HER-2 negative breast cancer. Patients were treated from 2002 to 2006 with epirubicin 90 mg/m2 and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 intravenously, every 3 weeks for 4 cycles before and 4 cycles after surgery (Series I – 13 patients), and from 2006 to 2010 with the same regimen administered for 8 cycles preoperatively (Series II – 37 patients), plus hormonal therapy for 5 years and radiation therapy if indicated. All Series I and 32 Series II patients were able to complete the preoperative chemotherapy. A complete response was found in 1 patient from Series I and 13 patients from Series II and the partial remission in 10 patients from Series I and 21 patients from Series II. Two Series I and 3 Series II patients did not respond clinically. Response rate (Series I/Series II) was 84/92%. All 50 patients underwent surgery. In Series I patients, 3 pCR occurred in the breast and the axilla was histologically negative in 2 cases. No evidence of disease both in the breast and in the axilla was achieved in 7.6% (1/13) of patients. In Series II patients, 8 pCR occurred in the breast and axilla was histologically negative in 15 patients. No evidence of disease both in the breast and in the axilla occurred in 10.8% (4/37) of patients. G3–G4 toxicity included myelosuppression in 3 patients from Series I and all patients from Series II, and mucositis in 1 patient from Series I and 4 patients from series II. No other G3–4 toxicities or toxic deaths occurred. Five-year progression free survival was 38% and 90% in Series I and Series II patients respectively. The incidence of pathologic complete remissions was lower in our patient population, compared to reported data. A longer duration of the preoperative treatment might be associated with a longer

  10. Incidence, symptoms, treatment, and prognosis in 113 patients with brain/meningeal metastasis from breast cancer. Screening in accordance with hormone receptor and HER2/neu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 113 of 422 patients with metastatic/recurrent breast cancer (MBC who were treated in our hospital after 2001, brain/meningeal metastasis was detected. In 240 patients who died, the overall incidence of brain/meningeal metastasis was 36.3% (n=87). With respect to hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 presence, metastasis was detected in 32 (58.2%) of 55 patients showing HR(-) and HER2(+), 17 (39.5%) of 43 patients showing HR(-) and HER2(-), 19 (31.5%) of 54 patients showing HR(+) and HER2(+), and 17 (20%) of 85 patients showing HR(+) and HER2(-) (brain metastasis was detected in 2 of 3 patients in whom HR or HER2 was unclear); the incidence was significantly higher in HR(-) or HER2(+) patients. Of our series including surviving patients, asymptomatic brain metastasis was detected using contrast-enhanced MRI in 24 HER2(+) patients. In the above 113 patients, the median survival time (MST) after diagnosis was 10 months. However, it was 17 months in 24 patients who underwent screening. For treatment, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) mainly with a gamma knife was performed. During a follow-up of more than 12 months, 1 to 4 sessions of treatment (mean: 2.39, median: 2) were required. In 50% of the patients, both WBRT and SRS were performed. There were no HR- or HER2- related differences in survival after brain metastasis. However, the MST was 34 months in 7 patients in whom the 1st relapse site involved the brain. In the future, the usefulness of early treatment via brain metastasis screening should be reviewed in HR(-) and HER2(+) patients. (author)

  11. Determination of HER2 phosphorylation at tyrosine 1221/1222 improves prediction of poor survival for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor-positive tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frogne, Thomas; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Henriksen, Katrine Lütken;

    2009-01-01

    High expression of total HER2 protein confers poor prognosis for breast cancer patients. HER2 is a member of the HER family consisting of four receptors, HER1 to HER4. HER receptor activity is regulated by a variety of mechanisms, and phosphorylation of the C-terminal part of the HER receptors is a...... marker for active signaling. The importance of phosphorylation and thereby activation of the HER1 to HER4 receptors, however, has not been investigated concomitantly in breast tumors. In the present study we examined the importance of active HER signaling in breast tumor biopsies and paired metastases...

  12. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  13. Hormone signaling pathways as treatment targets in renal cell cancer (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Niedzwiedzka, Magdalena; Porta, Camillo; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, biochemical and genetic research has revealed that renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology is hormone-related. It was shown that hormone receptors are abnormally expressed in RCC cells. Abnormal endocrine stimulation also plays a significant role in RCC pathophysiology. Cellular proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and drug resistance in RCC is modulated by para- and autocrine hormonal stimulation. In particular, RCC overexpression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and its receptor was reported. On the contrary, corticotropin releasing hormone was reported to inhibit RCC cell proliferation and regulate angiogenesis. Overexpression of luteinizing hormone also promotes RCC tumor angiogenesis. Estrogen receptor α overexpression increases the transcriptional factor activity of hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, but estrogen receptor β has a cancer suppressive role. Glucocorticoid receptors and androgen receptor are markers of indolent RCC and assigned tumor suppressive activity. Proopiomelanocortin is upregulated in VHL-mutated renal cell carcinoma via Nur77 transcription factor signaling. In RCC, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor promotes angiogenesis and metastatic formation via VEGF release. Mineralocorticoid receptor overexpression promotes cell survival and increases RCC cell proliferation. Vitamin D receptor expression is downregulated or absent in RCC and differentiate subtypes of renal cell tumors. RAR-β promotes tumorigenesis but retinoic acid receptor γ expression correlates negatively with the TNM stage at diagnosis. Finally, progesterone receptor expression is negatively correlated with the cancer stage. Molecular data analysis revealed the possibility of renal cancer cell proliferation induction via hormone activated pathways. Inhibition of hormonal signaling may thus play a putative role in supportive therapies against this cancer type. PMID:27035677

  14. Comparison of hormonal receptor and HER2 status between ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy and surgery in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yun Joo; Youk, Ji Hyun; Son, Eun Ji; Gweon, Hye Mi; Kim, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate the concordance of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses between ultrasound (US)-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy (CNB) and surgery and to analyze whether the clinicopathological and imaging features including those from mammography and ultrasonography can predict the concordance in breast cancer patients. The concordance of receptor status between CNB and surgery was assessed for 55 breast cancers in 55 women who underwent CNB before treatment. The clinicopathological and imaging features and the concordance rates were compared between the non-neoadjuvant chemotherapy (non-NAC) group and the NAC group according to the initial treatment. The concordance rates were analyzed according to the clinicopathological and imaging features, by using the chi-square or Fisher exact test and McNemar test for the categorical and the independent t-test for continuous variables. Among 55 women, 22 women (40%) were part of the non-NAC group and 33 women (60%) were part of the NAC group. The concordance rates were 0.86-1.00 in the non-NAC group and 0.76-0.88 in the NAC group. In all three receptors, the difference in the concordance rate between the two groups was not significant. In the NAC group, the absence of axillary lymph node metastasis (1.00, P=0.02) and visibility of cancer on mammography (0.93, P=0.04) showed the higher concordance of the HER2 status. Concordance of the receptor status between surgery and US-guided 14-gauge CNB was feasible in breast cancer patients. The absence of axillary lymph node metastasis after NAC and the visibility of cancer on mammography prior to NAC may be helpful for predicting the concordance of HER2 in breast cancer patients.

  15. Steroid hormone receptors in human salivary gland tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamey, P J; Leake, R. E.; Cowan, S K; Soutar, D S; McGregor, I. A.; McGregor, F M

    1987-01-01

    Major salivary gland tumours were studied for the presence of hormone receptors for oestrogen and progesterone. Of the eight salivary gland tumours exhibiting varied histology, none showed high affinity receptors for oestrogen or progesterone. Salivary tissue from four patients with non-neoplastic salivary gland disease was also studied and found not to contain high affinity receptor sites. The absence of hormone receptors in these glands suggests that such tumours are not dependent on endocr...

  16. Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V; Gaitskell, K; Hermon, C;

    2015-01-01

    -progestagen preparations, but differed across the four main tumour types (heterogeneity pcommon types, serous (RR 1·53, 95% CI 1·40-1·66; p...BACKGROUND: Half the epidemiological studies with information about menopausal hormone therapy and ovarian cancer risk remain unpublished, and some retrospective studies could have been biased by selective participation or recall. We aimed to assess with minimal bias the effects of hormone therapy...... on ovarian cancer risk. METHODS: Individual participant datasets from 52 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally. The principal analyses involved the prospective studies (with last hormone therapy use extrapolated forwards for up to 4 years). Sensitivity analyses included the retrospective studies...

  17. Management of Hormone Deprivation Symptoms After Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Loprinzi, Charles L; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-08-01

    Cancer survivors often experience symptoms related to hormone deprivation, including vasomotor symptoms, genitourinary symptoms, and sexual health concerns. These symptoms can occur due to natural menopause in midlife women, or they can be brought on by oncologic therapies in younger women or men. We searched PubMed for English-language studies from January 1990 through January 2016 to identify relevant articles on the management of hormone deprivation symptoms, including vasomotor, genitourinary, and sexual symptoms in patients with cancer. The search terms used included hormone deprivation, vasomotor symptoms, hot flash, vaginal dryness, sexual dysfunction, and breast cancer. This manuscript provides a comprehensive description of data supporting the treatment of symptoms associated with hormone deprivation. PMID:27492917

  18. Thyroid hormone action in the absence of thyroid hormone receptor DNA-binding in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Nikrodhanond, Amisra A.; Liberman, M. Charles; Applebury, Meredithe L.; Liao, Xiao Hui; Robbins, Janet T.; Refetoff, Samuel; Cohen, Ronald N.; Wondisford, Fredric E.

    2003-01-01

    Thyroid hormone action is mediated by thyroid hormone receptors (TRs), which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. DNA-binding is presumed to be essential for all nuclear actions of thyroid hormone. To test this hypothesis in vivo, the DNA-binding domain of TR-β was mutated within its P-box (GS mutant) using gene targeting techniques. This mutation in vitro completely abolishes TR-β DNA-binding, while preserving ligand (T3) and cofactor interactions with the receptor. Homoz...

  19. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone type II (GnRH-II) agonist regulates the invasiveness of endometrial cancer cells through the GnRH-I receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 25% of patients diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma have an invasive primary cancer accompanied by metastases. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays an important role in reproduction. In mammals, expression of GnRH-II is higher than GnRH-I in reproductive tissues. Here, we examined the effect of a GnRH-II agonist on the motility of endometrial cancer cells and its mechanism of action in endometrial cancer therapy. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to determine the expression of the GnRH-I receptor protein in human endometrial cancer. The activity of MMP-2 in the conditioned medium was determined by gelatin zymography. Cell motility was assessed by invasion and migration assay. GnRH-I receptor si-RNA was applied to knockdown GnRH-I receptor. The GnRH-I receptor was expressed in the endometrial cancer cells. The GnRH-II agonist promoted cell motility in a dose-dependent manner. The GnRH-II agonist induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, and the phosphorylation was abolished by ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and the JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Cell motility promoted by GnRH-II agonist was suppressed in cells that were pretreated with U0126 and SP600125. Moreover, U0126 and SP600125 abolished the GnRH-II agonist-induced activation of MMP-2. The inhibition of MMP-2 with MMP-2 inhibitor (OA-Hy) suppressed the increase in cell motility in response to the GnRH-II agonist. Enhanced cell motility mediated by GnRH-II agonist was also suppressed by the knockdown of the endogenous GnRH-I receptor using siRNA. Our study indicates that GnRH-II agonist promoted cell motility of endometrial cancer cells through the GnRH-I receptor via the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, and the subsequent, MAPK-dependent activation of MMP-2. Our findings represent a new concept regarding the mechanism of GnRH-II-induced cell motility in endometrial cancer cells and suggest the possibility of exploring GnRH-II as a potential therapeutic target for the

  20. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  1. Management of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Maha

    2013-12-01

    Targeting gonadal androgen synthesis (often in conjunction with blockade of androgen receptor) is the cornerstone of treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSPC). Despite the failure of androgen deprivation therapy, most tumors maintain some dependence on androgen or androgen receptor signaling for proliferation. This article reviews the current standard of care for metastatic HSPC, mechanisms of treatment resistance, novel drugs targeting the androgen signaling pathway, biomarkers predicting response to treatment and survival, future directions, and ongoing clinical trials in HSPC. PMID:24188260

  2. Fast evolution of growth hormone receptor in primates and ruminants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhenfang; LI Ying; ZHANG Yaping

    2005-01-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) evolves very slowly in most of mammals, but the evolutionary rates appear to have increased markedly on two occasions during the evolution of primates and ruminants. To investigate the evolutionary pattern of growth hormone receptor (GHR), we sequenced the extracellular domain of GHR genes from four primate species. Our results suggested that GHR in mammal also shows an episodic evolutionary pattern, which is consistent with that observed in pituitary growth hormone. Further analysis suggested that this pattern of rapid evolution observed in primates and ruminants is likely the result of coevolution between pituitary growth hormone and its receptor.

  3. The reciprocal regulation of stress hormones and GABAA receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan eMody

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-derived steroid hormones regulate the expression and function of GABAA receptors (GABAARs. Changes in GABAAR subunit expression have been demonstrated under conditions of altered steroid hormone levels, such as stress, as well as following exogenous steroid hormone administration. In addition to the effects of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABAAR subunit expression, stress hormones can also be metabolized to neuroactive derivatives which can alter the function of GABAARs. Neurosteroids allosterically modulate GABAARs at concentrations comparable to those during stress. In addition to the actions of stress-derived steroid hormones on GABAARs, GABAARs reciprocally regulate the production of stress hormones. The stress response is mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, the activity of which is governed by corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH neurons. The activity of CRH neurons is largely controlled by robust GABAergic inhibition. Recently, it has been demonstrated that CRH neurons are regulated by neurosteroid-sensitive, GABAAR δ subunit-containing receptors representing a novel feedback mechanism onto the HPA axis. Further, it has been demonstrated that neurosteroidogenesis and neurosteroid actions on GABAAR δ subunit-containing receptors on CRH neurons are necessary to mount the physiological response to stress. Here we review the literature describing the effects of steroid hormones on GABAARs as well as the importance of GABAARs in regulating the production of steroid hormones. This review incorporates what we currently know about changes in GABAARs following stress and the role in HPA axis regulation.

  4. Mortality risk of black women and white women with invasive breast cancer by hormone receptors, HER2, and p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black women are more likely than white women to have an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with higher mortality and this may contribute to the observed black-white difference in mortality. However, few studies have investigated the black-white disparity in mortality risk stratified by breast cancer subtype, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. Furthermore, it is not known whether additional consideration of p53 protein status influences black-white differences in mortality risk observed when considering subtypes defined by ER, PR and HER2 status. Four biomarkers were assessed by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded breast tumor tissue from 1,204 (523 black, 681 white) women with invasive breast cancer, aged 35–64 years at diagnosis, who accrued a median of 10 years’ follow-up. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit to assess subtype-specific black-white differences in mortality risk. No black-white differences in mortality risk were observed for women with triple negative (ER-negative [ER-], PR-, and HER2-) subtype. However, older (50–64 years) black women had greater overall mortality risk than older white women if they had been diagnosed with luminal A (ER-positive [ER+] or PR+ plus HER2-) breast cancer (all-cause hazard ratio, HR, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.18 to 2.99; breast cancer-specific HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.83 to 2.74). This black-white difference among older women was further confined to those with luminal A/p53- tumors (all-cause HR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.30 to 3.79; breast cancer-specific HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 0.93 to 3.86). Tests for homogeneity of race-specific HRs comparing luminal A to triple negative subtype and luminal A/p53- to luminal A/p53+ subtype did not achieve statistical significance, although statistical power was limited. Our findings suggest that the subtype-specific black-white difference in

  5. Thyroid hormone receptor β mutants: Dominant negative regulators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ action

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, Osamu; Ying, Hao; Furuya, Fumihiko; Zhu, Xuguang; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) and peroxisome proliferators have overlapping metabolic effects in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. Their actions are mediated by their respective receptors: thyroid hormone receptors (TR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). We recently found that a dominantly negative TRβ mutant (PV) that causes a genetic disease, resistance to thyroid hormone, acts to repress the ligand (troglitazone)-mediated transcriptional activity of PPARγ in cultured thyroi...

  6. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and breast cancer risk according to menopause and hormone receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Ferrari, Pietro; González, Carlos A.;

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary flavonoids and lignans and breast cancer (BC) risk is inconclusive, with the possible exception of isoflavones in Asian countries. Therefore, we investigated prospectively dietary total and subclasses of flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk according...

  7. Profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraiva P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen involvement in breast cancer has been established; however, the association between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Estrogen-like effects of thyroid hormone on breast cancer cell growth in culture have been reported. The objective of the present study was to determine the profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients. Serum aliquots from 26 patients with breast cancer ranging in age from 30 to 85 years and age-matched normal controls (N = 22 were analyzed for free triiodothyronine (T3F, free thyroxine (T4F, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, antiperoxidase antibody (TPO, and estradiol (E2. Estrogen receptor ß (ERß was determined in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry. Thyroid disease incidence was higher in patients than in controls (58 vs 18%, P < 0.05. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was the most frequent disorder in patients (31%; hypothyroidism (8% and positive anti-TPO antibodies (19% were also found. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the only dysfunction (18% found in controls. Hyperthyroidism was associated with postmenopausal patients, as shown by significantly higher mean T3 and T4 values and lower TSH levels in this group of breast cancer patients than in controls. The majority of positive ERß tumors were clustered in the postmenopausal patients and all cases presenting subclinical hyperthyroidism in this subgroup concomitantly exhibited Erß-positive tumors. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in only one of 6 premenopausal patients. We show here that postmenopausal breast cancer patients have a significantly increased thyroid hormone/E2 ratio (P < 0.05, suggesting a possible tumor growth-promoting effect caused by this misbalance.

  8. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor sequence from fish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Kumaresan; T Venugopal; A Vikas; T J Pandian; S M Athavan

    2000-03-01

    A search for the presence of mariner-like elements in the Labeo rohita genome by polymerase chain reaction led to the amplification of a partial DNA sequence coding for a putative transmembrane domain of gonadotropin hormone receptor. The amplified DNA sequence shows a high degree of homology to the available turkey and human luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormone receptor coding sequences. This is the first report on cloning such sequences of piscine origin.

  9. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  10. Treatment strategies for advanced hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer: the role of treatment order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Edith A

    2016-01-01

    Although survival rates among patients with breast cancer have improved in recent years, those diagnosed with advanced disease with distant metastasis face a 5-year survival rate of less than 25%, making the management of these patients an area still in significant need of continued research. Selecting the optimal treatment order from among the variety of currently available therapy options presents a relevant challenge for medical oncologists. With the understanding that the majority of patients with breast cancer and those who succumb to this disease have HR-positive disease, this review will focus on treatment options and treatment order in patients with HR-positive advanced breast cancer. While endocrine therapy is considered the preferred treatment for first-line therapy in HR-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, selection of the specific agent depends on the menopausal status of the patient. Palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor, is also recommended as first-line treatment in patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative disease. In patients with endocrine therapy-resistant disease, specific strategies include sequencing of other antiestrogen receptor agents, or agents that target other molecular pathways. Future treatment strategies for patients with primary or secondary resistance to endocrine therapy for advanced disease are discussed. These strategies include first-line therapy with high-dose fulvestrant or everolimus (in combination with exemestane or letrozole or with other endocrine therapies), use of the PI3K inhibitors (e.g., buparlisib, alpelisib, pictilisib, taselisib), entinostat, CDK 4/6 inhibitors (e.g., palbociclib, ribociclib, abemaciclib), and novel selective estrogen receptor degradation agents that may enhance the targeting of acquired mutations in the ESR1 gene. PMID:26830312

  11. Membrane progesterone receptors in reproduction and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadez-Cosmes, Paulina; Vázquez-Martínez, Edgar Ricardo; Cerbón, Marco; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2016-10-15

    Progesterone is a sexual steroid hormone that has a critical role in reproductive processes in males and females of several species, including humans. Furthermore, progesterone has been associated with pathological diseases such as breast, gynecological and brain cancer, regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. In the past, progesterone actions were thought to be only mediated by its intracellular receptor (PR). However, recent evidence has demonstrated that membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) mediate most of the non-classical progesterone actions. The role of the different mPRs subtypes in progesterone effects in reproduction and cancer is an emerging and exciting research area. Here we review studies to date regarding mPRs role in reproduction and cancer and discuss their functions and clinical relevance, suggesting mPRs as putative pharmacological targets and disease markers in cancer and diseases associated with reproduction. PMID:27368976

  12. The Role of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Prevention of Digestive System Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia C. M. Simmen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  13. Hormonal replacement therapy and gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The problem of quality of life and lifestyle in elderly women is today a very important social problem all over the world but particularly in rich western countries. Life expectancy of the population will be longer and longer in the future and for both females and males the biological involution correlated with the aging process must be delayed. The gonadal hormones stimulate the healthy state of the entire body (heart, skin, brain, bones, urogenital apparatus and so on) and consequently hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) is mandatory. In women the biological clock of menopause allows us to intervene at the right time, with personalized estrogenic, estroprogestinic or estroandrogenic treatments. Health benefits and groundless risks allow today a careful hormonal management even in women treated for gynaecological cancers (breast and endometrium as well). PMID:10412612

  14. Molecular identification of the insect adipokinetic hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staubli, Frank; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Cazzamali, Giuseppe;

    2002-01-01

    The insect adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) are a large family of peptide hormones that are involved in the mobilization of sugar and lipids from the insect fat body during energy-requiring activities such as flight and locomotion, but that also contribute to hemolymph sugar homeostasis. Here, we have...... identified the first insect AKH receptors, namely those from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the silkworm Bombyx mori. These results represent a breakthrough for insect molecular endocrinology, because it will lead to the cloning of all AKH receptors from all model insects used in AKH research, and......, therefore, to a better understanding of AKH heterogeneity and actions. Interestingly, the insect AKH receptors are structurally and evolutionarily related to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors from vertebrates....

  15. Update of NUREBASE: nuclear hormone receptor functional genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Ruau, David; Duarte, Jorge; Ourjdal, Tarik; Perrière, Guy; Laudet, Vincent; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are an abundant class of ligand-activated transcriptional regulators, found in varying numbers in all animals. Based on our experience of managing the official nomenclature of nuclear receptors, we have developed NUREBASE, a database containing protein and DNA sequences, reviewed protein alignments and phylogenies, taxonomy and annotations for all nuclear receptors. New developments in NUREBASE include explicit declaration of alternative transcripts of each gene, and...

  16. Selective induction of apoptosis by the cytotoxic analog AN-207 in cells expressing recombinant receptor for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Danila, Daniel C; Schally, Andrew V.; Nagy, Attila; Alexander, Joseph M

    1999-01-01

    The selectivity of ligands specific for certain cells can be used to preferentially target chemotherapeutic compounds to neoplastic cells. Human breast, ovarian, endometrial, and prostatic cancers express receptors that can mediate the delivery of targeted cytotoxic compounds to neoplastic cells. Recently, a potent derivative of 2-pyrrolinodoxorubicin (AN-201) conjugated to [d-Lys6] luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) (AN-207), was demonstrated to be less toxic than the nonconjugate...

  17. The role of the expression of bcl-2, p53 gene in tamoxifen-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells and its relationship with hormone receptor status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Woo Chul; Ham, Yong Ho [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the relationship of bcl-2, p53, ER and tamoxifen-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells, MCF-7 (ER+/bcl-2+/p53-) and MB MDA 468 (ER-/bcl-2-/p53+) cell line were cultured in estrogen-free condition. E2(10`-`9M) and tamoxifen (10`-`5M) were added to the media. The changes of bcl-2 and mutant p53 protein were checked by Western blot and apoptosis were measured by flowcytometry. In MCF-7 cells, we found that treatment with tamoxifen resulted in a decrease in bcl-2 protein level, but produced no change in mutant p53. In MB MDA 468 cell however, there were no changes of bcl-2 and mutant p53 protein level when E2 or tamoxifen were added. Apoptotic cells increased with time-dependent pattern when tamoxifen was added to MCF-7 cells. According to these result, ER+/blc-2+/mutant p53- cells, when treated with tamoxifen, were converted into bcl-2/mutant p53- cells which were more prone to apoptosis than bcl-2-/mutant p53+ cells. The paradoxical correlation of bcl-2 and ER which had been observed in clinical studies might be explained with this results and bcl-2 protein seems to be one of important factors that can predict the effect of hormone therapy. (author). 26 refs., 5 figs

  18. Hormonal therapy might be a better choice asmaintenance treatment thancapecitabine afterresponse toifrst-line capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy forpatients withhormone receptor-positive andHER2-negative, metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-LianChen; FengDu; Ruo-XiHong; Jia-YuWang; YangLuo; QingLi; YingFan; Bing-HeXu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Both hormonal therapy (HT) and maintenance capecitabine monotherapy (MCT) have been shown to extend time to progression (TTP) in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) after failure of taxanes and anthracycline‑containing regimens. However, no clinical trials have directly compared the effcacy of MCT and HT after response to ifrst‑line capecitabine‑based combination chemotherapy (FCCT) in patients with hormone receptor (HR)‑positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)‑negative breast cancer. Methods:We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 138 HR‑positive and HER2‑negative MBC patients who were in non‑progression status after FCCT and who were treated between 2003 and 2012 at the Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, in Beijing, China. The median number of ifrst‑line chemotherapy cycles was 6 (range, 4–8); combined agents included taxanes, vinorelbine, or gemcitabine. Of these 138 patients, 79 received MCT, and 59 received HT. Single‑agent capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1250mg/m2 twice daily for 14days, followed by a 7‑day rest period, repeated every 3weeks. Of the 59 patients who received HT, 37 received aromatase inhibitors (AIs), 8 received selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), and 14 received goserelin plus either AIs or SERMs. We then compared the MCT group and HT group in terms of treatment effcacy. Results:With a median follow‑up of 43months, patients in the HT group had a much longer TTP than patients in the MCT group (13 vs. 8months,P=0.011). When TTP was adjusted for age, menopausal status, Karnofsky performance status score, disease‑free survival, site of metastasis, number of metastatic sites, and response status after FCCT, extended TTP was still observed for patients in the HT group (hazard ratio: 0.63; 95% conifdence interval: 0.44–0.93;P=0.020). We also observed a trend of overall survival advantage for patients in the HT group vs

  19. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptor-mediated delivery of mitoxantrone using LHRH analogs modified with PEGylated liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingna He

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Yingna He, Linhua Zhang, Cunxian SongKey Laboratory of Biomedical Material of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, ChinaAbstract: A sterically stabilized, mitoxantrone-loaded liposome, tailored to target luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH receptor overexpressing cells, was developed to promote the efficiency of intracellular delivery of mitoxantrone through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Liposomes were prepared by lipid film hydration and an ultrasound dispersion process. Thiolated gonadorelin with affinity for the LHRH receptor was chemically coupled to N-[(3-maleimide-1-oxopropyl aminopropyl polyethylene glycol-carbamyl] distearoyl-l-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine via a thioether bond and subsequently inserted into polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes. The liposome was characterized in terms of its size, ligand density, drug loading, and leakage properties. The targeting nature and antitumor effects of the liposomes were evaluated in vitro using cultured MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A protein assay of ligand coupling to the liposomal surface indicated that more than 60% of the LHRH peptides were inserted into the liposome bilayer. Up to 1.0 mg/mL of stable liposomal mitoxantrone loading was achieved, with approximately 98% of this being entrapped within the liposomes. In vitro cell culture studies revealed that the gonadorelin-modified liposomes bound to their target cells had significantly higher affinity and better antitumor efficiency than generic drug-loaded liposomes. These events were presumed to occur through specific interactions of the LHRH with its cognate receptors on the cell surface. It was concluded that the targeting properties of the delivery system would potentially improve the therapeutic benefits of mitoxantrone, as compared with nontargeted liposomes.Keywords: mitoxantrone, liposome, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptor

  20. Resistance to Thyroid Hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TR?1, TR?1, TR?2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of ?2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TR?1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTH?) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit...

  1. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyu Hou; Flaig, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT). The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC) remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for pros...

  2. Synthesis of Analogues of Thyroid Hormones: Nuclear Receptor Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Vieira de Castro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are essential for the development and differentiation of all cells of the human body. This work reports the synthesis of some synthetic structural analogues of thyroid hormones, which may be modulators of the thyroid hormone receptor. The known compounds GC-1 (Sobetirome and CG-24 were successfully prepared and two novel analogous molecules were also synthesized by a new and efficient synthetic methodology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.739  

  3. Selective Cancer Targeting via Aberrant Behavior of Cancer Cell-associated Glucocorticoid Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Amarnath; Narayan, Kumar P; Pal, Krishnendu; Kumar, Jerald M.; Rangaraj, Nandini; Shasi V Kalivendi; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are ubiquitous, nuclear hormone receptors residing in cell types of both cancer and noncancerous origin. It is not known whether cancer cell–associated GR alone can be selectively manipulated for delivery of exogenous genes to its nucleus for eliciting anticancer effect. We find that GR ligand, dexamethasone (Dex) in association with cationic lipoplex (termed as targeted lipoplex) could selectively manipulate GR in cancer cells alone for the delivery of transgen...

  4. Effectiveness and adverse effects of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: Japanese experience and perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Satoru Ueno; Yasuhide Kitagawa; Takashi Fukagai; Hideyuki Akaza

    2012-01-01

    Recently,novel anti-androgens and inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis have been developed through the elucidation of mechanisms of castration resistance of prostate cancer.We believe that these new developments will improve hormonal therapy.On the other hand,there has been an increase in criticism of hormonal therapy,because hormonal therapy is supposed to induce adverse effects such as cardiovascular disease.In this review,we have introduced the Japanese experience of hormonal therapy,because we believe that there may be ethnic differences between Caucasians and Asian people in the efficacy and adverse effects of hormonal therapy.First,we showed that primary hormonal therapy can achieve long-term control of localized prostate cancer in some cases and that quality of life of patients receiving hormonal therapy is rather better than previously thought.Neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in cases undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very useful for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer.Further clinical trials are required to confirm the efficacy of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy.We showed that the death from cardiovascular diseases in Japanese patients receiving hormonal therapy was not higher than that in the general population.However,efforts should be made to decrease the adverse effects of hormonal therapy,because life-style change may increase the susceptibility to adverse effects by hormonal therapy even in Japan.Managements of endocrine and metabolic dysfunction,such as diabetes mellitus,are essential.New hormonal compounds such as selective androgen receptor modulators capable of specifically targeting prostate cancer are expected to be developed.

  5. Thyroid hormone receptor binds to a site in the rat growth hormone promoter required for induction by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. The authors have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. They show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor

  6. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Secondary Hormone Therapy in the Management of Hormone-sensitive and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Fizazi, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC). However, nearly all patients with mPC progress to castration-resistant PC (CRPC). Arrays of treatments, including secondary hormonal therapies, are available for the treatment of mPC and CRPC, which show efficacy when administered with ADT. Continuation of ADT is recommended for CRPC treatment as therapies are added. New secondary hormonal therapies include abiraterone, targeting the CYP17 enzyme family, and enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor with heightened binding specificity. The optimal decision-making process for CRPC treatment option remains unclear, pending further research and experience. PMID:26282624

  7. Profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva P.P.; Figueiredo N.B.; Padovani C.R.; Brentani M.M.; Nogueira C.R.

    2005-01-01

    Estrogen involvement in breast cancer has been established; however, the association between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Estrogen-like effects of thyroid hormone on breast cancer cell growth in culture have been reported. The objective of the present study was to determine the profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients. Serum aliquots from 26 patients with breast cancer ranging in age from 30 to 85 years and age-matched normal controls (N = 22) were analyze...

  8. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J. (UWA); (St. Vincent); (Queensland)

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  9. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT. The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for prostate cancer have added to the hormonal therapy armamentarium. These new therapeutic agents not only provide a survival benefit but also show potential for reversing hormonal resistance in metastatic CRPC, and thus redefining hormonally sensitive disease.

  10. Hormone receptor and ERBB2 status in gene expression profiles of human breast tumor samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dvorkin-Gheva

    Full Text Available The occurrence of large publically available repositories of human breast tumor gene expression profiles provides an important resource to discover new breast cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. For example, knowledge of the expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors (ER and PR, and that of the ERBB2 in breast tumor samples enables choice of therapies for the breast cancer patients that express these proteins. Identifying new biomarkers and therapeutic agents affecting the activity of signaling pathways regulated by the hormone receptors or ERBB2 might be accelerated by knowledge of their expression levels in large gene expression profiling data sets. Unfortunately, the status of these receptors is not invariably reported in public databases of breast tumor gene expression profiles. Attempts have been made to employ a single probe set to identify ER, PR and ERBB2 status, but the specificity or sensitivity of their prediction is low. We enquired whether estimation of ER, PR and ERBB2 status of profiled tumor samples could be improved by using multiple probe sets representing these three genes and others with related expression.We used 8 independent datasets of human breast tumor samples to define gene expression signatures comprising 24, 51 and 14 genes predictive of ER, PR and ERBB2 status respectively. These signatures, as demonstrated by sensitivity and specificity measures, reliably identified hormone receptor and ERBB2 expression in breast tumors that had been previously determined using protein and DNA based assays. Our findings demonstrate that gene signatures can be identified which reliably predict the expression status of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and that of ERBB2 in publically available gene expression profiles of breast tumor samples. Using these signatures to query transcript profiles of breast tumor specimens may enable discovery of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for

  11. Coffee consumption modifies risk of estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jingmei; Seibold, Petra; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Liu, Jianjun; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Hall, Per

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a complex disease and may be sub-divided into hormone-responsive (estrogen receptor (ER) positive) and non-hormone-responsive subtypes (ER-negative). Some evidence suggests that heterogeneity exists in the associations between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk, according to different estrogen receptor subtypes. We assessed the association between coffee consumption and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in a large population-based study (2,818 cases and 3,...

  12. The thyroid hormone receptor β induces DNA damage and premature senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Gallardo, M. Esther; Villamuera, Raquel; Gómez-Ferrería, María Ana; Pascual, Ángel; Buisine, Nicolas; Sachs, Laurent M.; Garesse, Rafael; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (THRs) can play a role in aging, cancer and degenerative diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of TH T3 (triiodothyronine) to THRB induces senescence and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cultured cells and in tissues of young hyperthyroid mice. T3 induces a rapid activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)/PRKAA (adenosine monophosphate- activated protein kinase) signal transduction and recruitment ...

  13. Hormone therapy use, sex hormone concentrations and gene expression : The Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Waaseth, Marit

    2010-01-01

    According to sales statistics, the use of hormone therapy (HT) increased markedly in Norway through the 1990s, but decreased from 2002. Both endogenous and exogenous sex hormones are known risk factors for cancer among women. Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth which develops gradually through genomic alterations. Technological developments provide the opportunity to investigate relationships between sex hormones and blood gene expression in a population based cohort like the ...

  14. Epidemiological trends of hormone-related cancers in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadnik, Vesna; Krajc, Mateja

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of hormone-related cancers tends to be higher in the developed world than in other countries. In Slovenia, six hormone-related cancers (breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate, testicular, and thyroid) account for a quarter of all cancers. Their incidence goes up each year, breast and prostate cancer in particular. The age at diagnosis is not decreasing for any of the analysed cancer types. The risk of breast cancer is higher in the western part of the country, but no differences in geographical distribution have been observed for other hormone-related cancers. Furthermore, areas polluted with endocrine-disrupting chemicals that affect hormone balance such as PCBs, dioxins, heavy metals, and pesticides, do not seem to involve a greater cancer risk. We know little about how many cancers can be associated with endocrine disruptors, as there are too few reliable exposure studies to support an association. PMID:27331295

  15. *601751 MELANIN-CONCENTRATING HORMONE RECEPTOR 1; MCHR1 [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 601751 FIELD TI 601751 MELANIN-CONCENTRATING HORMONE RECEPTOR 1; MCHR1 ;;G PROTEIN-COUP ... ted animals, and mice lacking MCH eat less and are lean . MCH antagonist might therefore provide a treatmen ... e. The null mice had normal body weights, yet were lean ... and had reduced fat mass. Surprisingly, the null m ...

  16. Ligand induction of a transcriptionally active thyroid hormone receptor coactivator complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Fondell, J D; Ge, H.; Roeder, R G

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation by nuclear hormone receptors is thought to involve interactions with putative cofactors that may potentiate receptor function. Here we show that human thyroid hormone receptor alpha purified from HeLa cells grown in the presence of thyroid hormone (T3) is associated with a group of distinct nuclear proteins termed thyroid hormone receptor-associated proteins (TRAPs). In an in vitro system reconstituted with general initiation factors and cofactors (and in the absenc...

  17. 新辅助化疗对乳腺癌激素受体 ER、PR 表达的影响%Influence of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on the Expression of Hormone Receptors ER、PR in Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵波涛; 罗庆丰; 高玟; 黄传生; 涂侃

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the expression of hormone receptors ER、PR in breast cancer .Methods Expression of ER、PR of 32 infitrating ductal carcinoma .patients before and after new adju-vant chemotherapy were detected by Maxvinsion immunohistochemistry .Results Expression of ER、PR of 32 infitrating ductal carcinoma patients before and after new adjuvant chemotherapy were the same .Negative expression of ER was observed in 5,ex-pression of ER +was observed in 8,ER ++in 12 and ER +++in 7.Negative expression of PR was observed in 6,expres-sion of PR +was observed in 7,PR ++in 12 and PR +++in 7.The positive expression of ER and PR was consistent ,and correlation comparison of the positive expression rate of ER and PR was important .Conclusion Expression of hormone receptors ER、PR in breast cancer before and after new adjuvant chemotherapy are the same .Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is safe .%目的:探讨新辅助化疗对乳腺癌激素受体ER、PR表达的影响。方法应用MaxVinsion免疫组织化学技术,检测32例浸润性导管癌乳腺患者新辅助化疗前、新辅助化疗后ER、PR表达情况。结果32例乳腺浸润性导管癌新辅助化疗前与化疗后检测结果完全相同:5例不表达ER,8例ER +,12例ER ++,7例ER +++;6例不表达PR,7例PR +,12例PR ++,7例PR +++。同时ER、PR阳性表达具有良好一致性,32例患者中ER、PR阳性表达间具有显著相关性。结论乳腺癌患者新辅助化疗前后激素受体ER、PR表达结果完全一致,新辅助化疗安全可行。

  18. Breast cancer with different prognostic characteristics developing in Danish women using hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, A T; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic;

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the risk of developing prognostic different types of breast cancer in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A total of 10 874 postmenopausal Danish Nurses were followed since 1993. Incident breast cancer cases and histopathological information were...... retrieved through the National Danish registries. The follow-up ended on 31 December 1999. Breast cancer developed in 244 women, of whom 172 were invasive ductal carcinomas. Compared to never users, current users of HRT had an increased risk of a hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, but a neutral risk...... of receptor-negative breast cancer, relative risk (RR) 3.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.77) and RR 0.99 (95% CI: 0.42-2.36), respectively (P for difference=0.013). The risk of being diagnosed with low histological malignancy grade was higher than high malignancy grade with RR 4.13 (95% CI...

  19. Nuclear hormone receptors involved in neoplasia: erb A exhibits a novel DNA sequence specificity determined by amino acids outside of the zinc-finger domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Smit-McBride, Z; Lewis, S; Sharif, M; Privalsky, M L

    1993-01-01

    The erb A oncogene is a dominant negative allele of a thyroid hormone receptor gene and acts in the cancer cell by encoding a transcriptional repressor. We demonstrate here that the DNA sequence recognition properties of the oncogenic form of the erb A protein are significantly altered from those of the normal thyroid hormone receptors and more closely resemble those of the retinoic acid receptors; this alteration appears to play an important role in defining the targets of erb A action in ne...

  20. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism).

    OpenAIRE

    Daughaday, W H; Trivedi, B

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, we have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of 12...

  1. Analysis of Paired Primary-Metastatic Hormone-Receptor Positive Breast Tumors (HRPBC Uncovers Potential Novel Drivers of Hormonal Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manso

    Full Text Available We sought to identify genetic variants associated with disease relapse and failure to hormonal treatment in hormone-receptor positive breast cancer (HRPBC. We analyzed a series of HRPBC with distant relapse, by sequencing pairs (n = 11 of tumors (primary and metastases at >800X. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed as well. Top hits, based on the frequency of alteration and severity of the changes, were tested in the TCGA series. Genes determining the most parsimonious prognostic signature were studied for their functional role in vitro, by performing cell growth assays in hormonal-deprivation conditions, a setting that mimics treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Severe alterations were recurrently found in 18 genes in the pairs. However, only MYC, DNAH5, CSFR1, EPHA7, ARID1B, and KMT2C preserved an independent prognosis impact and/or showed a significantly different incidence of alterations between relapsed and non-relapsed cases in the TCGA series. The signature composed of MYC, KMT2C, and EPHA7 best discriminated the clinical course, (overall survival 90,7 vs. 144,5 months; p = 0.0001. Having an alteration in any of the genes of the signature implied a hazard ratio of death of 3.25 (p<0.0001, and early relapse during the adjuvant hormonal treatment. The presence of the D348N mutation in KMT2C and/or the T666I mutation in the kinase domain of EPHA7 conferred hormonal resistance in vitro. Novel inactivating mutations in KMT2C and EPHA7, which confer hormonal resistance, are linked to adverse clinical course in HRPBC.

  2. Analysis of Paired Primary-Metastatic Hormone-Receptor Positive Breast Tumors (HRPBC) Uncovers Potential Novel Drivers of Hormonal Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Luis; Mourón, Silvana; Tress, Michael; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Morente, Manuel; Ciruelos, Eva; Rubio-Camarillo, Miriam; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose Luis; Pujana, Miguel A; Pisano, David G; Quintela-Fandino, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We sought to identify genetic variants associated with disease relapse and failure to hormonal treatment in hormone-receptor positive breast cancer (HRPBC). We analyzed a series of HRPBC with distant relapse, by sequencing pairs (n = 11) of tumors (primary and metastases) at >800X. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed as well. Top hits, based on the frequency of alteration and severity of the changes, were tested in the TCGA series. Genes determining the most parsimonious prognostic signature were studied for their functional role in vitro, by performing cell growth assays in hormonal-deprivation conditions, a setting that mimics treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Severe alterations were recurrently found in 18 genes in the pairs. However, only MYC, DNAH5, CSFR1, EPHA7, ARID1B, and KMT2C preserved an independent prognosis impact and/or showed a significantly different incidence of alterations between relapsed and non-relapsed cases in the TCGA series. The signature composed of MYC, KMT2C, and EPHA7 best discriminated the clinical course, (overall survival 90,7 vs. 144,5 months; p = 0.0001). Having an alteration in any of the genes of the signature implied a hazard ratio of death of 3.25 (p<0.0001), and early relapse during the adjuvant hormonal treatment. The presence of the D348N mutation in KMT2C and/or the T666I mutation in the kinase domain of EPHA7 conferred hormonal resistance in vitro. Novel inactivating mutations in KMT2C and EPHA7, which confer hormonal resistance, are linked to adverse clinical course in HRPBC. PMID:27195705

  3. Expression of functional growth hormone receptor in a mouse L cell line infected with recombinant vaccinia virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strous, G J; van Kerkhof, P; Verheijen, C; Rossen, J W; Liou, W; Slot, J W; Roelen, C A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor is a member of a large family of receptors including the receptors for prolactin and interleukins. Upon binding to one molecule of growth hormone two growth hormone receptor polypeptides dimerize. We have expressed the rabbit growth hormone receptor DNA in transfected mou

  4. Polypeptide hormone receptor phosphorylation: is there a role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether receptor phosphorylation is a critical step in the internalization of polypeptide hormones and their receptors, the authors have studied a model system wherein insulin stimulates phosphorylation of its receptor and is also internalized. Using insulin as a positive control, they found that it stimulated a partially purified plasma membrane preparation of IM-9 lymphocytes to autophosphorylate its receptor and to catalyze the phosphorylation of a tyrosine-containing substrate. The human GH (hGH) receptor of the IM-9 lymphocytes, when coupled to [125I]iodo-hGH, migrated as a 140,000-dalton protein on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This protein, in contrast to the insulin receptor, was not phosphorylated by the addition of hGH, nor did hGH stimulate this preparation to phosphorylate the tyrosine-containing substrate poly-(GluNa,Tyr)4:1, casein, or histone f2b under a variety of conditions. The authors conclude that receptor phosphorylation is not a critical intermediate in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of hGH and probably other polypeptide hormones and growth factors

  5. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus. PMID:26513165

  6. Immunohistochemical study of estrogen receptors and progesterone in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presence of estrogen receptors in breast tumors allows to judge about sensitivity of cancer to hormone therapy and diseases prognosis. Objective of the study is to compare histological forms of patient's age and various estrogen receptors combination in breast cancer. 30 patients were undergone to immune-histo-chemical examination of breast tumors in the Semipalatinsk cancer clinic. According to expression of estrogen and testosteron receptors they were divided into 4 groups. The most wide-spread histologic type of cancer was dust-infiltrative. This type took place of 3.3 % for the first group, 9.9 % for the second group, 16-6 % for the third one, and 36.6 % for the fourth one. Histological type of cancer had not effects on expression of receptors estrogen and progesterone in tumor. Rare breast cancer types like medullary occurred only in the fourth group. Dividing breast cancer into positive and negative or with expression of one hormone depending on expression of estrogen, testosteron receptors may be regarded as a sensible way. More expanded examination on immune-histo-chemical markers allows extending topics regarding therapy of breast cancer. (author)

  7. The Hinge Region of Human Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Receptor Operates as a Tunable Switch between Hormone Binding and Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Dighe, Rajan R.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which the hinge regions of glycoprotein hormone receptors couple hormone binding to activation of downstream effecters is not clearly understood. In the present study, agonistic (311.62) and antagonistic (311.87) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the TSH receptor extracellular domain were used to elucidate role of the hinge region in receptor activation. MAb 311.62 which identifies the LRR/Cb-2 junction (aa 265-275), increased the affinity of TSHR for the hormone ...

  8. Prediction of nuclear hormone receptor response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2005-03-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) class of transcription factors controls critical regulatory events in key developmental processes, homeostasis maintenance, and medically important diseases and conditions. Identification of the members of a regulon controlled by a NR could provide an accelerated understanding of development and disease. New bioinformatics methods for the analysis of regulatory sequences are required to address the complex properties associated with known regulatory elements targeted by the receptors because the standard methods for binding site prediction fail to reflect the diverse target site configurations. We have constructed a flexible Hidden Markov Model framework capable of predicting NHR binding sites. The model allows for variable spacing and orientation of half-sites. In a genome-scale analysis enabled by the model, we show that NRs in Fugu rubripes have a significant cross-regulatory potential. The model is implemented in a web interface, freely available for academic researchers, available at http://mordor.cgb.ki.se/NHR-scan. PMID:15563547

  9. Thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone receptors: Effects of thyromimetics on reverse cholesterol transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo; Pedrelli; Camilla; Pramfalk; Paolo; Parini

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is a complex process which transfers cholesterol from peripheral cells to the liver for subsequent elimination from the body via feces. Thyroid hormones (THs) affect growth, develop- ment, and metabolism in almost all tissues. THs exert their actions by binding to thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). There are two major subtypes of TRs, TRα and TRβ, and several isoforms (e.g. TRα1, TRα2, TRβ1, and TRβ2). Activation of TRα1 affects heart rate, whereas activation of TRβ1 has po...

  10. Sex Hormones and Their Receptors Regulate Liver Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minqian Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is one of the most essential organs involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Hepatic steatosis, a major manifestation of metabolic syndrome, is associated with imbalance between lipid formation and breakdown, glucose production and catabolism, and cholesterol synthesis and secretion. Epidemiological studies show sex difference in the prevalence in fatty liver disease and suggest that sex hormones may play vital roles in regulating hepatic steatosis. In this review, we summarize current literature and discuss the role of estrogens and androgens and the mechanisms through which estrogen receptors and androgen receptors regulate lipid and glucose metabolism in the liver. In females, estradiol regulates liver metabolism via estrogen receptors by decreasing lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid uptake, while enhancing lipolysis, cholesterol secretion, and glucose catabolism. In males, testosterone works via androgen receptors to increase insulin receptor expression and glycogen synthesis, decrease glucose uptake and lipogenesis, and promote cholesterol storage in the liver. These recent integrated concepts suggest that sex hormone receptors could be potential promising targets for the prevention of hepatic steatosis.

  11. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, V.; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A.; Belfiore, A.; D. Giuffrida; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G.B.; Brand, R.; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0...

  12. Menopausal hormone therapy in cancer survivors: A narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhle, Carol L; Kapoor, Ekta; Sood, Richa; Thielen, Jacqueline M; Jatoi, Aminah; Faubion, Stephanie S

    2016-10-01

    Decision making regarding the use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) for the treatment of bothersome menopausal symptoms in a cancer survivor can be complex, and includes assessment of its impact on disease-free or overall survival. Estrogen receptors are present in several cancer types, but this does not always result in estrogen-mediated tumor proliferation and adverse cancer-related outcomes. Estrogen may even be protective against certain cancers. Menopausal hormone therapy is associated with an increased risk of recurrence and mortality after diagnosis of some cancer types, but not others. We provide a narrative review of the medical literature regarding the risk of cancer recurrence and associated mortality with initiation of MHT after the diagnosis of breast, gynecologic, lung, colorectal, hematologic cancers, and melanoma. Menopausal hormone therapy may be considered for management of bothersome menopausal symptoms in women with some cancer types (e.g., colorectal and hematologic cancer, localized melanoma, and most cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers), while nonhormonal treatment options may be preferred for others (e.g., breast cancer). In women with other cancer types, recommendations are less straightforward, and the use of MHT must be individualized. PMID:27621244

  13. Homozygosity for a dominant negative thyroid hormone receptor gene responsible for generalized resistance to thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, S; Schwartz, I D; Mueller, O T; Root, A W; Usala, S J; Bercu, B B

    1991-11-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormones (GRTH) commonly results from mutations in the T3-binding domain of the c-erbA beta thyroid hormone receptor gene. We have reported on a novel deletion mutation in c-erbA beta in a kindred, S, with GRTH. One patient from this kindred was the product of a consanguineous union from two affected members and was homozygous for the beta-receptor defect. This patient at 3.5 weeks of age had unprecedented elevations of TSH, free T4, and free T3 (TSH, 389 mU/L; free T4, 330.8 pmol/L; free T3, 82,719 fmol/L). He displayed a complex mixture of tissue-specific hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. He had delayed growth (height age, 1 3/12 yr at chronological age 2 9/12 yr) and skeletal maturation (bone age, 4 months), and developmental delay (developmental age, 8 months), but he was quite tachycardic. The homozygous patient of kindred S is markedly different from a recently reported patient with no c-erbA beta-receptor. This difference indicates that a dominant negative form of c-erbA beta in man can inhibit at least some thyroid hormone action mediated by the c-erbA alpha-receptors. PMID:1682340

  14. Abnormal heart rate and body temperature in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Wikström, L; Johansson, C.; Saltó, C; C Barlow; Campos Barros, A; Baas, F.; Forrest, D; Thorén, P; Vennström, B

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid hormone, acting through several nuclear hormone receptors, plays important roles in thermogenesis, lipogenesis and maturation of the neonatal brain. The receptor specificity for mediating these effects is largely unknown, and to determine this we developed mice lacking the thyroid hormone receptor TR alpha 1. The mice have an average heart rate 20% lower than that of control animals, both under normal conditions and after thyroid hormone stimulation. Electrocardiograms show that the m...

  15. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in norm...

  16. Hormonal regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and memory formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmen J Krugers

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Humans and rodents retain memories for stressful events very well. The facilitated retention of these memories is normally very useful. However, in susceptible individuals a variety of pathological conditions may develop in which memories related to stressful events remain inappropriately present, such as in post-traumatic stress disorder. The memory enhancing effects of stress are mediated by hormones, such as norepinephrine and glucocorticoids which are released during stressful experiences. Here we review recently identified molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of stress hormones on synaptic efficacy and learning and memory. We discuss AMPA receptors as major target for stress hormones and describe a model in which norepinephrine and glucocorticoids are able to strengthen and prolong different phases of stressful memories.

  17. Role of chemotherapy in combination with hormonal therapy in first-line treatment of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresoli, G L; De Vincenzo, F; Sauta, M G; Bonomi, M; Zucali, P A

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a heterogeneous disease, whose growth is driven by androgens and androgen receptors. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment of hormone-naïve metastatic disease. The majority of patients are treated with medical castration with GnRH agonists or antagonists, which usually determines a profound PSA decline and a radiological and clinical benefit. However, essentially all patients experience progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and overall prognosis remains disappointing. Early targeting of cells that survive hormonal therapy may potentially prevent the development of CRPC. Several trials have explored the use of combination therapy with ADT and chemotherapy, targeting both the androgen dependent and independent cells simultaneously. Docetaxel was administered in combination with ADT to men with hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, in the attempt to improve the duration and quality of patient survival. Three large randomized trials (the GETUG-15, CHAARTED and more recently the STAMPEDE study) have assessed these endpoints, with partially conflicting results. Overall, the results from these trials seem to support the use of early docetaxel combined with ADT in selected hormone-naïve metastatic PC patients. Full publication of the results of all studies, with longer follow-up, and the results of other ongoing trials in this setting will hopefully further define the role and the indications of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:26222275

  18. Nipple Aspirate Fluid Hormone Concentrations and Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterton, Robert T; Heinz, Richard E; Fought, Angela J; Ivancic, David; Shappell, Claire; Allu, Subhashini; Gapstur, Susan; Scholtens, Denise M; Gann, Peter H; Khan, Seema A

    2016-04-01

    Prior reports identify higher serum concentrations of estrogens and androgens as risk factors for breast cancer, but steroids in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) may be more related to risk. Incident breast cancer cases and mammography controls were recruited. Sex steroids were measured in NAF from the unaffected breasts of cases and one breast of controls. Menopausal status and menstrual cycle phase were determined. NAF steroids were purified by HPLC and quantified by immunoassays. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine associations between NAF hormones and case-control status. NAF samples from 160 cases and 157 controls were evaluable for hormones. Except for progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the NAF and serum concentrations were not significantly correlated. NAF estradiol and estrone were not different between cases and controls. Higher NAF (but not serum) DHEA concentrations were associated with cases, particularly among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases (NAF odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 1.36). NAF DHEA was highly correlated with NAF estradiol and estrone but not with androstenedione or testosterone. Higher progesterone concentrations in both NAF and serum were associated with a lower risk of ER-negative cancer (NAF OR = 0.69, 95 % CI 0.51, 0.92). However, this finding may be explained by case-control imbalance in the number of luteal phase subjects (2 cases and 19 controls). The significantly higher concentration of DHEA in NAF of cases and its correlation with NAF estradiol indicates a potentially important role of this steroid in breast cancer risk; however, the negative association of progesterone with risk is tentative. PMID:26902826

  19. Tyrosine kinase signalling in breast cancer: ErbB family receptor tyrosine kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERBB family receptor tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in a significant subset of breast cancers. One of these receptors, HER2/neu, or ErbB-2, is the target for a new rational therapeutic antibody, Herceptin. Other inhibitors that target this receptor, and another family member, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, are moving into clinical trials. Both of these receptors are sometimes overexpressed in breast cancer, and still subject to regulation by hormones and other physiological regulators. Optimal use of therapeutics targeting these receptors will require consideration of the several modes of regulation of these receptors and their interactions with steroid receptors

  20. ICON 2013: Practical consensus recommendations for hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative advanced or metastatic breastcancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative breast cancer patients with advanced or metastatic disease is a common problem in India and other countries in this region. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience, and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists, to arrive at practical consensus recommendations for use by the community oncologists.

  1. Affinity labeling of rat liver thyroid hormone nuclear receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Nikodem, V M; Cheng, S Y; Rall, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor from rat liver nuclei has been covalently labeled with the N-bromoacetyl derivatives of L-thyroxine (T4) and 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3). Displacement binding studies showed that, in the presence of 100-fold molar excess of unlabeled N-bromoacetyl-T3 or T4, binding of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 was nearly totally inhibited. Heat inactivation of the receptor (55 degrees C for 15 min) resulted in parallel losses in the binding of T3 (95%) and N-bromoacetyl-T3 (93%). T...

  2. Mortality rates among early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer; Bjerre, Karsten; Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen;

    2011-01-01

    Indications for adjuvant endocrine treatment of breast cancer have gradually increased over the past several years. We aimed to define subgroups of patients who may or may not benefit from adjuvant endocrine therapy....

  3. Regulation of growth hormone secretion by (pro)renin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Tani, Yuji; Yamada, Shozo; Inoshita, Naoko; Hirata, Yukio; SHICHIRI, MASAYOSHI

    2015-01-01

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) has a single transmembrane domain that co-purifies with the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). In addition to its role in cellular acidification, V-ATPase has been implicated in membrane fusion and exocytosis via its Vo domain. Results from the present study show that PRR is expressed in pituitary adenoma cells and regulates growth hormone (GH) release via V-ATPase-induced cellular acidification. Positive PRR immunoreactivity was detected more often in surgically resecte...

  4. Steroid/thyroid hormone receptor genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    Kostrouch, Z; Kostrouchova, M; Rall, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    The large family of steroid/thyroid hormone receptor (STR) genes has been extensively studied in vertebrates and insects but little information is available on it in more primitive organisms. All members possess a DNA binding domain of zinc fingers of the C2, C2 type. We have used the polymerase chain reaction with degenerate oligonucleotide primers covering this region to clone three distinct members of this family from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. All three belong to the retinoic ac...

  5. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Keiding, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    .83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone......Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were...

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy After Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueck AO

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, patient samples in all studies investigating hormone replacement therapy (HRT after breast cancer have been small.Therefore, HRT should only be used if alternatives such as specifically not contraindicated phytopreparations or selective sero-tonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are not effective. This is primarily due to forensic reasons since clinical data on the risk ofalternatives (based on present evidence are even more sparse. Regarding HRT, four prospective randomized studies and at least15 observational studies after breast cancer are available. Only the HABITS study shows an increased risk of relapse. The authorssuggest that this is probably associated with the relatively high number of patients with HRT treatment after ER-positive cancersas well as due to the preferred use of estrogen/progestin-combined preparations. Based on the results of the randomized pla-cebo-controlled study Women’s Health Initiative (WHI as well as of at least 12 observational studies, the progestin componentseems to be mainly responsible for the probability of increased diagnosis frequency of primary breast cancer. However, no dataare available on the impact of progestin on the use of combined HRT after breast cancer. However, also with estrogen only anincreased risk of relapse must be expected and patients should be informed about it. This has to be concluded due to biologicalplausibility and observational studies although the estrogen-only arm in WHI did not show any increased primary risk. Thus, anyform of HRT should only be performed in exceptional cases, and treatment duration should be as short as possible with thelowest effective dose.

  7. A Comprehensive Nuclear Receptor Network for Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Kittler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer, nuclear receptors (NRs play a prominent role in governing gene expression, have prognostic utility, and are therapeutic targets. We built a regulatory map for 24 NRs, six chromatin state markers, and 14 breast-cancer-associated transcription factors (TFs that are expressed in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The resulting network reveals a highly interconnected regulatory matrix where extensive crosstalk occurs among NRs and other breast -cancer-associated TFs. We show that large numbers of factors are coordinately bound to highly occupied target regions throughout the genome, and these regions are associated with active chromatin state and hormone-responsive gene expression. This network also provides a framework for stratifying and predicting patient outcomes, and we use it to show that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta binds to a set of genes also regulated by the retinoic acid receptors and whose expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

  8. Current status of primary pharmacotherapy and future perspectives toward upfront therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Since 1941, androgen deprivation therapy has been the primary treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy consists of several regimens that vary according to therapeutic modality, as well as treatment schedule. Androgen deprivation therapy initially shows excellent antitumor effects, such as relief of cancer-related symptoms, tumor marker decline and tumor shrinking. However, most metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases eventually develop castration resistance and become lethal. Taxanes, such as docetaxel and cabazitaxel, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have emerged for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The concept and principle of primary therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has remained unchanged for decades. Recently, upfront docetaxel chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and would lead to a paradigm shift in primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This raises the possibility of upfront use of taxanes, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents combined with androgen deprivation therapy. The present review summarizes the current status of primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and discusses future perspectives in this field. PMID:27062039

  9. Radioreceptor assay for detergent-solubilized rat insulinoma growth hormone receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth hormone receptors from a rat insulinoma cell line, RIN-5AH were solubilized in the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. A radioreceptor assay based on polyethylene glycol precipitation of the growth hormone: receptor complex showed time-dependent and saturable hormone binding. The affinity in detergent solution for biosynthetic human growth hormone of approx. 6 ng/ml was found similar to that of intact RIN cells. The solubilization and receptor assay conditions described are useful for further characterization and purification of RIN cell growth hormone receptors, which might provide an initial insight into the molecular mechanism of the growth effects on islet β-cells. (author)

  10. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S;

    2010-01-01

    associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR...... and 3,949 controls (P(trend) = 1 × 10¿7) to P(trend) = 8 × 10¿5; rs2363956 per-allele OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.74-0.87, P(trend) = 1.1 × 10¿7...

  11. Association of polymorphisms in genes encoding hormone receptors ESR1, ESR2 and LHCGR with the risk and clinical features of testicular germ cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, Leon J S; Lundberg-Giwercman, Yvonne; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Eberhard, Jakob; Ståhl, Olof; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Daugaard, Gedske; Arver, Stefan; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is the most common malignancy in young men. Genetic variants known to be associated with risk of TGCC only partially account for the observed familial risks. We aimed to identify additional polymorphisms associated with risk as well as histological and clinical ...

  12. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  13. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final 125I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. 125I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors

  14. Growth hormone-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine 333 and/or 338 of the growth hormone receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L;

    1995-01-01

    Many signaling pathways initiated by ligands that activate receptor tyrosine kinases have been shown to involve the binding of SH2 domain-containing proteins to specific phosphorylated tyrosines in the receptor. Although the receptor for growth hormone (GH) does not contain intrinsic tyrosine...

  15. Hormonal and molecular aspects of endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Vincentius Hubertus Willibrordus Maria

    2008-01-01

    This thesis concerns the expression and prognostic value of various hormones and molecular markers playing a role n endometrioid endometrial cancer. Especially we were interested in the enzyme aromatase, its expression and (prognostic) role in endometrioid endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is t

  16. Evolution of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor and its ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion, which was first identified in the Japanese quail hypothalamus. GnIH peptides share a C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif in most vertebrates. The receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) is the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147) that inhibits cAMP production. GPR147 is also named neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptor 1 (NPFFR1), because it also binds NPFF that has a C-terminal PQRFamide motif. To understand the evolutionary history of the GnIH system in the animal kingdom, we searched for receptors structurally similar to GnIHR in the genome of six mammals (human, mouse, rat, cattle, cat, and rabbit), five birds (pigeon, chicken, turkey, budgerigar, and zebra finch), one reptile (green anole), one amphibian (Western clawed flog), six fishes (zebrafish, Nile tilapia, Fugu, coelacanth, spotted gar, and lamprey), one hemichordate (acorn worm), one echinoderm (purple sea urchin), one mollusk (California sea hare), seven insects (pea aphid, African malaria mosquito, honey bee, buff-tailed bumblebee, fruit fly, jewel wasp, and red flour beetle), one cnidarian (hydra), and constructed phylogenetic trees by neighbor joining (NJ) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. A multiple sequence alignment of the receptors showed highly conserved seven-transmembrane domains as well as disulfide bridge sites between the first and second extracellular loops, including the receptor of hydra. Both NJ and ML analyses grouped the receptors of vertebrates into NPFFR1 and NPFFR2 (GPR74), and the receptors of insects into the receptor for SIFamide peptides that share a C-terminal YRKPPFNGSIFamide motif. Although human, quail and zebrafish GnIHR (NPFFR1) were most structurally similar to SIFamide receptor of fruit fly in the Famide peptide (FMRFamide, neuropeptide F, short neuropeptide F, drosulfakinin, myosuppressin, SIFamide) receptor families, the amino acid sequences and the peptide coding

  17. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 109 M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type α2 (hTRα2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type α described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type β (formerly referred to as c-erbAβ) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type α1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type α2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes

  18. Cancer Cell Gene Expression Modulated from Plasma Membrane Integrin αvβ3 by Thyroid Hormone and Nanoparticulate Tetrac

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Paul J.; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Lin, Hung-Yun; Leith, John T.; Hercbergs, Aleck; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat; Incerpi, Sandra; Shaker A. Mousa

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 is generously expressed by cancer cells and rapidly dividing endothelial cells. The principal ligands of the integrin are extracellular matrix proteins, but we have described a cell surface small molecule receptor on αvβ3 that specifically binds thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone analogs. From this receptor, thyroid hormone (l-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3′-triiodo-l-thyronine, T3) and tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) regulate expression of specific genes by a mechanism that is initia...

  19. The maximum standardized uptake value of 18 F-FDG PET scan to determine prognosis of hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether PET scan maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) could differentiate luminal A from luminal B and help predict the survival of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients with luminal subtype is still unknown and need to be investigated. 305 MBC patients with luminal subtypes were screened with PET/CT. Eligible patients were prospectively followed up. In total, 134 patients were eligible for this study. SUVmax was significantly related to the number of metastatic sites and presence of visceral metastasis on univariate analysis. SUVmax could not effectively differentiate patients with luminal A from luminal B subtype. Although luminal subtype at diagnosis could predict the relapse-free interval, it could not predict progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) after developing relapse. In contrast, SUVmax was predictive of both PFS and OS and this effect was maintained in multivariate COX regression model. SUVmax of MBC did not correlate with molecular subtypes of primary tumor. While molecular subtype may be a valuable prognostic factor at primary diagnosis of breast cancer, the SUVmax, rather than molecular subtype, does have a potential to predict independently in multivariate analysis for the PFS and OS in patients with metastatic disease of luminal subtype

  20. RXR alpha, a promiscuous partner of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Bugge, T H; Pohl, J.; Lonnoy, O; Stunnenberg, H G

    1992-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR), thyroid hormone receptor (T3R) and vitamin D3 receptor (VD3R) differ from steroid hormone receptors in that they bind and transactivate through responsive elements organized as direct rather than inverted repeats. We now show that recombinant RAR and T3R are monomers in solution and cannot form stable homodimeric complexes on their responsive elements. Stable binding of the receptors to their responsive elements requires heterodimerization with a nuclear factor. ...

  1. Receptor guanylyl cyclases in Inka cells targeted by eclosion hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jer-Cherng; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Adams, Michael E; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2009-08-11

    A signature of eclosion hormone (EH) action in insect ecdysis is elevation of cGMP in Inka cells, leading to massive release of ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) and ecdysis initiation. Although this aspect of EH-induced signal transduction is well known, the receptor mediating this process has not been identified. Here, we describe a receptor guanylyl cyclase BdmGC-1 and its isoform BdmGC-1B in the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis that are activated by EH. The B form exhibits the conserved domains and putative N-glycosylation sites found in BdmGC-1, but possesses an additional 46-amino acid insertion in the extracellular domain and lacks the C-terminal tail of BdmGC-1. Combined immunolabeling and in situ hybridization reveal that BdmGC-1 is expressed in Inka cells. Heterologous expression of BdmGC-1 in HEK cells leads to robust increases in cGMP following exposure to low picomolar concentrations of EH. The B-isoform responds only to higher EH concentrations, suggesting different physiological roles of these cyclases. We propose that BdmGC-1 and BdmGC-1B are high- and low-affinity EH receptors, respectively. PMID:19666575

  2. Pan-cancer analyses of the nuclear receptor superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark D.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) act as an integrated conduit for environmental and hormonal signals to govern genomic responses, which relate to cell fate decisions. We review how their integrated actions with each other, shared co-factors and other transcription factors are disrupted in cancer. Steroid hormone nuclear receptors are oncogenic drivers in breast and prostate cancer and blockade of signaling is a major therapeutic goal. By contrast to blockade of receptors, in other cancers enhanced receptor function is attractive, as illustrated initially with targeting of retinoic acid receptors in leukemia. In the post-genomic era large consortia, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas, have developed a remarkable volume of genomic data with which to examine multiple aspects of nuclear receptor status in a pan-cancer manner. Therefore to extend the review of NR function we have also undertaken bioinformatics analyses of NR expression in over 3000 tumors, spread across six different tumor types (bladder, breast, colon, head and neck, liver and prostate). Specifically, to ask how the NR expression was distorted (altered expression, mutation and CNV) we have applied bootstrapping approaches to simulate data for comparison, and also compared these NR findings to 12 other transcription factor families. Nuclear receptors were uniquely and uniformly downregulated across all six tumor types, more than predicted by chance. These approaches also revealed that each tumor type had a specific NR expression profile but these were most similar between breast and prostate cancer. Some NRs were down-regulated in at least five tumor types (e.g. NR3C2/MR and NR5A2/LRH-1)) whereas others were uniquely down-regulated in one tumor (e.g. NR1B3/RARG). The downregulation was not driven by copy number variation or mutation and epigenetic mechanisms maybe responsible for the altered nuclear receptor expression.

  3. Pan-Cancer Analyses of the Nuclear Receptor Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Long

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NR act as an integrated conduit for environmental and hormonal signals to govern genomic responses, which relate to cell fate decisions. We review how their integrated actions with each other, shared co-factors and other transcription factors are disrupted in cancer. Steroid hormone nuclear receptors are oncogenic drivers in breast and prostate cancer and blockade of signaling is a major therapeutic goal. By contrast to blockade of receptors, in other cancers enhanced receptor function is attractive, as illustrated initially with targeting of retinoic acid receptors in leukemia. In the post-genomic era large consortia, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas, have developed a remarkable volume of genomic data with which to examine multiple aspects of nuclear receptor status in a pan-cancer manner. Therefore to extend the review of NR function we have also undertaken bioinformatics analyses of NR expression in over 3000 tumors, spread across six different tumor types (bladder, breast, colon, head and neck, liver and prostate. Specifically, to ask how the NR expression was distorted (altered expression, mutation and CNV we have applied bootstrapping approaches to simulate data for comparison, and also compared these NR findings to 12 other transcription factor families. Nuclear receptors were uniquely and uniformly downregulated across all six tumor types, more than predicted by chance. These approaches also revealed that each tumor type had a specific NR expression profile but these were most similar between breast and prostate cancer. Some NRs were down-regulated in at least five tumor types (e.g., NR3C2/MR and NR5A2/LRH-1 whereas others were uniquely down-regulated in one tumor (e.g., NR1B3/RARG. The downregulation was not driven by copy number variation or mutation and epigenetic mechanisms maybe responsible for the altered nuclear receptor expression.

  4. Advances in Variations of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 Status in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zhang Lili

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and molecular targeted therapy are vital means in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC), whose reasonable and standard applications are of great importance to prolong patients’ survival and improve the quality of life. The expressions of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) present signiifcant differences between primary and metastatic breast cancer. However, these differences may affect the selection of MBC patients for therapeutic strategies and judgment on the prognosis. Hence, the relevant researches on variations of hormone receptors and HER-2 in primary and metastatic breast cancer, discordant causes of ER, PR and HER-2 expression in primary and metastatic lesions and clinical value of biopsy to the metastases are reviewed in the study.

  5. Critical role for thyroid hormone receptor β2 in the regulation of paraventricular thyrotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, E. Dale; Ahima, Rexford S.; Boers, Mary-Ellen; Elmquist, Joel K.; Wondisford, Fredric E.

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3) production is regulated by feedback inhibition of thyrotropin (TSH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) synthesis in the pituitary and hypothalamus when T3 binds to thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) interacting with the promoters of the genes for the TSH subunit and TRH. All of the TR isoforms likely participate in the negative regulation of TSH production in vivo, but the identity of the specific TR isoforms that negatively regulate...

  6. Detection of two growth hormone receptor mRNAs and primary translation products in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, W.C.; Linzer, D I; Talamantes, F

    1989-01-01

    Two mouse growth hormone-receptor primary translation products of Mr 95,900 and 31,800 were identified from in vitro-translated late pregnant mouse liver mRNA. RNA isolated from mouse liver was translated in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system containing [35S]methionine, and the growth hormone receptor primary translation products were identified by immunoprecipitation with anti-mouse growth hormone receptor antiserum followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate/PAGE and fluorography. Detectable amount...

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor-Targeting Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Haixun; Lu, Jie; Hathaway, Helen; Royce, Melanie E.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Miao, Yubin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel radiolabeled gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor-targeting peptides for breast cancer imaging. Three novel 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated GnRH peptides were designed and synthesized. The radiometal chelator DOTA was conjugated to the epsilon or alpha amino group of D-lysine, or the epsilon amino group of L-lysine via an Ahx {aminohexanoic acid} linker to generate DOTA-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH1), DOTA...

  8. 促甲状腺激素受体在甲状腺癌中的表达及其临床作用探讨%Discussion of the Expression of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Thyroid Cancer and Its Clinical Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭红丽; 雷川云

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze and investigate the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in thyroid cancer patients. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on the clinical data of thyroid cancer patients admitted in the Oncology Depart-ment of our hospital from April 2011 to March 2015. And other 30 healthy people with normal thyroid function were selected as the control group. The thyroid tissues of the thyroid cancer patients and control group were stained by HE staining and measured by immunohistochemistry for detecting the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor. Results The results showed that thy-roid stimulating hormone receptor in normal thyroid tissue and the thyroid tissue of thyroid cancer patients expressed, but the latter coloring was shallow, the expression site was located in the base side of the cell membrane. The positive expression rate of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in the normal thyroid tissues was 100% (30/30), significantly higher than 84.84% (28/33) in thyroid tumor patients and 68.75%(22/32) in thyroid cancer patients. And the positive rate of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in thy-roid tumor patients was significantly higher than that in thyroid cancer patients with statistically significant difference ( P<0.05). Conclusion The results suggested that the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in the normal thyroid tissue is high-er, but with the degree of differentiation of the thyroid tissue decreases, the expression decreases significantly, which provides an important reference for the TSH suppression therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients.%目的 分析和探讨甲状腺癌患者体内促甲状腺激素受体表达情况. 方法 对整群选取的2011年4月-2015年3月该院肿瘤科收治的65例甲状腺癌患者临床资料进行回顾性分析,选取30例甲状腺功能正常的健康人作为对照组,对采集的甲状腺组织进行HE染色观

  9. Cell Cycle-dependent Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Is a Mechanism for Variable Hormone SensitivityD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Maruvada, Padma; Dmitrieva, Natalia I.; East-Palmer, Joyce; Yen, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-regulatable transcription factors. Currently, little is known about the expression of TRs or other nuclear hormone receptors during the cell cycle. We thus developed a stable expression system to express green fluorescent protein-TRβ in HeLa cells under tetracycline regulation, and studied TR expression during the cell cycle by laser scanning cytometry. Only ∼9-15% of the nonsynchronized cell population expressed TR because the majority of cells were...

  10. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptor-mediated delivery of mitoxantrone using LHRH analogs modified with PEGylated liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hongfan

    2010-01-01

    Yingna He, Linhua Zhang, Cunxian SongKey Laboratory of Biomedical Material of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, ChinaAbstract: A sterically stabilized, mitoxantrone-loaded liposome, tailored to target luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing cells, was developed to promote the efficiency of intracellular delivery of mitoxantrone through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Liposome...

  11. The liver taxis of receptor mediated lactosaminated human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiography imaging is used to assess liver taxis mechanism of anti-dwarfism drug lactosaminated human growth hormone (L-rhGH). Both L-rhGH and rhGH labelled with 131I are used to study their biodistribution in animals (including rabbits, cocks and rats). The results show that L-rhGH is of specific hepatic targeting property, and the maximum hepatic concentration rate is 76.8%, which is two times of rhGH. Its hepatic binding is receptor mediated

  12. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P.; Mathews, L S; Norstedt, G; Nielsen, J H

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and t...

  13. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas;

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation of...... the GH receptor. Two mutated cDNAs encoding truncated GH receptors, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454, respectively, were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected into the RIN cells. Both receptor mutants were expressed on the cell surface and displayed normal GH binding affinity. Whereas GH-R1......-638 had a molecular mass of about 110 kDa, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454 showed molecular masses of 49 and 80 kDa, respectively. Cells expressing GH-R1-454 internalized GH to a similar extent as cells transfected with the full length receptor and the parent cell line, but GH-R1-294-expressing cells showed a...

  14. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier;

    2013-01-01

    studies that exclusively enrolled patients with CRPC receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ie, testosterone (T) levels #50 ng/dL), this phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of ENZA monotherapy in patients who had never received hormone therapy; presenting with non-castrate T levels ($230 ng....../dL). Methods: This was a 25-wk, open-label, single-arm study of patients with hormone-naïve, histologically confirmed prostate cancer (all stages) requiring hormonal treatment, an ECOG PS score of 0,and a life expectancy .1 y. All patients received ENZA 160 mg/d without concomitment castration. Primary endpoint......Background: Enzalutamide (ENZA) is an oral androgen receptor inhibitor that has been approved in the US and shown to increase overall survival by 4.8 months over a placebo (HR,0.63) in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) previously treated with docetaxel (Scher et...

  15. Antiproliferative effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH antagonist on ovarian cancer cells through the EGFR-Akt pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Jozsef

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH are being developed for the treatment of various human cancers. Methods MTT assay was used to test the proliferation of SKOV3 and CaOV3. The splice variant expression of GHRH receptors was examined by RT-PCR. The expression of protein in signal pathway was examined by Western blotting. siRNA was used to block the effect of EGFR. Results In this study, we investigated the effects of a new GHRH antagonist JMR-132, in ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and CaOV3 expressing splice variant (SV1 of GHRH receptors. MTT assay showed that JMR-132 had strong antiproliferative effects on SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion. JMR-132 also induced the activation and increased cleaved caspase3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner in both cell lines. In addition, JMR-132 treatments decreased significantly the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR level and the phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt, suggesting that JMR-132 inhibits the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells. More importantly, treatment of SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells with 100 nM JMR-132 attenuated proliferation and the antiapoptotic effect induced by EGF in both cell lines. After the knockdown of the expression of EGFR by siRNA, the antiproliferative effect of JMR-132 was abolished in SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the inhibitory effect of the GHRH antagonist JMR-132 on proliferation is due, in part, to an interference with the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

  16. Binding of 125I-human growth hormone to specific receptors in human cultured lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of human growth hormone with human lymphocytes from an established culture (IM-9) was studied using 125I- human growth hormone. The binding of 125I-human growth hormone was rapid; with human growth hormone at 0.1 nM a steady state was observed in 90 min at 300. Bound labeled human growth hormone was dissociated rapidly by addition of excess unlabeled human growth hormone. Binding of 125I-human growth hormone to cultured lymphocytes was relatively insensitive to alterations in the pH and in the concentrations of Ca2+, Mg2+, EDTA. At 800 there was very little degradation of labeled human growth hormone or of the specific receptor sites. Tryptic digestion destroyed the capacity of cells to bind human growth hormone. The IM-9 cells bound all human growth hormone preparations but not unrelated hormones or nonprimate growth hormones. The binding of 125I-human growth hormone was inhibited 10 to 14 percent with 1 to 2 ng per ml of unlabeled human growth hormone and 50 percent with 30 to 40 ng per ml, well within the range of hormone concentrations in vivo. Analysis of steady state data revealed a single order of binding sites with an affinity constant of 1.3 x 109 M-1 and about 4000 binding sites per cell. Numerous human growth hormone preparations were assayed by use of this receptor system as well as by immunoassay and by bioassay in vivo. The po

  17. The thyroid hormone receptors modulate the skin response to retinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura García-Serrano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids play an important role in skin homeostasis and when administered topically cause skin hyperplasia, abnormal epidermal differentiation and inflammation. Thyroidal status in humans also influences skin morphology and function and we have recently shown that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs are required for a normal proliferative response to 12-O-tetradecanolyphorbol-13-acetate (TPA in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have compared the epidermal response of mice lacking the thyroid hormone receptor binding isoforms TRα1 and TRβ to retinoids and TPA. Reduced hyperplasia and a decreased number of proliferating cells in the basal layer in response to 9-cis-RA and TPA were found in the epidermis of TR-deficient mice. Nuclear levels of proteins important for cell proliferation were altered, and expression of keratins 5 and 6 was also reduced, concomitantly with the decreased number of epidermal cell layers. In control mice the retinoid (but not TPA induced parakeratosis and diminished expression of keratin 10 and loricrin, markers of early and terminal epidermal differentiation, respectively. This reduction was more accentuated in the TR deficient animals, whereas they did not present parakeratosis. Therefore, TRs modulate both the proliferative response to retinoids and their inhibitory effects on skin differentiation. Reduced proliferation, which was reversed upon thyroxine treatment, was also found in hypothyroid mice, demonstrating that thyroid hormone binding to TRs is required for the normal response to retinoids. In addition, the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 and the chemotactic proteins S1008A and S1008B were significantly elevated in the skin of TR knock-out mice after TPA or 9-cis-RA treatment and immune cell infiltration was also enhanced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since retinoids are commonly used for the treatment of skin disorders, these results demonstrating that TRs

  18. The Neuroendocrine Functions of the Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpad eDobolyi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand,tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39, is synthesized in only 2 brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control

  19. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Exogenous hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Dreyer, L; Tryggvadottir, L

    1997-01-01

    of the breast and uterine cervix) and beneficial effects (protection against cancers of the ovary and endometrium), indicate that 95 cases of breast cancer and 40 of cervical cancer will be caused by oral contraceptives annually around 2000 in the Nordic countries, which corresponds to 0.6% of all......The well-described influence of several aspects of reproductive life on the risk for cancer in the reproductive organs has raised concern regarding the safety of exogenous hormones, particularly since sex hormones have become one of the most widely used drugs among women in the western world. The...... major areas of application include oral contraception and hormone replacement therapy in women with menopausal symptoms. Since the introduction of oral contraceptives onto the Nordic market in the late 1960s, the number of users has grown steadily, to reach proportions of long-term users among women...

  20. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P;

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected ...

  1. Progesterone receptor action: defining a role in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Andrea R; Hagan, Christy R; Lange, Carol A

    2011-05-01

    The ovarian steroid hormones, estradiol and progesterone, and their nuclear receptors (estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PR]), are involved in breast cancer development. As ER-positive/PR-positive tumors progress, they are likely to become steroid hormone-resistant/independent, yet often retain expression of their steroid receptors. Notably, up to 40% of women with steroid receptor-positive tumors exhibit de novo resistance or eventually fail on estrogen- or ERα-blocking therapies (acquired resistance). Indeed, most of the research on this topic has centered on mechanisms of ER 'escape' from endocrine therapy and the design of better ER-blocking strategies; signaling pathways that mediate endocrine (i.e., anti-estrogen) resistance are also excellent therapeutic targets. However, serious consideration of PR isoforms as important drivers of early breast cancer progression and ER modulators is timely and significant. Indeed, progress has been hindered by ER-centric experimental approaches. This article will focus on defining a role for PR in breast cancer with hopes of providing a refreshing PR-focused perspective. PMID:21857868

  2. Abiraterone acetate for prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2011-01-01

    @@ Therapies targeting the androgen receptor (AR) axis have constituted the Holy Grail in the management of advanced prostate cancer for seven decades.1 These hormonal therapies have traditionally taken two main forms: those that suppress gonadal androgen synthesis (e.g.,the gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists/antagonists,such as leuprolide),and those that inhibit the AR directly (e.g.,the anti-androgens,such asbicalutamide).However,although the vast majority of patients with prostate cancer initially respond favorably to androgen-ablative therapies (manifested by tumor regressions and symptomatic improvements),all patients will eventually develop further disease progression after a median of 18-24 months.This transformed disease state,known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),is invariably fatal.

  3. The Role of the Enterohepatic Circulation of Bile Salts and Nuclear Hormone Receptors in the Regulation of Cholesterol Homeostasis: Bile Salts as Ligands for Nuclear Hormone Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Redinger, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    The coordinated effect of lipid activated nuclear hormone receptors; liver X receptor (LXR), bound by oxysterol ligands and farnesoid X receptor (FXR), bound by bile acid ligands, act as genetic transcription factors to cause feed-forward cholesterol catabolism to bile acids and feedback repression of bile acid synthesis, respectively. It is the coordinated action of LXR and FXR, each dimerized to retinoid X receptor, that signal nuclear DNA response elements to encode proteins that prevent e...

  4. Birth weight, breast cancer and the potential mediating hormonal environment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bukowski, Radek

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that woman\\'s risk of breast cancer in later life is associated with her infants birth weights. The objective of this study was to determine if this association is independent of breast cancer risk factors, mother\\'s own birth weight and to evaluate association between infants birth weight and hormonal environment during pregnancy. Independent association would have implications for understanding the mechanism, but also for prediction and prevention of breast cancer.

  5. Evidence for association of the cloned liver growth hormone receptor with a tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Uhler, M D; Billestrup, N;

    1992-01-01

    The ability of the cloned liver growth hormone (GH) receptor, when expressed in mammalian cell lines, to copurify with tyrosine kinase activity and be tyrosyl phosphorylated was examined. 125I-human growth hormone-GH receptor complexes isolated from COS-7 cells transiently expressing high levels...

  6. Management of Hormone-Sensitive and Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago

    1998-11-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is a significant health problem in the United States and is the focus of increasing attention in our society. With the aging of the US population, it is likely that prostate cancer will continue to grow in importance. The options for systemic therapy of metastatic prostate cancer should be familiar to physicians, including nonspecialists, whose patients seek their advice and counsel. METHODS: Past and recent literature was surveyed to provide an understanding of the systemic treatment of advanced prostate cancer. The author presents a review of the systemic treatment of metastatic prostate cancer in different clinical circumstances and addresses the current status of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer. RESULTS: Early androgen deprivation used over prolonged periods appears to be modestly superior to delayed androgen deprivation with a small potential survival advantage and an advantage in delaying disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. Patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer may benefit from secondary hormonal therapy (eg, adrenal enzyme inhibitors, antiandrogens, glucocorticoids) and chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The choices of therapy for metastatic prostate cancer depend on individual patient preference. Patients and physicians should be aware of the possible side effects associated with the therapeutics options for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:10761100

  7. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  8. Rapid signaling at the plasma membrane by a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Storey, Nina M.; Gentile, Saverio; Ullah, Hemayet; Russo, Angela; Muessel, Michelle; Erxleben, Christian; Armstrong, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Many nuclear hormones have physiological effects that are too rapid to be explained by changes in gene expression and are often attributed to unidentified or novel G protein-coupled receptors. Thyroid hormone is essential for normal human brain development, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for its effects remain to be identified. Here, we present direct molecular evidence for potassium channel stimulation in a rat pituitary cell line (GH4C1) by a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone, ...

  9. Hormone replacement therapy use dramatically increases breast oestrogen receptor expression in obese postmenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by postmenopausal women increases the risk of breast cancer. In this study, oestrogen receptor (ER)-α expression is examined using standard immunoperoxidase technique. Normal breast samples of 11 Australian postmenopausal women have been included in the ER-α study; the result showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.80) between ER-α expression in normal breast epithelial cells and body mass index (BMI) in normal women who currently use HRT. This finding confirms that the possibility of increased risk of breast cancer associated with increased ER-α expression in normal breast epithelial cells, in turn associated with high BMI and the use of HRT

  10. Analysis of estrogen receptor transcriptional enhancement by a nuclear hormone receptor coactivator.

    OpenAIRE

    McInerney, E M; Tsai, M J; O'Malley, B W; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    1996-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER), a member of a large superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of estrogen-responsive genes. The ER, in common with other members of this superfamily, contains two transcription activation functions (AFs)--one located in the amino-terminal region (AF-1) and the second located in the carboxyl-terminal region (AF-2). In most cell contexts, the synergistic activity of AF-1 and AF-2 is required for...

  11. Retinoid X Receptor Regulates Nur77/Thyroid Hormone Receptor 3-Dependent Apoptosis by Modulating Its Nuclear Export and Mitochondrial Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xihua; Liu, Wen; Lin, Feng; Li, Hui; Kolluri, Siva Kumar; Lin, Bingzhen; Han, Young-Hoon; Dawson, Marcia I.; Zhang, Xiao-kun

    2004-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) plays a central role in the regulation of intracellular receptor signaling pathways by acting as a ubiquitous heterodimerization partner of many nuclear receptors, including the orphan receptor Nur77 (also known as thyroid hormone receptor 3 or NGFI-B), which translocates from the nucleus to mitochondria, where it interacts with Bcl-2 to induce apoptosis. Here, we report that RXRα is required for nuclear export and mitochondrial targeting of Nur77 through their uniqu...

  12. Thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor extracellular domain chimeras as probes for thyrotropin receptor function.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Y; Wadsworth, H L; Chazenbalk, G D; Russo, D.; Seto, P; Rapoport, B

    1991-01-01

    To define the sites in the extracellular domain of the human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor that are involved in TSH binding and signal transduction we constructed chimeric thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin (TSH-LH/CG) receptors. The extracellular domain of the human TSH receptor was divided into five regions that were replaced, either singly or in various combinations, with homologous regions of the rat LH/CG receptor. The chimeric receptors were stably expressed in Chinese ...

  13. Effects of plasmid-mediated growth hormone-releasing hormone in severely debilitated dogs with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Hahn, Kevin A; King, Glen K; Cummings, Kathleen K; Carpenter, Robert H

    2002-12-01

    Cachexia is a common manifestation of late stage malignancy and is characterized by anemia, anorexia, muscle wasting, loss of adipose tissue, and fatigue. Although cachexia is disabling and can diminish the life expectancy of cancer patients, there are still no effective therapies for this condition. We have examined the feasibility of using a myogenic plasmid to express growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in severely debilitated companion dogs with naturally occurring tumors. At a median of 16 days after intramuscular delivery of the plasmid, serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a measure of GHRH activity, were increased in 12 of 16 dogs (P intramuscular injection of a GHRH-expressing plasmid is both safe and capable of stimulating the release of growth hormone and IGF-I in large animals. The observed anabolic responses to a single dose of this therapy might be beneficial in patients with cancer-associated anemia and cachexia. PMID:12498779

  14. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-08-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit. Biochemical abnormalities include low/low-normal T4 and high/high-normal T3 concentrations, a subnormal T4/T3 ratio, variably reduced reverse T3, raised muscle creatine kinase and mild anaemia. The disorder is mediated by heterozygous, loss-of-function, mutations involving either TRα1 alone or both TRα1 and α2, with no discernible phenotype attributable to defective α2. Whole exome sequencing and diagnostic biomarkers may enable greater ascertainment of RTHα, which is important as thyroxine therapy reverses some metabolic abnormalities and improves growth, constipation, dyspraxia and wellbeing. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of RTHα and its optimal management remain to be elucidated. PMID:26303090

  15. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Exogenous hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Dreyer, L; Tryggvadottir, L

    1997-01-01

    of the breast and uterine cervix) and beneficial effects (protection against cancers of the ovary and endometrium), indicate that 95 cases of breast cancer and 40 of cervical cancer will be caused by oral contraceptives annually around 2000 in the Nordic countries, which corresponds to 0.6% of all......The well-described influence of several aspects of reproductive life on the risk for cancer in the reproductive organs has raised concern regarding the safety of exogenous hormones, particularly since sex hormones have become one of the most widely used drugs among women in the western world. The...... aged 15-45 years in 1985 ranging between 6% (Norway) and 19% (Sweden) and proportions of current users in 1994 ranging between 20% (Norway) and 28% (Sweden). Such data on the current and long-term use of oral contraceptives by the female populations, linked with relative estimates of adverse (cancers...

  16. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  17. Role of the extracellular and intracellular loops of follicle stimulating hormone receptor in its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antara A Banerjee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR is a leucine rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors, which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR. Its cognate ligand, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH binds to and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD consisting of leucine rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD. The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs and three intracellular loops (ILs and ends in a short cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the extracellular domain (ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone-receptor internalization, recycling of hormone receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function.

  18. [Fulvestrant (Faslodex®) for hormone sensitive breast cancer. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagykálnai, Tamás; Landherr, László; Laczó, Ibolya; Pikó, Béla

    2015-09-01

    Endocrine agents are well established standards of care in hormone-sensitive postmenopausal breast cancer. The pure estrogen receptor antagonist (down-regulator) fulvestrant after binding to the ER induces its conformational change which disrupts ER signal and accelerates ER degradation. Fulvestrant is devoid of partial agonist activity. In unselected patients there was no difference in TTP between "standard dose" fulvestrant and aromatase inhibitors, but in first-line treatment of advanced breast cancer the elevated dose of fulvestrant may delay progression and may extend the overall survival compared with aromatase inhibitors. PMID:26339914

  19. Intercellular interactions and progression of hormonal resistance of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Semina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study is the analysis of the role of cell-cell interactions in the formation of the tumor cell resistance to hormonal drugs. About 70 % of breast tumors contain estrogen receptor (ER, a key molecular target for hormone (endocrine therapy. However, the efficiency of endocrine therapy of breast cancer is limited by the development of hormone resistance which leads to progression of tumor cells to hormone-independent phenotype, increase in tumor malignancy and worse prognosis. Hormonal independence may be accompanied with the loss of the receptors, as well as with the another mechanisms including ligand-independent receptor activation, disbalance between receptor activators and repressors, stimulation of hormone-independent pathways. It is less known about the role of the intercellular interactions in the progression of hormonal resistance. Several studies demonstrate the involvement of cell junctions in the mediating of cell response to (anti estrogens, however the significance of cell-cell contacts in the formation of hormonal resistance still not clear. Here we have hypothesized that the formation of the hormone resistance of tumors may be based, at least in part, on the transferring of the resistant phenotype from the resistant to hormone-sensitive cells – as a result of the secretion of the specific factors acting in the paracrine manner or via the direct cell-cell contacts. Using the estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells MCF-7 and the resistant subline MCF-7 / T developed by long-term cultivation of MCF-7 cells in the presence of antiestrogen tamoxifen, we investigated the possible changes in the hormonal sensitivity of these cells caused by the co-cultivation in vitro. To discern the cell cultures, the MCF-7 / T cells were previously transfected with the plasmid containing the gene of the green fluorescent protein (GFP, and GFP-positive hormone-resistant subline MCF-7 / T / GFP+ was developed. We showed that the co

  20. Advances in breast cancer treatment and prevention: preclinical studies on aromatase inhibitors and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs)

    OpenAIRE

    Schiff, Rachel; Chamness, Gary C.; Brown, Powel H.

    2003-01-01

    Intensive basic and clinical research over the past 20 years has yielded crucial molecular understanding into how estrogen and the estrogen receptor act to regulate breast cancer and has led to the development of more effective, less toxic, and safer hormonal therapy agents for breast cancer management and prevention. Selective potent aromatase inhibitors are now challenging the hitherto gold standard of hormonal therapy, the selective estrogen-receptor modulator tamoxifen. Furthermore, new s...

  1. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    OpenAIRE

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A.; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexe...

  2. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S;

    2010-01-01

    Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer diagn...

  3. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; McGuffog, Lesley; Tarrell, Robert; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Morrison, Jonathan; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Lesnick, Timothy; Ghoussaini, Maya; Barrowdale, Daniel; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Chu, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Giraud, Sophie; Lasset, Christine; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Goldgar, David E.; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Blum, Joanne L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Blank, Stephanie V.; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Gaudet, Mia M.; Altshuler, David; Guiducci, Candace; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Singer, Christian F.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Garber, Judy; Ramus, Susan J.; Gayther, Simon A.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Stephen; Szabo, Csilla I.; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Caligo, Maria A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Tung, Nadine; Toland, Amanda E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olofunmilayo; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Miron, Penelope; Gerty, Sue M.; Tapper, William; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, George; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Lambrechts, Diether; Paridaens, Robert; Ruediger, Thomas; Foersti, Asta; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkaes, Katri; Diasio, Robert B.; Lee, Adam M.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette; Vachon, Celine; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Dunning, Alison; Pharoah, Paul P. D.; Offit, Kenneth; Pankratz, V. Shane; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2010-01-01

    Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer diagnosi

  4. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  5. CHHBP: a newly identified receptor of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Tian, Jin-Ze; Zhuang, Cui-Heng; Zhang, Yi-Chen; Geng, Xu-Yun; Zhu, Li-Na; Sun, Jin-Sheng

    2016-04-15

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is a neurohormone found only in arthropods that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemolymph glucose levels, molting and stress responses. Although it was determined that a membrane guanylyl cyclase (GC) acts as the CHH receptor in the Y-organ during ecdysteroidogenesis, the identity of the CHH receptor in the hepatopancreas has not been established. In this study, we identified CHH binding protein (CHHBP), as a potential receptor by screening the annotated unigenes from the transcriptome of ITALIC! Eriocheir sinensis, after removal of the eyestalk. Analysis of the binding affinity between CHH and CHHBP provided direct evidence that CHH interacts with CHHBP in a specific binding mode. Subsequent analysis showed that CHHBP is expressed primarily in the hepatopancreas where it localizes to the cell membrane. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed that ITALIC! CHHBPtranscript levels gradually increase in the hepatopancreas following eyestalk ablation. RNAi-mediated suppression of ITALIC! CHHBPexpression resulted in decreased glucose levels. Furthermore, the reduction of blood glucose induced by ITALIC! CHHBPRNAi reached the same level as that observed in the eyestalk ablation group, suggesting that CHHBP is involved in glucose metabolism regulated by CHH. In addition, compared with the control group, injection of CHH was unable to rescue the decreased glucose levels in ITALIC! CHHBPRNAi crabs. CHH induced transport of 2-NBDG to the outside of cells, with indispensable assistance from CHHBP. Taken together, these findings suggest that CHHBP acts as one type of the primary signal processor of CHH-mediated regulation of cellular glucose metabolism. PMID:26896539

  6. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Tied to Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nguyen said his team accounted for some other factors that could affect depression risk -- including the severity of a man's cancer, ... Overall, 43 percent underwent hormone therapy. Once other factors were ... the risk of depression, the investigators found. While all of the study ...

  7. Hormone-replacement therapy influences gene expression profiles and is associated with breast-cancer prognosis: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Skoog Lambert; Shaw Peter; Pawitan Yudi; Nordgren Hans; Miller Lance D; Liu Edison T; Lin Chin-Yo; Huang Fei; Bjöhle Judith; Ploner Alexander; Hall Per; Smeds Johanna; Wedrén Sara; Öhd John; Bergh Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) increases breast-cancer risk. The influence of HRT on the biology of the primary tumor, however, is not well understood. Methods We obtained breast-cancer gene expression profiles using Affymetrix human genome U133A arrays. We examined the relationship between HRT-regulated gene profiles, tumor characteristics, and recurrence-free survival in 72 postmenopausal women. Results HRT use in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) pr...

  8. Exploratory Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Response-Guided Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Hormone Positive Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Miquel-Cases; Retèl, Valesca P; Bianca Lederer; Gunter von Minckwitz; Steuten, Lotte M.G.; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Guiding response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (guided-NACT) allows for an adaptative treatment approach likely to improve breast cancer survival. In this study, our primary aim is to explore the expected cost-effectiveness of guided-NACT using as a case study the first randomized controlled trial that demonstrated effectiveness (GeparTrio trial). Materials and Methods As effectiveness was shown in hormone-receptor positive (HR+) early breast cancers (EBC), our decision model compared t...

  9. Hormonal contraception and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cibula, D; Gompel, A; Mueck, A O;

    2010-01-01

    Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance.......Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance....

  10. Genomic organization of the human thyroid hormone receptor alpha (c-erbA-1) gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, V; Begue, A; Henry-Duthoit, C; Joubel, A; P. Martin; Stehelin, D.; Saule, S.

    1991-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor alpha (THRA or c-erbA-1) gene belongs to a family of genes which encode nuclear receptors for various hydrophobic ligands such as steroids, vitamin D, retinoic acid and thyroid hormones. These receptors are composed of several domains important for hormone-binding, DNA-binding, dimerization and activation of transcription. We show here that the human THRA gene is organized in 10 exons distributed along 27 kbp of genomic DNA on chromosome 17. The position of the in...

  11. Alien, a Highly Conserved Protein with Characteristics of a Corepressor for Members of the Nuclear Hormone Receptor Superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Dressel, Uwe; Thormeyer, Dorit; Altincicek, Boran; Paululat, Achim; Eggert, Martin; Schneider, Sandra; Tenbaum, Stephan P.; Renkawitz, Rainer; Baniahmad, Aria

    1999-01-01

    Some members of nuclear hormone receptors, such as the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), silence gene expression in the absence of the hormone. Corepressors, which bind to the receptor’s silencing domain, are involved in this repression. Hormone binding leads to dissociation of corepressors and binding of coactivators, which in turn mediate gene activation. Here, we describe the characteristics of Alien, a novel corepressor. Alien interacts with TR only in the absence of hormone. Addition of thy...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against rabbit mammary prolactin receptors. Specific antibodies to the hormone binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three monoclonal antibodies (M110, A82, and A917) were obtained by fusing myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice immunized with partially purified rabbit mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptors. All 3 antibodies were capable of complete inhibition of 125I-ovine prolactin (oPRL) binding to rabbit mammary PRL receptors in either particulate or soluble form. M110 showed slightly greater potency than oPRL in competing for 125I-oPRL binding. These antibodies also inhibited PRL binding to microsomal fractions from rabbit liver, kidney, adrenal, ovary, and pig mammary gland, although A82 showed poor inhibition in pig mammary gland. There was no cross-reaction of any of the 3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the other species tested: human (T-47D breast cancer cells) and rat (liver, ovary). In order to confirm that these antibodies are specific to the binding domain, antibodies were purified, iodinated, and binding characteristics were investigated. 125I-M110 and 125I-A82 binding was completely inhibited by lactogenic hormones, whereas nonlactogenic hormones did not cross-react. Competition of 125I-M110 by oPRL was comparable to that of 125I-oPRL by unlabeled oPRL, while 125I-A917 binding was only partially competed (30-60%) by lactogenic hormones. Tissue and species specificity of labeled antibody binding paralleled results of binding inhibition experiments using 125I-oPRL. In addition, A82 and A917 completely inhibited 125I-M110 binding. In contrast, 125I-A82 binding was stimulated by A917 and 125I-A917 binding was stimulated by A82

  13. Hormonal Contraception and Risk of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibula D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance. Methods: In this review, we included all cohort and case-control studies published in English up to December 2008. They were identified through a search of the literature using Pubmed and EMBASE. Results: Data about breast cancer risk indicate a slightly increased risk among current users of oral contraceptives (OC, an effect which disappears 5–10 years after stopping. Combined OC have a significant protective effect on the risk of ovarian cancer, and the protection increases with duration of use (relative risk decreased by 20 % for each 5 years of use. The significant risk reduction has been confirmed for BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. The risk of endometrial cancer is reduced by about 50 % in ever users, a benefit which is greater with increasing duration of use. An association has been found between increased risk of cervical cancer and long-term OC use. Current OC use has been associated with an excess risk of benign liver tumours and a modest increased risk of liver cancer. None of large prospective cohort studies with prolonged follow-up has observed an increased overall risk of cancer incidence or mortality among ever users of OC, indeed several have suggested important long-term benefits. Specifically, protective effect of OC can be used as chemoprevention in young women who are BRCA mutation carriers. Conclusions: Women wishing to use combined OC can be reassured that their decision is unlikely to place them at higher risk of developing cancer.

  14. New hormonal approaches to the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, J T; Allegra, J C

    1991-01-01

    From this data we can draw several conclusions. Although many new hormonal agents have been developed, there has not been significant improvement in tumor response to single agents over the past several decades. By applying knowledge of tumor ER and PR patient populations can be selected which will have a higher response rate to a given hormonal agent. The approach of combining chemotherapy and hormonal therapy does not appear to significantly alter the course of the disease. Sequential use of Tamoxifen, Premarin, and chemotherapy has been shown in cell lines and animal models to synchronize cells thus increasing the efficacy of chemotherapy. Clinical trials of this synchronization generally show higher response rates including significantly higher CR rates than chemotherapy alone. This approach appears promising and is undergoing further trials. LHRH agonists and tamoxifen are effective in premenopausal women with receptor positive tumors and may replace surgical ablative therapy. Aminoglutethimide is gaining wider acceptance as second-line therapy in postmenopausal ER-positive patients. The new agent 4-OHA may be as effective as AG but with fewer side effects. Toremifine a new antiestrogen and RU486 a new antiprogesterone are undergoing trials. While these new agents appear promising with fewer side effects or greater specificity of action, with the exception of sequential hormone priming/chemotherapy they represent 'the same old approach'. By this we mean manipulation of the hormonal environment of the cell in a continuous fashion acting via the estrogen receptor mechanism to achieve tumor regression. While certain new agents may be more tolerable, it is unlikely that a 'break through' will occur with this approach. The problem is the emergence of cells resistant to hormonal therapy. This occurs either through proliferation of a preexisting resistant clone or development under selective pressure of resistant tumors. Some but not all of these resistant clones

  15. Circulating Thyroxine, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, and Hypothyroid Status and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mondul, Alison M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Tracey Bosworth; Remaley, Alan T.; Jarmo Virtamo; Demetrius Albanes

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid hormones may influence risk of cancer through their role in cell differentiation, growth, and metabolism. One study of circulating thyroid hormones supports this hypothesis with respect to prostate cancer. We undertook a prospective analysis of thyroid hormones and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. METHODS: Within the ATBC Study, a randomized controlled trial of α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplements and cancer inc...

  16. Predicting Response to Hormonal Therapy and Survival in Men with Hormone Sensitive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Grivas, Petros D; Robins, Diane M.; Hussain, Maha

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the cornerstone of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. Despite several decades of clinical experience with this therapy there are no standard predictive biomarkers for response. Although several candidate genetic, hormonal, inflammatory, biochemical, metabolic biomarkers have been suggested as potential predictors of response and outcome, none has been prospectively validated nor has proven clinical utility to date. There is significant heterogeneity in the d...

  17. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; García-Serrano, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesús M.; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associat...

  18. Hormones and breast and endometrial cancers: preventive strategies and future research.

    OpenAIRE

    Hulka, B S; Brinton, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    A number of hormonal approaches for prevention of endometrial and breast cancers have been proposed. Because of the hormonal responsiveness of both tumors, much attention has focused on effects of exogenous hormone use. Although estrogens in hormone replacement therapy increase the risk of endometrial cancer, the disease is substantially reduced by long-term use of oral contraceptives. The issues with breast cancer are more complex, mainly because of a variety of unresolved effects. Long-term...

  19. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids

  20. The Influence of Hormonal Factors on the Risk of Developing Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Esther; Travier, Noémie; Waterboer, Tim; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Pawlita, Michael; Pala, Valeria; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Margall, Núria; Dillner, Joakim; Gram, Inger T; Tjønneland, Anne; Munk, Christian; Palli, Domenico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Mesrine, Sylvie; Fournier, Agnès; Fortner, Renée T; Ose, Jennifer; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Orfanos, Philippos; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Polidoro, Silvia; Mattiello, Amalia; Lund, Eiliv; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Quirós, J Ramón; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ekström, Johanna; Lindquist, David; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Riboli, Elio; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In addition to HPV, high parity and hormonal contraceptives have been associated with cervical cancer (CC). However, most of the evidence comes from retrospective case-control studies. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate associations between hormonal factors and risk of...... developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3)/carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC). METHODS AND FINDINGS: We followed a cohort of 308,036 women recruited in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study. At enrollment, participants.......7). CONCLUSIONS: Even though HPV is the necessary cause of CC, our results suggest that several hormonal factors are risk factors for cervical carcinogenesis. Adherence to current cervical cancer screening guidelines should minimize the increased risk of CC associated with these hormonal risk factors....

  1. Detection of thyroid hormone receptor disruptors by a novel stable in vitro reporter gene assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, de J.; Cano, P.; Craig-Veit, C.; Goodson, M.L.; Furlow, J.D.; Murk, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    A stable luciferase reporter gene assay was developed based on the thyroid hormone responsive rat pituitary tumor GH3 cell line that constitutively expresses both thyroid hormone receptor isoforms. Stable transfection of the pGL4CP-SV40-2xtaDR4 construct into the GH3 cells resulted in a highly sensi

  2. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the diapause hormone receptor in the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diapause hormone (DH) in the heliothine moth has shown its activity in termination of pupal diapause, while the orthology in the silkworm is known to induce embryonic diapause. In the current study, we cloned the diapause hormone receptor from the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (HzDHr) and tested ...

  3. Expression of Growth Hormone Receptors by Lymphocyte subpopulations in the Human tonsil

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier Thellin; Bernard Coumans; Willy Zorzi; Ross Barnard; Georges Hennen; Ernst Heinen; Ahmed Igout

    1998-01-01

    The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the receptors, in combination with phenotype markers. Unlike T cells, tonsillar B cells constitutively express the hGH-N receptor. Quiescent cells separated from activated cells by Percoll-gradient centrifugation bear fewer receptors than activated ones. Activated T cells express hGH-N-R, but the typ...

  4. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  5. (-) Arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-11-24

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (-) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  6. EVALUATION OF STEROID HORMONES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Bennett; Retnagowri Rajandram; Keng Lim Ng; Gobe, Glenda C

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a...

  7. Proteolytic activity of the purified hormone-binding subunit in the estrogen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Molinari, A M; Abbondanza, C; Armetta, I.; Medici, N; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Nigro, V; Puca, G A

    1991-01-01

    The hormone-binding subunit of the calf uterus estradiol receptor was purified as a hormone-free molecule. Immunoaffinity chromatography with a specific monoclonal antibody was used as the final step. The purified subunit was specifically labeled by radioactive diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled amino acid was serine. The purified receptor was able to release the fluorogenic or chromogenic group from synthetic peptides containing phenylalanine at the carboxyl...

  8. Signaling by Tyrosine Kinases Negatively Regulates the Interaction between Transcription Factors and SMRT (Silencing Mediator of Retinoic Acid and Thyroid Hormone Receptor) Corepressor

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Suk-Hyun; Wong, Chi-Wai; Privalsky, Martin L.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors that bind to specific sites on DNA and modulate the expression of adjacent target genes. Many nuclear hormone receptors display bimodal transcriptional properties; thyroid hormone receptors, for example, typically repress target gene expression in the absence of hormone, but activate target gene expression in the presence of hormone. The ability to repress is closely linked to the ability of the apo-receptor to physically b...

  9. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kitagishi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer.

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor and Vitamin D Receptor Signaling Pathways in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Satoru, E-mail: smatsuda@cc.nara-wu.ac.jp; Kitagishi, Yasuko [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women’s University, Kita-Uoya Nishimachi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)

    2013-10-21

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, which respond to specific ligands such as polyunsaturated fatty acids by altering gene expression. Three subtypes of this receptor have been discovered, each evolving to achieve different biological functions. Like other nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of PPARs is affected not only by ligand-stimulation, but also by cross-talk with other molecules. For example, both PPARs and the RXRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that coordinately regulate gene expression. In addition, PPARs and vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for cellular functions including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. Interaction of the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways has been shown at the level of molecular cross-regulation of their transcription factor. A variety of ligands influencing the PPARs and VDR signaling pathways have been shown to reveal chemopreventive potential by mediating tumor suppressive activities in human cancers. Use of these compounds may represent a potential novel strategy to prevent cancers. This review summarizes the roles of the PPARs and the VDR in pathogenesis and progression of cancer.

  13. Steroid hormone secretion in inflammatory breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illera, Juan Carlos; Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J; Monsalve, Beatriz; Illera, Maria J; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Silvan, Gema

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) is a special type of breast cancer with a poor survival rate. Though several IBC cell lines have been established, recently a first IMC cell line was established. The aims of this study were: (1) to validate a highly sensitive, reliable, accurate and direct amplified enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure several cell-secreted steroid hormones: progesterone (P4), androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T), 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone sulfate (SO4E1) in the culture medium. (2) To assess whether hormone production profile by IPC-366 cells validates the IMC model for human IBC. We validated a non-competitive amplified EIA for inflammatory breast cancer cell lines based on the results of accuracy, precision, sensitivity and parallelism. The low detection limits of the technique were: P4=13.2 pg/well, A4=2.3 pg/well, T=11.4 pg/well, E2=1.9 pg/well and SO4E1=4.5 pg/well. Intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variation percentages were 90%. In all hormones studied SUM149 have higher levels (1.4 times, but not significant) than IPC-366, and the correlation index between SUM149 and IPC-366 concentrations were >97%. We can coclude that cells of both cell lines, IPC-366 and SUM149, are capable to produce steroid hormone in culture media. The presented EIA methodology is very valuable for the detection of steroid production in culture media and could be used in hormone regulation studies and therapeutic agents in cell lines of inflammatory and non-inflammatory mammary carcinoma or other cancer cell lines in preclinical studies. PMID:26495931

  14. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  15. Effect of endothelin-1 on cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human hormone refractory prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Qi; Jia, Rui-Peng; Lin, Jianzhong; Xu, Lu-Wei; Wang, Zi-Zheng; Li, Wen-Cheng; WANG, SHU-KUI

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the effects and possible mechanisms of recombinant human endothelin (ET)-1 on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in human hormone refractory prostate cancer PC3 cells. PC3 cells were treated with 100 nmol/l ET-1 for the indicated times (3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 h) and concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nmol/l) for 24 h. Moreover, 100 nmol/l ET-1 was used to treat PC3 cells alone or in combination with endothelin A receptor (ETAR) antagonist BQ123 (1 μmol/l), endoth...

  16. Endocrine therapy for hormone treatment-naïve advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Miguel; Lopez-Tarruella, Sara; Gilarranz, Yolanda Jerez

    2016-08-01

    A proportion of patients with hormone receptor-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer will not have received prior endocrine therapy. However, there are limited clinical data specifically in these patients. We conducted a review of randomized phase II and III clinical studies of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, palbociclib, and fulvestrant to determine the evidence base supporting use of specific endocrine therapies in this patient population. From our findings, there is a paucity of clinical studies in patients with endocrine therapy-naïve disease; however, it appears that first-line treatment effects are consistent between patients who have and have not received prior endocrine treatment. PMID:27326977

  17. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  18. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  19. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  20. Localization and synthesis of the hormone-binding regions of the human thyrotropin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Atassi, M Z; Manshouri, T; Sakata, S.

    1991-01-01

    Two regions of human thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor (TSHR) (residues 12-44 and 308-364) were selected on the basis that they exhibit no sequence resemblance to luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor. Five synthetic overlapping peptides (12-30, 24-44, 308-328, 324-344, and 339-364) were studied for their ability to bind 125I-labeled human TSH (hTSH), its isolated alpha and beta subunits, bovine TSH, ovine TSH, human luteinizing hormone, and human follicle-...

  1. Management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Brandon; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    In 2014, prostate cancer will affect roughly 15 % of American men during their lifetimes with about 230,000 new cases and 29,000 deaths per year. If required, most can be treated with curative surgery or radiotherapy. Upon relapse, androgen deprivation therapy (intermittent or continuous) is the cornerstone of treatment for hormone-sensitive disease. Response is variable and treatment is associated with a significant risk of toxicity. Recently, significant advances in survival have been demonstrated with chemohormonal therapy in men with high-volume disease. In addition, new findings have informed the approach to preventing bone complications in patients on therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Devising clinical prediction tools and biomarkers is needed to select patients most likely to benefit from certain therapies and allow for a personalized approach. PMID:25677237

  2. Update in palliative management of hormone refractory cancer of prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pratipal; Srivastava, Aneesh

    2007-01-01

    Hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is an incurable disease and as in the pressure sensitive adhesive era the median survival of patients is increasing, these men increasingly develop symptomatic problems as a result of advanced local and or metastatic disease during their progression to death. Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to improve survival in this group of patients with use of chemotherapy which reinforces the need of better options in palliative care. We discus th...

  3. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 Enhances the Growth Hormone Receptor Expression in Tendon Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon.

  4. Dietary acrylamide intake and estrogen and progesterone receptor-defined postmenopausal breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Grete S; Hogervorst, Janneke G F; Schouten, Leo J;

    2010-01-01

    breast cancer cases were ascertained, with hormone receptor status information for 43%. Cox proportional hazards analysis was applied to determine hazard ratios in quintiles of dietary acrylamide intake stratifying on estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) and smoking status. No...... study showed some indications of a positive association between dietary acrylamide intake and receptor-positive breast cancer risk in postmenopausal never-smoking women. Further studies are needed to confirm or refute our observations....... risk of postmenopausal breast cancer stratified by estrogen and progesterone receptor status. This study was embedded within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, which was initiated in 1986 enrolling 62,573 women aged 55-69 years at baseline. After 13.3 years of follow-up, 2225 incident...

  5. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 1. Immunonaffinity purification of transformed receptors and production of monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), designated PR-6, produced against chick oviduct progesterone receptors cross-reacts with the M/sub r/ 120,000 human B receptors. An immunomatrix prepared with PR-6 was used to purify progesterone receptors (PR) from T47D human breast cancer cells. Single-step immunoaffinity chromatography results in enrichment of B receptors (identified by immunoblot with PR-6 and by photoaffinity labeling with [3H]promegestone) to a specific activity of 1915 pmol/mg of protein (or 23% purity) and with 27% yield. Purity and yields as judged by gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of the B protein were approximately 1.7-fold higher due to partial loss in hormone binding activity at the elution step. B receptors purified under these conditions are transformed and biologically active. They were maintained as undergraded 120-kDa doublets and retained both hormone and DNA binding activities. These purified B receptors were used as immunogen for production of four monoclonal antibodies against human PR. Three of the MAbs, designated as B-30 (IgG1), B-64 (IgG1), and B-11 (IgM), are specific for B receptors. The fourth MAb, A/B-52 (IgG1), reacts with both A and B receptors. The IgG MAbs are monospecific for human PR since they recognize and absorb native receptor-hormone complexes, displace the sedimentation of 4S receptors on salt containing sucrose gradients, and, by immunoblot assay of crude T47D cytosol, react only with receptor polypeptides. Although mice were injected with B receptors only, production of A/B-52 which recognized both A and B receptors provides evidence that these two proteins share regions of structural homology

  6. Steroid hormone receptors in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, B A; Nurshireen, A; Rashidah, M; Zainal, B Y; Roslan, B A; Mahamooth, Z

    1990-06-01

    One hundred and six prostatic tissue samples obtained from transurethral resection were analysed for androgen and estrogen receptors. In 62 of these, progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were also assayed. Steroid receptors were assayed using single saturation dose 3H-labelled ligand assays. Ninety percent of the 97 prostatic hyperplasia tissues and six of the nine prostatic carcinoma tissues were positive for androgen receptors. Estrogen receptors were only present in 19% and 33% respectively. Progesterone receptors were present in 70% of the tissues, but glucocorticoid receptors were present in only 16% of prostatic hyperplasia and none in prostatic carcinoma. PMID:1725553

  7. Steroid hormone synthetic pathways in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2013-09-01

    While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) since the seminal recognition of the disease as androgen-dependent by Huggins and Hodges in 1941, therapy is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) over a period of about 18 months, with an ensuing median survival of 1 to 2 years. Importantly, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment. Castration resistant tumors are characterized by elevated tumor androgens that are well within the range capable of activating the AR and AR-mediated gene expression, and by steroid enzyme alterations which may potentiate de novo androgen synthesis or utilization of circulating adrenal androgens. The dependence of CRPC on intratumoral androgen metabolism has been modeled in vitro and in vivo, and residual intratumoral androgens are implicated in nearly every mechanism by which AR-mediated signaling promotes castration-resistant disease. These observations suggest that tissue based alterations in steroid metabolism contribute to the development of CRPC and underscore these metabolic pathways as critical targets of therapy. Herein, we review the accumulated body of evidence which strongly supports intracrine (tumoral) androgen synthesis as an important mechanism underlying PCa progression. We first discuss the presence and significance of residual prostate tumor androgens in the progression of CRPC. We review the classical and non-classical pathways of androgen metabolism, and how dysregulated expression of these enzymes is likely to potentiate tumor androgen production in the progression to CRPC. Next we review the in vitro and in vivo data in human tumors, xenografts, and cell line models which demonstrate the capacity of prostate tumors to utilize cholesterol and adrenal androgens in the production of testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and briefly review the potential role of exogenous

  8. Growth hormone promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of growth hormone receptors in murine 3T3-F442A fibroblasts and adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, C.M.; Shafer, J.A.; Rozsa, F.W.; Wang, X.; Lewis, S.D.; Renken, D.A.; Natale, J.E.; Schwartz, J.; Carter-Su, C.

    1988-01-12

    Because many growth factor receptors are ligand-activated tyrosine protein kinases, the possibility that growth hormone (GH), a hormone implicated in human growth, promotes tyrosyl phosphorylation of its receptor was investigated. /sup 125/I-Labeled human GH was covalently cross-linked to receptors in intact 3T3-F442A fibroblasts, a cell line which differentiates into adipocytes in response to GH. The cross-linked cells were solubilized and passed over a column of phosphotyrosyl binding antibody immobilized on protein A-Sepharose. Immunoadsorbed proteins were eluted with a hapten (p-nitrophenyl phosphate) and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The eluate from the antibody column contained in M/sub r/ 134,000 /sup 125/I-GH-receptor complex. A similar result was obtained when the adipocyte form of 3T3-F442A cells was used in place of fibroblast form. O-Phosphotyrosine prevented /sup 125/I-GH-receptor complexes from binding to the antibody column, whereas O-phosphoserine and O-phosphothreonine did not. In studies of GH-promoted phosphorylation in 3T3-F442A fibroblasts labeled metabolically with (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, GH was shown to stimulate formation of a /sup 32/P-labeled protein which bound to immobilized phosphotyrosyl binding antibodies. The molecular weight of 114,000 obtained for this protein is similar to that expected for non-cross-linked GH receptor. These observations provide strong evidence that binding of GH to its receptor stimulates phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in the GH receptor.

  9. Growth hormone promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of growth hormone receptors in murine 3T3-F442A fibroblasts and adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because many growth factor receptors are ligand-activated tyrosine protein kinases, the possibility that growth hormone (GH), a hormone implicated in human growth, promotes tyrosyl phosphorylation of its receptor was investigated. 125I-Labeled human GH was covalently cross-linked to receptors in intact 3T3-F442A fibroblasts, a cell line which differentiates into adipocytes in response to GH. The cross-linked cells were solubilized and passed over a column of phosphotyrosyl binding antibody immobilized on protein A-Sepharose. Immunoadsorbed proteins were eluted with a hapten (p-nitrophenyl phosphate) and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The eluate from the antibody column contained in M/sub r/ 134,000 125I-GH-receptor complex. A similar result was obtained when the adipocyte form of 3T3-F442A cells was used in place of fibroblast form. O-Phosphotyrosine prevented 125I-GH-receptor complexes from binding to the antibody column, whereas O-phosphoserine and O-phosphothreonine did not. In studies of GH-promoted phosphorylation in 3T3-F442A fibroblasts labeled metabolically with [32P]P/sub i/, GH was shown to stimulate formation of a 32P-labeled protein which bound to immobilized phosphotyrosyl binding antibodies. The molecular weight of 114,000 obtained for this protein is similar to that expected for non-cross-linked GH receptor. These observations provide strong evidence that binding of GH to its receptor stimulates phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in the GH receptor

  10. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yayun Liang,1 Benford Mafuvadze,1 Johannes D Aebi,2 Salman M Hyder1 1Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center and Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA; 2Medicinal Chemistry, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED, Roche Innovation Center Basel, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration; however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylaminohexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071 (RO, which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the

  11. Expression and function of androgen receptor coactivator p44/Mep50/WDR77 in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ligr

    Full Text Available Hormones, including estrogen and progesterone, and their receptors play an important role in the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma. Androgen, its receptor and coactivators have also been implicated in these processes. p44/Mep50/WDR77 was identified as a subunit of the methylosome complex and lately characterized as a steroid receptor coactivator that enhances androgen receptor as well as estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activity in a ligand-dependent manner. We previously described distinct expression and function of p44 in prostate, testis, and breast cancers. In this report, we examined the expression and function of p44 in ovarian cancer. In contrast to findings in prostate and testicular cancer and similar to breast cancer, p44 shows strong cytoplasmic localization in morphologically normal ovarian surface and fallopian tube epithelia, while nuclear p44 is observed in invasive ovarian carcinoma. We observed that p44 can serve as a coactivator of both androgen receptor (AR and estrogen receptor (ER in ovarian cells. Further, overexpression of nuclear-localized p44 stimulates proliferation and invasion in ovarian cancer cells in the presence of estrogen or androgen. These findings strongly suggest that p44 plays a role in mediating the effects of hormones during ovarian tumorigenesis.

  12. EFFICIENCY OF HORMONE THERAPY WITH LEIPRORELIN (LUCRIN DEPOT® IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most common cancers. Hormone therapy (HT is the basic treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive PC. HT with luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH analogues is considered to be an effective method for hormone exposure as monotherapy and in combination with other drugs. Lucrin depot® is a potent and safe LHRH analogue whose efficacy has been proven by a number of clinical trials. This drug may be recommended as monotherapy or in combination with other hormonal agents in patients with PC if there are indications for androgen deprivation.

  13. EFFICIENCY OF HORMONE THERAPY WITH LEIPRORELIN (LUCRIN DEPOT® IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most common cancers. Hormone therapy (HT is the basic treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive PC. HT with luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH analogues is considered to be an effective method for hormone exposure as monotherapy and in combination with other drugs. Lucrin depot® is a potent and safe LHRH analogue whose efficacy has been proven by a number of clinical trials. This drug may be recommended as monotherapy or in combination with other hormonal agents in patients with PC if there are indications for androgen deprivation.

  14. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne;

    2007-01-01

    Background- We hypothesized that the estrogen receptor (ESR1) IVS1-397T/C polymorphism affects high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer of reproductive organs, and hip fracture. Methods and Results- We studied cr...

  15. Integration of Nuclear- and Extranuclear-Initiated Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madak Erdogan, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    Estrogenic hormones exert their effects through binding to Estrogen Receptors (ERs), which work in concert with coregulators and extranuclear signaling pathways to control gene expression in normal as well as cancerous states, including breast tumors. In this thesis, we have used multiple genome-wide analysis tools to elucidate various ways that…

  16. Characterization of the ligand-dependent transactivation domain of thyroid hormone receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Barettino, D; Vivanco Ruiz, M M; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    1994-01-01

    Transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors is achieved through autonomous activation functions (AFs), a constitutive N-terminal AF-1 and a C-terminal, ligand-dependent AF-2 that comprises a motif conserved between nuclear receptors. We have performed an extensive mutational analysis of the putative AF-2 domain of chicken thyroid hormone receptor alpha (cT3R alpha). We show that the AF-2 region mediates transactivation as well as transcriptional interference (squelching), not only between...

  17. Prediagnostic circulating follicle stimulating hormone concentrations and ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Meghan A; Alberg, Anthony J; Allen, Diane S; Allen, Naomi E; Brinton, Louise A; Dorgan, Joanne F; Kaaks, Rudolf; Rinaldi, Sabina; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2009-08-01

    Gonadotropins have been indicted in ovarian carcinogenesis but direct evidence has been limited and inconsistent. The aim of this study was to determine the association between prediagnostic levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and subsequent development of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted using cases and controls drawn from three cohorts: CLUE I and CLUE II of Washington County, MD, and the Island of Guernsey Study, United Kingdom. In total, 67 incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases were each matched to 1 to 2 controls on age, menopausal status, time since last menstrual period, current hormone use and other relevant factors. FSH concentrations were classified into ranked thirds of low, medium or high based on the distribution among controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) across increasing thirds of FSH concentrations. Results of the analysis showed that ovarian cancer risk decreased with higher FSH concentrations (p-trend = 0.005). Compared with the lowest third of FSH concentrations, the OR among those in the middle and highest thirds were 0.45 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.20-1.00] and 0.26 (95% CI: 0.10-0.70), respectively. Associations persisted after excluding cases diagnosed within 5 years of follow-up. In conclusion, a reduction in subsequent risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was observed among women with higher circulating FSH concentrations. These findings contradict the hypothesized role of FSH as a risk factor in ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:19444906

  18. Androgen receptor profiling predicts prostate cancer outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Stelloo, Suzan; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van der Poel, Henk G.; de Jong, Jeroen; van Leenders, Geert JLH; Jenster, Guido; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bergman, Andries M; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in men. Biomarkers for outcome prediction are urgently needed, so that high-risk patients could be monitored more closely postoperatively. To identify prognostic markers and to determine causal players in prostate cancer progression, we assessed changes in chromatin state during tumor development and progression. Based on this, we assessed genomewide androgen receptor/chromatin binding and identified a distinct androgen receptor/chromati...

  19. Birth weight, breast cancer and the potential mediating hormonal environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Bukowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that woman's risk of breast cancer in later life is associated with her infants birth weights. The objective of this study was to determine if this association is independent of breast cancer risk factors, mother's own birth weight and to evaluate association between infants birth weight and hormonal environment during pregnancy. Independent association would have implications for understanding the mechanism, but also for prediction and prevention of breast cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Risk of breast cancer in relation to a first infant's birth weight, mother's own birth weight and breast cancer risk factors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 410 women in the Framingham Study. Serum concentrations of estriol (E3, anti-estrogen alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A were measured in 23,824 pregnant women from a separate prospective cohort, the FASTER trial. During follow-up (median, 14 years 31 women (7.6% were diagnosed with breast cancer. Women with large birth weight infants (in the top quintile had a higher breast cancer risk compared to other women (hazard ratio (HR, 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.2-5.2; P = 0.012. The finding was not affected by adjustment for birth weight of the mother and traditional breast cancer risk factors (adjusted HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.6; P = 0.021. An infant's birth weight had a strong positive relationship with the mother's serum E3/AFP ratio and PAPP-A concentration during pregnancy. Adjustment for breast cancer risk factors did not have a material effect on these relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Giving birth to an infant with high birth weight was associated with increased breast cancer risk in later life, independently of mother's own birth weight and breast cancer risk factors and was also associated with a hormonal environment during pregnancy favoring future breast cancer development and progression.

  20. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin; Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked. PMID:25473228

  1. Hormone treatment, estrogen receptor polymorphisms and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Ryan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between hormone treatment (HT and mortality remains controversial. This study aimed to determine whether the risk of mortality associated with HT use varies depending on the specific characteristics of treatment and genetic variability in terms of the estrogen receptor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A prospective, population-based study of 5135 women aged 65 years and older who were recruited from three cities in France and followed over six years. Detailed information related to HT use was obtained and five estrogen receptor polymorphisms were genotyped. The total follow-up was 25,436 person-years and during this time 352 women died. Cancer (36.4% and cardiovascular disease (19.3% were the major causes of death. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, education, centre, living situation, comorbidity, depression, physical and mental incapacities, indicated no significant association between HT and mortality, regardless of the type or duration of treatment, or the age at initiation. However, the association between HT and all-cause or cancer-related mortality varied across women, with significant interactions identified with three estrogen receptor polymorphisms (p-values = 0.004 to 0.03 in adjusted analyses. Women carrying the C allele of ESR1 rs2234693 had a decreased risk of all-cause mortality with HT (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.18-0.97, while in stark contrast, those homozygous for the T allele had a significantly increased risk of cancer-related mortality (HR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.23-8.20. The findings were similar for ESR1 rs9340799 and ESR2 rs1271572. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The risk of mortality was not associated with HT duration, type or age at initiation. It was however not equal across all women, with some women appearing genetically more vulnerable to the effects of HT in terms of their estrogen receptor genotype. These findings, if confirmed in another independent study, may help explain the

  2. Expression of Obesity Hormone Leptin in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-chun Cong; Xian-wei Dai; Ming-yang Shen; Jun-jiang Wang; Chun-sheng Chen; Hong Zhang; Lei Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The obesity hormone, leptin, has been found to participate in the development and proliferation of normal and malignant tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of leptin in human colorectal cancer.Methods: Serum leptin levels were measured via ABC-ELLSA in 30 colorectal cancers and 24 normal controls. Leptin concentration in colorectal cancer was analyzed in terms of selected clinicopathological features and some oncogenes.Results: The mean concentration of leptin was significantly higher for colorectal cancers(3.54±1.46 ng/ml) than normal controls(2.27±0.99 ng/ml), no gender difference was observed in this study. Leptin expression in poorly differentiated tumors was obviously lower than those in moderately and well differentiated tumors. There were no statistically significant correlations between leptin and the serum CEA and CA199 in colorectal cancers (P>0.05), and between leptin and the expressions of K-RAS, P53, APC, DCC genes in tumor tissues (P>0.05).Conclusion: Leptin is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer, which is related to the differentiation degrees of the tumor. There is no correlation between leptin expression and chages of oncogenes in colorectal cancers.

  3. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Contreras-Jurado

    Full Text Available Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  4. Novel bioluminescent binding assays for interaction studies of protein/peptide hormones with their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Protein/peptide hormones are the largest group of endogenous signaling molecules and exert various biological functions by binding to specific cell membrane receptors. To study the interactions between these hormones and their receptors, quantitative ligand-receptor binding assays have been widely used for decades. However, the assays conventionally relied on the use of radioligands, which have some major drawbacks and can only be used in laboratories with a radioactive material license. We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones using the brightest bioluminescent reporter known to date, nanoluciferase (NanoLuc). The NanoLuc reporter can be either chemically conjugated to an appropriate position, or genetically fused at one terminus, of protein/peptide hormones. Compared to conventional radioligands, these bioluminescent ligands have higher sensitivity, better safety, and longer shelf lives, and thus, represent a novel class of non-radioactive tracers for quantitative receptor binding assays. In the present review, we provide some general considerations and specific examples for setting up the bioluminescent binding assays. Such techniques can be applied to other protein/peptide hormones in future to facilitate their interaction studies with their receptors. PMID:27020777

  5. Endocrinology and hormone therapy in breast cancer: Endocrine therapy in premenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine therapy remains important in premenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Ovarian ablation, used alone, is effective in delaying recurrence and increasing survival in such women. When added to chemotherapy, it is less clear that it is effective perhaps because of the endocrine ablative effect of chemotherapy. Trials comparing ovarian ablation with or without tamoxifen to CMF-type chemotherapy suggest that the endocrine therapy is equivalent to or better than this chemotherapy in women whose tumors have estrogen and/or progesterone receptor. Tamoxifen is also effective in preventing recurrence and prolonging survival in the adjuvant setting in premenopausal women. While most of the available data deals with tamoxifen given alone, it appears to have a similar beneficial effect when added to chemotherapy in the premenopausal adjuvant setting. Adjuvant aromatase inhibitors should not be used in premenopausal women

  6. Hormone profiles in women treated for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some investigators believe that the protective effect of radiotherapy is hormonally mediated. To determine whether ovarian radiation affects serum hormone levels differently from surgical removal of the ovaries, serum estradiol, estrone, testosterone and androstenedione were evaluated by radioimmunoassay in 320 women (203 irradiated and 117 nonirradiated) from six US clinics participating in a large international cohort study of women treated for cervical cancer since the 1960's. Overall, estradiol levels were similar for both treatment groups, while estrone, testosterone and androstenedione levels were somewhat lower in irradiated women than in nonirradiated women after adjustment for year of birth. Notably, among women in both groups whose treatment included bilateral oophorectomy, irradiated women consistently had lower levels of androstenedione, testosterone and estrone but similar levels of estradiol

  7. Estrogen receptor, Progesterone receptor, HER2 status and Ki67 index and responsiveness to adjuvant tamoxifen in postmenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients enrolled in the DBCG 77C trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoop, Ann; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke; Jensen, M. B.;

    2014-01-01

    from 1515 patients was analysed and the hormone receptor positive (estrogen receptor (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR)) cancers were defined as luminal A if Ki67 low and HER2-negative; as luminal B if Ki67 high or HER2-positive; and otherwise as non-luminal-HER2 positive or triple negative...

  8. Behavioral Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Lobo, Tania; Dash, Chiranjeev; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvant hormone therapy contributes to reductions in recurrence and mortality for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, adherence to hormone therapy is suboptimal. This is the first systematic literature review examining interventions aimed at improving hormone therapy adherence. Researchers followed the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Ovid-Medline, and EMBASE were searched for behavioral interventions that aimed to enhance adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors. A total of 376 articles were screened for eligibility. Five articles met the study criteria. All interventions presented adherence outcomes after 1-year follow-up. None significantly enhanced adherence compared to the usual care in the primary analysis (odds ratios ranged from 1.03 to 2.06 for adherence and from 1.11 to 1.18 for persistence). All studies targeted patients, and only 3 studies included postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Three tested the same intervention consisting of educational materials. Only one was conducted in the United States. Only one reported participants' ethnicity. Overall, it was unclear whether the studies contained bias. The use of different terminology and operationalization of adherence made comparisons challenging. Interventions to improve adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in US breast cancer populations that include survivors who are ethnically diverse, premenopausal, and receiving tamoxifen therapy are necessary to inform future interventions. Adoption of consistent adherence definitions/measurements will provide a clearer framework to consolidate aggregate findings. Given the limited efficacy of tested interventions, it is important to engage oncologists and researchers to develop approaches that target different components associated with hormone therapy adherence, such as doctor-patient communication or social support. PMID:27133733

  9. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, the authors have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and to contain a specific GH receptor mRNA that was not expressed in the parent cell line. The expression of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1.24 cells compared to 1.9-fold in the nontransfected RIN5-AH cells. The expression of the transfected receptor was stimulated 1.6- and 2.3-fold when cells were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 μM Zn2+ was associated with an increased magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. They conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin biosynthesis in RIN5-AH cells

  10. The Role of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Prevention of Digestive System Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Simmen, Rosalia C. M.; Brown, Adam R.; Simmen, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations h...

  11. Progesterone receptors - animal models and cell signaling in breast cancer: Role of steroid receptor coactivators and corepressors of progesterone receptors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progesterone, an ovarian steroid hormone, plays a key role in the development and function of the mammary gland, as it also does in the uterus and the ovary. The action of progesterone is mediated through its intracellular cognate receptor, the progesterone receptor (PR), which functions as a transcription factor that regulates gene expression. As with other nuclear receptors, coregulators (coactivators and corepressors) recruited by the liganded or unliganded PR, either to enhance or to suppress transcription activity, modulate the function of the PR. Mutation or aberrant expression of the coregulators might thus affect the normal function of the PR and hence disrupt the normal development of the mammary gland, which may lead to breast cancer

  12. Distinct RNA motifs are important for coactivation of steroid hormone receptors by steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA)

    OpenAIRE

    Lanz, Rainer B.; Razani, Bahram; Goldberg, Aaron D.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2002-01-01

    Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) is an RNA transcript that functions as a eukaryotic transcriptional coactivator for steroid hormone receptors. We report here the isolation and functional characterization of distinct RNA substructures within the SRA molecule that constitute its coactivation function. We used comparative sequence analysis and free energy calculations to systematically study SRA RNA subdomains for identification of structured regions and base pairings, and we used site-dire...

  13. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  14. Somatostatin, somatostatin receptors, and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Fisher, William E; Kim, Hee Joon; Wang, Xiaoping; Brunicardi, Charles F; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-03-01

    Somatostatin may play an important role in the regulation of cancer growth including pancreatic cancer by interaction with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) on the cell surface. Five SSTRs were cloned, and the function of these SSTRs is addressed in this review. SSTR-2, SSTR-5, and SSTR-1 are thought to play major roles in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth both in vitro and in vivo. SSTR-3 may be involved in mediating apoptosis, but the role of SSTR-4 is not clear. In most pancreatic cancers, functional SSTRs are absent. Reintroduction of SSTR genes has been shown to inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in cell cultures and animal models. PMID:15706439

  15. Complex Actions of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Antagonist NH-3 on Gene Promoters in Different Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Vanya; Nguyen, Van Phuong; Nguyen, Ngoc-Ha; Togashi, Marie; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Baxter, John D.; Webb, Paul

    2008-01-01

    It is desirable to obtain new antagonists for thyroid hormone (TRs) and other nuclear receptors (NRs). We previously used X-ray structural models of TR ligand binding domains (LBDs) to design compounds, such as NH-3, that impair coactivator binding to activation function 2 (AF-2) and block thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3) actions. However, TRs bind DNA and are transcriptionally active without ligand. Thus, NH-3 could modulate TR activity via effects on other coregulator interaction surf...

  16. Identification and optimization of small-molecule agonists of the human relaxin hormone receptor RXFP1

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jingbo; Huang, Zaohua; Chen, Catherine Z.; Agoulnik, Irina U; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Ferrer, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I.; Marugan, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    The anti-fibrotic, vasodilatory, and pro-angiogenic therapeutic properties of recombinant relaxin peptide hormone have been investigated in several diseases and recent clinical trial data has shown benefit in treating acute heart failure. However, the remodeling capacity of these peptide hormones is difficult to study in chronic settings due to their short half-life and the need for intravenous administration. Here we present the first small-molecule series of human relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1)...

  17. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, J.; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a syntheti...

  18. The role of melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors in energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    DouglasJMacNeil

    2013-01-01

    Extensive studies in rodents with melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) have demonstrated that the neuropeptide hormone is a potent orexigen. Acutely, MCH causes an increase in food intake, while chronically it leads to increased weight gain, primarily as an increase in fat mass. Multiple knockout mice models have confirmed the importance of MCH in modulating energy homeostasis. Animals lacking MCH, MCH-containing neurons, or the MCH receptor all are resistant to diet-induced obesity. These gen...

  19. Presence of a putative steroidal allosteric site on glycoprotein hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mario; Dimida, Antonio; Ferrarini, Eleonora; Silvano, Elena; De Marco, Giuseppina; Agretti, Patrizia; Aloisi, Gabriella; Simoncini, Tommaso; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Tonacchera, Massimo; Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto

    2009-11-25

    In a previous work we found that the insecticide 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), inhibits the accumulation of cAMP as induced by the bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) in cells transfected with the TSH receptor. In this work, we demonstrate that the DDT molecular analogues, diethylstilbestrol and quercetine, are more potent inhibitors of the TSH receptor activity than DDT itself. The notion that all these compounds interfere with nuclear estrogen receptors, as either agonists (DDT and diethylstilbestrol) or antagonists (quercetin), prompted us to test the ability of the steroid hormone 17-beta-estradiol to inhibit the TSH receptor activity. We found that estrogen exposure causes a modest but significant inhibition of the bTSH induced cAMP accumulation both in transfected CHO-TSH receptor and Fischer Rat Thyroid Low Serum 5% (FRTL-5) cells. When applied to CHO cells transfected with the luteinizing hormone receptor, 17-beta-estradiol proved capable of inhibiting the hCG induced cAMP accumulation at a concentration as low as 10nM, though the effect was not greater than 35%. The effect of 17-beta-estradiol was not estrogen receptors mediated, as co-transfection of the estrogen receptor alpha and beta subunits with LH receptor caused cAMP to increase above the level attained by the sole hCG stimulation, and not to decrease it as expected. These data suggest the presence of a steroidal-like allosteric binding site on glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:19766106

  20. Identification and optimization of small-molecule agonists of the human relaxin hormone receptor RXFP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jingbo; Huang, Zaohua; Chen, Catherine Z; Agoulnik, Irina U; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Ferrer, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I; Marugan, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    The anti-fibrotic, vasodilatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutic properties of recombinant relaxin peptide hormone have been investigated in several diseases, and recent clinical trial data has shown benefit in treating acute heart failure. However, the remodelling capacity of these peptide hormones is difficult to study in chronic settings because of their short half-life and the need for intravenous administration. Here we present the first small-molecule series of human relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 agonists. These molecules display similar efficacy as the natural hormone in several functional assays. Mutagenesis studies indicate that the small molecules activate relaxin receptor through an allosteric site. These compounds have excellent physical and in vivo pharmacokinetic properties to support further investigation of relaxin biology and animal efficacy studies of the therapeutic benefits of relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 activation. PMID:23764525

  1. Proteolytic activity of the purified hormone-binding subunit in the estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, A M; Abbondanza, C; Armetta, I; Medici, N; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Nigro, V; Puca, G A

    1991-05-15

    The hormone-binding subunit of the calf uterus estradiol receptor was purified as a hormone-free molecule. Immunoaffinity chromatography with a specific monoclonal antibody was used as the final step. The purified subunit was specifically labeled by radioactive diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled amino acid was serine. The purified receptor was able to release the fluorogenic or chromogenic group from synthetic peptides containing phenylalanine at the carboxyl terminus. This occurred only in the presence of estradiol and was hampered by aprotinin and diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Estradiol-dependent hydrolytic activity was also found in the eluate from gel slices after SDS/PAGE of purified receptor. This activity comigrated with the renaturable estradiol-binding activity. The estradiol antagonists 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 as well as other steroid hormones were unable to activate this hydrolytic activity. PMID:1709742

  2. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3×10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9×10(-6)mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5)mol/L), beraprost (10(-5)mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5)mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. PMID:26686607

  3. Perspectives of breast cancer etiology: synergistic interaction between smoking and exogenous hormone use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Hong Zhu; Cao-Hui Hu; Paul Strickland

    2011-01-01

    To explore breast cancer etiology, literature was searched using Medline. We explored the (1)plausibility of smoking in breast carcinogenesis; (2) physiological properties, susceptibility windows, and exposure timing of breast cells; (3) role of exogenous hormones in breast carcinogenesis; (4) biological mechanism of synergistic interactions between smoking and exogenous hormones in breast carcinogenesis; and (5) evidence from epidemiologic studies and the fitted secular trend between smoking rate, exogenous hormone use, and breast cancer incidence in past decades. We deduced that exogenous hormone use per se is not a significant cause and its association with breast cancer is distorted by chronic exposure to environmental carcinogens, especially smoking. We hypothesize that smoking is one of the causes of breast cancer and that this causality is strengthened by synergistic interaction between smoking and exogenous hormone use. Physicians should be cautious of prescribing exogenous hormones for those with chronic exposure to environmental carcinogens to prevent breast cancer.

  4. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Seve...

  5. Hormonal treatment of obstructed kidneys in patients with prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1993-01-01

    A review of 1288 patients with previously untreated prostatic cancer revealed 209 patients (16%) with ureteric obstruction; the obstruction was bilateral in 36%. The effect of hormonal treatment was assessed in 88 patients with 120 obstructed kidneys: 77 patients had androgen deprivation or...... therapy alone survived for a median of 26 months (range 1-111), while the patients who also needed diversion survived for a median of 13 months (range 1-28). The median time spent at home was 24 months (0-102) and 10 months (0-23) respectively, presumably reflecting the worse general condition of the...

  6. Association of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Oliver J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Simmonds, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common autoimmune disease (AID) that shares many of its susceptibility loci with other AIDs. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) represents the primary autoantigen in GD, in which autoantibodies bind to the receptor and mimic its ligand, thyroid stimulating...... hormone, causing the characteristic clinical phenotype. Although early studies investigating the TSHR and GD proved inconclusive, more recently we provided convincing evidence for association of the TSHR region with disease. In the current study, we investigated a combined panel of 98 SNPs, including 70...

  7. EFFICIENCY OF HORMONE THERAPY WITH LEIPRORELIN (LUCRIN DEPOT®) IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    B. Ya. Alekseev; Kaprin, A. D.; K. M. Nyushko

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers. Hormone therapy (HT) is the basic treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive PC. HT with luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues is considered to be an effective method for hormone exposure as monotherapy and in combination with other drugs. Lucrin depot® is a potent and safe LHRH analogue whose efficacy has been proven by a number of clinical trials. This drug may be recommended as monotherapy or in combination with other...

  8. Anthropometric and hormonal risk factors for male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinton, Louise A; Cook, Michael B; McCormack, Valerie;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology of male breast cancer is poorly understood, partly because of its relative rarity. Although genetic factors are involved, less is known regarding the role of anthropometric and hormonally related risk factors. METHODS: In the Male Breast Cancer Pooling Project, a consortium...... of 11 case-control and 10 cohort investigations involving 2405 case patients (n = 1190 from case-control and n = 1215 from cohort studies) and 52013 control subjects, individual participant data were harmonized and pooled. Unconditional logistic regression generated study design-specific (case......-control/cohort) odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with exposure estimates combined using fixed effects meta-analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Risk was statistically significantly associated with weight (highest/lowest tertile: OR = 1.36; 95% CI = 1.18 to 1.57), height (OR = 1...

  9. Exogenous hormones in the aetiology of cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, M P

    1984-07-01

    Both animal experimental work and epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory research on the effects of endogenous hormones in the human have made it clear that some influence of administered female sex hormones on the risk of certain cancers would be anticipated, and this has turned out to be the case. This review focuses on the administration of hormones during pregnancy, around the time of the menopause, and to prevent pregnancy. In the daughters who were exposed in utero to stilbestrol during the 1950s and 1960s, the most important effect is the development of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the vagina or cervix. Few cases of this disease have been reported before puberty, but the cumulative risk thereafter up to the age of 24 years is estimated to be between 1.4 and 4/10,000 exposed. Much less attention has been paid to the mothers who actually took the stilbestrol than to their daughters, but the published data fail to provide any convincing evidence of an increased risk of either breast or reporductive cancer among them. Regarding the administration of hormones around the time of menopause, it is well established that unopposed estrogen therapy in menopausal women can cause endometrial cancer. This has been demonstrated in a large number of case control studies reported since 1975. Most of these studies were conducted in the US and most concern the drup Premarin (conjugated equine estrogens). Some cohort studies also have been reported, and they largely support the results of the case control studies. There is now little doubt that combined oral contraceptives (OCs) protect against both epithelial ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer. Preliminary findings in the major cohort studies concerned with the longterm effects of OC use also are encouraging. A series of large case control studies conducted during the 1970s showed clearly that there is no general association between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk, but these large studies included few women

  10. EVALUATION OF STEROID HORMONES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Bennett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a peak in interest in evaluating the roles of androgen and estrogen receptors in RCC pathogenesis in the late 20th century, with some positive outcomes for RCC therapy that targeted estrogen receptors, especially for metastatic disease. Since that time, however, there have been few studies that look at use of steroid hormone modulators for RCC, especially in the light of new therapies such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and new immune therapies, which are having some success for treatment of metastatic RCC. This review summarises past and current literature and attempts to stimulate renewed interest in research into the steroid hormones and their receptors, which might be used to effect, for example, in combination with the other newer targeted therapies for RCC.

  11. Estrogen receptor isoforms and progestin hormone dependence in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, A M; Caruso, S P; Levin, E

    1994-09-01

    The close interaction between receptors and other transcription factors suggests that their corresponding transducing signals can trigger functional and structural changes in other related molecules. The effect of a progestinic agent, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), on some of the estrogen-receptor (ER) parameters was studied in 2 murine mammary tumor sublines with different progestin hormone dependence for their respective growth. The relative binding affinity of estradiol and tamoxifen for the ER, the receptor content and the ER isoforms studied by HPLC were determined in the hormone-autonomous (HA) and the hormone-dependent (HD) tumor sublines. In the HA subline administration of MPA did not modify the tumor growth rate, whereas this was accelerated in the HD subline. The ER content was clearly increased in the HD tumor subline, but not in the HA subline, compared with the untreated controls. In contrast, the E2 and tamoxifen relative binding affinity for the ER and the isoform profiles were affected by MPA treatment in the HA, but not in the HD tumor subline. The functional change (decrease in relative binding affinity) can be attributed to the appearance of a lower-molecular-size ER isoform under the progestinic treatment. Modifications in one receptor molecule by the action of ligands corresponding to another type of receptor show the interconection between transcription factors and the necessity of broadening conventional concepts regarding hormone dependence in mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:8077051

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death. The difficulty in detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage, aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapy all contribute to the high mortality. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in normal human tissues. It is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factors receptors and is encoded by proto-oncogenes. Several studies have demonstrated that EGFR is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer. Over-expression correlates with more advanced disease, poor survival and the presence of metastases. Therefore, inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. Although several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with chemotherapy demonstrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor cell apoptosis and regression in xenograft models, these benefits remain to be confirmed. Multimodality treatment incorporating EGFR-inhibition is emerging as a novel strategy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  13. FGF receptor genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, D; Pineda, S; Michailidou, K;

    2014-01-01

    Background:Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Common variation in other fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors might also modify risk. We tested this hypothesis by studying......, 12 893 (6269 cases and 6624 controls) of Asian and 2048 (1116 cases and 932 controls) of African ancestry. Associations with risk of breast cancer, overall and by disease sub-type, were assessed using unconditional logistic regression.Results:Little evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... that common variants in the other FGF receptors are not associated with risk of breast cancer to the degree observed for FGFR2....

  14. 卡培他滨维持治疗在激素受体阴性晚期乳腺癌中的临床观察%Clinical observation of Capecitabine maintenance treatment in hormone receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴凡; 刘健

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察卡培他滨维持治疗激素受体阴性转移性乳腺癌的近期、远期疗效及不良反应方法:对一线化疗疾病获得控制的晚期转移性乳腺癌予卡培他滨单药维持化疗直至疾病进展结果:卡培他滨维持化疗总有效率(CR+PR)为10.5%,肿瘤控制率(CR+PR+SD)为52.6%。中位疾病进展时间(mTTP)为13.4个月。主要不良反应为白细胞减少、手足综合征及口腔黏膜炎结论:卡培他滨维持治疗在转移性乳腺癌中疗效肯定,不良反应可耐受。%Objective: To explore the efficacy and adverse reactions of capecitabine in the maintenance treatment of hormone receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer. methods: Metastatic breast cancer patients who gain control by first-line chemotherapy was treated by capecitabine monotherapy maintenance regiment until disease progression. Results: Total effective rate (CR + PR) was 10.5%, the tumor control rate (CR + PR + SD) was 52.6% and median time to progression (mTTP) was 13.4 months in metastatic breast cancer patients treated by capecitabine maintenance chemotherapy. The main adverse events were hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia and mucositis Conclusion: Capecitabine maintenance therapy has a definite curative effect in metastatic breast cancer, which adverse reactions can be tolerated.

  15. Growth Hormone (GH1) Gene Variation, the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) Exon 3 Deletion Polymorphism in a West-African Population

    OpenAIRE

    Millar, David S.; Lewis, Mark D.; Horan, Martin; Newsway, Vicky; Rees, D Aled; Easter, Tammy E.; Pepe, Guglielmina; Rickards, Olga; Norin, Martin; Scanlon, Maurice F.; Krawczak, Michael; Cooper, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Growth Hormone (GH1) Gene Variation, the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) Exon 3 Deletion Polymorphism in a West-African Population UNITED KINGDOM (Millar, David S.) UNITED KINGDOM Received: 2008-05-29 Revised: 2008-08-21 Accepted: 2008-09-22

  16. Expression of growth hormone and its receptor in chronic atrophic gastritis and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Si; Qian Cao; Min Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth hormone (GH) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) expression of and its clinical significance in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG).METHODS:A total of 90 cases were enrolled in the study.Thirty were healthy controls,the other 60 patients were divided into two groups according to the endoscopical and histological diagnosis.Blood samples were drawn in the morning (menarche did not occur during the blood extraction in female patients),gastric mucosa was obtained by endoscopy.Serum GH and gastrice mucosal GHR levels were measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA) and En Vinsion technique.RESULTS:The average GH level was 1.021±0.132μ/L in CAG patients,in controls it was 2.869 0.512μ/L.There was a significant difference between these two groups(P<0.01).The positive rate of GHR in CAG patients was 10%,in controls the rate was 100%.There was a significant difference (P<0.01).There was no significant change of GH level (3.176±0.421μ/L) in patients with gastric carcinoma compared with controls (P>0.05).CONCLUSION:The study shows that levels of GH and GHR expression are low in CAG patients.CAG pathogenesis has a correlation with mucosal nutrient deficiency,decreased levels of GH and GHR have an adverse effect on the repair and regeneration of CAG.There is no significant change of GH in gastric carcinorma patients,GH dose not play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  17. New Treatment Option for Young Women with Hormone-Sensitive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment option for young women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer Posted: June 1, 2014 Contact: NCI Press Office 301-496-6641 A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a ...

  18. Mathematically modelling and controlling prostate cancer under intermittent hormone therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshito Hirata; Gouhei Tanaka; Nicholas Bruchovsky; Kazuyuki Aihara

    2012-01-01

    In this review,we summarize our recently developed mathematical models that predict the effects of intermittent androgen suppression therapy on prostate cancer (PCa).Although hormone therapy for PCa shows remarkable results at the beginning of treatment,cancer cells frequently acquire the ability to grow without androgens during long-term therapy,resulting in an eventual relapse.To circumvent hormone resistance,intermittent androgen suppression was investigated as an alternative treatment option.However,at the present time,it is not possible to select an optimal schedule of on- and off-treatment cycles for any given patient.In addition,clinical trials have revealed that intermittent androgen suppression is effective for some patients but not for others.To resolve these two problems,we have developed mathematical models for PCa under intermittent androgen suppression.The mathematical models not only explain the mechanisms of intermittent androgen suppression but also provide an optimal treatment schedule for the on- and off-treatment periods.

  19. Anti-Müllerian Hormone Signaling Regulates Epithelial Plasticity and Chemoresistance in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tim N; Korobeynikov, Vladislav A; Kudinov, Alexander E; Georgopoulos, Rachel; Solanki, Nehal R; Andrews-Hoke, Magda; Kistner, Timothy M; Pépin, David; Donahoe, Patricia K; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Einarson, Margret B; Zhou, Yan; Boumber, Yanis; Proia, David A; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Golemis, Erica A

    2016-07-19

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and its type II receptor AMHR2, both previously thought to primarily function in gonadal tissue, were unexpectedly identified as potent regulators of transforming growth factor (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer. AMH is a TGF-β/BMP superfamily member, and AMHR2 heterodimerizes with type I receptors (ALK2, ALK3) also used by the type II receptor for BMP (BMPR2). AMH signaling regulates expression of BMPR2, ALK2, and ALK3, supports protein kinase B-nuclear factor κB (AKT-NF-κB) and SMAD survival signaling, and influences BMP-dependent signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). AMH and AMHR2 are selectively expressed in epithelial versus mesenchymal cells, and loss of AMH/AMHR2 induces EMT. Independent induction of EMT reduces expression of AMH and AMHR2. Importantly, EMT associated with depletion of AMH or AMHR2 results in chemoresistance but sensitizes cells to the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor ganetespib. Recognition of this AMH/AMHR2 axis helps to further elucidate TGF-β/BMP resistance-associated signaling and suggests new strategies for therapeutic targeting of EMT. PMID:27396341

  20. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable.Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment.In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  1. Celecoxib plus hormone therapy versus hormone therapy alone for hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: first results from the STAMPEDE multiarm, multistage, randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    James, Nicholas D.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Mason, Malcolm D; Clarke, Noel W; Anderson, John; Dearnaley, David P; Dwyer, John; Jovic, Gordana; Ritchie, Alastair WS; Russell, J Martin; Sanders, Karen; Thalmann, George N; Bertelli, Gianfilippo; Birtle, Alison J; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Long-term hormone therapy alone is standard care for metastatic or high-risk, non-metastatic prostate cancer. STAMPEDE—an international, open-label, randomised controlled trial—uses a novel multiarm, multistage design to assess whether the early additional use of one or two drugs (docetaxel, zoledronic acid, celecoxib, zoledronic acid and docetaxel, or zoledronic acid and celecoxib) improves survival in men starting first-line, long-term hormone therapy. Here, we report the...

  2. A new mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor gene of a Chinese family with resistance to thyroid hormone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Qian; GONG Chun-xiu; GU Yi; SU Chang

    2011-01-01

    Background Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a dominant inherited syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. It is usually due to mutations located at the ligand-binding domain and adjacent hinge region of the thyroid hormone receptor β(TRβ). We report the clinical and laboratory characteristics and the genetic analysis of a patient with this rare disorder and his family members.Methods The clinical presentations and changes of thyroid function tests (TFTs) including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pituitary and other laboratory tests were analysed. TFTs of his family's members were detected as well. Direct DNA sequencing of the TRβ gene was done for those with abnormal TFTs.Results The RTH child had goiter, irritability, aggressiveness, and sudoresis. His TFTs showed high levels of circulating free thyroid hormones (FT4 and FT3) and normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. He felt worse when treated as hyperthyroidism (Grave disease) with thiamazole and his clinical presentations got improved obviously when treated as RTH with bromocriptine without obvious advert effect. We identified a novel missense mutation, A317D, located in exon 9 of the gene of this boy and his mother. His mother had not any clinical presentation, but having abnormal TFTs results.Conclusions This patient reported here was concordant with the criteria of RTH. The feature is dysfunction of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. A novel mutation was found in the TRβ, A317D, of this family. This research verified the phenomena that there is a clinical heterogeneity within the same mutation of different RTH patients.

  3. The origins of estrogen receptor alpha-positive and estrogen receptor alpha-negative human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current hormonal therapies have benefited millions of patients with breast cancer. Their success, however, is often temporary and limited to a subset of patients whose tumors express estrogen receptor alpha (ER). The therapies are entirely ineffective in ER-negative disease. Recent studies suggest that there are many biological pathways and alterations involved in determining whether ER is expressed and how it is regulated during breast cancer evolution. Improving hormonal therapies, in addition to perfecting current strategies, will also target these newly discovered pathways and alterations, and others yet to be found. The present commentary will briefly highlight a few important observations and unanswered questions regarding ER status and growth regulation during breast cancer evolution, which hopefully will help to stimulate new thinking and progress in this important area of medial research

  4. Menopausal hormone therapy in relation to breast cancer characteristics and prognosis: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Lena U; Granath, Fredrik; Dickman, Paul W.; Einarsdóttir, Kristjana; Wedrén, Sara; Persson, Ingemar; Hall, Per

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Menopausal hormone therapy has been reported to increase the risk of certain subtypes of breast cancer and to be associated with a favorable survival. These associations could either be due to an increased mammographic surveillance or to a biological effect. We assessed these associations in a Swedish cohort of postmenopausal breast cancer patients holding information on mammographic examinations, menopausal hormone therapy use, other breast cancer risk factors, and cancer treatm...

  5. The mineralocorticoid hormone receptor and action in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshahi, M; Nicolas, C; Mirshahi, A; Hecquet, C; d'Hermies, F; Faure, J P; Agarwal, M K

    1996-02-01

    Immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody, directed against the mineralocorticoid receptor protein purified from rat kidney in presence of the receptor-specific ligand RU 26752, labeled a single 98-102 kDa band in soluble extracts from bovine retina and from cultured bovine retinal pigment epithelial cells, identical to the receptor in several other tissues from the rat. The antibody also immunoprecipitated the receptor-3H-RU 26752 complex in bovine retinal extract. The growth of the isolated pigment epithelial cells was inhibited by RU 26752 and ZK91587, two ligands specific to the mineralocorticoid receptor. Successive passages in culture led to the disappearance of immunoreactivity in Western blots, concurrently with the refractoriness of the cells to growth inhibition by the two antagonists. On sections of the human eye, mineralocorticoid receptor-specific immunofluorescence was observed in retinal cone cells, pigment epithelium, epithelium of ciliary body, iris, cornea and lens. To our knowledge, this is the first ever demonstration of the mineralocorticoid receptor in ocular tissues. PMID:8619799

  6. Distinct growth hormone receptor signaling modes regulate skeletal muscle development and insulin sensitivity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mavalli, Mahendra D.; DiGirolamo, Douglas J.; Fan, Yong; Riddle, Ryan C.; Campbell, Kenneth S.; van Groen, Thomas; Frank, Stuart J.; Sperling, Mark A.; Esser, Karyn A; Bamman, Marcas M; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle development, nutrient uptake, and nutrient utilization is largely coordinated by growth hormone (GH) and its downstream effectors, in particular, IGF-1. However, it is not clear which effects of GH on skeletal muscle are direct and which are secondary to GH-induced IGF-1 expression. Thus, we generated mice lacking either GH receptor (GHR) or IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) specifically in skeletal muscle. Both exhibited impaired skeletal muscle development characterized by reductions ...

  7. NHERF1 Regulates Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Desensitization: Interference with β-Arrestin BindingS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; Yang, Yanmei; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.; Friedman, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) activation, desensitization, internalization, and recycling proceed in a cyclical manner. The Na+/H+ exchange regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a cytoplasmic adapter protein that regulates trafficking and signaling of several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including the PTH1R. The mineral ion wasting and bone phenotype of NHERF1-null mice suggests that PTH1R may interact with NHERF1. The objective of this study was to exam...

  8. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiman, Vineet K; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-stu...

  9. Enzymatic Regulation of Steroidogenesis and Nuclear Receptor Activation : Special Focus on Vitamin D and Sex Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    LUNDQVIST, JOHAN

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed reactions are important to regulate steroidogenesis and nuclear receptor activation. The present investigation examines the role of steroid metabolism catalyzed by CYP7B1 for regulation of hormone receptor activation and the effects of vitamin D on enzymatic regulation of steroidogenesis. The study reports data indicating that CYP7B1 can regulate estrogenic signaling by converting estrogens into inactive or less active metabolites. Similar results were obtained for CYP7B1-med...

  10. Growth hormone receptor expression and function in pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lene R; Kristiansen, Mikkel T; Rasmussen, Lars M;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Hypopituitarism, in particular GH deficiency, is prevalent in patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) both before and after surgery. The factors regulating the growth of pituitary adenomas in general and residual tumour tissue in particular are not...... transcription 5) phosphorylation was measured by Western blot analysis as an index of GHR signalling; cell proliferation was evaluated by [H3]-thymidine incorporation and glycoprotein hormone production analysed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: All adenomas investigated expressed the GHR, but there was no...... detection of STAT5 phosphorylation. Overall, GH and IGF-I administration did not significantly stimulate cell proliferation in vitro, although some individual adenomas exhibited a proliferative response to various extents. GH also did not significantly influence glycoprotein hormone secretion in vitro...

  11. Characterization of the adipokinetic hormone receptor of the anautogenous flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bil, Magdalena; Timmermans, Iris; Verlinden, Heleen; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is an insect neuropeptide mainly involved in fat body energy mobilization. In flies (Phormia regina, Sarcophaga crassipalpis), bugs (Pyrrhocoris apterus) and cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) AKH was also demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of digestion. This makes AKH an important peptide for anautogenous female flies that need to feed on a supplementary protein meal to initiate vitellogenesis, the large scale synthesis of yolk proteins and their uptake by the developing oocytes. Flesh fly AKH, originally identified as Phormia terraenovae hypertrehalosemic hormone (PhoteHrTH), functions through activation of the AKH receptor (AKHR). This is a G protein-coupled receptor that is the orthologue of the human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor. Pharmacological characterization indicated that the receptor can be activated by two related dipteran AKH ligands with an EC50 value in the low nanomolar range, whereas micromolar concentrations of the Tribolium castaneum AKH were needed. Consistent with the energy mobilizing function of AKH, the receptor transcript levels were most abundant in the fat body tissue. Nonetheless, Sarcophaga crassipalpis AKHR transcript levels were also high in the brain, the foregut and the hindgut. Interestingly, the receptor transcript numbers were reduced in almost all measured tissues after protein feeding. These changes may enforce the use of ingested energy carrying molecules prior to stored energy mobilization. PMID:27063262

  12. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  13. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  14. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  15. Expression of the growth hormone receptor gene in insulin producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays a dual role in glucose homeostasis. On the one hand, it exerts an insulin antagonistic effect on the peripheral tissue, on the other hand, it stimulates insulin biosynthesis and beta-cell proliferation. The expression of GH-receptors on the rat insulinoma cell line RIN-5...

  16. Liver expression of steroid hormones and Apolipoprotein D receptors in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FJ Vizoso; L Rodrigo; M Rodriguez; A Altadill; ML González-Diéguez; A Linares; LO González; S Junquera; F Fresno-Forcelledo; MD Corte

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the tissular expression of Androgen (A), Estrogen (E) and Progesterone (Pg) receptors, and Apolipoprotein D (ApoD), in liver tumors from resected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases in order to assess their possible relationship to prognosis.METHODS We performed an immunohistochemical study using tissue microarrays (containing more than 260 cancer specimens, from 31 HCC patients and controls)to determine the presence of specific antibodies against AR, ER, PgR and ApoD, correlating their findings with several clinico-pathological and biological variables. The staining results were categorized using a semi-quantitive score based on their intensity, and the percentage of immunostained cells was measured.RESULTS: A total of 21 liver tumors (67.7%) were positive for AR; 16 (51.6%) for ER; 26 (83.9%) for PgR and 12 (38.7%) stained for ApoD. We have found a wide variability in the immunostaining score values for each protein, with a median (range) of 11.5 (11.5-229.5) for AR; 11.1 (8.5-65) for ER; 14.2 (4-61) for PgR; and 37.7 (13.8-81.1) for ApoD. A history of heavy ethanol consumption, correlated positively with AR and PgR and negatively with ER status. HCV chronic infection also correlated positively with AR and PgR status. However,the presence of ApoD immunostaining did not correlate with any of these variables. Tumors with a positive immuno-staining for PgR showed a better prognosis.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a moderate clinical value of the steroid receptor status in HCC, emphasizing the need to perform further studies in order to evaluate the possible role of new hormonal-based therapies.

  17. Targeting folate receptor alpha for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Anthony; Bax, Heather J.; Josephs, Debra H; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Pellizzari, Giulia; Fittall, Matthew; Grigoriadis, Anita; Figini, Mariangela; Canevari, Silvana; Spicer, James F; Tutt, Andrew N; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2016-01-01

    Promising targeted treatments and immunotherapy strategies in oncology and advancements in our understanding of molecular pathways that underpin cancer development have reignited interest in the tumor-associated antigen Folate Receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein. Its overexpression in tumors such as ovarian, breast and lung cancers, low and restricted distribution in normal tissues, alongside emerging insights into tumor-promoting functi...

  18. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Enzalutamide Monotherapy in Hormone-naïve Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per;

    2015-01-01

    prespecified primary endpoint (ie, prostate-specific antigen [PSA] response at week 25), regardless of metastases at baseline, and favorable tolerability. OBJECTIVE: To determine the long-term efficacy and safety of enzalutamide monotherapy at 1 and 2 yr. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Open-label, single...... reductions in PSA, signals indicating a favorable tumor response, and favorable safety/tolerability profile, with relatively small negative effects on total-body BMD. PATIENT SUMMARY: In this long-term follow-up of the efficacy and safety of enzalutamide monotherapy in patients with hormone-naïve prostate......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor inhibitor with a demonstrated overall survival benefit in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A phase 2 study of enzalutamide monotherapy in patients with hormone-naïve prostate cancer (HNPC) showed a high response rate for the...

  19. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李清怀

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its clinical significance.Methods Seventy-four patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated in our department from January 2009 to January 2011were selected as the observation group,and 28 patients with nodular goiter were selected as the control group.Expression of TSH receptor in the two groups were detected by immunohistochemistry.Results The positive rate of TSH receptor expression in the observation group was55.4 (41/74) ,significantly lower than that of the control

  20. Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, A; Wang, B; Picon-Ruiz, M; Buchwald, P; Ince, Tan A

    2016-05-01

    Anti-estrogen and anti-HER2 treatments have been among the first and most successful examples of targeted therapy for breast cancer (BC). However, the treatment of triple-negative BC (TNBC) that lack estrogen receptor expression or HER2 amplification remains a major challenge. We previously discovered that approximately two-thirds of TNBCs express vitamin D receptor (VDR) and/or androgen receptor (AR) and hypothesized that TNBCs co-expressing AR and VDR (HR2-av TNBC) could be treated by targeting both of these hormone receptors. To evaluate the feasibility of VDR/AR-targeted therapy in TNBC, we characterized 15 different BC lines and identified 2 HR2-av TNBC lines and examined the changes in their phenotype, viability, and proliferation after VDR and AR-targeted treatment. Treatment of BC cell lines with VDR or AR agonists inhibited cell viability in a receptor-dependent manner, and their combination appeared to inhibit cell viability additively. Moreover, cell viability was further decreased when AR/VDR agonist hormones were combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. The mechanisms of inhibition by AR/VDR agonist hormones included cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in TNBC cell lines. In addition, AR/VDR agonist hormones induced differentiation and inhibited cancer stem cells (CSCs) measured by reduction in tumorsphere formation efficiency, high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and CSC markers. Surprisingly, we found that AR antagonists inhibited proliferation of most BC cell lines in an AR-independent manner, raising questions regarding their mechanism of action. In summary, AR/VDR-targeted agonist hormone therapy can inhibit HR2-av TNBC through multiple mechanisms in a receptor-dependent manner and can be combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27120467

  1. Dimeric Arrangement of the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and a Structural Mechanism for Ligand-induced Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Parker, Naomi R.; Miller, Laurence J.; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel); (Mayo)

    2010-06-25

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). Little is known about the oligomeric state of the receptor and its regulation by hormone. The crystal structure of the ligand-free PTH1R extracellular domain (ECD) reveals an unexpected dimer in which the C-terminal segment of both ECD protomers forms an {alpha}-helix that mimics PTH/PTHrP by occupying the peptide binding groove of the opposing protomer. ECD-mediated oligomerization of intact PTH1R was confirmed in living cells by bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. As predicted by the structure, PTH binding disrupted receptor oligomerization. A receptor rendered monomeric by mutations in the ECD retained wild-type PTH binding and cAMP signaling ability. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH1R forms constitutive dimers that are dissociated by ligand binding and that monomeric PTH1R is capable of activating G protein.

  2. Epidermal dexamethasone receptors in dogs with confirmed hyperadrenocorticalism, hypothyroidism or undiagnosed hormonal alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, A H; Stafford, W L

    1991-11-01

    Low capacity, high affinity [3H] dexamethasone binding receptors were identified in cytosolic preparations of the skin (mean number 42.0 +/- 25.2 fmol mg-1 protein, apparent dissociation constant (1 nM +/- 0.23) of clinically normal dogs. No [3H] dexamethasone binding was observed in the skin of nine out of 10 dogs with confirmed spontaneous hyperadrenocorticism or in the skin of three out of six dogs with undiagnosed hormonal alopecia. A reduction was detected in the number of [3H] dexamethasone binding receptors in the skin of one dog with confirmed hypothyroidism. This study provides evidence for the susceptibility of canine glucocorticoid receptors to down regulation by imbalances of endogenous hormones, particularly increased glucocorticoid concentrations. PMID:1780592

  3. Changes in parathyroid hormone receptor binding affinity during egg laying: implications for calcium homeostasis in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, T; Kawashima, M; Takahashi, T; Iwata, A; Oka, N; Tanaka, K

    1996-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor bindings were examined in the membrane fraction of the calvaria and the kidney of the hen by the use of [125I]PTH-related protein (PTHrP) binding assays. The binding specificity, reversibility, and saturation of the receptor were demonstrated. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) were obtained by Scatchard analyses. In both calvaria and kidney, Kd and Bmax values decreased at 3 h before oviposition in egg-laying hens, but not in nonlaying hens. Administration of 17 beta-estradiol or progesterone in vivo caused a decrease in the Kd and Bmax values. Ionized calcium concentrations in the blood plasma showed a decrease at 13 h before oviposition. The results suggest that the PTH receptor binding in the calvaria and the kidney is affected by ovarian steroid hormones and may play a role in maintaining the calcium homeostasis in the egg-laying hen. PMID:8970893

  4. Reconstitution of hormone-responsive detergent-solubilized follicle stimulating hormone receptors into liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An FSH receptor-enriched fraction that responds to exogenous FSH by activation of adenylate cyclase was prepared by ultrafiltration of sucrose density gradient-purified light membranes derived from bovine calf testes homogenates and solubilized with Triton X-100. To further confirm the functional nature of the detergent-solubilized FSH receptor, the extract was incorporated by lipid hydration into large multilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, 2:1 molar ratio. Receptor incorporation was determined by measurement of specific binding of [125I] human FSH ([125I] hFSH). Substitution of dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine or increasing the cholesterol concentration of the vesicles reduced specific binding of [125I]hFSH. Under conditions favoring optimal incorporation of the receptor, specific binding of [125I]hFSH was time and temperature dependent and saturable when increasing concentrations of radioligand were added to a constant amount of proteoliposomes. Reconstituted proteoliposomes bound 1600 fmol FSH/mg protein with an affinity of 3.54 x 10(9) M-1. Inhibition of [125I] hFSH binding by hFSH was comparable to that seen with the membrane-bound receptor (ED50 = 10 ng). Equilibrium binding studies with [3H]Gpp(NH)p indicated that a single class of high affinity GTP binding sites with an association constant (Ka) of 3.33 x 10(7) m-1 which bound 2.19 fmol [3H]Gpp(NH)p/mg protein had also been incorporated into the proteoliposomes. Addition of FSH induced a 2-fold stimulation of [3H]Gpp(NH)p binding, supporting our earlier studies suggesting that the detergent-solubilized FSH receptor is complexed to the G protein. Of particular significance in the present study was the observation that both NaF and FSH stimulated cAMP production in the reconstituted system

  5. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules. PMID:26308901

  6. Randomized controlled trial of toremifene 120 mg compared with exemestane 25 mg after prior treatment with a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the failure of a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (nsAI) for postmenopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer (mBC), it is unclear which of various kinds of endocrine therapy is the most appropriate. A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of daily toremifene 120 mg (TOR120), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, and exemestane 25 mg (EXE), a steroidal aromatase inhibitor. The primary end point was the clinical benefit rate (CBR). The secondary end points were objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. Initially, a total of 91 women was registered in the study and randomly assigned to either TOR120 (n = 46) or EXE (n = 45) from October 2008 to November 2011. Three of the 46 patients in the TOR120 arm were not received treatment, 2 patients having withdrawn from the trial by their preference and one having been dropped due to administration of another SERM. When analyzed after a median observation period of 16.9 months, the intention-to-treat analysis showed that there were no statistical difference between TOR120 (N = 46) and EXE (n = 45) in terms of CBR (41.3% vs. 26.7%; P = 0.14), ORR (10.8% vs. 2.2%; P = 0.083), and OS (Hazard ratio, 0.60; P = 0.22). The PFS of TOR120 was longer than that of EXE, the difference being statistically significant (Hazard ratio, 0.61, P = 0.045). The results in treatment-received cohort (N = 88) were similar to those in ITT cohort. Both treatments were well-tolerated with no severe adverse events, although the treatment of 3 of 43 women administered TOR120 was stopped after a few days because of nausea, general fatigue, hot flush and night sweating. TOR120, as a subsequent endocrine therapy for mBC patients who failed non-steroidal AI treatment, could potentially be more beneficial than EXE. https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr.cgi?function

  7. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ER alpha and ER beta, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ER alpha mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most nota

  8. A case–control study of reproductive factors, female hormone use, and risk of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuqing; Coogan, Patricia F.; Palmer, Julie R; Strom, Brian L.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Findings from several previous studies that have assessed the relation of reproductive factors and female hormone use to the risk of pancreatic cancer are inconclusive. The authors examined the association between reproductive factors and the use of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormone therapy to the risk of pancreatic cancer among 284 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1,096 controls using data from the hospital-based Case–Control Surveillance Study. Older age at first pregnancy a...

  9. Apoptotic Death of Prostate Cancer Cells by a Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-II Antagonist

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sumi; Han, Ji Man; Cheon, Jun; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Seong, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. However, the androgen-independency of the cancer in advanced stages has spurred researchers to look for new medical treatments. In previous reports, we developed the GnRH-II antagonist Trp-1 to inhibit proliferation and stimulate the autophagic death of various prostate cancer cells, including androgen-independent cells. We furt...

  10. Development of GR/MR Chimeric Receptors and Their Response to Steroid Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We have established an effective and reliable technique of developing GR/MR chimeric receptors by DNA homologous recombination. To develop the method we transformed several different E. coli strains with a linearized plasmid containing full length of mGR(mouse GR) and hormone binding domain(HBD) of rMR(rat MR), the linear DNA undergoes recombination due to the homology of the mGR and the rMR and recircularize , and propagation in E. coli. PCR was performed to screen correct construction in which fusion between GR and MR took place. The constructs were digested with appropriate restriction endonucleases to test probable fusion sites of GR and HBD of MR. Precise fusion sites of GR and MR for constructs AB1157 # 2 , AB1157 # 18, AB 1157 # 22, AB1157 # 32, CMK603 # 6 were verified by DNA sequencing. Trans fection of COS- 7 cells with the constructs and subsequent treatment of transfected COS-7 cells with steroid hormones were carried out, the results showed that the constructs gave response to tested hormones. The study suggested that the GR/MR chimeric receptors can give rise to fusion proteins and their interactive function between hormone and receptor.

  11. Correlation between hormone dependency and the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor by tumor promoters in human mammary carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the tumor promoter phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA) on the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor levels were investigated in hormone-dependent (MCF-7, T-47-D, and ZR-75-1) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231, HBL-100, and BT-20) human mammary carcinoma cell lines. In the absence of TPA, hormone-independent cell lines contained high concentrations of low-affinity EGF receptors, whereas hormone-dependent cell lines exhibited low concentrations of high-affinity receptors. TPA causes a change of the receptor from a high- to the low-affinity state in hormone-dependent cell lines, as well as in the hormone-independent HBL-100, whereas the affinity remained unchanged in MDA-MB-231 and BT-20 cells. Tumor promoters such as TPA or teleocidin inhibited the proliferation of these cell lines at concentrations above 10 μM with the exception of the T-47-D cells. Evaluation of different TPA analogs indicated a positive correlation between the growth-inhibitory effects and their ability to stimulate the subcellular redistribution of protein kinase C activity in MCF-7 cells. These data suggest a protein kinase C-mediated down-regulation of the progesterone receptor concentration and of the EGF receptor affinity, which is supposed to mediate the mitogenic response. Furthermore, these results support the hypothesis that the tumor-derived growth factors induced by estradiol act via the EGF receptor in hormone-dependent mammary carcinoma cells

  12. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  13. Depression as a risk factor for overall and hormone-related cancer: The Korean cancer prevention study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hyoung Yoon; Keyes, Katherine M.; Mok, Yejin; Jung, Keum Ji; Shin, Yee-Jin; Jee, Sun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Depression has been hypothesized to be a risk factor of cancer, especially hormone related cancers. However, few studies have been conducted with large enough sample size and sufficient follow up period to rigorously estimate these associations. We aim to examine the relationship between depression and risk of registry documented overall and hormone related cancers. In this 19 year prospective cohort study of general population, 601,775 Koreans aged 30 64 years had a biennial medical evaluati...

  14. Evidence That the Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH) Receptor Transmembrane Domain Influences Kinetics of TSH Binding to the Receptor Ectodomain*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Rapoport, Basil

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-induced reduction in ligand binding affinity (negative cooperativity) requires TSH receptor (TSHR) homodimerization, the latter involving primarily the transmembrane domain (TMD) but with the extracellular domain (ECD) also contributing to this association. To test the role of the TMD in negative cooperativity, we studied the TSHR ECD tethered to the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that multimerizes despite the absence of the TMD. ...

  15. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, AD; Ellervik, C; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Axelsson, CK; Grønholdt, ML; Grande, P; Jensen, Gorm B; Nordestgaard, BG; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Ellervik, Christina; Axelsson, Christen Kirk; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Grande, Peer; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2007-01-01

    thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism), cancer of reproductive organs (breasts, ovaries, uterus, and prostate), and hip fracture. We also studied patients with ischemic heart disease (n=2495), ischemic cerebrovascular disease (n=856), and breast cancer (n=1256) versus general population......Background- We hypothesized that the estrogen receptor (ESR1) IVS1-397T/C polymorphism affects high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer of reproductive organs, and hip fracture. Methods and Results- We studied...... controls. The CC, CT, and TT genotypes had general population frequencies of 21%, 50%, and 29%, respectively. Cross-sectionally, genotype did not influence high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy. In the cohort study, there were no differences in risks of CVD, cancer of...

  16. Remarkable change in age-specific breast cancer incidence in the Swiss canton of Geneva and its possible relation with the use of hormone replacement therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article aims to explain the reasons for the remarkable change in age of breast cancer occurrence in the Swiss canton of Geneva. We used population-based data from the Geneva cancer registry, which collects information on method of detection, stage and tumour characteristics since 1975. For patients diagnosed between 1997–2003, we obtained additional information on use of hormone replacement therapy from a large prospective study on breast cancer. Using generalized log linear regression analysis, we compared age-specific incidence rates with respect to period, stage, oestrogen receptor status, method of detection and use of hormone replacement therapy. In the periods 1975–1979 and 1985–1989, breast cancer risk increased with age, showing the highest incidence rates among women aged ≥ 85 years. From 1997, the age-specific incidence curve changed completely (p < 0.0001), showing an incidence peak at 60–64 years and a reduced incidence among elderly women. This incidence peak concerned mainly early stage and oestrogen positive cancers and was exclusively observed among women who ever used hormone replacement therapy, regardless whether the tumour was screen-detected or not. The increasing prevalence of hormone replacement therapy use during the 1990s could explain the important change in age-specific breast cancer incidence, not only by increasing breast cancer risk, but also by revealing breast cancer at an earlier age

  17. Disruption of parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor phosphorylation prolongs ERK1/2 MAPK activation and enhances c-fos expression

    OpenAIRE

    Tawfeek, Hesham A.; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that parathyroid hormone (PTH) binding to the PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor (PPR) stimulates G protein coupling, receptor phosphorylation, β-arrestin translocation, and internalization of the ligand/receptor complex. The extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 MAPK) are downstream effectors of PPR. In the current study, we investigated the role of PPR phosphorylation in the PTH regulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Sh...

  18. Molecular identification of the first insect ecdysis triggering hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Annette; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael;

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website (www.flybase.org) contains an annotated gene sequence (CG5911), coding for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned the cDNA corresponding to this sequence and found that the gene has not been correctly predicted. The corrected gene CG5911 has five introns and...... six exons (1-6). Alternative splicing yields two cDNAs called A (containing exons 1-5) and B (containing exons 1-4, 6). We expressed these splicing variants in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that the corrected CG5911-A and -B cDNAs coded for two different G protein-coupled receptors that could...

  19. Polymorphism of growth hormone receptor (GHR gene in Holstein Friesian dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restu Misrianti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone gene have a critical role in the regulation of lactation, mammary gland development and growth process through its interaction with a specific receptor. Growth hormone (GH is an anabolic hormone which is synthesized and secreted by somatotrop cell in pituitary anterior lobe, and interacts with a specific receptor on the surface of the target cells. Growth hormone receptor (GHR has been suggested as candidate gene for traits related to milk production in Bovidae. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic polymorphism of the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR genes in Holstein Friesian (HF cattle. Total of 353 blood samples were collected from five populations belonging to Cikole Dairy Cattle Breeding Station (BPPT-SP Cikole (88 samples, Pasir Kemis (95 samples, Cilumber (98 samples, Cipelang Livestock Embryo Center (BET Cipelang (40 samples, Singosari National Artificial Insemination Centre (BBIB Singosari (32 samples and 17 frozen semen samples from Lembang Artificial Insemination Center (BIB Lembang. Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques then PCR products were genotyped by the Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP methods. There were two allele dan three genotypes were found namely: allele A and G, Genotype AA, AG and GG repectively. Allele A frequency (0.70-0.82 relatively higher than allele G frequency (0.18-0.30. Chi square test show that on group of BET Cipelang, BIB Lembang and BBIB Singosari population were not significantly different (0.00-0.93, while on group of BET Cipelang, BIB Lembang dan BBIB Singosari population were significantly different (6.02-11.13. Degree of observed heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.13-0.42 and expected heterozygosity (He ranged from 0.29-0.42.

  20. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor signaling and its impact on reproduction in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y; McFarlane, Heather; Maddineni, Sreenivasa R; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2009-09-01

    In birds, as in other vertebrates, reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis with each component secreting specific neuropeptides or hormones. Until recently, it was believed this axis is exclusively under the stimulatory control of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I) which in turn, stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion from the pituitary gland. However, the discovery of a novel inhibitory hypothalamic peptide able to reduce LH secretion (gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone: GnIH) challenged this dogma. Furthermore, with the characterization of its specific receptor (GnIHR), progress has been made to clarify the physiological relevance of GnIH in birds. This short review discusses the recent advances in GnIHR signaling at the level of the pituitary gland and the gonads. GnIHR is a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family which couples to G(alphai) and, upon activation inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, thus reducing intracellular cAMP levels. This implies that GnIH interferes with signaling of any GPCR coupled to G(alphas), including GnRH, LH and FSH receptors. In the chicken pituitary gland, the GnRHR-II/GnIHR ratio changes during sexual maturation in favor of GnRHR-II that appears to result in hypothalamic control of gonadotropin secretion shifting from inhibitory to stimulatory, with corresponding changes in GnRH-induced cAMP levels. Within the gonads, GnIH and its receptor may act in an autocrine/paracrine manner and may interfere with LH and FSH signaling to influence ovarian follicular maturation and recruitment, as well as spermatogenesis. PMID:19332068

  1. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2, and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, M.; Sorensen, F.B.; Overgaard, M.;

    2008-01-01

    present analysis included 1,000 of the 3,083 high-risk breast cancer patients randomly assigned to PMRT in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) protocol 82 trials b and c. Tissue microarray sections were stained for ER, PgR, and HER-2. Median follow-up time for patients alive was 17 years......+/HER-2+, Rec-/HER-2- (triple negative), and Rec-/HER-2+. Results A significantly improved overall survival after PMRT was seen only among patients characterized by good prognostic markers such as hormonal receptor-positive and HER-2- patients (including the two Rec+ subtypes). No significant overall...

  2. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2, and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Sørensen, Flemming B; Knudsen, Helle;

    2008-01-01

    present analysis included 1,000 of the 3,083 high-risk breast cancer patients randomly assigned to PMRT in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) protocol 82 trials b and c. Tissue microarray sections were stained for ER, PgR, and HER-2. Median follow-up time for patients alive was 17 years......+/HER-2+, Rec-/HER-2-(triple negative), and Rec-/HER-2+. RESULTS: A significantly improved overall survival after PMRT was seen only among patients characterized by good prognostic markers such as hormonal receptor-positive and HER-2- patients (including the two Rec+ subtypes). No significant overall...

  3. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook;

    2015-01-01

    facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated...

  4. Estrogen and progesterone hormone receptor status in breast carcinoma: Comparison of immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    K Radhika; A K Prayaga

    2010-01-01

    Context : Estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) play a significant role in the prognosis of breast cancer. For preoperative chemotherapy in locally advanced lesions, trucut biopsy is used to localize the ER and PR receptors by immunohistochemistry. Immunocytochemistry can be a better alternative to immunohistochemistry as it better fixes cells. AIMS : To evaluate the degree of correlation between immunocytochemical (ICC) and immunohistochemical (IHC) determination of ER an...

  5. High expression of follicle stimulating hormone receptor in testicular tissue of idiopathic azoospermic patients with severe spermatogenic defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liquan; Huang Hefeng; Jin Fan; Zhou Caiyun; Qian Yuli; Chen Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Background Follicle stimulating hormone is necessary for normal reproduction in men.The biochemical actions of follicle stimulating hormone result from binding to the follicle stimulating hormone receptor in the plasma membrane of Sertoli cells.Here,we investigated the expression of the follicle stimulating hormone receptor in different testicular histological phenotypes of patients with idiopathic azoospermia.Methods Fifty-seven cases of idiopathic azoospermia were classified into three groups according to the results of testicular biopsy:patients with hypospermatogenesis,patients with maturation arrest,and patients with Sertoli cell-only syndrome.Thirteen azoospermic patients identified by testicular biopsy as being capable of completing spermatogenesis acted as the control group.Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed in each case,and the serum hormone level was also measured in all patients.Results The serum follicle stimulating hormone level in patients with Sertoli cell-only syndrome was significantly higher than in patients with hypospermatogenesis,maturation arrest,and complete spermatogenesis (P<0.01).The serum follicle stimulating hormone level in patients with maturation arrest was significantly higher than in patients with hypospermatogenesis and complete spermatogenesis (P<0.05).There was no difference in serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in patients with hypospermatogenesis and complete spermatogenesis.The follicle stimulating hormone receptor expression level of testicular samples with Sertoli cell-only syndrome was significantly higher than in those with hypospermatogenesis,maturation arrest,and complete spermatogenesis (P<0.05),but no significant difference was observed among hypospermatogenesis,maturation arrest,and complete spermatogenesis testicular samples.Conclusions Different serum follicle stimulating hormone levels and follicle stimulating hormone receptor

  6. Hormones and breast cancer: can we use them in ways that could reduce the risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many hormones promote or inhibit breast cancer in different ways. These effects and the mechanisms involved are reviewed in order to suggest a potentially safer use of hormones. Natural estrogens, administered transdermally, and natural progesterone may be the safest combination of female hormones. Increased intake of cruciferous vegetables could provide additional safety by improving 2-hydoxyestrone and diminishing 16 alphahydroxyestrone. Testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may directly inhibit breast cancer, but could potentially stimulate it by being aromatized into estrogen in the breast. Modest doses with blood level monitoring appear logical. Melatonin and oxytocin are inhibitory to breast and other cancers. Insulin is a growth factor for breast cancer. Managing insulin resistance before the onset of diabetes could reduce the risk. Tri-iodothyronine (T3 has multiple anti-breast cancer effects. Synthroid may not increase T3 levels adequately. Human growth hormone does not appear to increase risk; but it should not be given for performance enhancement.

  7. Current applications of PET imaging of sex hormone receptors with a fluorinated analogue of estradiol or of testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the most frequent approach in the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) is detecting the hypermetabolic activity of the cancer tissue. A more specific approach, which may be complementary, is detecting the overexpression of receptors. In this review article, we aim to evaluate the results that are currently available for PET imaging of the sex hormone receptors in clinical oncology. The indication of PET and now PET/CT has been more disputed in breast carcinoma than in many other primary cancers (e.g., lung, head and neck, colorectal, lymphoma). 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), the glucose analogue for PET imaging, has a limited sensitivity to detect the primary breast tumors in case of lobular or in situ forms or small sized tumors localised on systematic mammography, and to identify minimal node invasion in the axilla. Using 16α-(18F]fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES), a fluorinated estradiol analogue, PET is able to detect the over-expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) in lesions, at a whole-body level. FES and FDG appear complementary for a better diagnostic performance in staging locally advanced breast cancer or restaging recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Another potential indication is predicting the response to starting or resuming hormone therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer, in relation with the ER status of all lesions revealed by FES PET. In two retrospective studies, FDG PET was also able to predict the response to hormone therapy, on basis of a metabolic flare, observed either after 7-10 days of treatment or during an estradiol challenge. A prospective comparison of those approaches is warranted. One study reported predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy thanks to a low value of FES SUVmax or FES/FDG SUV max ratio. The presence of ER in uterine tumors, including the benign ones, in ovarian cancers or even in meningiomas, may have therapeutic consequences and FES PET could have a clinical utility

  8. Analysis of photoaffinity label derivatives to probe thyroid hormone receptor in human fibroblasts, GH1 cells, and soluble receptor preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation of growth hormone gene expression by thyroid hormone in cultured GH1 cells is mediated by a chromatin-associated receptor. We have previously described a photoaffinity label derivative of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-T3) in which the alanine side chain was modified to form N-2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionyl-L-T3 (L-[125I]T3-PAL). On exposure to 254 nm UV light, L-[125I]T3-PAL generates a carbene which covalently modifies two thyroid hormone receptor forms in intact GH1 cells; an abundant 47,000 Mr species and a less abundant 57,000 Mr form. We have now synthesized similar photoaffinity label derivatives of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (L-T4) and 3,3',5'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-rT3). Both compounds identify the same receptor forms in intact cells and in nuclear extracts in vitro as L-[125I]T3-PAL. Labeling by L-[125I]rT3-PAL was low and consistent with the very low occupancy of receptor by L-rT3. Underivatized L-[125I]T3 and L-[125I]T4 labeled the same receptor forms at 254 nm but at a markedly lower efficiency than their PAL derivatives. In contrast, N-bromoacetyl-L-[125I]T3, a chemical affinity labeling agent, did not derivatize either receptor form in vitro. The relative efficiency of coupling to receptor at 254 nm was L-[125I]T4-PAL greater than L-[125I]T3-PAL greater than L-[125I]T4 greater than L-[125I]T3. Although L-[125I]T4-PAL has a lower affinity for receptor than L-[125I]T3-PAL, its coupling efficiency was 5-10-fold higher. This suggests that the alanine side chain of L-[125I]T4-PAL is positioned in the ligand binding region near a residue which is efficiently modified by photoactivation. With L-[125I]T4-PAL we were able to identify three different molecular weight receptor species in human fibroblast nuclei

  9. Parathyroid hormone decreases renal vitamin D receptor expression in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, Kevin D.; Vanhooke, Janeen L.; Prahl, Jean M.; DeLuca, Hector F.

    2005-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear transcription factor responsible for mediating the biological activities of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. Renal and parathyroid gland VDR content is an important factor in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D metabolism, and the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. In these tissues, VDR expression is highly regulated by the calcium and vitamin D status. Although 1,25(OH)2D3 up-regulates VDR expression, hypocalcemia ...

  10. Estrogen receptor-associated proteins: possible mediators of hormone-induced transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halachmi, S; Marden, E; Martin, G; MacKay, H; Abbondanza, C; Brown, M

    1994-06-01

    The estrogen receptor is a transcription factor which, when bound to estradiol, binds DNA and regulates expression of estrogen-responsive genes. A 160-kilodalton estrogen receptor-associated protein, ERAP160, was identified that exhibits estradiol-dependent binding to the receptor. Mutational analysis of the receptor shows that its ability to activate transcription parallels its ability to bind ERAP160. Antiestrogens are unable to promote ERAP160 binding and can block the estrogen-dependent interaction of the receptor and ERAP160 in a dose-dependent manner. This evidence suggests that ERAP160 may mediate estradiol-dependent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor. Furthermore, the ability of antiestrogens to block estrogen receptor-ERAP160 complex formation could account for their therapeutic effects in breast cancer. PMID:8197458

  11. Androgen receptor expression as a prognostic and predictive marker in triple-negative breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Zakaria; Nehal El-Mashad; Dareen Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It is clear that triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumors are heterogeneous group, but clinically important sub-sets have begun to emerge. We investigate the immunohistochemical expression of androgen receptor (AR) among those hormonal insensitive groups which have only the option of chemotherapy. Exploiting this knowledge for therapy has been challenging. Patients & methods: Seventy seven patients with TNBC subtype, treated from January 2009 until February 2011 were evaluated ...

  12. Pterostilbene-Isothiocyanate Conjugate Suppresses Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells Irrespective of Androgen Receptor Status

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Chakraborty, Ajanta; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy and anti-hormonal therapies are the most common treatments for non-organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). However, the effectiveness of these therapies is limited, thus necessitating the development of alternative approaches. The present study focused on analyzing the role of pterostilbene (PTER)-isothiocyanate (ITC) conjugate – a novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by appending an ITC moiety on PTER backbone – in regulating the functions of androgen receptor (AR), thereby ...

  13. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A.; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide...

  14. Osteopontin deficiency enhances parathyroid hormone/ parathyroid hormone related peptide receptor (PPR) signaling-induced alteration in tooth formation and odontoblastic morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Morishita, Maki; Ono, Noriaki; Miyai, Kentano; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Hanyu, Ryo; Nagao, Masashi; Kamolratanakul, Paksinee; Notomi, Takuya; Rittling, Susan R; Denhardt, David T.; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Noda, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor (PPR) signaling is known to be involved in tooth development. In bone, extracellular matrix protein osteopontin (OPN) is a negative regulator of PPR signaling in bone formation. However, the role of OPN in modulation of PPR action in tooth development is not understood. Therefore, we examined the tooth in double mutant mice. Constitutively active PPR was expressed specifically in the odontoblasts and osteoblasts (caPPR-tg) in th...

  15. Long chain fatty Acyl-CoA synthetase 4 is a biomarker for and mediator of hormone resistance in human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Wu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4 in breast cancer. Public databases were utilized to analyze the relationship between ACSL4 mRNA expression and the presence of steroid hormone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 in both breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. In addition, cell lines were utilized to assess the consequences of either increased or decreased levels of ACSL4 expression. Proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth and apoptosis were used as biological end points. Effects on mRNA expression and signal transduction pathways were also monitored. A meta-analysis of public gene expression databases indicated that ACSL4 expression is positively correlated with a unique subtype of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC, characterized by the absence of androgen receptor (AR and therefore referred to as quadruple negative breast cancer (QNBC. Results of experiments in breast cancer cell lines suggest that simultaneous expression of ACSL4 and a receptor is associated with hormone resistance. Forced expression of ACSL4 in ACSL4-negative, estrogen receptor α (ER-positive MCF-7 cells resulted in increased growth, invasion and anchorage independent growth, as well as a loss of dependence on estrogen that was accompanied by a reduction in the levels of steroid hormone receptors. Sensitivity to tamoxifen, triacsin C and etoposide was also attenuated. Similarly, when HER2-positive, ACSL4-negative, SKBr3 breast cancer cells were induced to express ACSL4, the proliferation rate increased and the apoptotic effect of lapatinib was reduced. The growth stimulatory effect of ACSL4 expression was also observed in vivo in nude mice when MCF-7 control and ACSL4-expressing cells were utilized to induce tumors. Our data strongly suggest that ACSL4 can serve as both a biomarker for, and mediator of, an aggressive breast cancer phenotype.

  16. Evaluation of the ability of adjuvant tamoxifen-benefit gene signatures to predict outcome of hormone-naive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen in the advanced setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Lyng, Maria Bibi; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E;

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular markers indicative of response to tamoxifen and easily implemented in the routine setting, we recently reported three gene signatures that could stratify post-menopausal tamoxifen-treated, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) patients according to outcome in the adjuvant setting...

  17. A systematic review of non-hormonal treatments of vasomotor symptoms in climacteric and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewe, Juergen; Bucher, Kathleen A; Zahner, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal climacteric symptoms of hot flushes and night sweats affect 24-93% of all women during the physiological transition from reproductive to post-reproductive life. Though efficacious, hormonal therapy and partial oestrogenic compounds are linked to a significant increase in breast cancer. Non-hormonal treatments are thus greatly appreciated. This systematic review of published hormonal and non-hormonal treatments for climacteric, and breast and prostate cancer-associated hot flushes, examines clinical efficacy and therapy-related cancer risk modulation. A PubMed search included literature up to June 19, 2014 without limits for initial dates or language, with the search terms, (hot flush* OR hot flash*) AND (clinical trial* OR clinical stud*) AND (randomi* OR observational) NOT review). Retrieved references identified further papers. The focus was on hot flushes; other symptoms (night sweats, irritability, etc.) were not specifically screened. Included were some 610 clinical studies where a measured effect of the intervention, intensity and severity were documented, and where patients received treatment of pharmaceutical quality. Only 147 of these references described studies with alternative non-hormonal treatments in post-menopausal women and in breast and prostate cancer survivors; these results are presented in Additional file 1. The most effective hot flush treatment is oestrogenic hormones, or a combination of oestrogen and progestins, though benefits are partially outweighed by a significantly increased risk for breast cancer development. This review illustrates that certain non-hormonal treatments, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, gabapentin/pregabalin, and Cimicifuga racemosa extracts, show a positive risk-benefit ratio. Key pointsSeveral non-hormonal alternatives to hormonal therapy have been established and registered for the treatment of vasomotor climacteric symptoms in peri- and post-menopausal women.There are indications

  18. Study of change of sex hormone receptors in diabetic impotent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the relationship between diabetic impotence and sex hormones as well as sex hormone receptors. 32 diabetic impotent patients, 32 diabetic patients with normal sex function, 32 impotent patients without diabetes, and 40 healthy men were enrolled. The plasma sex hormone levels were examined by radioimmunoassay, and sex hormone receptors in white blood cells by radioreceptor assay. Compared with healthy men and impotent patients without diabetes, PRL levels in both diabetic impotent patients and diabetic patients with normal sex function increased markedly, T and AR levels decreased, and the ratio of E2/T and ER/AR increased. Compared with diabetic patients with normal sex function, while there was no significant difference in PRL, T and E2/T ratio, the AR level of diabetic impotent patients further decreased, and the ER/AR ratio further increased. Negative correlation was found between age and AR as well as T. The decline of AR and the increase of ER/AR ratio might be one main cause of diabetic impotence. And the decline of T and AR might be an important cause of the increase of diabetic impotence incidence with age

  19. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billestrup, N.; Allevato, G.; Moldrup, A. [Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to medite GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH-stimulated metabolic effects such as protein synthesis and lipolysis. Furthermore, this mutant GH receptor internalized rapidly following GH binding. Another truncated GH receptor lacking all but five amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain could not mediate any effects of GH nor did it internalize. Deletion of the proline-rich region or changing the four prolines to alanines also resulted in a GH receptor deficient in signaling. Mutation of phenylalanine 346 to alanine resulted in a GH receptor which did not internalize rapidly; however, this mutant GH receptor was capable of mediating GH-stimulated transcription as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (1) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (2) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (3) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Association of estrogen receptor-α and progesterone receptor A expression with hormonal mammary carcinogenesis: role of the host microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Montero Girard, Guadalupe; Silvia I. Vanzulli; Cerliani, Juan Pablo; Bottino, María Cecilia; Bolado, Julieta; Vela, Jorge; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Benavides, Fernando; Gutkind, Silvio; Patel, Vyomesh; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induces estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive ductal invasive mammary carcinomas in BALB/c mice. We sought to reproduce this MPA cancer model in C57BL/6 mice because of their widespread use in genetic engineering. Within this experimental setting, we studied the carcinogenic effects of MPA, the morphologic changes in mammary glands that are induced by MPA and progesterone, and the levels of ER and PR expression i...

  1. Expression of anti-Mullerian hormone receptor on the appendix testis in connection with urological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kornél Kistamás; Olga Ruzsnavszky; Andrea Telek; Lívia Kosztka; Ilona Kovács; Beatrix Dienes; László Csernoch

    2013-01-01

    The female internal sex organs develop from the paramesonephric (Mullerian) duct.In male embryos,the regression of the Mullerian duct is caused by the anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH),which plays an important role in the process of testicular descent.The physiological remnant of the Mullerian duct in males is the appendix testis (AT).In our previous study,we presented evidence for the decreased incidence of AT in cryptorchidism with intraoperative surgery.In this report,the expression of the anti-Mullerian hormone receptor type 2 (AMHR2),the specific receptor of AMH,on the AT was investigated in connection with different urological disorders,such as hernia inguinalis,torsion of AT,cysta epididymis,varicocele,hydrocele testis and various forms of undescended testis.The correlation between the age of the patients and the expression of the AMHR2 was also examined.Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the receptor's mRNA and protein levels,respectively.We demonstrate that AMHR2 is expressed in the ATs.Additionally,the presence of this receptor was proven at the mRNA and protein levels.The expression pattern of the receptor correlated with neither the examined urological disorders nor the age of the patients;therefore,the function of the AT remains obscure.

  2. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric; (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (MCW); (UCR); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  3. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2009-12-03

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved ?-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypermetabolism in mice caused by the central action of an unliganded thyroid hormone receptor α1

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Maria; Alkemade, Anneke; Mittag, Jens; Nordström, Kristina; Katz, Abram; Rozell, Björn; Westerblad, Håkan; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Thyroid hormone, via its nuclear receptors TRα and TRβ, controls metabolism by acting locally in peripheral tissues and centrally by regulating sympathetic signaling. We have defined aporeceptor regulation of metabolism by using mice heterozygous for a mutant TRα1 with low affinity to T3. The animals were hypermetabolic, showing strongly reduced fat depots, hyperphagia and resistance to diet-induced obesity accompanied by induction of genes involved in glucose handling and fatty acid metaboli...

  5. Nuclear receptors for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone regulate transcription of keratin genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomic, M; Jiang, C K; Epstein, H S; Freedberg, I M; Samuels, H H; M. Blumenberg

    1990-01-01

    In the epidermis, retinoids regulate the expression of keratins, the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells. We have cloned the 5' regulatory regions of four human epidermal keratin genes, K#5, K#6, K#10, and K#14, and engineered constructs in which these regions drive the expression of the CAT reporter gene. By co-transfecting the constructs into epithelial cells along with the vectors expressing nuclear receptors for retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone, we have demonstrated t...

  6. Modulation of interleukin 2 receptor expression on normal human lymphocytes by thymic hormones.

    OpenAIRE

    Sztein, M B; Serrate, S A; Goldstein, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    The expression of interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R) is a critical step leading to normal lymphocyte proliferation. Since thymosin fraction 5 (TF5), a thymic hormone preparation, enhances lymphoproliferative responses of human cells, we examined the effects of TF5 on the expression of IL-2R on mitogen-stimulated human lymphocytes. TF5 significantly increased the percentage and antigen density of cells expressing IL-2R after stimulation with an optimal concentration of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) wh...

  7. Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis are Increased in Kidneys of Growth Hormone Receptor Knockout (GHRKO) Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gesing, Adam; Bartke, Andrzej; Wang, Feiya; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Masternak, Michal M.

    2011-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor knockout mice (GHRKO) are remarkably long-lived and highly insulin sensitive. Alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis are associated with aging and various metabolic derangements. We have previously demonstrated increased gene expression of key regulators of mitochondriogenesis in kidneys, hearts and skeletal muscles of GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study was to quantify the protein levels of the following regulators of mitochondriogenesis: peroxisome pro...

  8. Brain volumes in late life: gender, hormone treatment, and estrogen receptor variants.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Joanne; Artero, Sylvaine; Carrière, Isabelle; Scali, Jacqueline; Maller, Jerome; Meslin, Chantal; Ritchie, Karen; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Structural imaging studies suggest gender differences in brain volumes; however, whether hormone treatment (HT) can protect against age-related structural changes remains unknown, and no prior neuroimaging study has investigated potential interactions between HT and estrogen receptor (ESR) polymorphisms. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure gray and white matter, hippocampal volume, corpus callosum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), total intracranial volume (ICV) and white matter lesions ...

  9. 506 Basal T Cell Subpopulations of Normal Humans Vary by Stress Hormone Receptor Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Rehm, Kristina; Xiang, Lianbin; Marshall, Gailen

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological stress has been correlated with allergy and asthma activity although there are clearly individual differences in the responses to the same stressor. These individual differences could be influenced by stress hormone receptor binding affinity, which could be altered by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods We categorized differences in immunoregulatory profiles from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 207 normal volunteers according to various glucoc...

  10. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms. PMID:27089421

  11. The Relationship Between Gene Polymorphism of Leptin and Leptin Receptor and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jinshui; Fang, Yanling; Lin, Xinfu; Zhou, Huowang; ZHU, SHAOBO; Zhang, Yugui; Yang, Huicong; Ye, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a major cause of congenital short stature. GHD patients have significantly decreased serum leptin levels, which are regulated by gene polymorphism of leptin and leptin receptor. This study thus investigated the relationship between gene polymorphism and susceptibility to GHD. Material/Methods A case-control study was performed using 180 GHD children in addition to 160 healthy controls. After the extraction of whole genomic DNA, the genotypes of l...

  12. Antagonizing the parathyroid calcium receptor stimulates parathyroid hormone secretion and bone formation in osteopenic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gowen, Maxine; Stroup, George B.; Dodds, Robert A; James, Ian E.; Votta, Bart J.; Smith, Brian R.; Bhatnagar, Pradip K.; Lago, Amparo M.; Callahan, James F.; DelMar, Eric G.; Miller, Michael A.; Nemeth, Edward F.; Fox, John

    2000-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an effective bone anabolic agent, but it must be administered parenterally. An orally active anabolic agent would provide a valuable alternative for treating osteoporosis. NPS 2143 is a novel, selective antagonist (a “calcilytic”) of the parathyroid cell Ca2+ receptor. Daily oral administration of NPS 2143 to osteopenic ovariectomized (OVX) rats caused a sustained increase in plasma PTH levels, provoking a dramatic increase in bone turnover but no net change in bo...

  13. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Cynthia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC, female breast carcinoma (FBC, and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%, focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%, and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82. Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions.

  14. Receptors of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Ovarian-Axis Hormone in Uterine Myomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Plewka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the expression of GnRH, FSH, LH, ER-α, ER-β, and PR receptors was examined in uterine myomas of women in reproductive and perimenopausal age. In cases of GnRH and tropic hormones a membranous and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical reaction was detected, in cases of ER-α and PR the reaction was located in cell nucleus, and in the case of ER-β it manifested also a cytoplasmic location. In some of the examined cases the expression was detected in endometrium, myocytes, and endothelium of blood vessels, in uterine glands and myoma cells. In myometrium the level of GnRH and LH receptors increases with age, whereas the level of progesterone and both estrogen receptors decreases. In myomas of women in reproductive age, independently of their size, expression of GnRH, FSH, and LH receptors was more pronounced than in myometrium. In women of perimenopausal age, independently of myoma size, expression of LH and estrogen α receptors was higher while expression of GnRH receptors was lower than in myometrium. FSH receptor expression was not observed. Expression of estrogen receptor β was not affected by age of the woman or size of myoma. Analysis of obtained results indicates on existing in small myomas local feedback axis between GnRH-LH-progesterone.

  15. Depression related to (neo)adjuvant hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: We studied whether hormonal therapy, (neo)adjuvant to radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, is related to an increase in depression and whether this is caused by the hormonal therapy itself or by the relatively poor prognosis of patients who get (neo)adjuvant hormonal therapy. Methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 288 patients, irradiated for prostate cancer (T1-3N0M0), were studied prospectively in two clinics. In one clinic almost all patients received (neo)adjuvant androgen deprivation (Bicalutamide + Gosereline). In a second clinic hormonal therapy was prescribed mainly for high risk patients. This allowed us to separate the effects of hormonal therapy and the patient's prognosis. Results: During the course of hormonal therapy, depression was significantly heightened by both hormone use (p < 0.001) and poor prognosis (p < 0.01). After completion of hormonal therapy, poor prognosis continued to affect the depression score (p < 0.01). The increase was, however, small. Conclusions: Depression was mildly increased in patients receiving hormonal therapy. The increase appeared to be related to both the hormone therapy itself and the high risk status of patients. High risk status, with the associated poor prognosis, had a more sustained effect on depression. The rise was statistically significant, but was too small, however, to bear clinical significance.

  16. Potential applications for sigma receptor ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waarde, Aren; Rybczynska, Anna A; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O

    2015-10-01

    Sigma receptors (sigma-1 and sigma-2) represent two independent classes of proteins. Their endogenous ligands may include the hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and sphingolipid-derived amines which interact with sigma-1 receptors, besides steroid hormones (e.g., progesterone) which bind to both sigma receptor subpopulations. The sigma-1 receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone with various ion channels and G-protein-coupled membrane receptors as clients. The sigma-2 receptor was identified as the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1). Although sigma receptors are over-expressed in tumors and up-regulated in rapidly dividing normal tissue, their ligands induce significant cell death only in tumor tissue. Sigma ligands may therefore be used to selectively eradicate tumors. Multiple mechanisms appear to underlie cell killing after administration of sigma ligands, and the signaling pathways are dependent both on the type of ligand and the type of tumor cell. Recent evidence suggests that the sigma-2 receptor is a potential tumor and serum biomarker for human lung cancer and an important target for inhibiting tumor invasion and cancer progression. Current radiochemical efforts are focused on the development of subtype-selective radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Right now, the mostpromising tracers are [18F]fluspidine and [18F]FTC-146 for sigma-1 receptors and [11C]RHM-1 and [18F]ISO-1 for the sigma-2 subtype. Nanoparticles coupled to sigma ligands have shown considerable potential for targeted delivery of antitumor drugs in animal models of cancer, but clinical studies exploring this strategy in cancer patients have not yet been reported. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25173780

  17. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  18. Advances in breast cancer treatment and prevention: preclinical studies on aromatase inhibitors and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensive basic and clinical research over the past 20 years has yielded crucial molecular understanding into how estrogen and the estrogen receptor act to regulate breast cancer and has led to the development of more effective, less toxic, and safer hormonal therapy agents for breast cancer management and prevention. Selective potent aromatase inhibitors are now challenging the hitherto gold standard of hormonal therapy, the selective estrogen-receptor modulator tamoxifen. Furthermore, new selective estrogen-receptor modulators such as arzoxifene, currently under clinical development, offer the possibility of selecting one with a more ideal pharmacological profile for treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Two recent studies in preclinical model systems that evaluate mechanisms of action of these new drugs and suggestions about their optimal clinical use are discussed

  19. The Thyroid Hormone Receptors Inhibit Hepatic Interleukin-6 Signaling During Endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Saiz-Ladera, Cristina; Valiño, Arturo José; Regadera, Javier; Alemany, Susana; Aranda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Decreased thyroidal hormone production is found during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic shock in animals as well as in critically ill patients. Here we studied the role of the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) in activation of STAT3, NF-κB and ERK, which play a key role in the response to inflammatory cytokines during sepsis. TR knockout mice showed down-regulation of hepatic inflammatory mediators, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) in response to LPS. Paradoxically, STAT3 and ERK activity were higher, suggesting that TRs could act as endogenous repressors of these pathways. Furthermore, hyperthyroidism increased cytokine production and mortality in response to LPS, despite decreasing hepatic STAT3 and ERK activity. This suggested that TRs could directly repress the response of the cells to inflammatory mediators. Indeed, we found that the thyroid hormone T3 suppresses IL-6 signalling in macrophages and hepatocarcinoma cells, inhibiting STAT3 activation. Consequently, the hormone strongly antagonizes IL-6-stimulated gene transcription, reducing STAT3 recruitment and histone acetylation at IL-6 target promoters. In conclusion, TRs are potent regulators of inflammatory responses and immune homeostasis during sepsis. Reduced responses to IL-6 should serve as a negative feedback mechanism for preventing deleterious effects of excessive hormone signaling during infections. PMID:27484112

  20. The Metabolism, Analysis, and Targeting of Steroid Hormones in Breast and Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capper, Cameron P; Rae, James M; Auchus, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Breast and prostate cancers are malignancies in which steroid hormones drive cellular proliferation. Over the past century, this understanding has led to successful treatment strategies aimed to inhibit hormone-mediated tumor growth. Nonetheless, disease relapse and progression still pose significant clinical problems, with recurrent and metastatic tumors often exhibiting resistance to current drug therapies. The central role of androgens and estrogens in prostate and breast cancer etiology explains not only why endocrine therapies are often initially successful but also why many tumors ultimately become resistant. It is hypothesized that reducing the concentration of active hormones in the systemic circulation may be insufficient to block cancer progression, as this action selects for tumor cells that can generate active steroids from circulating precursors. This review aims to highlight the currently known differences of steroid biosynthesis in normal physiology versus hormone-dependent cancers, modern approaches to the assessment and targeting of these pathways, and priorities for future research. PMID:26969590

  1. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R;

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...

  2. Extended and Structurally Supported Insights into Extracellular Hormone Binding, Signal Transduction and Organization of the Thyrotropin Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Gerd; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kleinau, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The hormone thyrotropin (TSH) and its receptor (TSHR) are crucial for the growth and function of the thyroid gland. The TSHR is evolutionary linked with the receptors of follitropin (FSHR) and lutropin/choriogonadotropin (LHR) and their sequences and structures are similar. The extracellular region of TSHR contains more than 350 amino acids and binds hormone and antibodies. Several important questions related to functions and mechanisms of TSHR are still not comprehensively understood. One ma...

  3. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing, E-mail: wangstella5@163.com [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong Univeristy, Wenhua Xi Road 107, Shandong Province (China); Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province (China); Yang, Qifeng, E-mail: qifengy@gmail.com [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong Univeristy, Wenhua Xi Road 107, Shandong Province (China); Haffty, Bruce G., E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, NB (United States); Li, Xiaoyan, E-mail: xiaoyanli1219@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province (China); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  4. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  5. From Bittner to Barr: a viral, diet and hormone breast cancer aetiology hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, James S; Tran, Dinh; Rawlinson, William D.

    2000-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the human homologue of the mouse mammary tumour virus (HHMMTV) and other viruses, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), act as cofactors with diet, oestrogens and other hormones in the initiation and promotion of some types of breast cancer in genetically susceptible women. It is further hypothesized that diet influences the risk of breast cancer, through its influence on oestrogen metabolism and that of other hormones, in combination with ge...

  6. Reproductive Factors, Exogenous Hormones, and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the CTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eunjung; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Rull, Rudolph P.; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ursin, Giske; Henderson, Katherine D.; Bernstein, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Female steroid hormones are hypothesized to play a protective role in pancreatic cancer risk. However, results from epidemiologic studies that examined hormone-related exposures have been inconsistent. The California Teachers Study is a cohort study of female public school professionals that was established in 1995–1996. Of the 118,164 eligible study participants, 323 women were diagnosed with incident invasive pancreatic cancer through December 31, 2009. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard...

  7. Expression of growth hormone receptor and its mRNA in hepatic cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Wang; Shuang Chen; Jie Wang; Qing-Jia Ou; Chao Liu; Shu-Sen Zheng; Mei-Hai Deng; Xiao-Ping Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of growth hormone receptor (GHR) and mRNA of GHR in cirrhotic livers of rats with the intension to find the basis for application of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to patients with liver cirrhosis.METHODS: Hepatic cirrhosis was induced in SpragueDawley rats by administration of thioacetamide intraperitoneally for 9-12 weeks. Collagenase Ⅳ was perfused in situ for isolation of hepatocytes. The expression of GHR and its mRNA in cirrhotic livers was studied with radio-ligand binding assay, RT-PCR and digital image analysis.RESULTS: One class of specific growth hormone-binding site, GHR, was detected in hepatocytes and hepatic tissue of cirrhotic livers. The binding capacity of GHR (RT, fmol/mg protein) in rat cirrhotic liver tissue (30.8±1.9) was significantly lower than that in normal control (74.9±3.9) at the time point of the ninth week after initiation of induction of cirrhosis (n=10, P<0.05), and it decreased gradually along with the accumulation of collagen in the process of formation and development of liver cirrhosis (P<0.05). The number of binding sites (×10 4/cell) of GHR on rat cirrhotic hepatocytes (0.86±0.16) was significantly lower than that (1.28±0.24)in control (n= 10, P<0.05). The binding affinity of GHR among liver tissue, hepatocytes of various groups had no significant difference (P>0.05). The expression of GHR mRNA (riOD,pixel) in rat cirrhotic hepatic tissues (23.3±3.1) was also significantly lower than that (29.3±3.4) in normal control (n=10, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The growth hormone receptor was expressed in a reduced level in liver tissue of cirrhotic rats,and lesser expression of growth hormone receptors was found in a later stage of cirrhosis. The reduced expression of growth hormone receptor was partly due to its decreased expression on cirrhotic hepatocytes and the reduced expression of its mRNA in cirrhotic liver tissue.

  8. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  9. Interactions between intakes of alcohol and postmenopausal hormones on risk of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol and postmenopausal hormone use are well-established modifiable risk factors for breast cancer. Alcohol may decrease the metabolic clearance of estradiol, whereby the risk of breast cancer associated with hormone use may depend on blood alcohol levels. The objective is to determine whether...... breast cancer (HR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.52-2.61) compared to nonhormone users. We found an interaction between these 2 factors; those who had an intake of more than 2 drinks per day and took hormones had a risk of 4.74 (95% CI: 2.61-8.59) for breast cancer compared to abstainers who did not use hormones...... alcohol interacts with hormone use on risk of breast cancer. The 5,035 postmenopausal women who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study were asked about their alcohol intake and hormone use at baseline in 1981-1983 and were followed until 2002 in the Danish cancer registry, with <0.1% loss to...

  10. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Myriam; Kancharla, Arun; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Agranovich, Daniel; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27529230

  11. Altered metabolism of growth hormone receptor mutant mice: a combined NMR metabonomics and microarray study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Joachim Schirra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth hormone is an important regulator of post-natal growth and metabolism. We have investigated the metabolic consequences of altered growth hormone signalling in mutant mice that have truncations at position 569 and 391 of the intracellular domain of the growth hormone receptor, and thus exhibit either low (around 30% maximum or no growth hormone-dependent STAT5 signalling respectively. These mutations result in altered liver metabolism, obesity and insulin resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis of metabolic changes was performed using microarray analysis of liver tissue and NMR metabonomics of urine and liver tissue. Data were analyzed using multivariate statistics and Gene Ontology tools. The metabolic profiles characteristic for each of the two mutant groups and wild-type mice were identified with NMR metabonomics. We found decreased urinary levels of taurine, citrate and 2-oxoglutarate, and increased levels of trimethylamine, creatine and creatinine when compared to wild-type mice. These results indicate significant changes in lipid and choline metabolism, and were coupled with increased fat deposition, leading to obesity. The microarray analysis identified changes in expression of metabolic enzymes correlating with alterations in metabolite concentration both in urine and liver. Similarity of mutant 569 to the wild-type was seen in young mice, but the pattern of metabolites shifted to that of the 391 mutant as the 569 mice became obese after six months age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The metabonomic observations were consistent with the parallel analysis of gene expression and pathway mapping using microarray data, identifying metabolites and gene transcripts involved in hepatic metabolism, especially for taurine, choline and creatinine metabolism. The systems biology approach applied in this study provides a coherent picture of metabolic changes resulting from impaired STAT5 signalling by the growth hormone

  12. Female Hormonal Factors and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer in Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Seyedeh Ghazaleh; Chau, Rowena; Ouakrim, Driss Ait; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Arnold, Julie; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Haile, Robert W.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Baron, John A.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-01-01

    Importance Apart from hysterectomy, there is no consensus recommendation for reducing endometrial cancer risk for women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation (Lynch syndrome). Objective To investigate the association between hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk in Lynch syndrome. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective cohort study including 1,128 women with a MMR gene mutation identified from the Colon Cancer Family Registry was conducted. Data were analyzed using a weighted cohort approach. Participants were recruited between 1997 and 2012, from centers across the United States, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. Exposures Age at menarche, first and last live birth, and menopause, number of live births, hormonal contraceptive use, and postmenopausal hormone use. Main Outcome and Measures Self-reported diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Results Endometrial cancer was diagnosed in 133 women (incidence per 100 person-years, 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24 to 0.34). A lower risk of endometrial cancer was associated with later age at menarche (hazard ratio [HR] per year, 0.85 [95%CI, 0.73 to 0.99]; P=.04), parity (parous vs nulliparous: HR, 0.21 [95%CI, 0.10 to 0.42]; P<.001), and hormonal contraceptive use (≥1 year vs <1 year: HR, 0.39 [95%CI, 0.23 to 0.64]; P<.001). There was no statistically significant association between endometrial cancer and age at first and last live birth, age at menopause, and postmenopausal hormone use. Conclusions and Relevance For women with a MMR gene mutation, some endogenous and exogenous hormonal factors were associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer. These directions and strengths of associations were similar to those for the general population. If replicated, these findings suggest that women with a MMR gene mutation may be counseled like the general population in regard to hormonal influences on endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26151267

  13. Gonadal steroid hormone receptors and sex differences in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R J; Burgess, L H; Kerr, J E; O'Keefe, J A

    1994-12-01

    The rapid activation of stress-responsive neuroendocrine systems is a basic reaction of animals to perturbations in their environment. One well-established response is that of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In rats, corticosterone is the major adrenal steroid secreted and is released in direct response to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secreted from the anterior pituitary gland. ACTH in turn is regulated by the hypothalamic factor, corticotropin-releasing hormone. A sex difference exists in the response of the HPA axis to stress, with females reacting more robustly than males. It has been demonstrated that in both sexes, products of the HPA axis inhibit reproductive function. Conversely, the sex differences in HPA function are in part due to differences in the circulating gonadal steroid hormone milieu. It appears that testosterone can act to inhibit HPA function, whereas estrogen can enhance HPA function. One mechanism by which androgens and estrogens modulate stress responses is through the binding to their cognate receptors in the central nervous system. The distribution and regulation of androgen and estrogen receptors within the CNS suggest possible sites and mechanisms by which gonadal steroid hormones can influence stress responses. In the case of androgens, data suggest that the control of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus is mediated trans-synaptically. For estrogen, modulation of the HPA axis may be due to changes in glucocorticoid receptor-mediated negative feedback mechanisms. The results of a variety of studies suggest that gonadal steroid hormones, particularly testosterone, modulate HPA activity in an attempt to prevent the deleterious effects of HPA activation on reproductive function. PMID:7729815

  14. Occurrence of xenobiotic ligands for retinoid X receptors and thyroid hormone receptors in the aquatic environment of Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Xenobiotic RXR agonists and antagonists were found in river systems in Taiwan. • Potential TR antagonists were mainly detected in water extracts. • Samples collected near the river mouths exhibited high RXR disrupting activity. • RXR/TR antagonist activity in water became stronger after HPLC fractionation. • Bioassays are useful tools to investigate xenobiotic ligands for nuclear receptors. - Abstract: Various synthetic compounds are frequently discharged into the environment via human activities. Among them, certain contaminants may disrupt normal physiological functions of wildlife and humans via interactions with nuclear receptors. To protect human health and the environment, it is important to detect environmental ligands for human nuclear receptors. In this study, yeast-based reporter gene assays were used to investigate the occurrence of xenobiotic ligands for retinoid X receptors (RXR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR) in the aquatic environment of Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that RXR agonist/antagonist activity was detected in river water and sediment samples. In particular, high RXR agonist/antagonist activity was found in the samples collected near river mouths. Additionally, few samples also elicited significant TR antagonist activity. Our findings show that the aquatic environment of Taiwan was contaminated with RXR and TR ligands. Further study is necessary to identify these xenobiotic RXR and TR agonists and antagonists

  15. Prospective studies of hormonal and life-style related factors and risk of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wirén, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Androgens are important in prostate cancer development but how circulating levels of androgens affect risk of prostate cancer of different aggressiveness is not clear. Being childless has been associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer, but it is not clear if this association is causal or a result of residual confounding. Fathering of dizygotic twins, a marker of high fertility, has not been studied in relation to risk of prostate cancer. Another marker of life-long hormonal ...

  16. Hormone Use in Food Animal Production: Assessing Potential Dietary Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Keeve E; Smith, Tyler J S

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the role of hormones in breast cancer etiology, following reports that heightened levels of endogenous hormones and exposure to exogenous hormones and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals through food and the environment are associated with increased breast cancer risk. Seven hormone drugs (testosterone propionate, trenbolone acetate, estradiol, zeranol, progesterone, melengestrol acetate, and bovine somatotropin) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in food animals. There is concern that these drugs or their biologically active metabolites may accumulate in edible tissues, potentially increasing the risk of exposure for consumers. To date, the potential for human exposure to residues of these compounds in animal products, as well as the risks that may result from this exposure, is poorly understood. In this paper, we discuss the existing scientific evidence examining the toxicological significance of exposure to hormones used in food animal production in relation to breast cancer risk. Through a discussion of U.S. federal regulatory programs and the primary literature, we interpret the state of surveillance for residues of hormone drugs in animal products and discuss trends in meat consumption in relation to the potential for hormone exposure. Given the lack of chronic bioassays of oral toxicity of the seven hormone compounds in the public literature and the limitations of existing residue surveillance programs, it is not currently possible to provide a quantitative characterization of risks that result from the use of hormonal drugs in food animal production, complicating our understanding of the role of dietary hormone exposure in the population burden of breast cancer. PMID:26231238

  17. Liganded and unliganded activation of estrogen receptor and hormone replacement therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Maggi, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Abstracts Over the past two decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor physiology in mammals widened considerably as we acquired a deeper appreciation of the roles of estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ER? and ER?) in reproduction as well as in bone and metabolic homeostasis, depression, vascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. In addition, our insights on ER transcriptional functions in cells increased considerably with the demonstration that ER activity is n...

  18. Risk of Hormone Escape in a Human Prostate Cancer Model Depends on Therapy Modalities and Can Be Reduced by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyader, Charlotte; Céraline, Jocelyn; Gravier, Eléonore; Morin, Aurélie; Michel, Sandrine; Erdmann, Eva; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Cabon, Florence; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Poupon, Marie-France; Oudard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Almost all prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation treatment but many recur. We postulated that risk of hormone escape -frequency and delay- are influenced by hormone therapy modalities. More, hormone therapies induce crucial biological changes involving androgen receptors; some might be targets for escape prevention. We investigated the relationship between the androgen deprivation treatment and the risk of recurrence using nude mice bearing the high grade, hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenograft PAC120. Tumor-bearing mice were treated by Luteinizing-Hormone Releasing Hormone (LHRH) antagonist alone, continuous or intermittent regimen, or combined with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide or flutamide). Tumor growth was monitored. Biological changes were studied as for genomic alterations, AR mutations and protein expression in a large series of recurrent tumors according to hormone therapy modalities. Therapies targeting Her-2 or AKT were tested in combination with castration. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tumor growth was inhibited by continuous administration of the LH-RH antagonist degarelix (castration), but 40% of tumors recurred. Intermittent castration or complete blockade induced by degarelix and antiandrogens combination, inhibited tumor growth but increased the risk of recurrence (RR) as compared to continuous castration (RRintermittent: 14.5, RRcomplete blockade: 6.5 and 1.35). All recurrent tumors displayed new quantitative genetic alterations and AR mutations, whatever the treatment modalities. AR amplification was found after complete blockade. Increased expression of Her-2/neu with frequent ERK/AKT activation was detected in all variants. Combination of castration with a Her-2/neu inhibitor decreased recurrence risk (0.17) and combination with an mTOR inhibitor prevented it. Anti-hormone treatments influence risk of recurrence although tumor growth inhibition was initially similar. Recurrent tumors displayed

  19. Sex hormone receptors in the hypothalamus and their role in sexual differentiation of the male rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this investigation, changes in the level of receptors for sex hormones in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats were studied on the first through fifth days of postnatal life, and the results obtained were compared with the levels of luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in the peripheral blood in order to discover any correlation between these parameters. 2,4,6,7,-3H-estradiol-17β and 1,2,6,7-3H-testosterone were used as labeled hormones. The values of the association constant and concentration of specific binding sites for estradiol and testosterone in hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats during neonatal development is shown. It is found that in male rats on the first day after birth, receptors for estradiol and testosterone are present and they enable the action both of the testicular hormone and that of estradiol to be realized

  20. Outcomes of Estrogen Receptor Negative and Progesterone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Melissa; Chang, Martin C.; González, Rosa; Lategan, Belinda; del Barco, Elvira; Vera-Badillo, Francisco; Quesada, Paula; Goldstein, Robyn; Cruz, Ignacio; Ocana, Alberto; Cruz, Juan J.; Amir, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features and outcomes of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor positive (PgR+) breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a well-characterized database of sequential patients diagnosed with early stage invasive breast carcinoma. Outcomes of interest were time to relapse (TTR) and overall survival (OS). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted to assess the association of ER-/PgR+ with TTR and OS in comparison to ER+ and to ER- and PgR negative (ER-/PgR-) tumors irrespective of HER2 status. ER and PgR expression was conservatively defined as 10% or greater staining of cancer cells. Results 815 patients were followed for a median of 40.5 months; 56 patients (7%) had ER-/PgR+, 624 (77%) had ER+ and 136 (17%) had ER-/PgR- phenotypes. Compared with ER+ tumors, ER-/PgR+ tumors were associated with younger age (50 versus 59 years, p=0.03), high grade (50% versus 24%, p<0.001) and more frequent HER2 overexpression/amplification (43% versus 14%, p<0.001). TTR for ER-/PgR+ was intermediate between ER+ and ER-/PgR- tumors, but was not significantly different from ER+ tumors. Recurrences in the ER-/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- groups occurred early in follow-up while in ER+ tumors recurrences continued to occur over the duration of follow-up. OS of ER-/PgR+ was similar to ER+ tumors and better than that of ER-/PgR- tumors. Conclusions The ER-/PgR+ phenotype is associated with higher grade with HER2 overexpression/amplification and occurs more commonly in younger women. Risk of relapse and death more closely resembles ER+ than ER-/PgR- tumors suggesting this phenotype represents a group of more aggressive hormone receptor positive tumors. PMID:26161666

  1. HER-2, p53, p21 and hormonal receptors proteins expression as predictive factors of response and prognosis in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel plus epirubicin combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been considered the standard care in locally advanced breast cancer. However, about 20% of the patients do not benefit from this clinical treatment and, predictive factors of response were not defined yet. This study was designed to evaluate the importance of biological markers to predict response and prognosis in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with taxane and anthracycline combination as neoadjuvant setting. Sixty patients received preoperative docetaxel (75 mg/m2) in combination with epirubicin (50 mg/m2) in i.v. infusion in D1 every 3 weeks after incisional biopsy. They received adjuvant chemotherapy with CMF or FEC, attaining axillary status following definitive breast surgery. Clinical and pathologic response rates were measured after preoperative therapy. We evaluated the response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the prognostic significance of clinicopathological and immunohistochemical parameters (ER, PR, p51, p21 and HER-2 protein expression). The median patient age was 50.5 years with a median follow up time 48 months after the time of diagnosis. Preoperative treatment achieved clinical response in 76.6% of patients and complete pathologic response in 5%. The clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical parameters were not able to predict response to therapy and, only HER2 protein overexpression was associated with a decrease in disease free and overall survival (P = 0.0007 and P = 0.003) as shown by multivariate analysis. Immunohistochemical phenotypes were not able to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Clinical response is inversely correlated with a risk of death in patients submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and HER2 overexpression is the major prognostic factor in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with a neoadjuvant docetaxel and epirubicin combination

  2. Characterization of pituitary growth hormone and its receptor in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Carranza, Martha; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) has been studied in most vertebrate groups; however, only a few studies have been carried out in reptiles. Little is known about pituitary hormones in the order Squamata, to which the green iguana (gi) belongs. In this work, we characterized the hypophysis of Iguana iguana morphologically. The somatotrophs (round cells of 7.6-10 μm containing 250- to 300-nm secretory granules where the giGH is stored) were found, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, exclusively in the caudal lobe of the pars distalis, whereas the lactotrophs were distributed only in the rostral lobe. A pituitary giGH-like protein was obtained by immuno-affinity chromatography employing a heterologous antibody against chicken GH. giGH showed molecular heterogeneity (22, 44, and 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE/Western blot under non-reducing conditions and at least four charge variants (pIs 6.2, 6.5, 6.9, 7.4) by isoelectric focusing. The pituitary giGH cDNA (1016 bp), amplified by PCR and RACE, encodes a pre-hormone of 218 aa, of which 190 aa correspond to the mature protein and 28 aa to the signal peptide. The giGH receptor cDNA was also partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences of giGH and giGHR homologs in vertebrates suggest a parallel evolution and functional relationship between the GH and its receptor. PMID:24769041

  3. Influence of LHRH on sex hormone receptors in the amygdala of the male rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drekić Dmitar M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoradiography was used to localize estrogen-accumulating cells in the amygdala (AMY, of male rats. with LHRH hormones of seven adult male rats (86 days old. Seven mail rats were each treated with an injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH, 25 μg at 83 days old and 3 days later with 250 μCi 3H-estradiol (E2. A control group of male rats was also treated with 250 μCi 3H-E2, two hours before sacrifice. Both groups were sacrificed at 86 days old. In the control group of male rats, the nuclei of the AMY with the highest density of estrogen binding (receptors were nucleus medialis (NM, nucleus corticalis (NCO, nucleus centralis (NCE and massa intercalata (MI of pars corticomedialis of AMY. These nuclei belong to the phylogenetically older corticomedial part of the AMY. Light to moderate labeling was present in the phylogenetically younger nucleus basomedialis (NBM and nucleus basolateralis (NBL. Weak labeling was present in nucleus lateralis anterior (NLA and nucleus lateralis posterior (NLP both from the phylogenetically younger basolateral part of the adult male rat AMY. This distribution of estrogen receptors could be related to the biologically more significant influence of estrogen on the regions of response divergence than on regions of sensory convergence of AMY. In the male rats treated with LHRH 3H-E2, we noticed different a distribution of estrogen receptors, in the different types nuclei of neurons (nucleus of AMY. We observed a smaller number of estrogen receptors in the nucleus of pyramidal neurons, while in fusiform and stellate neurons, a similar number of receptors was present as in the control group for NM, NCO, and NCE. In massa intercalata we found a large numberof receptors in the nuclei of neurons, in the older pars AMY. In younger pars AMY, NBL and NLP, we noticed a significant decrease of receptors for estradiol in the nuclei of pyramidal and fusiform neurons.

  4. Effects of plasticizers and their mixtures on estrogen Receptor and thyroid hormone functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2009-01-01

    Plasticizers are additives used to increase the flexibility or plasticity of the material to which they are added, normally rigid plastic and as additives in paint and adhesives. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the estrogen and the thyroid hormone (TH) systems....... We investigated in vitro the thyroid hormone-like and estrogenic activities of a range of widely used plasticizers and phenols including benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), di-2-ethyl hexyl phthalate...... estrogenic activities of the compounds were assessed in MVLN cells, stably transfected with an estrogen receptor (ER) luciferase reporter vector. Furthermore, the combined effect of a multi-components mixture of six plasticizers was evaluated for its estrogenic and TH-like activities. All the tested...

  5. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Patterns of thyroid hormone receptor expression in zebrafish and generation of a novel model of resistance to thyroid hormone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Federica; Carra, Silvia; Agostini, Maura; Cotelli, Franco; Peeters, Robin; Chatterjee, Krishna; Persani, Luca

    2016-03-15

    Resistance to thyroid hormone can be due to heterozygous, dominant negative (DN) THRA (RTHα) or THRB (RTHβ) mutations, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we delineate the spatiotemporal expression of TH receptors (TRs) in zebrafish and generated morphants expressing equivalent amounts of wild-type and DN TRαs (thraa_MOs) and TRβs (thrb_MOs) in vivo. Both morphants show severe developmental abnormalities. The phenotype of thraa_MOs includes brain and cardiac defects, but normal thyroid volume and tshba expression. A combined modification of dio2 and dio3 expression can explain the high T3/T4 ratio seen in thraa_MOs, as in RTHα. Thrb_MOs show abnormal eyes and otoliths, with a typical RTHβ pattern of thyroid axis. The coexpression of wild-type, but not mutant, human TRs can rescue the phenotype in both morphants. High T3 doses can partially revert the dominant negative action of mutant TRs in morphant fish. Therefore, our morphants recapitulate the RTHα and RTHβ key manifestations representing new models in which the functional consequences of human TR mutations can be rapidly and faithfully evaluated. PMID:26802880

  7. Breast cancer incidence and use of hormone therapy in Denmark 1978-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there have recently been reports of declining incidence rates for breast cancer. Decreased use of hormone therapy and decreased use of mammography has been put forward as possible reasons for this decline. The aim of this study was to analyse breast cancer incidence trends in...

  8. Hormone therapy and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Eisen (Andrea); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Moller (Pal); H. Lynch (Henry); J. Klijn (Jan); C. Kim-Sing (Charmaine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); L. Gilbert (Lucy); P. Ghadirian (Parviz); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); G. Rennert (Gad); E. Friedman (Eitan); C. Isaacs (Claudine); B. Rosen (Barry); M.J. Daly (Mark); P. Sun (Ping); S. Narod (Steven); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S. Cummings (Shelly); N. Tung (Nadine); F.J. Couch (Fergus); W.D. Foulkes (William); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); R. Gershoni-Baruch (Ruth); D. Horsman (David); H. Saal (Howard); E. Warner (Ellen); W. Meschino (Wendy); K. Offit (Kenneth); A. Trivedi (Amber); M. Robson (Mark); M. Osborne (Michael); D. Gilchrist (Dawna); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); W. McKinnon (Wendy); M. Wood (Marie); C. Maugard (Christine); B. Pasini (Barbara); T. Wagner (Teresa); K. Sweet; B. Pasche (Boris); T. Fallen (Taya); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C. Eng (Charis); R.N. Kurz; S. Armel (Susan); A. Tulman (Anna); P.J. Ainsworth (Peter); E. Lemire (Edmond); J. McLennan; G. Evans (Gareth); T. Byrski (Tomas); T. Huzarski (Tomas); L. Shulman (Lee)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hormone therapy (HT) is commonly given to women to alleviate the climacteric symptoms associated with menopause. There is concern that this treatment may increase the risk of breast cancer. The potential association of HT and breast cancer risk is of particular interest to wo

  9. Dysgeusia in symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: think of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Nishith K; Hayes, Shelbi; Hahs, Seth; Varney, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with marked dysgeusia to all food and symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is described. She eventually turned out to have metastatic small cell lung cancer. The case study explores the interesting constellation of dysgeusia, SIADH and lung cancer.

  10. The Arabidopsis NPR1 Protein Is a Receptor for the Plant Defense Hormone Salicylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid (SA is an essential hormone in plant immunity, but its receptor has remained elusive for decades. The transcriptional coregulator NPR1 is central to the activation of SA-dependent defense genes, and we previously found that Cys521 and Cys529 of Arabidopsis NPR1's transactivation domain are critical for coactivator function. Here, we demonstrate that NPR1 directly binds SA, but not inactive structural analogs, with an affinity similar to that of other hormone-receptor interactions and consistent with in vivo Arabidopsis SA concentrations. Binding of SA occurs through Cys521/529 via the transition metal copper. Mechanistically, our results suggest that binding of SA causes a conformational change in NPR1 that is accompanied by the release of the C-terminal transactivation domain from the N-terminal autoinhibitory BTB/POZ domain. While NPR1 is already known as a link between the SA signaling molecule and defense-gene activation, we now show that NPR1 is the receptor for SA.

  11. Morphological and Hormonal Identiifcation of Porcine Atretic Follicles and Relationship Analysis of Hormone Receptor Levels During Granulosa Cell Apoptosis In vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU De-bing; YU Min-li; LIN Fei; JIANG Bao-chun; YANG Li-na; WANG Si-yu; ZHAO Ying; WNAG Zheng-chao

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that follicular atresia is initiated or caused by granulosa cell apoptosis followed by theca cell degeneration in mammalian ovaries, but the mechanism of follicular atresia is still to be elucidated. Therefore, our present study was designed to examine our hypothesis that the changes of follicular microenvironment induce the granulosa cell apoptosis during pocrine follicular atresia in vivo. We ifrstly isolated intact porcine antral follicles and identiifed them into three groups, healthy follicles (HF), early atretic follicles (EAF) and progressed atretic follicles (PAF) through morphology and histology. To further conifrm their status, we detected hormone levels in follicular lfuids and the expression level of apoptosis gene Bax in granulosa cells. The rate of progesterone (P) and estradiol (E2) was increased with the expression of Bax, indicating hormone can be used as a marker of granulosa cell apoptosis or follicular atresia. Finally, we analyzed the expression level of hormone receptor genes in granulosa cells and their relationship with follicular atresia. In PAF, the expression of Progesterone receptor (PGR) was increased signiifcantly while estradiol receptor (ER) had no notable changes, which suggesting the increased-PGR accelerated the effect of P-stimulated granulosa cell apoptosis. The dramatic increasing of androgen receptor (AR) expression in PAF and the obvious increase of tumor necrosis factor-αreceptor (TNFR) in EAF indicated that there are different pathways regulating granulosa cell apoptosis during follicular atresia. Together, our results suggested that different pathways of granulosa cell apoptosis was induced by changing the follicular microenvironment during follicular atresia.

  12. 3,5-T2 is an alternative ligand for the thyroid hormone receptor β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A; Navarrete-Ramírez, P; Hernández-Puga, G; Villalobos, P; Holzer, G; Renaud, J P; Laudet, V; Orozco, A

    2013-08-01

    Several liganded nuclear receptors have alternative ligands acting in a tissue-specific fashion and playing important biological roles. We present evidence that 3,5-diiodothyronine (T(2)), a naturally occurring iodothyronine that results from T(3) outer-ring deiodination, is an alternative ligand for thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ1). In tilapia, 2 TRβ isoforms differing by 9 amino acids in the ligand-binding domain were cloned. Binding and transactivation studies showed that T(2) activates the human and the long tilapia TRβ1 isoform, but not the short one. A chimeric human TRβ1 (hTRβ1) that contained the 9-amino-acid insert showed no response to T(2), suggesting that the conformation of the hTRβ1 naturally allows T(2) binding and that other regions of the receptor are implicated in TR activation by T(2). Indeed, further analysis showed that the N terminus is essential for T(2)-mediated transactivation but not for that by T(3) in the long and hTRβ1, suggesting a functional interaction between the N-terminal domain and the insertion in the ligand-binding domain. To establish the functional relevance of T(2)-mediated TRβ1 binding and activation, mRNA expression and its regulation by T(2) and T(3) was evaluated for both isoforms. Our data show that long TRβ1expression is 10(6)-fold higher than that of the short isoform, and T(3) and T(2) differentially regulate the expression of these 2 TRβ1 isoforms in vivo. Taken together, our results prompted a reevaluation of the role and mechanism of action of thyroid hormone metabolites previously believed to be inactive. More generally, we propose that classical liganded receptors are only partially locked to very specific ligands and that alternative ligands may play a role in the tissue-specific action of receptors. PMID:23736295

  13. Functional heterodimerization of prolactin and growth hormone receptors by ovine placental lactogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, A; Bignon, C; Daniel, N; Grosclaude, J; Gertler, A; Djiane, J

    2000-03-01

    Although homo- or heterodimerization are common mechanisms for activation of cytokine receptors, cross-talk between two distinct receptors in this superfamily has been never shown. Here we show a physiologically relevant example indicating that such an interaction does occurs, thus raising the hypothesis that heterodimerization between distinct cytokine receptors may be a novel mechanism contributing to the diversity of cytokine signaling. These findings were documented using both surface plasmon resonance and gel filtration experiments and show that ovine placental lactogen (PL) heterodimerizes the extracellular domains (ECDs) of ruminant growth hormone receptor (GHR) and prolactin receptor (PRLR). We also show that PL or PL analogues that exhibit little or no activity in cells transfected with PRLRs and no activity in cells transfected with ovine GHRs exhibit largely enhanced activity in cells cotransfected with both PRLRs and GHRs. Furthermore, chimeric receptors consisting of cytosolic and transmembrane part of ovine GHR or ovine PRLR and ECDs of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (GM-CSFR) alpha or beta were constructed. Upon transfection into Chinese hamster ovary cells along with reporter luciferase gene and stimulation by GM-CSF, a significant increase in luciferase activity occurred when GM-CSFR-alpha-PRLR and GM-CSFR-beta-GHR or GM-CSFR-alpha-GHR and GM-CSRR-beta-PRLR were cotransfected. In conclusion, we show that ovine PL is capable of functional heterodimerization of GHR and PRLR and that when their cytosolic parts, coupled to the ECD of GM-CSF receptors, are heterodimerized by GM-CSF, they are capable of transducing biological signal. PMID:10692427

  14. Salt Bridges Overlapping the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Agonist Binding Site Reveal a Coincidence Detector for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Conn, P. Michael

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small s...

  15. Receptors and effects of gut hormones in three osteoblastic cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Peter JM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years the interest on the relationship of gut hormones to bone processes has increased and represents one of the most interesting aspects in skeletal research. The proportion of bone mass to soft tissue is a relationship that seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle regulations that imply "cross-talks" between the nutrient intake and tissues like fat. Thus, recognition of the mechanisms that integrate a gastrointestinal-fat-bone axis and its application to several aspects of human health is vital for improving treatments related to bone diseases. This work analysed the effects of gut hormones in cell cultures of three osteoblastic cell lines which represent different stages in osteoblastic development. Also, this is the first time that there is a report on the direct effects of glucagon-like peptide 2, and obestatin on osteoblast-like cells. Methods mRNA expression levels of five gut hormone receptors (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide [GIP], glucagon-like peptide 1 [GLP-1], glucagon-like peptide 2 [GLP-2], ghrelin [GHR] and obestatin [OB] were analysed in three osteoblastic cell lines (Saos-2, TE-85 and MG-63 showing different stages of osteoblast development using reverse transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction. The responses to the gut peptides were studied using assays for cell viability, and biochemical bone markers: alkaline phosphatase (ALP, procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptides (P1NP, and osteocalcin production. Results The gut hormone receptor mRNA displayed the highest levels for GIP in Saos-2 and the lowest levels in MG-63, whereas GHR and GPR39 (the putative obestatin receptor expression was higher in TE-85 and MG-63 and lower in Saos-2. GLP-1 and GLP-2 were expressed only in MG-63 and TE-85. Treatment of gut hormones to cell lines showed differential responses: higher levels in cell viability in Saos-2 after GIP, in TE-85 and MG-63 after GLP-1, GLP-2, ghrelin and

  16. Diversification and coevolution of the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor system in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tine, Mbaye; Kuhl, Heiner; Teske, Peter R; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The gut hormone ghrelin is involved in numerous metabolic functions, such as the stimulation of growth hormone secretion, gastric motility, and food intake. Ghrelin is modified by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) or membrane-bound O-acyltransferase domain-containing 4 (MBOAT4) enabling action through the growth hormone secretagogue receptors (GHS-R). During the course of evolution, initially strong ligand/receptor specificities can be disrupted by genomic changes, potentially modifying physiological roles of the ligand/receptor system. Here, we investigated the coevolution of ghrelin, GOAT, and GHS-R in vertebrates. We combined similarity search, conserved synteny analyses, phylogenetic reconstructions, and protein structure comparisons to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the ghrelin system. Ghrelin remained a single-gene locus in all vertebrate species, and accordingly, a single GHS-R isoform was identified in all tetrapods. Similar patterns of the nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) ratio (dN/dS) in the vertebrate lineage strongly suggest coevolution of the ghrelin and GHS-R genes, supporting specific functional interactions and common physiological pathways. The selection profiles do not allow confirmation as to whether ghrelin binds specifically to GOAT, but the ghrelin dN/dS patterns are more similar to those of GOAT compared to MBOAT1 and MBOAT2 isoforms. Four GHS-R isoforms were identified in teleost genomes. This diversification of GHS-R resulted from successive rounds of duplications, some of which remained specific to the teleost lineage. Coevolution signals are lost in teleosts, presumably due to the diversification of GHS-R but not the ghrelin gene. The identification of the GHS-R diversity in teleosts provides a molecular basis for comparative studies on ghrelin's physiological roles and regulation, while the comparative sequence and structure analyses will assist translational medicine to determine structure-function relationships of the

  17. Upregulation of Leukotriene Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venerito, Marino [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Kuester, Doerthe [Institute of Pathology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Harms, Caroline [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Schubert, Daniel [Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany); Wex, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.wex@med.ovgu.de; Malfertheiner, Peter [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Str. 44, Magdeburg 39120 (Germany)

    2011-08-08

    Leukotrienes (LT) mediate allergic and inflammatory processes. Previously, we identified significant changes in the expression pattern of LT receptors in the gastric mucosa after eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and LT receptors in gastric cancer (GC). The expression of 5-LOX and receptors for LTB4 (BLT-1, BLT-2) and cysteinyl-LT (CysLT-1, CysLT-2) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in GC samples of 35 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy and in 29 tumor-free tissue specimens from gastric mucosa. Male-to-female ratio was 24:11. The median age was 70 years (range 34–91). Twenty-two patients had GC of intestinal, six of diffuse, six of mixed and one of undifferentiated type. The IHC analysis showed a nearly ubiquitous expression of studied proteins in GC (88–97%) and in tumor-free specimens as well (89–100%). An increase in the immunoreactive score of both BLT receptors and CysLT-1 was observed in GC compared to tumor-free gastric mucosa (p < 0.001 for BLT-1; p < 0.01 for BLT-2 and CysLT-1, Mann-Whitney U-test). No differences in the IHC expression of 5-LOX and CsyLT-2 were observed between GC and tumor-free mucosa. The expression of BLT-2, CysLT-1 and CysLT-2 was increased in GC of intestinal type when compared to the diffuse type (p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). LTB4 receptors and CysLT-1 are up-regulated in GC tissue implying a role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  18. Upregulation of Leukotriene Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schubert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leukotrienes (LT mediate allergic and inflammatory processes. Previously, we identified significant changes in the expression pattern of LT receptors in the gastric mucosa after eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX and LT receptors in gastric cancer (GC. Methods: The expression of 5-LOX and receptors for LTB4 (BLT-1, BLT-2 and cysteinyl-LT (CysLT-1, CysLT-2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in GC samples of 35 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy and in 29 tumor-free tissue specimens from gastric mucosa. Results: Male-to-female ratio was 24:11. The median age was 70 years (range 34–91. Twenty-two patients had GC of intestinal, six of diffuse, six of mixed and one of undifferentiated type. The IHC analysis showed a nearly ubiquitous expression of studied proteins in GC (88–97% and in tumor-free specimens as well (89–100%. An increase in the immunoreactive score of both BLT receptors and CysLT-1 was observed in GC compared to tumor-free gastric mucosa (p < 0.001 for BLT-1; p < 0.01 for BLT-2 and CysLT-1, Mann-Whitney U-test. No differences in the IHC expression of 5-LOX and CsyLT-2 were observed between GC and tumor-free mucosa. The expression of BLT-2, CysLT-1 and CysLT-2 was increased in GC of intestinal type when compared to the diffuse type (p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test. Conclusions: LTB4 receptors and CysLT-1 are up-regulated in GC tissue implying a role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Upregulation of Leukotriene Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukotrienes (LT) mediate allergic and inflammatory processes. Previously, we identified significant changes in the expression pattern of LT receptors in the gastric mucosa after eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and LT receptors in gastric cancer (GC). The expression of 5-LOX and receptors for LTB4 (BLT-1, BLT-2) and cysteinyl-LT (CysLT-1, CysLT-2) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in GC samples of 35 consecutive patients who underwent gastrectomy and in 29 tumor-free tissue specimens from gastric mucosa. Male-to-female ratio was 24:11. The median age was 70 years (range 34–91). Twenty-two patients had GC of intestinal, six of diffuse, six of mixed and one of undifferentiated type. The IHC analysis showed a nearly ubiquitous expression of studied proteins in GC (88–97%) and in tumor-free specimens as well (89–100%). An increase in the immunoreactive score of both BLT receptors and CysLT-1 was observed in GC compared to tumor-free gastric mucosa (p < 0.001 for BLT-1; p < 0.01 for BLT-2 and CysLT-1, Mann-Whitney U-test). No differences in the IHC expression of 5-LOX and CsyLT-2 were observed between GC and tumor-free mucosa. The expression of BLT-2, CysLT-1 and CysLT-2 was increased in GC of intestinal type when compared to the diffuse type (p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). LTB4 receptors and CysLT-1 are up-regulated in GC tissue implying a role in gastric carcinogenesis

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate lung cancer growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PaulDGardner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels modulate ion flux across cell membranes, activate signal transduction pathways, and influence cellular transport – vital biological functions that are inexorably linked to cellular processes that go awry during carcinogenesis. Indeed, deregulation of ion channel function has been implicated in cancer-related phenomena such as unrestrained cell proliferation and apoptotic evasion. As the prototype for ligand-gated ion channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have been extensively studied in the context of neuronal cells but accumulating evidence also indicate a role for nAChRs in carcinogenesis. Recently, variants in the nAChR genes CHRNA3, CHRNA5, and CHRNB4 have been implicated in nicotine dependence and lung cancer susceptibility. Here, we silenced the expression of these three genes to investigate their function in lung cancer. We show that these genes are necessary for the viability of small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC, the most aggressive type of lung cancer. Furthermore, we show that nicotine promotes SCLC cell viability whereas an α3β4-selective antagonist, α-conotoxin AuIB, inhibits it. Our findings posit a mechanism whereby signaling via α3/α5/β4-containing nAChRs promotes lung carcinogenesis.

  1. Current medical treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Franco; Lumachi; Davide; A; Santeufemia; Stefano; MM; Basso

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers(BC) are estrogen receptor(ER)-positive and thus endocrine therapy(ET) should be considered complementary to surgery in the majority of patients. The advantages of oophorectomy, adrenalectomy and hypophysectomy in women with advanced BC have been demonstrated many years ago, and currently ET consist of(1) ovarian function suppression(OFS), usually obtained using gonadotropinreleasing hormone agonists(Gn RHa);(2) selective estrogen receptor modulators or down-regulators(SERMs or SERDs); and(3) aromatase inhibitors(AIs), or a combination of two or more drugs. For patients aged less than 50 years and ER+ BC, there is no conclusive evidence that the combination of OFS and SERMs(i.e., tamoxifen) or chemotherapy is superior to OFS alone. Tamoxifen users exhibit a reduced risk of BC, both invasive and in situ, especially during the first 5 years of therapy, and extending the treatment to 10 years further reduced the risk of recurrences. SERDs(i.e., fulvestrant) are especially useful in the neoadjuvant treatment of advanced BC, alone or in combination with either cytotoxic agents or AIs. There are two types of AIs: type Ⅰ are permanent steroidal inhibitors of aromatase, while type Ⅱ are reversible nonsteroidal inhibitors. Several studies demonstrated the superiority of the third-generation AIs(i.e., anastrozole and letrozole) compared with tamoxifen, and adjuvant therapy with AIs reduces the recurrence risk especially in patients with advanced BC. Unfortunately, some cancers are or became ET-resistant, and thus other drugs have been suggested in combination with SERMs or AIs, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors(palbociclib) and mammalian target of rapamycin(m TOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus. Further studies are required to confirm their real usefulness.

  2. Mutation of thyroid hormone receptor-β in mice predisposes to the development of mammary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Guigon, CJ; Kim, DW; Willingham, MC; Cheng, S-Y

    2011-01-01

    Correlative data suggest that thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) mutations could increase the risk of mammary tumor development, but unequivocal evidence is still lacking. To explore the role of TRβ mutants in vivo in breast tumor development and progression, we took advantage of a knock-in mouse model harboring a mutation in the Thrb gene encoding TRβ (ThrbPV mouse). Although in adult nulliparous females, a single ThrbPV allele did not contribute to mammary gland abnormalities, the presence of...

  3. The role of thyroid hormone nuclear receptors in the heart: evidence from pharmacological approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersinga, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    This review evaluates the hypothesis that the cardiac effects of amiodarone can be explained—at least partly—by the induction of a local ‘hypothyroid-like condition’ in the heart. Evidence supporting the hypothesis comprises the observation that amiodarone exerts an inhibitory effect on the binding of T3 to thyroid hormone receptors (TR) alpha-1 and beta-1 in vitro, and on the expression of particular T3-dependent genes in vivo. In the heart, amiodarone decreases heart rate and alpha myosin h...

  4. A single arginine residue determines species specificity of the human growth hormone receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, S C; Frick, G P; X Wang; Kopchick, J J; Lobo, R B; Goodman, H M

    1995-01-01

    Although growth hormone (GH) receptors (GHRs) in many species bind human (h) GH as well as their own GH, the hGHR only binds primate GH. Arg43 in hGHR interacts with Asp171 of hGH. Nonprimates have a His in the position equivalent to residue 171 of primate GH and a Leu in position 43 of primate GHR. To determine whether Arg43 accounts for the species specificity of the hGHR, point mutations that changed Leu43 to Arg were introduced into the cDNAs encoding the bovine (b) GHR or the rat GH bind...

  5. Growth Hormone Receptor Antagonist Treatment Reduces Exercise Performance in Young Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goto, K.; Doessing, S.; Nielsen, R.H.; Flyvbjerg, A.; Kjaer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The effects of GH on exercise performance remain unclear. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of GH receptor (GHR) antagonist treatment on exercise performance. Design: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist pegvisomant or placebo for 16 d. After the treatment...... period, they exercised to determine exercise performance and hormonal and metabolic responses. Participants: Twenty healthy males participated in the study. Intervention: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist (n = 10; 10 mg/d) or placebo (n = 10). After the treatment period, they performed a...

  6. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...... investigated in efforts to overcome hERG liabilities while having orally active, potent and selective compounds with sufficient brain penetration. A chemometric comparison of ∼2000 diverse MCHR1 and ∼1000 diverse hERG ligands underline the structural similarities. A binding pocket analysis of a MCHR1 model...

  7. Clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy" as a form of hormonal manipulation for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown in in-vitro experiments that "withdrawal" of tamoxifen inhibits growth of tumor cells. However, evidence is scarce when this is extrapolated into clinical context. We report our experience to verify the clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy". Methods Breast cancer patients since 1998 who fulfilled the following criteria were selected from the departmental database and the case-notes were retrospectively reviewed: (1 estrogen receptor positive, operable primary breast cancer in elderly (age > 70 years, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer; (2 disease deemed suitable for treatment by hormonal manipulation; (3 disease assessable by UICC criteria; (4 received "withdrawal" from a prior endocrine agent as a form of therapy; (5 on "withdrawal therapy" for ≥ 6 months unless they progressed prior. Results Seventeen patients with median age of 84.3 (53.7-92.5 had "withdrawal therapy" as second to tenth line of treatment following prior endocrine therapy using tamoxifen (n = 10, an aromatase inhibitor (n = 5, megestrol acetate (n = 1 or fulvestrant (n = 1. Ten patients (58.8% had clinical benefit (CB (complete response/partial response/stable disease ≥ 6 months with a median duration of Clinical Benefit (DoCB of 10+ (7-27 months. Two patients remain on "withdrawal therapy" at the time of analysis. Conclusion "Withdrawal therapy" appears to produce sustained CB in a significant proportion of patients. This applies not only to "withdrawal" from tamoxifen, but also from other categories of endocrine agents. "Withdrawal" from endocrine therapy is, therefore, a viable intercalating option between endocrine agents to minimise resistance and provide additional line of therapy. It should be considered as part of the sequencing of endocrine therapy.

  8. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostat...

  9. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion-Preliminary Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Gandhi, Ankit V; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y; Chipitsyna, Galina I; Yeo, Charles J; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2016-01-01

    According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P < 0.05). Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P < 0.05). We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27123358

  10. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion—Preliminary Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Gandhi, Ankit V.; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y.; Chipitsyna, Galina I.; Yeo, Charles J.; Arafat, Hwyda A.

    2016-01-01

    According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P < 0.05). Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P < 0.05). We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27123358

  11. BRAF-Activated Long Noncoding RNA Modulates Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Proliferation through Regulating Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haitao; Wang, Meng; Jiang, Lixin; Chu, Haidi; Hu, Jinchen; Ning, Jinyao; Li, Baoyuan; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The importance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in tumorigenesis has recently been demonstrated. However, the role of lncRNAs in development of thyroid cancer remains largely unknown. Materials and Methods Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, expression of three lncRNAs, including BRAF-activated long noncoding RNA (BANCR), papillary thyroid cancer susceptibility candidate 3 (PTCSC3), and noncoding RNA associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and growth arrest (NAMA), was investigated in the current study. Results Of the three lncRNAs (BANCR, PTCSC3, and NAMA), expression of BANCR was significantly up-regulated while PTCSC3 and NAMA were significantly down-regulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) compared to that in normal tissue. BANCR-knockdown in a PTC-derived cell line (IHH-4) resulted in significant suppression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). BANCR-knockdown also led to inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase through down-regulation of cyclin D1. In addition, BANCR was enriched by polycomb enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), and silencing BANCR led to decreased chromatin recruitment of EZH2, which resulted significantly reduced expression of TSHR. Conclusion These findings indicate that BANCR may contribute to the tumorigenesis of PTC through regulation of cyclin D1 and TSHR. PMID:26323637

  12. The expression of the pituitary growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor and its splice variants in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Havt, Alexandre; Andrew V. Schally; Varga József L.; Toller Gábor L.; Horváth Judit E. (New Orleans); Szepesházi Károly; Köster, Frank; Kovitz, Kevin; Groot, Kate; Zarándi Márta; Kanashiro, Celia A.; Halmos Gábor (1962-) (gyógyszerész, receptorfarmakológus, experimentális onkológus)

    2005-01-01

    Various attempts to detect human pituitary growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (pGHRH-R) in neoplastic extrapituitary tissues have thus far failed. Recently, four splice variants (SVs) of GHRH-R have been described, of which SV1 has the highest structural homology to pGHRH-R and likely plays a role in tumor growth. The aim of this study was to reinvestigate whether human tumors and normal human extrapituitary tissues express the pGHRH-R and to corroborate our previous findings on its SV...

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer in Korean Women: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The epidemiological characteristics of breast cancer incidence by age group in Korean women are unique. This systematic review aimed to investigate the association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer risk in Korean women. Methods: We searched electronic databases such as KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, and RISS4U as well as PubMed for publications on Korean breast cancer patients. We also conducted manual searching based on references and citations in potential pap...

  14. Development of an immunotherapeutic adenovirus targeting hormone-independent prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim JS; Lee SD; Lee SJ; Chung MK

    2013-01-01

    Jae Sik Kim,1 Sang Don Lee,2 Sang Jin Lee,3 Moon Kee Chung21Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St Mary's Hospital, Incheon, 2Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan, 3Genitourinary Cancer Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, KoreaBackground: To develop a targeting therapy for hormone-independent prostate cancer, we constructed and characterized conditionally replicating ...

  15. Factors associated to persistence with hormonal therapy in women with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Cláudia; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze factors associated with persistence to breast cancer hormone therapy in order to contribute to the quality of care improvement. METHODS Retrospective longitudinal study, based on secondary data. A cohort of 5,861 women with breast cancer registered in different datasets of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute and the Brazilian Unified Health System were analyzed. All women were treated at this hospital, which provides free medication, and the follow-up period was from ...

  16. Multi-nutrient supplement improves hormone ratio associated with cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzan, Anthony J.; Zabrecky, George P; Newberg, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    Background Gynecological cancers are among the most common in women and are directly related to a variety of hormonal factors. One potential risk factor associated with developing a gynecological malignancy is the ratio of two hormone metabolites, 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-HE) and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-HE). A number of botanical constituents such as indoles, flavonoids, and resveratrol have been shown to have a favorable effect on the metabolic pathways that affect this ratio. The present...

  17. Quality of life impact of primary treatments for localized prostate cancer patients without hormonal treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Y.; Guedea Edo, Ferran; Aguiló, F.; Fernández, P.; Macías, V.; Mariño, A.; Hervás, A; Herruzo, A.; Ortiz, M.J.; Ponce de León, J.; Craven-Bratle, J.; Suárez, J.F.; Boladeras, A.; Pont, A.; Ayala, A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Earlier studies evaluating the effect on quality of life (QoL) of localized prostate cancer interventions included patients receiving adjuvant hormone therapy, which could have affected their outcomes. Our objective was to compare the QoL impact of the three most common primary treatments on patients who were not receiving adjuvant hormonal treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of 435 patients treated with radical prostatectomy, external-beam radiotherapy, or b...

  18. Ten-year adjuvant hormone therapy for breast cancer: the pros and cons (a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Portnoy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen is one of the basic drugs of adjuvant hormone therapy in patients with hormone-dependent breast tumors. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the results of randomized trials of long-term adjuvant hormone therapy for breast cancer.

  19. Ten-year adjuvant hormone therapy for breast cancer: the pros and cons (a review of literature)

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Portnoy; T. A. Shendrikova

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is one of the basic drugs of adjuvant hormone therapy in patients with hormone-dependent breast tumors. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the results of randomized trials of long-term adjuvant hormone therapy for breast cancer.

  20. A nested case-control study of adjuvant hormonal therapy persistence and compliance, and early breast cancer recurrence in women with stage I-III breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: Non-persistence and non-compliance are common in women prescribed hormonal therapy for breast cancer, but little is known about their influence on recurrence. Methods: A nested case–control study of associations between hormonal therapy non-persistence and non-compliance and the risk of early recurrence in women with stage I–III breast cancer was undertaken. Cases, defined as women with a breast cancer recurrence within 4 years of hormonal therapy initiati...

  1. A nested case–control study of adjuvant hormonal therapy persistence and compliance, and early breast cancer recurrence in women with stage I–III breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Barron, T I; Cahir, C; Sharp, L.; Bennett, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non-persistence and non-compliance are common in women prescribed hormonal therapy for breast cancer, but little is known about their influence on recurrence. Methods: A nested case–control study of associations between hormonal therapy non-persistence and non-compliance and the risk of early recurrence in women with stage I–III breast cancer was undertaken. Cases, defined as women with a breast cancer recurrence within 4 years of hormonal therapy initiation, were matched to contr...

  2. Juvenile hormone receptors in insect larval epidermis: Identification by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritiated photoaffinity analogs of the natural lepidopteran juvenile hormones, JH I and II (epoxy[3H]bishomofarnesyl diazoacetate ([3H]EHDA) and epoxy[3H]homofarnesyl diazoacetate ([3H]EHDA)), and of the JH analog methoprene ([3H]methoprene diazoketone ([3H]MDK)) were synthesized and used to identify specific JH binding proteins in the larval epidermis of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta). EBDA and EHDA specifically photolabeled a 29-kDa nuclear protein (pI 5.8). This protein and a second 29-kDa protein (pI 6.0) were labeled by MDK, but excess unlabeled methoprene or MDK only prevented binding to the latter. These 29-kDa proteins are also present in larval fat body but not in epidermis from either wandering stage or allatectomized larvae, which lack high-affinity JH binding sites. A 29-kDa nuclear protein with the same developmental specificity as this JH binder bound the DNA of two larval endocuticle genes. A 38-kDa cytosolic protein was also specifically photolabeled by these photoaffinity analogs. The 29-kDa nuclear protein is likely the high-affinity receptor for JH that mediates its genomic action, whereas the 38-kDa cytosolic protein may serve as an intracellular carrier for these highly lipophilic hormones and hormone analogs

  3. Calcium mobilization from fish scales is mediated by parathyroid hormone related protein via the parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotllant, J; Redruello, B; Guerreiro, P M; Fernandes, H; Canario, A V M; Power, D M

    2005-12-15

    The scales of bony fish represent a significant reservoir of calcium but little is known about their contribution, as well as of bone, to calcium balance and how calcium deposition and mobilization are regulated in calcified tissues. In the present study we report the action of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) on calcium mobilization from sea bream (Sparus auratus) scales in an in vitro bioassay. Ligand binding studies of piscine 125I-(1-35(tyr))PTHrP to the membrane fraction of isolated sea bream scales revealed the existence of a single PTH receptor (PTHR) type. RT-PCR of fish scale cDNA using specific primers for two receptor types found in teleosts, PTH1R, and PTH3R, showed expression only of PTH1R. The signalling mechanisms mediating binding of the N-terminal amino acid region of PTHrP were investigated. A synthetic peptide (10(-8) M) based on the N-terminal 1-34 amino acid residues of Fugu rubripes PTHrP strongly stimulated cAMP synthesis and [3H]myo-inositol incorporation in sea bream scales. However, peptides (10(-8) M) with N-terminal deletions, such as (2-34), (3-34) and (7-34)PTHrP, were defective in stimulating cAMP production but stimulated [3H]myo-inositol incorporation. (1-34)PTHrP induced significant osteoclastic activity in scale tissue as indicated by its stimulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, (7-34)PTHrP failed to stimulate the activity of this enzyme. This activity could also be abolished by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, but not by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122. The results of the study indicate that one mechanism through which N-terminal (1-34)PTHrP stimulates osteoclastic activity of sea bream scales, is through PTH1R and via the cAMP/AC intracellular signalling pathway. It appears, therefore, that fish scales can act as calcium stores and that (1-34)PTHrP regulates calcium mobilization from them; it remains to be established if this mechanism contributes to calcium homeostasis in vivo

  4. Developmental and Cell Cycle Quiescence Is Mediated by the Nuclear Hormone Receptor Coregulator DIN-1S in the Caenorhabditis elegans Dauer Larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Eileen; Li, Shaolin; Roy, Richard

    2016-08-01

    When faced with suboptimal growth conditions, Caenorhabditis elegans larvae can enter a diapause-like stage called "dauer" that is specialized for dispersal and survival. The decision to form a dauer larva is controlled by three parallel signaling pathways, whereby a compromise of TGFβ, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, or insulin/IGF-like signaling (ILS) results in dauer formation. Signals from these pathways converge on DAF-12, a nuclear hormone receptor that triggers the changes required to initiate dauer formation. DAF-12 is related to the vitamin D, liver-X, and androstane receptors, and like these human receptors, it responds to lipophilic hormone ligands. When bound to its ligand, DAF-12 acquires transcriptional activity that directs reproductive development, while unliganded DAF-12 forms a dauer-specifying complex with its interacting protein DIN-1S to regulate the transcription of genes required for dauer development. We report here that din-1S is required in parallel to par-4/LKB1 signaling within the gonad to establish cell cycle quiescence during the onset of the dauer stage. We show that din-1S is important for postdauer reproduction when ILS is impaired and is necessary for long-term dauer survival in response to reduced ILS. Our work uncovers several previously uncharacterized functions of DIN-1S in executing and maintaining many of the cellular and physiological processes required for appropriate dauer arrest, while also shedding light on the coordination of nuclear hormone signaling, the LKB1/AMPK signaling cascade, and ILS/TGFβ in the control of cell cycle quiescence and tissue growth: a key feature that is often misregulated in a number of hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:27260305

  5. Influence of music on steroid hormones and the relationship between receptor polymorphisms and musical ability: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that music confers plasticity to the brain. In a preliminary pilot study, we examined the effect of music listening on steroid hormones and the relationship between steroid hormone receptor polymorphisms and musical ability. Twenty-one subjects (10 males and 11 females) were recruited and divided into musically talented and control groups. The subjects selected (1) music they preferred (chill-inducing music) and (2) music they did not like. Before and after the experiments,...

  6. Effect of two human growth hormone receptor antagonists on glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Shui-xian SHEN; Li-hua ZHU; En-bi WANG; Zeng-can YE; Jun LIN; Li-he GUO; Fei-hong LUO; Xi-hong LIU; Xin FANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of human growth hormone (hGH) receptor antagonist in the treatment of end-stage diabetic renal complications. METHODS: Two hGH mutants, hGHA1 (Cys-hGH-dell-4, G120R, K168A, E174A,C182S, de1186-191) and hGHA2 (hGH-H21A, G120R, E174A) were expressed in E coli. The IC50 (Mean±SD)values for the mutants for inhibiting 125I-hGH binding to rabbit growth hormone receptor were (65±10) ng for hGHA1, (27±5.6) ng for hGHA2, and (10±0.6) ng for wild type hGH, respectively. RESULTS: After treatment for 12 weeks, the renal histology analysis showed that treatment with hGHA2 at 4 mg/kg body weight daily markedly suppressed glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats; hGHA1 at the same dosage slightly increased the renal damage compared with saline; while wild type hGH at 1 U/kg body weight daily severely worsened the glomerulo-sclerosis in diabetic SD rats. CONCLUSION: The data indicated that hGHA2 inhibited the end-stage glomerulosclerosis in diabetic rats, but hGHA1 mildly increased the glomerulosclerosis.

  7. Host target modification as a strategy to counter pathogen hijacking of the jasmonate hormone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yao, Jian; Withers, John; Xin, Xiu-Fang; Banerjee, Rahul; Fariduddin, Qazi; Nakamura, Yoko; Nomura, Kinya; Howe, Gregg A; Boland, Wilhelm; Yan, Honggao; He, Sheng Yang

    2015-11-17

    In the past decade, characterization of the host targets of pathogen virulence factors took a center stage in the study of pathogenesis and disease susceptibility in plants and humans. However, the impressive knowledge of host targets has not been broadly exploited to inhibit pathogen infection. Here, we show that host target modification could be a promising new approach to "protect" the disease-vulnerable components of plants. In particular, recent studies have identified the plant hormone jasmonate (JA) receptor as one of the common targets of virulence factors from highly evolved biotrophic/hemibiotrophic pathogens. Strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, for example, produce proteinaceous effectors, as well as a JA-mimicking toxin, coronatine (COR), to activate JA signaling as a mechanism to promote disease susceptibility. Guided by the crystal structure of the JA receptor and evolutionary clues, we succeeded in modifying the JA receptor to allow for sufficient endogenous JA signaling but greatly reduced sensitivity to COR. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing this modified receptor not only are fertile and maintain a high level of insect defense, but also gain the ability to resist COR-producing pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and P. syringae pv. maculicola. Our results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that host target modification can be a promising new approach to prevent the virulence action of highly evolved pathogens. PMID:26578782

  8. Genome inventory and analysis of nuclear hormone receptors in Tetraodon nigroviridis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghu Prasad Rao Metpally; Ramakrishnan Vigneshwar; Ramanathan Sowdhamini

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) form a large superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, which regulate genes underlying a wide range of (patho) physiological phenomena. Availability of the full genome sequence of Tetraodon nigroviridis facilitated a genome wide analysis of the NRs in fish genome. Seventy one NRs were found in Tetraodon and were compared with mammalian and fish NR family members. In general, there is a higher representation of NRs in fish genomes compared to mammalian ones. They showed high diversity across classes as observed by phylogenetic analysis. Nucleotide substitution rates show strong negative selection among fish NRs except for pregnane X receptor (PXR), estrogen receptor (ER) and liver X receptor (LXR). This may be attributed to crucial role played by them in metabolism and detoxification of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds and might have resulted in slight positive selection. Chromosomal mapping and pairwise comparisons of NR distribution in Tetraodon and humans led to the identification of nine syntenic NR regions, of which three are common among fully sequenced vertebrate genomes. Gene structure analysis shows strong conservation of exon structures among orthologoues. Whereas paralogous members show different splicing patterns with intron gain or loss and addition or substitution of exons played a major role in evolution of NR superfamily.

  9. The Relationship Between Gene Polymorphism of Leptin and Leptin Receptor and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinshui; Fang, Yanling; Lin, Xinfu; Zhou, Huowang; Zhu, Shaobo; Zhang, Yugui; Yang, Huicong; Ye, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a major cause of congenital short stature. GHD patients have significantly decreased serum leptin levels, which are regulated by gene polymorphism of leptin and leptin receptor. This study thus investigated the relationship between gene polymorphism and susceptibility to GHD. MATERIAL AND METHODS A case-control study was performed using 180 GHD children in addition to 160 healthy controls. After the extraction of whole genomic DNA, the genotypes of leptin and leptin receptor gene loci were analyzed by sequencing for single-nucleotide polymorphism. RESULTS The frequency distribution of all alleles identified in leptin gene (loci rs7799039) and leptin receptor gene (loci rs1137100 and rs1137101) fit Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a significant difference in allele frequency at loci rs7799039 or rs1137101, as individuals with heterozygous GA allele had lower (rs7799039) or higher (rs1137101) GHD risk. No significant difference in allele frequency was discovered at loci rs1137100 (p>0.05), which was unrelated to GHD susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS Gene polymorphism of leptin (loci rs7799039) and leptin receptor (loci rs1137101) are correlated with GHD susceptibility. PMID:26915772

  10. The Function of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 in Normal Tissues and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. Walsh, Li Qin, Jean Ching-Yi Tien, Leonie S. Young, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1 was identified as the first authentic steroid receptor coactivator. Since then, the SRC proteins have remained at the epicenter of coregulator biology, molecular endocrinology and endocrine-related cancer. Cumulative works on SRC-1 have shown that it is primarily a nuclear receptor coregulator and functions to construct highly specific enzymatic protein complexes which can execute efficient and successful transcriptional activation of designated target genes. The versatile nature of SRC-1 enables it to respond to steroid dependent and steroid independent stimulation, allowing it to bind across many families of transcription factors to orchestrate and regulate complex physiological reactions. This review highlights the multiple functions of SRC-1 in the development and maintenance of normal tissue functions as well as its major role in mediating hormone receptor responsiveness. Insights from genetically manipulated mouse models and clinical data suggest SRC-1 is significantly overexpressed in many cancers, in particular, cancers of the reproductive tissues. SRC-1 has been associated with cellular proliferation and tumor growth but its major tumorigenic contributions are promotion and execution of breast cancer metastasis and mediation of resistance to endocrine therapies. The ability of SRC-1 to coordinate multiple signaling pathways makes it an important player in tumor cells' escape of targeted therapy.

  11. Research on the Changes of Endocrine Hormones in Mammary Cancer and Hyperplasia of Mammary Glands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chengqi

    2002-01-01

    Objective Based on a comparison of endocrine hormones between patients of mammary cancer and those of hyperplasia of mammary glands, a preliminary analysis of the interaction between endocrine hormones and the immune system was oonducted. Methods The experiment involved 50 cases of mammary cancer and hyperplasia of mammary glands each.Blood samples were taken from pre - menopausal and menopausal patients; six kinds of hypophyseal hommones(PRL, GH, TSH,ACTH, FSH and LH) and three kinds of sex hormones ( E2,P and T) were subjected to RIA tests.Results Wilcoxon matchpaired assay and normal approximation of the experiment indicated that the FSH level before pre - menopause and the ACTH level during menopause in patients with mammary canoer were higher that those of patients suffering hyperplasia of mamary glands. Conclusion Statistics show the the normal rhythm between endocrine hormones and the immune system is disrupted in mammary cancer patients, the feedback mechanism of the hypothalamo- hypophyseal- adrenal system is maladjusted,resulting in inhibition of the immune function. Female hormones induce the gene mutation and the sensitivity of the cells is increased, resulting in a significant acceleration of the hyperplasia of cancer cells.

  12. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reproductive and hormonal factors are known to be associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population, including parity and oral contraceptive (OC) use. However, their effect on ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has only been investigated in a...... small number of studies. METHODS: We used data on 2,281 BRCA1 carriers and 1,038 BRCA2 carriers from the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study to evaluate the effect of reproductive and hormonal factors on ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers. Data were analyzed within a weighted Cox...... proportional hazards framework. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the risk of ovarian cancer between parous and nulliparous carriers. For parous BRCA1 mutation carriers, the risk of ovarian cancer was reduced with each additional full-term pregnancy (P trend = 0.002). BRCA1 carriers who had...

  13. In vivo phosphorylation of progesterone receptors in the T47Dco human breast cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have had evidence indicating that human progesterone receptors (PR) are phosphoproteins, and used metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine and [32P]orthophosphate to study the synthesis, structure, and phosphorylation of PR in T47Dco human breast cancer cells, a cell line extremely rich for PR. Human PR exist as two independent hormone-binding proteins; B-receptors which are triplets in SDS-gels (Mr 114, 117, and 120 kDa), and A-receptors that are a single band (94 kDa). The work presented here documents that human A- and B-receptors are phosphorylated on serine residues in the untransformed state, with phosphate being incorporated into all three bands of the B-proteins. However, a brief [35S]methionine pulse shows that both A and B are synthesized as singlets of 94 and 114 kDa, respectively. The B-triplet is formed post-translationally by slow phosphorylation. B-triplet formation, or maturation, can be reversed by treatment with calf alkaline phosphatase or stabilized by the presence of phosphatase inhibitors. Additional [35S]labeling studies in the presence of progestins demonstrate that receptors that are 15 min old are able to bind hormone and transform to the tight nuclear binding state

  14. An aprotinin binding site localized in the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor from calf uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, V; Medici, N; Abbondanza, C; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Molinari, A M; Puca, G A

    1990-07-31

    It has been proposed that the estrogen receptor bears proteolytic activity responsible for its own transformation. This activity was inhibited by aprotinin. Incubation of transformed ER with aprotinin modified the proteolytic digestion of the hormone binding subunit by proteinase K. The smallest hormone-binding fragment of the ER, obtained by tryptic digestion, was still able to bind to aprotinin. These results suggest that aprotinin interacts with ER and the hormone-binding domain of ER is endowed with a specific aprotinin-binding site. PMID:1696480

  15. The Role of Estrogen Receptor β in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christoforou, Paraskevi; Christopoulos, Panagiotis F; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the main molecular tool regulating growth and function of the prostate gland, estrogen receptor β (ERβ) is involved in the differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells and numerous antiproliferative actions on prostate cancer cells. However, ERβ splice variants have been associated with prostate cancer initiation and progression mechanisms. ERβ is promising as an anticancer therapy and in the prevention of prostate cancer. Herein, we review the re...

  16. The role of Estrogen Receptor Beta in Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Christoforou, Paraskevi; Christopoulos, Panagiotis F; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the main molecular tool regulating growth and function of prostate gland, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is involved contributive in the differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells and numerous antiproliferative actions on prostate cancer cells. However, ERβ splice variants have been associated with prostate cancer initiation and progression mechanisms. Nowadays, ERß is a promising target as an anticancer therapy and prevention for prostate cancer....

  17. Expression of OATP family members in hormone-related cancers: potential markers of progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pressler

    Full Text Available The organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP family of transporters has been implicated in prostate cancer disease progression probably by transporting hormones or drugs. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the expression, frequency, and relevance of OATPs as a biomarker in hormone-dependent cancers. We completed a study examining SLCO1B3, SLCO1B1 and SLCO2B1 mRNA expression in 381 primary, independent patient samples representing 21 cancers and normal tissues. From a separate cohort, protein expression of OATP1B3 was examined in prostate, colon, and bladder tissue. Based on expression frequency, SLCO2B1 was lower in liver cancer (P = 0.04 which also trended lower with decreasing differentiation (P = 0.004 and lower magnitude in pancreatic cancer (P = 0.05. SLCO2B1 also had a higher frequency in thyroid cancer (67% than normal (0% and expression increased with stage (P = 0.04. SLCO1B3 was expressed in 52% of cancerous prostate samples and increased SLCO1B3 expression trended with higher Gleason score (P = 0.03. SLCO1B3 expression was also higher in testicular cancer (P = 0.02. SLCO1B1 expression was lower in liver cancer (P = 0.04 which trended lower with liver cancer grade (P = 0.0004 and higher with colon cancer grade (P = 0.05. Protein expression of OATP1B3 was examined in normal and cancerous prostate, colon, and bladder tissue samples from an independent cohort. The results were similar to the transcription data, but showed distinct localization. OATPs correlate to differentiation in certain hormone-dependent cancers, thus may be useful as biomarkers for assessing clinical treatment and stage of disease.

  18. Effects of steroid sex hormones and adriamycin on human bladder cancer cells in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimoto,Jun

    1982-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of steroid sex hormones on the established cell lines derived from human urinary bladder cancer, T24, and from human transitional cell cancer of the urinary tract, 253J, were examined using the colony formation method. Of the seven kinds of steroid hormones tested, estradiol-17 beta was intensively cytotoxic for both cells. The cytotoxic effect was depended on the dose and time of treatment. The combined effect of Adriamycin and estradiol-17 beta on T24 cells could be recognized at low concentrations of Adriamycin (less than or equal to 10(-3 micrograms/ml after exposure for 24 h.

  19. A Preclinical Model for ERα-Positive Breast Cancer Points to the Epithelial Microenvironment as Determinant of Luminal Phenotype and Hormone Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sflomos, George; Dormoy, Valerian; Metsalu, Tauno; Jeitziner, Rachel; Battista, Laura; Scabia, Valentina; Raffoul, Wassim; Delaloye, Jean-Francois; Treboux, Assya; Fiche, Maryse; Vilo, Jaak; Ayyanan, Ayyakkannu; Brisken, Cathrin

    2016-03-14

    Seventy-five percent of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α positive (ER(+)). Research on these tumors is hampered by lack of adequate in vivo models; cell line xenografts require non-physiological hormone supplements, and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are hard to establish. We show that the traditional grafting of ER(+) tumor cells into mammary fat pads induces TGFβ/SLUG signaling and basal differentiation when they require low SLUG levels to grow in vivo. Grafting into the milk ducts suppresses SLUG; ER(+) tumor cells develop, like their clinical counterparts, in the presence of physiological hormone levels. Intraductal ER(+) PDXs are retransplantable, predictive, and appear genomically stable. The model provides opportunities for translational research and the study of physiologically relevant hormone action in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26947176

  20. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in primary cerebrocortical cells: role of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes and interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to its nuclear receptors (TR) to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the cross...