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Sample records for cancer genetics overview

  1. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary in which the features of hereditary cancer and the structure and content of other PDQ cancer genetics summaries are described. The summary also contains an extensive list of genetics resources available online.

  2. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  3. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer > Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  4. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  5. Report: Human cancer genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Marilyn; ALBERTSON Donna

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  6. Human cancer genetics*

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  7. Overview | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments (TARGET) initiative uses comprehensive molecular characterization to determine the genetic changes that drive the initiation and progression of hard-to-treat childhood cancers. TARGET aims to identify therapeutic targets and prognostic markers so that new, more effective treatment strategies can be developed and applied. Novel pediatric cancer treatments are needed because:

  8. Cancer Vaccines: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sunil; Prendergast, George C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine approaches for cancer differ from traditional vaccine approaches for infectious disease in tending to focus on clearing active disease rather than preventing disease. In this review, we provide a brief overview of different types of vaccines and adjuvants that have been investigated for the purpose of controlling cancer burdens in patients, some of which are approved for clinical use or in late-stage clinical trials, such as the personalized dendritic cell vaccine sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and the recombinant viral prostate cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac-VF). Vaccines against human viruses implicated in the development and progression of certain cancers, such as human papillomavirus in cervical cancer, are not considered here. Cancers express "altered self" antigens that tend to induce weaker responses than the "foreign" antigens expressed by infectious agents. Thus, immune stimulants and adjuvant approaches have been explored widely. Vaccine types considered include autologous patient-derived immune cell vaccines, tumor antigen-expressing recombinant virus vaccines, peptide vaccines, DNA vaccines, and heterologous whole-cell vaccines derived from established human tumor cell lines. Opportunities to develop effective cancer vaccines may benefit from seminal recent advances in understanding how immunosuppressive barricades are erected by tumors to mediate immune escape. In particular, targeted ablation of these barricades with novel agents, such as the immune checkpoint drug ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) approved recently for clinical use, may offer significant leverage to vaccinologists seeking to control and prevent malignancy.

  9. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden, D J P; van Laarhoven, H W M; Westenberg, A H; de Wilt, J H W; Blanken-Peeters, C F J M

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This multimodal therapeutic approach has significantly improved patient survival. However, the median overall survival among women with IBC is still poor. By elucidating the biologic characteristics of IBC, new treatment options may become available. We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature on IBC through computerized literature searches. The objective of the current review is to present an overview of the literature related to the biology, imaging and multidisciplinary treatment of inflammatory breast cancer.

  10. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrion-Castillo, A.; Franke, B.; Fisher, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies

  11. Genetic abnormalities in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamboni Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence and mortality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are nearly coincident having a five-year survival of less than 5%. Enormous advances have been made in our knowledge of the molecular alterations commonly present in ductal cancer and other pancreatic malignancies. One significant outcome of these studies is the recognition that common ductal cancers have a distinct molecular fingerprint compared to other nonductal or endocrine tumors. Ductal carcinomas typically show alteration of K-ras, p53, p16INK4, DPC4 and FHIT, while other pancreatic tumor types show different aberrations. Among those tumors arising from the exocrine pancreas, only ampullary cancers have a molecular fingerprint that may involve some of the same genes most frequently altered in common ductal cancers. Significant molecular heterogeneity also exists among pancreatic endocrine tumors. Nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors have frequent mutations in MEN-1 and may be further subdivided into two clinically relevant subgroups based on the amount of chromosomal alterations. The present review will provide a brief overview of the genetic alterations that have been identified in the various subgroups of pancreatic tumors. These results have important implications for the development of genetic screening tests, early diagnosis, and prognostic genetic markers.

  12. An overview of genetic counseling in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Araceli Lantigua

    2013-12-01

    This brief report provides an overview of the history and current status of genetic services in Cuba. In 1971, the University of Medical Sciences of Havana began to train doctors in medical genetics according to the medicine development plan in Cuba. With the aim of introducing genetic services to the population, two main issues were identified: the impact of neural tube defects as a cause of infantile mortality, and a founder effect resulting in a high frequency of sickle cell anemia, which increased the mortality rate and impacted the quality of peoples' lives. The impact of consanguinity is variable; it depends on the isolation of the population, with rates of 1 to 11% in different regions for first and second cousin marriages. From 1981, the services of medical genetics began to expand to the entire country, according to a government directive, and the need to design a program for the specialty became evident. From 1995 to 2000, two Masters-level programs were designed by professors of the Department of Medical Genetics, University of Medical Sciences of Havana, and authorized by the Ministry of Higher Education. One program in medical genetics was designed for physicians with other specialties, and the second program was designed to train professionals to become genetic counselors. The majority of graduates from the latter program are working at the primary level of healthcare.

  13. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs.

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable ...

  19. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Gallbladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer. Tests that examine the gallbladder and nearby organs are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ... cancer cells or to make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation therapy and certain ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Laryngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Laryngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Laryngeal Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ...

  2. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic counseling, and a genetic counselor may recommend genetic testing based on your family health history. When collecting ... find information on colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome, cancer genetic testing, and genetic counseling services. Colorectal Cancer, Centers for ...

  3. Introduction to cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Rose B; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-12-02

    The last 30 years have witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, including those that predispose to hematopoietic malignancies. The identification and characterization of families affected by these syndromes is enhancing our knowledge of the oncologic and nononcologic manifestations associated with predisposing germ line mutations and providing insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Here, we provide an overview of the cancer genetic susceptibility syndromes, focusing on aspects relevant to the evaluation of patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Guidance is provided to facilitate recognition of these syndromes by hematologists/oncologists, including descriptions of the family history features, tumor genotype, and physical or developmental findings that should raise concern for an underlying cancer genetic syndrome. The clinical implications and management challenges associated with cancer susceptibility syndromes are also discussed.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neoplasm of lung malignant tumor of lung pulmonary cancer pulmonary carcinoma pulmonary neoplasms respiratory carcinoma Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources ... Encyclopedia: Lung Cancer--Non-Small Cell Encyclopedia: Lung Cancer--Small Cell ...

  5. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, D.J. van; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Westenberg, A.H.; Wilt, J.H. de; Blanken-Peeters, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This multimoda

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from hard- ...

  7. Overview: New Modality for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is now becoming a promising modality of cancer treatment upon the clinical successes of adoptive T-cell transfer and immune checkpoint blockade. At the 30th Nagoya International Cancer Treatment Symposium, Marcel R.M. van den Brink (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, MSKCC, New York, N.Y., USA) showed novel strategies to control malignant relapse and graft-versus-host disease, both major obstacles for clinical benefits in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Alexander M. Lesokhin (MSKCC, New York, N.Y., USA) presented an overview of immune checkpoint blockade, particularly focusing on hematologic malignancies stressing the importance of immunomonitoring to identify biomarkers.

  8. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics.

  9. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  10. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaram Choudhary

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  11. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  12. Overview of cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Gerard Chin Chye

    2002-03-01

    The problem of cancer in Malaysia is a growing one. It is now the fourth leading cause of death among medically certified deaths. Cancer of the lung is the most common killer among malignancies. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is 30 000. The majority of patients are found at a late stage of the disease. The National Cancer Control Program aims to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer and to improve the quality of life of cancer patients. Policies encompass prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, palliative care and rehabilitation. The program for prevention includes an anti-smoking campaign and immunization of babies against hepatitis B. Papanicolaou's smear and breast self-examination are among efforts for the early detection of cancer. Public education and the promotion of healthy lifestyles have been actively carried out. Facilities for treatment and palliative care are being developed further. Networks between the public and private sectors and non-governmental organizations have been on-going. Apart from the establishment and upgrading of treatment facilities, the need for training of skilled staff in the treatment of cancer is highlighted.

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. Sipuleucel-T is a type of biologic therapy used to ... already treated with hormone therapy. Biologic therapy with sipuleucel-T for patients already treated with hormone therapy. External ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... in dozens of tiny bulbs that can make milk. The lobes, lobules, and bulbs are linked by ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  17. Genetics of Endometrial Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Okuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancers exhibit a different mechanism of tumorigenesis and progression depending on histopathological and clinical types. The most frequently altered gene in estrogen-dependent endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors is PTEN. Microsatellite instability is another important genetic event in this type of tumor. In contrast, p53 mutations or Her2/neu overexpression are more frequent in non-endometrioid tumors. On the other hand, it is possible that the clear cell type may arise from a unique pathway which appears similar to the ovarian clear cell carcinoma. K-ras mutations are detected in approximately 15%–30% of endometrioid carcinomas, are unrelated to the existence of endometrial hyperplasia. A β-catenin mutation was detected in about 20% of endometrioid carcinomas, but is rare in serous carcinoma. Telomere shortening is another important type of genomic instability observed in endometrial cancer. Only non-endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tumors were significantly associated with critical telomere shortening in the adjacent morphologically normal epithelium. Lynch syndrome, which is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of cancer susceptibility and is characterized by a MSH2/MSH6 protein complex deficiency, is associated with the development of non-endometrioid carcinomas.

  18. Genetics of idiopathic generalized epilepsy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. V. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is a common type of epilepsy. Strong support for a genetic role in IGE comes from twin and family studies. Several subtypes of IGE have been reported but families often have members affected with different subtypes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of genetic basis of monogenic inherited epilepsies. However, most IGEs are complex genetic diseases and some susceptible IGE genes are shared across subtypes that determine subtypes in specific combinations. The high throughput technologies like deoxyribonucleic acid microarrays and sequencing technologies have the potential to identify causative genes or loci in non-familial cases.

  19. 75 FR 76460 - Lymphohematopoietic Cancers Induced by Chemicals and Other Agents: Overview and Implications for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... AGENCY Lymphohematopoietic Cancers Induced by Chemicals and Other Agents: Overview and Implications for..., ``Lymphohematopoietic Cancers Induced by Chemicals and Other Agents: Overview and Implications for Risk Assessment.... ADDRESSES: The draft ``Lymphohematopoietic Cancers Induced by Chemicals and Other Agents: Overview...

  20. Genetic basis of stroke: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshi Anjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke or "brain attack" is a complex disease caused by a combination of multiple risk factors. It has major social and economic consequences. Various epidemiological studies in families and twins have revealed that there is a genetic component to stroke risk. Stroke may be the outcome of single gene disorders or more commonly, a polygenic multifactorial disease. Mutations in several candidate genes have been found to be associated with stroke. However, association studies in population-based samples have failed to identify reliable disease markers. The publication of the "Human Genome Project" has indeed improved our knowledge about the potential role of genetics in complex disorders including stroke. Rapidly expanding field of genetics is in a state of transforming medicine into a new kind in future, the individualized medicine, using tailor made drugs according to the genetic makeup of the individuals. However, this involves integrating genome wide genetic information with medical information. The first genome wide association study on ischemic stroke has been published recently. Further studies will hopefully tell us how far the genetic information will assist us to tailor clinical and therapeutic decisions to an individual′s genotype.

  1. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer--An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Orlowska, Janina; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kadar, Zoltan; Turdean, Sabin; Bara, Tivadar

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer varies by up to ten fold throughout the world, and the geographic distribution of hereditary cases is not well explored. Familial clustering is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of all gastric cancers develop due to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this review, the characteristics of HDGC are presented according to molecular particularities, geographic distribution, and other parameters. Based on our experience and the data from the literature, we discuss the possibility of applying a mutation signature (spectrum) study and adductomic approaches to a comparative carcinogenesis of HDGC. We also provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of genetic counseling and criteria for screening and surveillance of eligible families.

  2. Genetics of leprosy reactions: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Fava

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 (T1R and Type-2 (T2R leprosy reactions (LR, which affect up to 50% of leprosy patients, are aggressive inflammatory episodes of sudden onset and highly variable incidence across populations. LR are often diagnosed concurrently with leprosy, but more frequently occur several months after treatment onset. It is not uncommon for leprosy patients to develop recurring reactional episodes; however, they rarely undergo both types of LR. Today, LR are the main cause of permanent disabilities associated with leprosy and represent a major challenge in the clinical management of leprosy patients. Although progress has been made in understanding the immunopathology of LR, the factors that cause a leprosy patient to suffer from LR are largely unknown. Given the impact that ethnic background has on the risk of developing LR, host genetic factors have long been suspected of contributing to LR. Indeed, polymorphisms in seven genes [Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2, nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain containing 2, vitamin D receptor, natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1, C4B and interleukin-6] have been found to be associated with one or more LR outcomes. The identification of host genetic markers with predictive value for LR would have a major impact on nerve damage control in leprosy. In this review, we present the recent advances achieved through genetic studies of LR.

  3. Overview of the genetic tools in the Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruyuki eAtomi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This section provides an overview of the genetic systems developed in the Archaea. Genetic manipulation is possible in many members of the halophiles, methanogens, Sulfolobus and Thermococcales. We describe the selection/counterselection principles utilized in each of these groups, which consist of antibiotics and their resistance markers, and auxotrophic host strains and complementary markers. The latter strategy utilizes techniques similar to those developed in yeast. However, Archaea are resistant to many of the antibiotics routinely used for selection in the Bacteria, and a number of strategies specific to the Archaea have been developed. In addition, examples utilizing the genetic systems developed for each group will be briefly described.

  4. Complex genetic mechanisms in glaucoma: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Kollu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucomas comprise a group of hereditary optic neuropathies characterized by progressive and irreversible visual field loss and damage to the optic nerve head. It is a complex disease with multiple molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis. Genetic heterogeneity is the hallmark of all glaucomas and multiple chromosomal loci have been linked to the disease, but only a few genes have been characterized, viz. myocilin (MYOC, optineurin (OPTN, WDR36 and neurotrophin-4 (NTF4 in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and CYP1B1 and LTBP2 in congenital and developmental glaucomas. Case-control-based association studies on candidate genes involved in different stages of glaucoma pathophysiology have indicated a very limited involvement. The complex mechanisms leading to glaucoma pathogenesis indicate that it could be attributed to multiple genes with varying magnitudes of effect. In this review, we provide an appraisal of the various efforts in unraveling the molecular mystery in glaucoma and also some future directions based on the available scientific knowledge and technological developments.

  5. Complex genetic mechanisms in glaucoma: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kollu N; Nagireddy, Srujana; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata

    2011-01-01

    Glaucomas comprise a group of hereditary optic neuropathies characterized by progressive and irreversible visual field loss and damage to the optic nerve head. It is a complex disease with multiple molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis. Genetic heterogeneity is the hallmark of all glaucomas and multiple chromosomal loci have been linked to the disease, but only a few genes have been characterized, viz. myocilin (MYOC), optineurin (OPTN), WDR36 and neurotrophin-4 (NTF4) in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and CYP1B1 and LTBP2 in congenital and developmental glaucomas. Case-control-based association studies on candidate genes involved in different stages of glaucoma pathophysiology have indicated a very limited involvement. The complex mechanisms leading to glaucoma pathogenesis indicate that it could be attributed to multiple genes with varying magnitudes of effect. In this review, we provide an appraisal of the various efforts in unraveling the molecular mystery in glaucoma and also some future directions based on the available scientific knowledge and technological developments.

  6. Genetically modified crops: Brazilian law and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, C D; Martins, F J O; Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; dos Santos, O J A P; Alves, D P; Brasileiro, B P; Peternelli, L A

    2014-07-07

    In Brazil, the first genetically modified (GM) crop was released in 1998, and it is estimated that 84, 78, and 50% of crop areas containing soybean, corn, and cotton, respectively, were transgenic in 2012. This intense and rapid adoption rate confirms that the choice to use technology has been the main factor in developing national agriculture. Thus, this review focuses on understanding these dynamics in the context of farmers, trade relations, and legislation. To accomplish this goal, a survey was conducted using the database of the National Cultivar Registry and the National Service for Plant Variety Protection of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply [Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento (MAPA)] between 1998 and October 13, 2013. To date, 36 events have been released: five for soybeans, 18 for corn, 12 for cotton, and one for beans. From these events, 1395 cultivars have been developed and registered: 582 for soybean, 783 for corn and 30 for cotton. Monsanto owns 73.05% of the technologies used to develop these cultivars, while the Dow AgroScience - DuPont partnership and Syngenta have 16.34 and 4.37% ownership, respectively. Thus, the provision of transgenic seeds by these companies is an oligopoly supported by legislation. Moreover, there has been a rapid replacement of conventional crops by GM crops, whose technologies belong almost exclusively to four multinational companies, with the major ownership by Monsanto. These results reflect a warning to the government of the increased dependence on multinational corporations for key agricultural commodities.

  7. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Lena Karapanagiotou; Kostas Syrigos

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating for patients and their relatives as the incidence rate is approximately the same as mortality rate. Only a small percentage, which ranges from 0.4% to 4% of patients who have been given this diagnosis, will be alive at five years. At the time of diagnosis, 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have unresectable or metastatic disease.Moreover, the therapeutic alternatives offered by chemotherapy or radiotherapy are few, if not zero. For all these reasons, there is an imperative need of analyzing and understanding the primitive lesions that lead to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathology of these lesions is the key of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of this cancer and will probably help us in earlier diagnosis and better therapeutic results. This review focuses on medical research on pancreatic cancer models and the underlying genetic alterations.

  8. Vitamin D and cancer: an overview on epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez Mena, José Manuel; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a rapidly increasing number of studies have investigated the relationship of vitamin D with total cancer and site-specific cancer obtaining diverse findings. In this chapter we provide an overview of epidemiological studies of vitamin D intake, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D serum levels and vitamin D associated polymorphisms in relation to total and site-specific cancer risk. Overall, epidemiological evidence for total cancer is inconclusive. However, a large number of studies support a relationship of vitamin D with colorectal cancer and to a lesser extent with breast cancer. Findings are inconsistent for other cancers including all other gastrointestinal cancers and prostate cancer. Different vitamin D associated polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated to colorectal, breast and prostate cancer risk.

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  11. Sex and Women with Cancer -- Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Sexuality for the Woman With Cancer Cancer, sex, and sexuality When you first learned you had ... affect your sexual function. What is a normal sex life? People vary a great deal in their ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  13. The genetics of cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Mark M; Freedman, Matthew L

    2011-01-01

    One hundred years ago, decades before the discovery of the structure of DNA, debate raged regarding how human traits were passed from one generation to the next. Phenotypes, including risk of disease, had long been recognized as having a familial component. Yet it was difficult to reconcile genetic segregation as described by Mendel with observations exhaustively documented by Karl Pearson and others regarding the normal distribution of human characteristics. In 1918, R. A. Fisher published his landmark article, "The Correlation Between Relatives on the Supposition of Mendelian Inheritance," bridging this divide and demonstrating that multiple alleles, all individually obeying Mendel's laws, account for the phenotypic variation observed in nature.Since that time, geneticists have sought to identify the link between genotype and phenotype. Trait-associated alleles vary in their frequency and degree of penetrance. Some minor alleles may approach a frequency of 50% in the human population, whereas others are present within only a few individuals. The spectrum for penetrance is similarly wide. These characteristics jointly determine the segregation pattern of a given trait, which, in turn, determine the method used to map the trait. Until recently, identification of rare, highly penetrant alleles was most practical. Revolutionary studies in genomics reported over the past decade have made interrogation of most of the spectrum of genetic variation feasible.The following article reviews recent discoveries in the genetic basis of inherited cancer risk and how these discoveries inform cancer biology and patient management. Although this article focuses on prostate cancer, the principles are generic for any cancer and, indeed, for any trait.

  14. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  15. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  16. Overview of gastrointestinal cancer prevention in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Min; Lee, Ho-Jae; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Ko, Weon Jin; Cho, Joo Young; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2015-12-01

    "War on cancer" was declared through the National Cancer Act by President Richard Nixon in 1971, but cancer statistics from the American Cancer Society and other sources indicated the failure of this war, suggesting instead focus on the message that a "prevention strategy" might be much more effective than cancer treatment. While cancer statistics notoriously showed sharp increases in incidence as well as in mortality concurrent with economic growth in Asia, fortunately Asian countries benefit from plentiful resources of natural compounds, which can prevent cancer. Just like cancer chemotherapeutics targeted to kill cancer cells in Western countries, natural agents activating molecular mechanisms for cancer prevention, reversion of premalignant tumors, and even ablation of cancer stem cells, are very abundant in Asia. Currently, these natural agents are under very active investigations targeting the hallmarks of cancer prevention, including selective induction of apoptosis in cancer cells, suppression of growth factors or their signaling, suppression of cell proliferation and of cancer-promoting angiogenesis, induction of mesenchymal-epithelial transition, and disruption of the tumor microenvironment, developing promising cancer preventive agents. However, Asia is the most populous continent in the world and some Asian countries do not have the resources to implement cancer screening programs for early detection or treatment. In addition, despite the excellent cancer preventive screening strategies in some Asian countries, well-designed clinical trials for cancer prevention are somewhat delayed compared to Western countries. In this review article, several phytochemicals/phytoceuticals produced and studied in different Asian countries will be introduced, including Korean red ginseng (pride of Korea), curcumin (Indian spice for life), black or green tea (popular in Japan/Sri Lanka), genistein from tofu (famous Chinese food), diallylsulfide or S-allylcysteine (garlic

  17. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Amit; Bali, Deepika; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2013-07-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  18. Forest genetic monitoring: an overview of concepts and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussi, Barbara; Westergren, Marjana; Aravanopoulos, Filippos; Baier, Roland; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Finzgar, Domen; Alizoti, Paraskevi; Bozic, Gregor; Avramidou, Evangelia; Konnert, Monika; Kraigher, Hojka

    2016-08-01

    Safeguarding sustainability of forest ecosystems with their habitat variability and all their functions is of highest priority. Therefore, the long-term adaptability of forest ecosystems to a changing environment must be secured, e.g., through sustainable forest management. High adaptability is based on biological variation starting at the genetic level. Thus, the ultimate goal of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to halt the ongoing erosion of biological variation is of utmost importance for forest ecosystem functioning and sustainability. Monitoring of biological diversity over time is needed to detect changes that threaten these biological resources. Genetic variation, as an integral part of biological diversity, needs special attention, and its monitoring can ensure its effective conservation. We compare forest genetic monitoring to other biodiversity monitoring concepts. Forest genetic monitoring (FGM) enables early detection of potentially harmful changes of forest adaptability before these appear at higher biodiversity levels (e.g., species or ecosystem diversity) and can improve the sustainability of applied forest management practices and direct further research. Theoretical genetic monitoring concepts developed up to now need to be evaluated before being implemented on a national and international scale. This article provides an overview of FGM concepts and definitions, discusses their advantages and disadvantages, and provides a flow chart of the steps needed for the optimization and implementation of FGM. FGM is an important module of biodiversity monitoring, and we define an effective FGM scheme as consisting of an assessment of a forest population's capacity to survive, reproduce, and persist under rapid environmental changes on a long-term scale.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and breast cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezgen, G; Roach, E C; Kizilarslanoglu, M C; Petekkaya, I; Altundag, K

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening cancer in women and the most important cause of cancer-related deaths among women. This disease is on the rise in Turkey. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and high blood sugar. Several studies have examined the association of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome with breast cancer. More recent studies have shown it to be an independent risk factor for breast cancer. It has also been associated with poorer prognosis, increased incidence, a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Basic research studies are now in progress to illuminate the molecular pathways and mechanisms that are behind this correlation. Given the fact that all of the components of metabolic syndrome are modifiable risk factors, preventive measures must be established to improve the outcome of breast cancer patients. In this review we set the background by taking into account previous studies which have identified the components of metabolic syndrome individually as breast cancer risk factors. Then we present the latest findings which elaborate possible explanations regarding how metabolic syndrome as a single entity may affect breast cancer risk.

  20. Overview of Dietary Supplements in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoubian, Aline; Dargham, Rana Abu; Khauli, Raja B; Bachir, Bassel G

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a key health concern for men with its etiology still under investigation. Recently, the role of dietary supplements has been noted to have a major inhibitory effect on prostate cancer and numerous studies have been conducted in this regard. This review provides a summary on numerous recent studies conducted in this field. Some of the studies reviewed revealed a protective role for supplements, and others showed no correlation while some even had an adverse effect. The mechanism of how these supplements act on the prostate is still not clear. Further studies are warranted especially for supplements that have been shown to have a potential inhibitory role in prostate cancer.

  1. Relationship between allergy and cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmeyer, Delia; Lorentz, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Allergic diseases and malignancies cause a lot of morbidity, mortality and high costs for healthcare systems. An inverse association between allergy and cancer has been suspected for a long time, but even despite extensive research no general relationship has been determined. This review comprises 32 epidemiological studies published between 1960 and 2011 and draws conclusions regarding relationships between specific types of cancer and allergic diseases. On the one hand, inflammatory reactions in the course of allergy can support carcinogenesis but are limited to specific areas, whereas on the other hand systemic effects in terms of enhanced immunosurveillance can prevent cancer.

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... duct cancer include jaundice and pain in the abdomen. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... Dark urine . Clay colored stool . Pain in the abdomen . Fever . Itchy skin. Nausea and vomiting . Weight loss ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  4. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  5. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women The U.S. Preventive Services ... Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-related Cancer in Women. This final recommendation statement ...

  6. An overview of triple negative breast cancer for surgical oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiva; Barry, Mitchel; Gallagher, David J; Kell, Malcolm; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2015-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a distinct subgroup of breast cancers with an immunohistochemical phenotype that is negative for oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2). The aim of this article is to provide a broad overview of recent developments in the diagnosis and management of TNBC for surgical oncologists. This overview discusses the subtypes of TNBC and the relationship between this type of breast cancer and the BRCA1 gene. In addition, the article explores recent advances in the treatment of TNBC from a surgical, radiation, and medical oncology point of view. Lastly, evolving therapeutic strategies that have potential to enhance outcomes for patients with TNBC are also discussed.

  7. Lactic dehydrogenase and cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Monica; Sapio, Luigi; Spina, Annamaria; Naviglio, Daniele; Calogero, Armando; Naviglio, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Despite the intense scientific efforts made, there are still many tumors that are difficult to treat and the percentage of patient survival in the long-term is still too low. Thus, new approaches to the treatment of cancer are needed. Cancer is a highly heterogeneous and complex disease, whose development requires a reorganization of cell metabolism. Most tumor cells downregulate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increase the rate of glucose consumption and lactate release, independently of oxygen availability (Warburg effect). This metabolic rewiring is largely believed to favour tumor growth and survival, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Importantly, the correlation between the aerobic glycolysis and cancer is widely regarded as a useful biochemical basis for the development of novel anticancer strategies. Among the enzymes involved in glycolysis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is emerging as a very attractive target for possible pharmacological approaches in cancer therapy. This review addresses the state of the art and the perspectives concerning LDH both as a useful diagnostic marker and a relevant molecular target in cancer therapy and management.

  8. Cancer and pregnancy: an overview for obstetricians and gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salani, Ritu; Billingsley, Caroline C; Crafton, Sarah M

    2014-07-01

    A relatively rare occurrence, pregnancy-associated cancer affects approximately 1 in 1000 pregnancies. Optimizing treatment of the cancer and minimizing harm to the fetus are often dependent on the extent of disease, treatment options required, and the impact on the pregnancy as well as the gestational age of pregnancy. When malignancy is diagnosed, the obstetrician-gynecologist plays a key role in the diagnosis, initial evaluation, and coordination of patient care. Furthermore, the obstetrician-gynecologist may be asked to assist in fertility planning for young women with a new diagnosis of cancer and may be responsible for addressing questions about family-planning needs and the safety of future pregnancy. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to provide the obstetrician-gynecologist with a relevant overview of the current literature regarding concurrent pregnancy and cancer diagnoses, management options, including maternal and neonatal outcomes, as well as the future needs of young women diagnosed with cancer who desire fertility preservation.

  9. Psychosomatic Aspects of Cancer: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John B.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested in this literature review on the psychosomatic aspects of cancer that psychoanalytic interpretations which focused on intrapsychic elements have given way to considerations of rehabilitation and assistance with the complex emotional reactions of patients and their families to terminal illness and death. (Author/DB)

  10. ATMPs for Cancer Immunotherapy: A Regulatory Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses European regulatory requirements for development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) for cancer immunotherapy approaches, describing the framework for clinical trials and for marketing authorization.Regulatory critical issues and challenges for developing ATMP are also discussed, with focus on potency determination, long-term follow-up, comparability, and insertional mutagenesis issues. Some of the most critical features of GMP application to ATMP are also described.

  11. Genetic testing and your cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000842.htm Genetic testing and your cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Survivorship ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) BLADDER CANCER Sources for This Page American Cancer Society: What Are the Key Statistics for Bladder Cancer? Bryan RT, Hussain SA, James ...

  13. [Genetic cancer syndromes and reproductive choice: dialogue between parents and politicians on preimplantation genetic diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermeijer, M.F.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Page-Christiaens, G.C.; Wert, G.M.W.R. de

    2008-01-01

    Genetic cancer syndromes have identical clinical severity, limited therapeutic options, reduced life expectancy, and risks of genetic transmission, as do other genetic or congenital diseases for which prenatal genetic diagnosis or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is allowed in the Netherlands

  14. Intention to seek information on cancer genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Andrews

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The public has a high interest in seeking personal genetic information, which holds implications for health information seeking research and health care policy. Rapid advances in cancer genetics research promise early detection, prevention and treatment, yet consumers may have greater difficulty finding and using the information they may need to make informed decisions regarding their personal health and the future of their families. Design. A statewide telephone survey was conducted of non-institutionalized Kentucky residents 18 years of age or older to investigate factors associated with the intention to seek cancer genetics information, including the need for such information seeking help. Results. The results show that intention to seek cancer genetics information, if testing were readily available, is moderately high (62.5% of those responding; n=835, and that status as a racial minority, the perception that cancer runs in one's family, and frequent worrying about cancer risk are statistically significant predictors of intent to seek genetics information. Conclusion. . We argue that an already complex health information environment will be even more difficult for individuals to navigate as genetic research becomes more ubiquitous in health care. An increase in demand for genetics information in various forms, as suggested by these results and those of other studies, implies that enduring intervention strategies are needed to help individuals acquire necessary health information literacy skills, with special attention given to racial minorities.

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

  16. Genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Bergman, Andreas M.; van der Poel, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Mouse models of prostate cancer are used to test the contribution of individual genes to the transformation process, evaluate the collaboration between multiple genetic lesions observed in a single tumour, and perform preclinical intervention studies in prostate cancer research. Methods:

  17. Psychological impact of genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: an update of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Bettina

    2005-12-01

    This article presents an overview of the rapidly evolving body of literature on the psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Uptake of genetic testing for BRCA1/2 and HNPCC-related mutations is more consistently related to psychological factors, rather than sociodemographic variables. Most studies on the psychological impact of genetic testing amongst individuals who have never been affected by cancer demonstrate that non-carriers derive significant psychological benefits from genetic testing, while no adverse effects have been observed amongst carriers. These benefits are more clear-cut for HNPCC, compared to hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, reflecting differences in risk management options. The few studies available on individuals affected with cancer indicate that the impact of genetic testing is mediated and amplified by their former experience of cancer. Future directions and challenges of research in this area are reviewed. In particular, more empirical data are needed on the broader impact of genetic testing on those with inconclusive results or results of uncertain significance. As genetic testing is becoming available for other types of familial cancer, additional investigations will be needed as there is evidence to suggest that the impact of genetic testing may be unique to each type of familial cancer.

  18. Colorectal cancer screening: a global overview of existing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuders, Eline H; Ruco, Arlinda; Rabeneck, Linda; Schoen, Robert E; Sung, Joseph J Y; Young, Graeme P; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks third among the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, with wide geographical variation in incidence and mortality across the world. Despite proof that screening can decrease CRC incidence and mortality, CRC screening is only offered to a small proportion of the target population worldwide. Throughout the world there are widespread differences in CRC screening implementation status and strategy. Differences can be attributed to geographical variation in CRC incidence, economic resources, healthcare structure and infrastructure to support screening such as the ability to identify the target population at risk and cancer registry availability. This review highlights issues to consider when implementing a CRC screening programme and gives a worldwide overview of CRC burden and the current status of screening programmes, with focus on international differences.

  19. An overview of doxorubicin formulations in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivankar, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    The burden of cancer is continuously increasing, and is rapidly becoming a global pandemic. The first liposomal encapsulated anticancer drug which received clinical approval against malignancies including solid tumours, transplantable leukemias and lymphomas was Doxorubicin HCl. This review is aimed at providing an overview of doxorubicin in cancer therapy. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin has a polyethylene glycol (PEG) layer around doxorubicin-containing liposome as the result of a process known as pegylation. Non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (NPLD) was developed to overcome the drawbacks associated with previous formulations. Nudoxa; (NPLD) with its unique drug delivery system offers the benefit of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin without hand foot syndrome as the major side effect. Future studies will be directed towards estimating the costs of treatment with the novel liposomal doxorubicin formulations in order to assess their widespread use and robustness in treating patients with cancer.

  20. Genetic Screening for Familial Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Carla

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Approximately 10% of gastric cancer cases show familial clustering but only 1-3% of gastric carcinomas arise as a result of inherited gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Direct proof that Hereditary Gastric Cancer a genetic disease with a germline gene defect has come from the demonstration of co-segregation of germline E-cadherin (CDH1 mutations with early onset diffuse gastric cancer in families with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance (HDGC. E-cadherin is a transmembrane calcium-dependent cell-adhesion molecule involved in cell-junction formation and the maintenance of epithelial integrity. In this review, we describe frequency and type of CDH1 mutations in sporadic and familial gastric cancer. Further we demonstrate the functional significance of some CDH1 germline missense mutations found in HDGC. We also discuss the CDH1 polymorphisms that have been associated to gastric cancer. We report other types of malignancies associated to HDGC, besides diffuse gastric cancer. Moreover, we review the data available on putative alternative candidate genes screened in familial gastric cancer. Finally, we briefly discuss the role of low-penetrance genes and Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer. This knowledge is a fundamental step towards accurate genetic counselling, in which a highly specialised pre-symptomatic therapeutic intervention should be offered.

  1. Therapeutic vaccines for cancer: an overview of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Ignacio; Gaudernack, Gustav; Gerritsen, Winald; Huber, Christoph; Parmiani, Giorgio; Scholl, Suzy; Thatcher, Nicholas; Wagstaff, John; Zielinski, Christoph; Faulkner, Ian; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic potential of host-specific and tumour-specific immune responses is well recognized and, after many years, active immunotherapies directed at inducing or augmenting these responses are entering clinical practice. Antitumour immunization is a complex, multi-component task, and the optimal combinations of antigens, adjuvants, delivery vehicles and routes of administration are not yet identified. Active immunotherapy must also address the immunosuppressive and tolerogenic mechanisms deployed by tumours. This Review provides an overview of new results from clinical studies of therapeutic cancer vaccines directed against tumour-associated antigens and discusses their implications for the use of active immunotherapy.

  2. Genetic counseling of the cancer survivor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulvihill, J.J.; Byrne, J.

    1989-02-01

    Each year, tens of thousands of persons are diagnosed with cancer, are treated, and become survivors while still in their reproductive years. Their concerns about possible germ-cell damage as a result of life-saving radiation, chemotherapy, or both are plausible, based on evidence from animal models and from somatic cell mutations in human beings. A 40-year follow-up of survivors of the atomic bomb blasts in Japan showed no detectable genetic damage and suggested that the human gonad is more resistant to radiogenic mutation than the laboratory mouse. The pooled results of studying 12 series of offspring of cancer patients showed a 4% rate of major birth defects (similar to that of the general population) and an excess of fetal loss and low birth weight in offspring of women who received abdominal radiotherapy. According to preliminary evaluation of a new National Cancer Institute collaboration with five cancer registries, offspring of survivors of childhood cancers had no more birth defects than expected and, beyond an increase in probably familial cancers in children younger than 5, no overall increase in childhood cancer. Ideally, genetic and reproductive counseling should take place as soon as cancer is diagnosed (before therapy starts) and again when pregnancy is contemplated. 28 references.

  3. Genetic Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    delivery to cancer patients. In: Principles and Practice of Oncology , human ovarian cancer xenografts utilizing a tropism- PPO Updates, DeVita Jr VT...1 Lyudmila N. Kaliberova,1 Cecil R. Stockard, William E. Grizzle, 2 and Donald J. Buchsbaum",* ’Department of Radiation Oncology and 2 Department...and D.J. Buchsbaum. Department of Radiation Oncology , Division of Human Gene Therapy, and Gene Therapy Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham

  4. PEGylation in anti-cancer therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Mishra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced drug delivery systems using poly(ethylene glycol (PEG is an important development in anti-cancer therapy. PEGylation has the ability to enhance the retention time of the therapeutics like proteins, enzymes small molecular drugs, liposomes and nanoparticles by protecting them against various degrading mechanisms active inside a tissue or cell, which consequently improves their therapeutic potential. PEGylation effectively alters the pharmacokinetics (PK of a variety of drugs and dramatically improves the pharmaceutical values; recent development of which includes fabrication of stimuli-sensitive polymers/smart polymers and polymeric micelles to cope of with the pathophysiological environment of targeted site with less toxic effects and more effectiveness. This overview discusses PEGylation involving proteins, enzymes, low molecular weight drugs, liposomes and nanoparticles that has been developed, clinically tried for anti-cancer therapy during the last decade.

  5. Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer: Psychological and Social Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic testing for breast cancer: Psychological and social impact Genetic testing to estimate breast and ovarian cancer risk may prompt many emotional and psychological reactions. How will getting the news that you' ...

  6. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  7. Genetic Determinants of Gastric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Boccia (Stefania)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractResults show that gastric cancer risk is increased by the inheritance of the variant alleles of the metabolic genes SULT1A1 and CYP2E1 *6, especially among smokers and drinkers, respectively. An additional increased risk is conferred by the inheritance of GSTT1 null variant, especially i

  8. Genetic determinants of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western world and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will have a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2). The degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the gener

  9. Overview of diagnostic/targeted treatment combinations in personalized medicine for breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessari A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anna Tessari,1 Dario Palmieri,2 Serena Di Cosimo11Division of Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; 2Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Breast cancer includes a body of molecularly distinct subgroups, characterized by different presentation, prognosis, and sensitivity to treatments. Significant advances in our understanding of the complex architecture of this pathology have been achieved in the last few decades, thanks to new biotechnologies that have recently come into the research field and the clinical practice, giving oncologists new instruments that are based on biomarkers and allowing them to set up a personalized approach for each individual patient. Here we review the main treatments available or in preclinical development, the biomolecular diagnostic and prognostic approaches that changed our perspective about breast cancer, giving an overview of targeted therapies that represent the current standard of care for these patients. Finally, we report some examples of how new technologies in clinical practice can set in motion the development of new drugs.Keywords: breast cancer, biomarkers, gene expression profile, next generation sequencing, targeted therapy

  10. The Genetics of Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Pomerantz, Mark M.; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2011-01-01

    One hundred years ago, decades prior to the discovery of the structure of DNA, debate raged regarding how human traits were passed from one generation to the next. Phenotypes, including risk of disease, had long been recognized as having a familial component. Yet it was difficult to reconcile genetic segregation as described by Mendel with observations exhaustively documented by Karl Pearson and others regarding the normal distribution of human characteristics. In 1918, RA Fisher published hi...

  11. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of prostate cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for prostate cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary prostate cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  12. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  13. Study Points to Genetic Subtypes of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a study by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network that identified distinct genetic and molecular changes in esophageal cancers that could improve their classification and identify potential new treatments.

  14. Behavioral Genetics and the Forensic Mental Health Provider: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Tracy D

    2015-10-01

    The area of behavioral genetics has sufficiently entered the area of forensic mental health work that providers should have some working knowledge of the strengths and limitations of these exciting technical advances. Using MAOA as an example, this essay reviews some of the recurring themes in forensic behavioral genetics and suggests additional ways in which the technology might be used in legal matters.

  15. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert L Hollis; Charlie Gourley

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  16. Genetic instability in Gynecological Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-hua; ZHOU Hong-lin

    2003-01-01

    Defects of mismatch repair (MMR) genes also have beenidentified in many kinds of tumors. Loss of MMR functionhas been linked to genetic instability especially microsatelliteinstability that results in high mutation rate. In this review, wediscussed the microsatellite instability observed in thegynecological tumors. We also discussed defects in the DNAmismatch repair in these tumors and their correlation to themicrosatellite instability, as well as the gene mutations due tothe microsatellite instability in these tumors. From thesediscussion, we tried to understand the mechanism ofcarcinogenesis in gynecological tumors from the aspect ofgenetic instability due to mismatch repair defects.

  17. Molecular diagnosis of lung cancer: an overview of recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Health surveillance of workers occupationally exposed to lung carcinogens calls for screening procedures which may not be fully justified, owing to current uncertainties about the outcome of early detection. Indeed, bias-free designs are difficult to set up, and the effects of lead time, length and screening biases can all result in an overestimation of the benefits of screenings, which certainly increase survival, but without any actual reduction of mortality. A major issue with modern imaging techniques is the very high incidence of discovery of lung nodules, usually false positive, but still calling for additional and sometimes painful examinations. Currently, the differential diagnosis is mainly based on additional imaging approaches, particularly positron emission tomography, which is very expensive and also shows limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, purely morphological criteria seem to be insufficient to distinguish lung cancer at early stages from benign nodules with sufficient confidence. A molecular approach to the diagnosis of lung cancer through biomarkers measured by non-invasive means could greatly improve the specificity of imaging procedures. Extremely sensitive mass spectrometric techniques and polymerase chain reaction-based methods are available to detect, in accessible media, molecular alterations which characterise lung cancer at an early stage, thereby reducing the rate of false positives. The lessons learnt from decades of screening programmes based on imaging and the future prospects possibly enhanced by using biomarkers are briefly discussed in this overview. (www.actabiomedica.it)

  18. Genetics of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: An Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jharna Puppala; Siva Prasad Siddapuram; Jyothy Akka; Anjana Munshi

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world today.Its incidence in adults and children is rising rapidly due to the ongoing epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes.Hence,it has become a global public health issue.Environmental factors have been found to play a major role in the etiology of NAFLD,especially for genetically susceptible populations.Among these,one of the most important factors is junk food,especially the typical "Western-style" diet rich in simple carbohydrates,saturated fat,and highly processed food materials.Genetic predisposition to NAFLD does occur; however,a precise definition of genetic factors responsible for NAFLD is still lacking.Specific variants of different genes have been shown to present a risk for NAFLD.Genetic studies might be helpful in the management of the disease by developing novel treatment strategies based on individual's genotype.

  19. Bamboo: an overview on its genetic diversity and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Lucina; Ali, Md Nasim; Gantait, Saikat; Chakraborty, Somsubhra

    2015-02-01

    Genetic diversity represents the heritable variation both within and among populations of organisms, and in the context of this paper, among bamboo species. Bamboo is an economically important member of the grass family Poaceae, under the subfamily Bambusoideae. India has the second largest bamboo reserve in Asia after China. It is commonly known as "poor man's timber", keeping in mind the variety of its end use from cradle to coffin. There is a wide genetic diversity of bamboo around the globe and this pool of genetic variation serves as the base for selection as well as for plant improvement. Thus, the identification, characterization and documentation of genetic diversity of bamboo are essential for this purpose. During recent years, multiple endeavors have been undertaken for characterization of bamboo species with the aid of molecular markers for sustainable utilization of genetic diversity, its conservation and future studies. Genetic diversity assessments among the identified bamboo species, carried out based on the DNA fingerprinting profiles, either independently or in combination with morphological traits by several researchers, are documented in the present review. This review will pave the way to prepare the database of prevalent bamboo species based on their molecular characterization.

  20. The Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovesná, Jaroslava; Demnerová, Kateřina; Pouchová, Vladimíra

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are those whose genetic material has been altered by the insertion of a new gene or by the deletion of an existing one(s). Modern biotechnology, in particular, the rise of genetic engineering, has supported the development of GMOs suitable for research purposes and practical applications (Gepts, 2002; Novoselova,Meuwissen, & Huirne, 2007; Sakakibara & Saito, 2006). For over 20 years GM bacteria and other GM organisms have been used in laboratories for the study of gene functions (Maliga & Small, 2007; Ratledge & Kristiansen, 2006). Agricultural plants were the first GMOs to be released into the environment and placed on the market. Farmers around the world use GMsoybeans, GMcorn and GM cotton that are herbicide tolerant, or insect resistant, or combine several traits that reduce the costs associated with crop production (Corinne, Fernandez-Cornejo, & Goodhue, 2004).

  1. Genetic eye research in Tasmania: a historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, David A

    2012-03-01

    Although considerable recent work on hereditary eye diseases in Tasmanian families has been published, much of this depended on a century of meticulous pedigree collection by earlier clinical researchers. This article reviews some of the historical papers and the importance they have played in gene discovery and understanding of ophthalmic genetics. Tasmanian families have contributed to the identification of genes for X-linked megalocornea, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, retinitis pigmentosa, congenital cataract, ptosis, keratoconus, glaucoma and myopia. The true value of the Tasmanian pedigrees will be realized with the translation of genetic discoveries into early diagnosis and treatment for these eye diseases.

  2. Cancer treatment and the KIR-HLA system: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Patrizia; De Re, Valli; Vacca, Angelo; Dammacco, Franco; Racanelli, Vito

    2017-02-10

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the success of cancer therapy depends not only on a combination of adequate procedures (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) that aim to eliminate all tumor cells, but also on the functional state of the host immune system. HLA and KIR molecules, in particular, are critical to the interactions between tumor cells and both innate and adaptive immune cells such as NK cells and T cells. Different KIR-HLA gene combinations as well as different HLA expression levels on tumor cells associate with variable tumor prognosis and response to treatment. On the other hand, different therapies have different effects on HLA molecules and immune cell functions regulated by these molecules. Here, we provide an overview of the KIR-HLA system, a description of its alterations with clinical relevance in diverse tumor types, and an analysis of the consequences that conventional cancer therapies may have on it. We also discuss how this knowledge can be exploited to identify potential immunological biomarkers that can help to select patients for tailored therapy.

  3. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma — including information about specific gene mutations and related cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing skin cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these syndromes.

  4. Genetic tools for manipulating Acinetobacter baumannii genome: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Indranil

    2015-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen involved in a variety of infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteraemia. A. baumannii has become resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics and multidrug-resistant isolates are becoming a severe problem in the healthcare setting. In the past few years, whole-genome sequences of >200 A. baumannii isolates have been generated. Several methods and molecular tools have been used for genetic manipulation of various Acinetobacter spp. Here, we review recent developments of various genetic tools used for modification of the A. baumannii genome, including various ways to inactivate gene function, chromosomal integration and transposon mutagenesis.

  5. Overview of genetic analysis of human opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Santi M

    2015-01-01

    The human μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), due to its genetic and structural variation, has been a target of interest in several pharmacogenetic studies. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR), encoded by OPRM1, contributes to regulate the analgesic response to pain and also controls the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse, including opioids, nicotine, and alcohol. Genetic polymorphisms of opioid receptors are candidates for the variability of clinical opioid effects. The non-synonymous polymorphism A118G of the OPRM1 has been repeatedly associated with the efficacy of opioid treatments for pain and various types of dependence. Genetic analysis of human opioid receptors has evidenced the presence of numerous polymorphisms either in exonic or in intronic sequences as well as the presence of synonymous coding variants that may have important effects on transcription, mRNA stability, and splicing, thus affecting gene function despite not directly disrupting any specific residue. Genotyping of opioid receptors is still in its infancy and a relevant progress in this field can be achieved by using advanced gene sequencing techniques described in this review that allow the researchers to obtain vast quantities of data on human genomes and transcriptomes in a brief period of time and with affordable costs.

  6. Overview of genetically modified crops and their relevance for Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisser H. Álvarez-Guevara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The first transgenic plants were created in Europe about three decades ago. In Nicaragua, however, there is not commercial cultivation of transgenic crops allowed yet, and the only history of transgenic grain imports occurred in 2005, when the introduction of 15 events of GM maize was first authorized. The Law on Prevention of Risks from Living Modified Organisms by Means of Molecular Biotechnology was published in 2010, and more recently, in September 2012, the Law on Conservation and Sustainable Use of Biodiversity came into force. In line with the resulting requirements from these laws, the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAGFOR currently works in coordination with the Molecular Biology Center at the University of Central America to ensure that grains imported in the country correspond to events legally authorized. This article begins by presenting an overview of transgenic crops (GMO, their history and their implications for the economy and human health. Next, we describe the current status of GMO in Nicaragua. We conclude that MAGFOR has been successful in fulfilling the law in regards to sampling of imports related to the introduction of GMO grains. It is recommended, however, that for better monitoring of compliance with these laws, it will be necessary to establish a systematic monitoring plan nationwide, aimed at the appropriate screening and detection of transgenic material both in crop seeds as well as in imported grains.

  7. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, SS; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H.; Hilner, JE; Julier, C.; Morahan, G; J. Nerup; Nierras, C.; Pociot, F; Todd, JA.

    2009-01-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual’s risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community...

  8. Genetic ecotoxicology of radionuclides in mosquitofish: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C.W. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Blaylock, B.G. [SENES, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes several experiments conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory over the last several years. In 1977, approximately 250 western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) were transplanted from a non-contaminated pond into a radionuclide-contaminated settling basin. These, two populations, along with an additional contaminated and non-contaminated population, are the focus of these studies. Parameters measured were DNA strand breaks, fecundity, embryonic abnormalities, and RAPD and allozyme genotypes. The results are as follows: (1) the fish from the contaminated sites had more strand breaks than reference fish; (2) the number of strand breaks were negatively correlated with fecundity and positively correlated with abnormalities; (3) the contaminated populations had higher genetic diversity, and displayed a higher frequency of certain RAPD markers (contaminant-indicative markers) as well as nucleoside phosphorylase (NP) heterozygotes; (4) fish which displayed the contaminant-indicative markers or were NP heterozygotes had higher fecundity and fewer strand breaks than other fish when exposed to radiation. These types of studies are significant because they integrate responses from the molecular, organismal and population levels of biological organization. These results are discussed in relation to needs for future study and relevancy of RAPD research, as well as genetic ecotoxicology in general, to environmental monitoring programs.

  9. Genetic drift. Overview of German, Nazi, and Holocaust medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M Michael

    2010-03-01

    An overview of German, Nazi, and Holocaust medicine brings together a group of subjects discussed separately elsewhere. Topics considered include German medicine before and during the Nazi era, such as advanced concepts in epidemiology, preventive medicine, public health policy, screening programs, occupational health laws, compensation for certain medical conditions, and two remarkable guidelines for informed consent for medical procedures; also considered are the Nuremberg Code; American models for early Nazi programs, including compulsory sterilization, abusive medical experiments on prison inmates, and discrimination against black people; two ironies in US and Nazi laws; social Darwinism and racial hygiene; complicity of Nazi physicians, including the acts of sterilization, human experimentation, and genocide; Nazi persecution of Jewish physicians; eponyms of unethical German physicians with particular emphasis on Reiter, Hallervorden, and Pernkopf; eponyms of famous physicians who were Nazi victims, including Pick and van Creveld; and finally, a recommendation for convening an international committee of physicians and ethicists to deal with five issues: (a) to propose alternative names for eponyms of physicians who exhibited complicity during the Nazi era; (b) to honor the eponyms and stories of physicians who were victims of Nazi atrocities and genocide; (c) to apply vigorous pressure to those German and Austrian Institutes that have not yet undertaken investigations to determine if the bodies of Nazi victims remain in their collections; (d) to recommend holding annual commemorations in medical schools and research institutes worldwide to remember and to reflect on the victims of compromised medical practice, particularly, but not exclusively, during the Nazi era because atrocities and acts of genocide have occurred elsewhere; and (e) to examine the influence of any political ideology that compromises the practice of medicine.

  10. Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Cancer) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of kidney cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for kidney cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease.

  11. Molecular-Genetic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasteva M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women. Advances in breast cancer knowledge have deciphered the involvement of a number of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes in disease pathogenesis. These genes are part of the complex biochemical pathways, which enable cell cycle control and maintenance of genome integrity. Their function may be disrupted as a result of alterations in gene sequence or misregulation of gene expression including alterations in DNA methylation pattern. The present review summarizes the main findings on major breast cancer related genes BRCA1/2, p53, ATM, CHEK2, HER2, PIK3CA and their tumorigenic inactivation/activation. The potential clinical importance of these genes with respect to patients’ prognosis and therapy are also discussed. The possible implication of other putative breast cancer related genes is also outlined. The first elaborate data on the genetic and epigenetic status of the above mentioned genes concerning Bulgarian patients with the sporadic form of the disease are presented. The studies indicate for a characteristic mutational spectrum in some of the genes for the Bulgarian patients and specific correlation between the status of different genes and clinicopathological characteristics.

  12. A mechanistic overview on male infertility and germ cell cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépieux, Pascale; Lécureuil, Charlotte; Marion, Sébastien; Kara, Elodie; Piketty, Vincent; Martinat, Nadine; Guillou, Florian; Royère, Dominique; Reiter, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The testis is devoted to two important tasks: haploid cell production and sexual steroid synthesis. A number of highly sophisticated and unique strategies operate during spermatogenesis, a process crucial for reproduction, heredity and evolution. It is particularly important to decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms whose function can be perverted in pathological situations, such as infertility and testicular cancers, which represent an increasing biomedical issue today. This review summarises the currently available data concerning some key molecular components that are altered or potentially involved in male infertility and testicular tumors, with the aim of defining some common "hot spots". We particularly focused on genetically engineered in vivo models in which testicular functions are altered and we pinpointed to the potential involvement of the targeted genes in testicular pathologies. Those molecular mechanisms peculiar to the male gonad can be envisioned as a basis for the design of novel drugs potentially dedicated to testicular dysfunction.

  13. Disparities in Cancer Genetic Risk Assessment and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Meghan L; Jones, Tarsha; Habin, Karleen

    2016-07-01

    Scientific and technologic advances in genomics have revolutionized genetic counseling and testing, targeted therapy, and cancer screening and prevention. Among younger women, African American and Hispanic women have a higher rate of cancers that are associated with hereditary cancer risk, such as triple-negative breast cancer, which is linked to poorer outcomes. Therefore, genetic testing is particularly important in diverse populations. Unfortunately, all races and ethnic groups are not well represented in current genetic testing practices, leading to disparities in cancer prevention and early detection.

  14. Human gene therapy: a brief overview of the genetic revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjukta

    2013-02-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The prelude to successful gene therapy i.e. the efficient transfer and expression of a variety of human gene into target cells has already been accomplished in several systems. Safe methods have been devised to do this, using several viral and no-viral vectors. Two main approaches emerged: in vivo modification and ex vivo modification. Retrovirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus are suitable for gene therapeutic approaches which are based on permanent expression of the therapeutic gene. Non-viral vectors are far less efficient than viral vectors, but they have advantages due to their low immunogenicity and their large capacity for therapeutic DNA. To improve the function of non-viral vectors, the addition of viral functions such as receptor mediated uptake and nuclear translocation of DNA may finally lead to the development of an artificial virus. Gene transfer protocols have been approved for human use in inherited diseases, cancers and acquired disorders. In 1990, the first successful clinical trial of gene therapy was initiated for adenosine deaminase deficiency. Since then, the number of clinical protocols initiated worldwide has increased exponentially. Although preliminary results of these trials are somewhat disappointing, but human gene therapy dreams of treating diseases by replacing or supplementing the product of defective or introducing novel therapeutic genes. So definitely human gene therapy is an effective addition to the arsenal of approaches to many human therapies in the 21st century.

  15. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, S S; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H; Hilner, J E; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, J; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual's risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community. To facilitate the access to these resources, the T1DGC has developed a Consortium Agreement (http://www.t1dgc.org) that specifies the rights and responsibilities of investigators who participate in Consortium activities. The T1DGC has assembled a resource of affected sib-pair families, parent-child trios, and case-control collections with banks of DNA, serum, plasma, and EBV-transformed cell lines. In addition, both candidate gene and genome-wide (linkage and association) studies have been performed and displayed in T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) for all researchers to use in their own investigations. In this supplement, a subset of the T1DGC collection has been used to investigate earlier published candidate genes for T1D, to confirm the results from a genome-wide association scan for T1D, and to determine associations with candidate genes for other autoimmune diseases or with type II diabetes that may be involved with beta-cell function.

  16. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: a clinical-genetic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abboud RT

    2011-03-01

    in patients with chronic irreversible airflow obstruction, especially in those with early onset of disease or positive family history. Testing is also recommended for immediate family members of those with AATD, asthmatics with persistent airflow obstruction, and infants and older subjects with unexplained liver disease. There are over 100 different AAT gene variants; most are rare and only some are associated with clinical disease.Keywords: AAT, AATD, ZZ, early onset emphysema, panacinar emphysema, neonatal jaundice and hepatitis, childhood liver disease, genetics of alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antitrypsin laboratory testing and phenotyping

  17. Genetic Testing for Rare Cancer: The Wider Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Identification of a potential genetic susceptibility to cancer and confirmation of a pathogenic gene mutation raises a number of challenging issues for the patient with cancer, their relatives and the health professionals caring for them. The specific risks and management issues associated with rare cancer types have been addressed in the earlier chapters. This chapter considers the wider issues involved in genetic counselling and genetic testing for a genetic susceptibility to cancer for patients, families and health professionals. The first part of the chapter will present the issues raised by the current practice in genetic counselling and genetic testing for cancer susceptibility. The second part of the chapter will address some of the issues raised by the advances in genetic testing technology and the future opportunities provided by personalised medicine and targeted cancer therapy. Facilitating these developments requires closer integration of genomics into mainstream cancer care, challenging the existing paradigm of genetic medicine, adding additional layers of complexity to the risk assessment and management of cancer and presenting wider issues for patients, families, health professionals and clinical services.

  18. Prevalence and detection of psychosocial problems in cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijzenga, W.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Hahn, D.E.E.; van der Kolk, L.E.; Sidharta, G.N.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Only a minority of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling experience heightened levels of psychological distress, but many more experience a range of cancer genetic-specific psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of such psychosocial problems, and to i

  19. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Guo (Qi); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); S. Kar (Siddhartha); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); B. Holleczek (B.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); C.D. Berg (Christine); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-

  20. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta-analysis ...

  1. Adrenocortical cancer (ACC) - literature overview and own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworakowska, Dorota; Drabarek, Agata; Wenzel, Ingrid; Babińska, Anna; Świątkowska-Stodulska, Renata; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a malignant endocrine tumour. The rarity of the disease has stymied therapeutic development. Age distribution shows two peaks: the first and fifth decades of life, with children and women more frequently affected. Although 60-70% of ACCs are biochemically found to overproduce hormones, it is not clinically apparent in many cases. If present, endocrine symptoms include signs of hypercortisolaemia, virilisation or gynaecomastia. ACC carries a poor prognosis, and a cure can be achieved only by complete surgical resection. Mitotane is used both as an adjuvant treatment and also in non-operative patients. The role of radio- and chemotherapy is still controversial. The post-operative disease free survival is low and oscillates around 30% due to high tumour recurrence rate. The diagnosis is based on tumour histological assessment with the use of the Weiss score, however urinary steroid profiling (if available) can serve to differentiate between ACC and other adrenal tumours. Conventional prognostic markers in ACC include stage and grade of disease, and, as currently reported, the presence of hypercortisolaemia. Molecular analysis has had a significant impact on the understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism of ACC development and the evaluation of prognostic and predictive markers, among which alterations of the IGF system, the Wnt pathway, p53 and molecules involved in cancer cell invasion properties and angiogenesis seem to be very promising. We here summarise our own experience related to the management of ACC and present a literature overview. We have not aimed to include a detailed summary of the molecular alterations biology described in ACC, as this has already been addressed in other papers.

  2. Cancer genetic association studies in the genome-wide age

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Sharon A

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of hundreds of thousands of SNPs have led to a deluge of studies of genetic variation in cancer and other common diseases. Large case–control and cohort studies have identified novel SNPs as markers of cancer risk. Genome-wide association study SNP data have also advanced understanding of population-specific genetic variation. While studies of risk profiles, combinations of SNPs that may increase cancer risk, are not yet clinically applicable, future, large-sca...

  3. Resveratrol as MDR reversion molecule in breast cancer: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamolhodaei, Nafiseh Sadat; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hayes, A Wallace; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2017-03-14

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide; therefore, a strategy to defeat breast cancer is an extremely important medical issue. One of the major challenges in this regard is multidrug resistance (MDR). Resveratrol, a well-known phytoestrogen, may be helpful as part of an overall strategy to defeat breast cancer. The mixed agonist and antagonist role of resveratrol for the estrogen receptor makes it a controversial but interesting molecule in cancer therapy, especially in hormone dependent cancers. Several in vitro investigations have suggested that resveratrol can reverse multidrug resistance. However, poor bioavailability of resveratrol is a potential limitation for resveratrol treatment and cancer outcome in vivo. Fortunately, combination therapy with other selected compounds improves resveratrol's bioavailability and/or a delay in its metabolism. This review summaries the available published literature dealing with the effects of resveratrol on multidrug resistance in cancer and more specifically, breast cancer.

  4. Clinical implications of genomics for cancer risk genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David M; James, Paul A; Ballinger, Mandy L

    2015-06-01

    The study of human genetics has provided substantial insight into cancer biology. With an increase in sequencing capacity and a reduction in sequencing costs, genomics will probably transform clinical cancer genetics. A heritable basis for many cancers is accepted, but so far less than half the genetic drivers have been identified. Genomics will increasingly be applied to populations irrespective of family history, which will change the framework of phenotype-directed genetic testing. Panel testing and whole genome sequencing will identify novel, polygenic, and de-novo determinants of cancer risk, often with lower penetrance, which will challenge present binary clinical classification systems and management algorithms. In the future, genotype-stratified public screening and prevention programmes could form part of tailored population risk management. The integration of research with clinical practice will result in so-called discovery cohorts that will help identify clinically significant genetic variation.

  5. Genetic factors associated with cancer male breast: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Maria Tomaz Silveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The male breast cancer is a rare neoplastic framework, covers 1% of cases of breast cancer worldwide, 1% of malignant tumors in men and has an annual incidence of 1 per 100,000 men. Information was gathered about the current studies related to genetic character in addressed condition, in which the goal was to analyze aspects of predisposition and association, using 16 original articles indexed in the period between January 2011 to February 2016, written in English and Spanish, with experimental design or observational, using male breast cancer descriptors, breast cancer and genetic factor for breast cancer, as well as their English translations male breast cancer, cancer treatment, breast cancer and genetic factors. It was mainly discussed the genetic influence on the occurrence of male breast cancer, such as changes in suppressors BRCA genes, relationships with CHECK2 checkpoint, family history and links with Klinefelter syndrome, among other factors. Environmental aspects are also suggested by the literature on the clinical neoplasic manifestation, but with less conclusive emphases. Although the literature on the subject still need growth and deepening, we observe scientific reassurances about the importance of genetic influence, especially the BRCA 1, about the Multifactorial etiology of the neoplasia.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ...

  7. Genomic and genetic alterations influence the progression of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefania Nobili; Lorenzo Bruno; Ida Landini; Cristina Napoli; Paolo Bechi; Francesco Tonelli; Carlos A Rubio; Enrico Mini; Gabriella Nesi

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancerrelated deaths worldwide, although the incidence has gradually decreased in many Western countries. Twomain gastric cancer histotypes, intestinal and diffuse, are recognised. Although most of the described genetic alterations have been observed in both types, different genetic pathways have been hypothesized. Genetic and epigenetic events, including 1q loss of heterozygosity (LOH), microsatellite instability and hypermethylation, have mostly been reported in intestinal-type gastric carcinoma and its precursor lesions, whereas 17p LOH, mutation or loss of E-cadherin are more often implicated in the development of diffuse-type gastric cancer.

  8. Cancer genetics and genomics: essentials for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jean; Habin, Karleen; Underhill, Meghan

    2014-06-01

    Cancer genetics and genomics are rapidly evolving, with new discoveries emerging in genetic mutations, variants, genomic sequencing, risk-reduction methods, and targeted therapies. To educate patients and families, state-of-the-art care requires nurses to understand terminology, scientific and technological advances, and pharmacogenomics. Clinical application of cancer genetics and genomics involves working in interdisciplinary teams to properly identify patient risk through assessing family history, facilitating genetic testing and counseling services, applying risk-reduction methods, and administering and monitoring targeted therapies.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary diffuse gastric cancer hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  10. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or enviro......BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic...... or environmental factors. METHODS: We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated...... genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482). We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from...

  11. A micro costing of NHS cancer genetic services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, G L; Tudor-Edwards, R; Gray, J; Butler, R; Wilkinson, C; Turner, J; France, B; Bennett, P

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the first full micro costing of a commonly used cancer genetic counselling and testing protocol used in the UK. Costs were estimated for the Cardiff clinic of the Cancer Genetics Service in Wales by issuing a questionnaire to all staff, conducting an audit of clinic rooms and equipment and obtaining gross unit costs from the finance department. A total of 22 distinct event pathways were identified for patients at risk of developing breast, ovarian, breast and ovarian or colorectal cancer. The mean cost per patient were £97–£151 for patients at moderate risk, £975–£3072 for patients at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and £675–£2909 for patients at high risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer. The most expensive element of cancer genetic services was labour. Labour costs were dependent upon the amount of labour, staff grade, number of counsellors used and the proportion of staff time devoted to indirect patient contact. With the growing demand for cancer genetic services and the growing number of national and regional cancer genetic centers, there is a need for the different protocols being used to be thoroughly evaluated in terms of costs and outcomes. PMID:15583691

  12. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  13. Various types and management of breast cancer: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh N Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Now days, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women. Since last two decades, researches related to the breast cancer has lead to extraordinary progress in our understanding of the disease, resulting in more efficient and less toxic treatments. Increased public awareness and improved screening have led to earlier diagnosis at stages amenable to complete surgical resection and curative therapies. Consequently, survival rates for breast cancer have improved significantly, particularly in younger women. This article addresses the types, causes, clinical symptoms and various approach both non- drug (such as surgery and radiation and drug treatment (including chemotherapy, gene therapy etc. of breast cancer.

  14. VARIOUS TYPES AND MANAGEMENT OF BREAST CANCER: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh N. Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Now days, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women. Since last two decades, researches related to the breast cancer has lead to extraordinary progress in our understanding of the disease, resulting in more efficient and less toxic treatments. Increased public awareness and improved screening have led to earlier diagnosis at stages amenable to complete surgical resection and curative therapies. Consequently, survival rates for breast cancer have improved significantly, particularly in younger women. This article addresses the types, causes, clinical symptoms and various approach both non- drug (such as surgery and radiation and drug treatment (including chemotherapy, gene therapy etc. of breast cancer.

  15. An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction...

  16. Cancer genetics: from Boveri and Mendel to microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmain, A

    2001-10-01

    The human genome has now been sequenced, a century after the re-discovery of Mendel's Laws, and the publication of Theodor Boveri's chromosomal theory of heredity. Tracing the historical landmarks of cancer genetics from these early days to the present time not only gives us an appreciation of how far we have come, but also emphasizes the challenges that we face if we are to unravel the genetic basis of hereditary and sporadic cancers in the next century.

  17. Overview of genetic tools and techniques to study Notch signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, Thomas; Groves, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Aberrations of Notch signaling in humans cause both congenital and acquired defects and cancers. Genetically engineered mice provide the most efficient and cost-effective models to study Notch signaling in a mammalian system. Here, we review the various types of genetic models, tools, and strategies to study Notch signaling in mice, and provide examples of their use. We also provide advice on breeding strategies for conditional mutant mice, and a protocol for tamoxifen administration to mouse strains expressing inducible Cre recombinase-estrogen receptor fusion proteins.

  18. Metaplastic breast cancer: clinical overview and molecular aberrations for potential targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouharb, Sausan; Moulder, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Metaplastic breast cancer is a rare subtype of invasive mammary carcinoma, with an aggressive behavior and usually poor outcome. Responses to systemic chemotherapy are suboptimal compared to patients with standard invasive ductal carcinoma. Limited data are available in regards to best treatment modalities, including chemotherapy. This review gives an overview of metaplastic breast cancer and its clinical and pathologic characteristics, in addition to treatment strategies, clinical trials, and future directions.

  19. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  20. Management of fatigue in patients with cancer -- a practical overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, R.H.; Peters, M.; Donofrio, S.; Borne, B. van den; Jong, F.A. de

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a serious clinical problem and is one of the most common symptoms experienced by cancer patients. CRF has deleterious effects on many aspects of patient quality of life including their physical, psychological and social well-being. It can also limit their ability to f

  1. An overview of innovative techniques to improve cervical cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Reesink-Peters, Nathalie; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Nijman, Hans W.; van Zanden, Jelmer; Volders, Haukeline; Hollema, Harry; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Schuuring, Ed; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Although current cytomorphology-based cervical cancer screening has reduced the incidence of cervical cancer, Pap-smears are associated with high false positive and false negative rates. This has spurred the search for new technologies to improve current screening. New methodologies are automation o

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have spread to the nerve that controls the larynx (not shown). (3) Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes and ... or the nerves that control the diaphragm and larynx (not shown). (1) Cancer has spread to lymph nodes above the collarbone ...

  3. General Intelligence (g): Overview of a Complex Construct and Its Implications for Genetics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A; Shelton, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Current technology has dramatically increased the prevalence of studies to establish the genetic correlates of a wide variety of human characteristics, including not only the physical attributes that determine what we look like and the risk of physiological disease but also the psychological and cognitive characteristics that often define who we are as individuals. Perhaps one of the most deeply personal and often controversial characteristics is the concept of general intelligence, known in the psychological literature as "g." As with the genetic study of any complex trait, the first step in studying the genetics of g is to carefully define the characteristic of interest. For g, this entails establishing what intelligence means and providing a clear operational definition for how it will be measured. In this paper, we provide a brief historical and theoretical overview of the construct of general intelligence, describe its relationship to the contemporary measurement of intelligence, and discuss these concepts in light of the challenges associated with defining g as a characteristic in the study of genetics.

  4. [An overview of antibody-based cancer therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qing-fang; Shao, Rong-guang; Zhen, Yong-su

    2012-10-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for cancer therapy has achieved considerable success in recent years. Approximate 17 monoclonal antibodies have been approved as cancer therapeutics since 1997. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are powerful new treatment options for cancer, and naked antibodies have recently achieved remarkable success. The safety and effectiveness of therapeutic mAbs in oncology vary depending on the nature of the target antigen and the mechanisms of tumor cell killing. This review provides a summary of the current state of antibody-based cancer therapy, including the mechanisms of tumor cell killing by antibodies, tumor antigens as antibody targets, clinical effectiveness of antibodies in cancer patients and nanoparticles-based ADCs.

  5. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Marie Agnese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families, but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. As a surgeon with additional training in clinical cancer genetics, I have perhaps a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important.

  6. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2016-06-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors that can predict which counselees are most likely to develop psychological problems after presymptomatic genetic testing. Counselees with a 50 % risk of BRCA1/2 or Lynch syndrome completed questionnaires at three time-points: after receiving a written invitation for a genetic counseling intake (T1), 2-3 days after receiving their DNA test result (T2), and 4-6 weeks later (T3). The psychological impact of the genetic test result was examined shortly and 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Subsequently, the influence of various potentially prognostic factors on psychological impact were examined in the whole group. Data from 165 counselees were analyzed. Counselees with an unfavorable outcome did not have more emotional distress, but showed significantly more cancer worries 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Prognostic factors for cancer worries after genetic testing were pre-existing cancer worries, being single, a high risk perception of getting cancer, and an unfavorable test result. Emotional distress was best predicted by pre-existing cancer worries and pre-existing emotional distress. The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result appears considerable if it is measured as "worries about cancer." Genetic counselors should provide additional guidance to counselees with many cancer worries, emotional distress, a high risk perception or a weak social network.

  7. Genetic evidence linking lung cancer and COPD: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crapo JD

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Young1,4, Raewyn J Hopkins1, Gregory D Gamble1, Carol Etzel2, Randa El-Zein2, James D Crapo31Department of Medicine and School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Epidemiology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 4Synergenz Biosciences Ltd, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: Epidemiological studies indicate that tobacco smoke exposure accounts for nearly 90% of cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer. However, genetic factors may explain why 10%–30% of smokers develop these complications. This perspective reviews the evidence suggesting that COPD is closely linked to susceptibility to lung cancer and outlines the potential relevance of this observation. Epidemiological studies show that COPD is the single most important risk factor for lung cancer among smokers and predates lung cancer in up to 80% of cases. Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer, lung function, and COPD have identified a number of overlapping “susceptibility” loci. With stringent phenotyping, it has recently been shown that several of these overlapping loci are independently associated with both COPD and lung cancer. These loci implicate genes underlying pulmonary inflammation and apoptotic processes mediated by the bronchial epithelium, and link COPD with lung cancer at a molecular genetic level. It is currently possible to derive risk models for lung cancer that incorporate lung cancer-specific genetic variants, recently identified “COPD-related” genetic variants, and clinical variables. Early studies suggest that single nucleotide polymorphism-based risk stratification of smokers might help better target novel prevention and early diagnostic strategies in lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk model

  8. An overview on applications of optical spectroscopy in cervical cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilakapati Murali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the treatment modalities, cervical cancers are one of the leading causes of cancer death among women. Pap smear and colposcopy are the existing screening methods and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. However, these methods have been shown to be prone to reporting errors, which could be due to their subjective interpretation. Radiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the locally advanced stages of cervical cancers. The typical treatment regimen spans over 4 months, from the first fraction of radiation to clinical assessment of tumor response to radiotherapy. It is often noticed that due to intrinsic properties of tumors, patients with the same clinical stage and histological type respond differently to radiotherapy. Hence, there exists a need for the development of new methods for early diagnosis as well as for early prediction of tumor radioresponse. Optical spectroscopic methods have been shown to be potential alternatives for use in cancer diagnosis. In this review, we provide a brief background on the anatomy and histology of the uterine cervix and the etiology of cervical cancers; we briefly discuss the optical spectroscopic approach to cervical cancer diagnosis. A very brief discussion on radiation therapy and radiation resistance is also provided. We also share our experiences with the Raman spectroscopic methodologies in cervical cancer diagnosis as well as in the prediction of tumor radioresponse.

  9. Genetic progression and the waiting time to cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Beerenwinkel

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer results from genetic alterations that disturb the normal cooperative behavior of cells. Recent high-throughput genomic studies of cancer cells have shown that the mutational landscape of cancer is complex and that individual cancers may evolve through mutations in as many as 20 different cancer-associated genes. We use data published by Sjöblom et al. (2006 to develop a new mathematical model for the somatic evolution of colorectal cancers. We employ the Wright-Fisher process for exploring the basic parameters of this evolutionary process and derive an analytical approximation for the expected waiting time to the cancer phenotype. Our results highlight the relative importance of selection over both the size of the cell population at risk and the mutation rate. The model predicts that the observed genetic diversity of cancer genomes can arise under a normal mutation rate if the average selective advantage per mutation is on the order of 1%. Increased mutation rates due to genetic instability would allow even smaller selective advantages during tumorigenesis. The complexity of cancer progression can be understood as the result of multiple sequential mutations, each of which has a relatively small but positive effect on net cell growth.

  10. Combinations of genetic data in a study of oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling Thyge; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mondal, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    for a polygenic disorder will not occur in in control persons genetically unrelated to patients, so the strategy is to analyze combinations of genetic variants present exclusively in patients. In a previous study of oral cancer and leukoplakia 325 SNPs were analyzed. This study has been supplemented...... with an analysis of combinations of two SNP genotypes from among the 325 SNPs. Two clusters of combinations containing 95 patient specific combinations were significantly associated with oral cancer or leukoplakia. Of 373 patients with oral cancer 205 patients had a number of these 95 combinations in their genome...

  11. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  12. Endocrine resistance in breast cancer--An overview and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert; Tyson, John J; Dixon, J Michael

    2015-12-15

    Tumors that express detectable levels of the product of the ESR1 gene (estrogen receptor-α; ERα) represent the single largest molecular subtype of breast cancer. More women eventually die from ERα+ breast cancer than from either HER2+ disease (almost half of which also express ERα) and/or from triple negative breast cancer (ERα-negative, progesterone receptor-negative, and HER2-negative). Antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors are largely indistinguishable from each other in their abilities to improve overall survival and almost 50% of ERα+ breast cancers will eventually fail one or more of these endocrine interventions. The precise reasons why these therapies fail in ERα+ breast cancer remain largely unknown. Pharmacogenetic explanations for Tamoxifen resistance are controversial. The role of ERα mutations in endocrine resistance remains unclear. Targeting the growth factors and oncogenes most strongly correlated with endocrine resistance has proven mostly disappointing in their abilities to improve overall survival substantially, particularly in the metastatic setting. Nonetheless, there are new concepts in endocrine resistance that integrate molecular signaling, cellular metabolism, and stress responses including endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) that provide novel insights and suggest innovative therapeutic targets. Encouraging evidence that drug combinations with CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors can extend recurrence free survival may yet translate to improvements in overall survival. Whether the improvements seen with immunotherapy in other cancers can be achieved in breast cancer remains to be determined, particularly for ERα+ breast cancers. This review explores the basic mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapies, concluding with some new insights from systems biology approaches further implicating autophagy and the UPR in detail, and a brief discussion of exciting new avenues and future prospects.

  13. Genetic variations may help identify best candidates for preventive breast cancer drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  14. Vector-mediated cancer gene therapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Prem

    2005-05-01

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in developing gene therapy approaches for the treatment of cancer. The two events that have permitted the formulation of concept of cancer gene therapy are the new understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenesis, and the development of the DNA-delivery vehicles or vectors. Many approaches to cancer gene therapy have been proposed, and several viral and non-viral vectors have been utilized. The purpose of this review article is to describe the various strategies of cancer gene therapy (transfer of tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes-enzyme/pro-drug approach, inhibition of dominant oncogenes, immunomodulation approaches, expression of molecules that affect angiogenesis, tumor invasion and metastasis, chemosensitization and radiosensitization approaches, and chemoprotection of stem cells). The chapter also reviews the commonly used vectors (retroviral vectors, adenoviral vectors, adeno-associated viral vectors, pox viruses, herpes simplex viruses, HIV- vectors, non-viral vectors and targetable vectors) for cancer gene therapy. Some of the important issues in cancer gene therapy, and the potential future directions are also being discussed.

  15. [A novel approach to techniques in genetic testing for cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    In molecular targeted drug therapy, genetic screening is carried out to identify the existence of target genes that are specifically expressed in cancer cells. Conventional methods for detecting the mutation of genes in cancer cells through the use of purified DNA is time consuming, especially in the case of the enzymatic treatment of pathological specimens, and it is difficult to finish all these protocols on the same day. Also, depending on the condition of the patients, it may be difficult to perform surgery or biopsy, and pathological specimens are not always obtainable. Thus, sometimes genetic screening using purified DNA and the enzymatic treatment of pathological specimens cannot be performed. We have successfully solved these problems using i-densy, a genetic analysis device, and two different methods of genetic testing for cancer. The first is a method which, without extracting DNA, uses simply pretreated pathological specimens for genetic screening. Using deparaffinized specimens that have only been heat-treated for a short period of time, we were able to obtain the exact same results as if we had extracted DNA. The second is the highly specific genetic screening technique, the MBP-QP method. Using this method, we were able to confirm the detection of genetic mutation from the DNA of blood plasma. It is now possible to screen for the mutation of genes in cancer cells using just a blood sample from patients without using tissue or cells, which also has little burden on the patient.

  16. Psycho-oncological support for breast cancer patients: A brief overview of breast cancer services certification schemes and national health policies in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neamţiu, L; Deandrea, S; Pylkkänen, L; Freeman, C; López Alcalde, J; Bramesfeld, A; Saz-Parkinson, Z; Ulutürk, A; Lerda, D

    2016-10-01

    Psycho-oncology addresses the psychological, social, behavioural, and ethical aspects of cancer. Identification and proper management of the patients' psychosocial needs, as well as the needs of their caregivers and family are essential for a person-centred concept of breast cancer care. The aim of this overview is to describe how psychosocial support in breast cancer is incorporated in cancer-related policy documents, such as national cancer plans and breast cancer care certification schemes.

  17. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, M.A.; Hes, F.J.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Tol, M.P. van den; Seynaeve, C.; Oosterwijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    - In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. - Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. - The 1100delC muta

  18. Genetics and Personal Insurance: the Perspectives of Canadian Cancer Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Michelle; Ngueng Feze, Ida; Joly, Yann

    2015-12-01

    Genetic discrimination in the context of genetic testing has been identified as a concern for symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals for more than three decades. Genetic counselors are often the health care professionals who discuss risks and benefits of genetic testing with patients, thereby making them most appropriate to address patient concerns about genetics and personal insurance (i.e., life, life as related to mortgage or group insurance, disability, critical illness and travel). A pilot study was conducted to ascertain the current practices of Canadian cancer genetic counselors in regard to their discussions with patients about genetic testing and access to personal insurance. Among the 36 counselors surveyed, 100 % reported discussing the issue of genetic testing and personal insurance with their patients. Several factors influenced the content, depth and length of these discussions including age, cancer status, family members, and patients' current and future insurance needs. Counselors reported discussing with patients the possible impact of genetic test results on access to personal insurance, possible access and use of patient genetic information by insurance companies, and whom patients should contact if they have additional questions. The most commonly reported inquiries from patients included questions about the possible impact of genetic testing on their ability to obtain insurance, and the insurability of family members. While 28 % of counselors reported having been contacted by an insurer requesting access to patient information, only one counselor was aware of or could recall the outcome of such a request. This pilot study revealed that issues concerning genetics and personal insurance are commonly discussed in Canadian cancer genetic counseling sessions. Counselors furthermore expressed a need for additional educational resources on the topic of genetics and personal insurance for themselves and their patients.

  19. Cancer development, progression, and therapy: an epigenetic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sibaji; Horn, Garrick; Moulton, Kimberly; Oza, Anuja; Byler, Shannon; Kokolus, Shannon; Longacre, McKenna

    2013-10-21

    Carcinogenesis involves uncontrolled cell growth, which follows the activation of oncogenes and/or the deactivation of tumor suppression genes. Metastasis requires down-regulation of cell adhesion receptors necessary for tissue-specific, cell-cell attachment, as well as up-regulation of receptors that enhance cell motility. Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and DNA hydroxymethylation, can modify these characteristics. Targets for these epigenetic changes include signaling pathways that regulate apoptosis and autophagy, as well as microRNA. We propose that predisposed normal cells convert to cancer progenitor cells that, after growing, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. This process, which is partially under epigenetic control, can create a metastatic form of both progenitor and full-fledged cancer cells, after which metastasis to a distant location may occur. Identification of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms has provided potential therapeutic avenues. In particular, epigenetic drugs appear to potentiate the action of traditional therapeutics, often by demethylating and re-expressing tumor suppressor genes to inhibit tumorigenesis. Epigenetic drugs may inhibit both the formation and growth of cancer progenitor cells, thus reducing the recurrence of cancer. Adopting epigenetic alteration as a new hallmark of cancer is a logical and necessary step that will further encourage the development of novel epigenetic biomarkers and therapeutics.

  20. Cancer Development, Progression, and Therapy: An Epigenetic Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenna Longacre

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis involves uncontrolled cell growth, which follows the activation of oncogenes and/or the deactivation of tumor suppression genes. Metastasis requires down-regulation of cell adhesion receptors necessary for tissue-specific, cell–cell attachment, as well as up-regulation of receptors that enhance cell motility. Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and DNA hydroxymethylation, can modify these characteristics. Targets for these epigenetic changes include signaling pathways that regulate apoptosis and autophagy, as well as microRNA. We propose that predisposed normal cells convert to cancer progenitor cells that, after growing, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. This process, which is partially under epigenetic control, can create a metastatic form of both progenitor and full-fledged cancer cells, after which metastasis to a distant location may occur. Identification of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms has provided potential therapeutic avenues. In particular, epigenetic drugs appear to potentiate the action of traditional therapeutics, often by demethylating and re-expressing tumor suppressor genes to inhibit tumorigenesis. Epigenetic drugs may inhibit both the formation and growth of cancer progenitor cells, thus reducing the recurrence of cancer. Adopting epigenetic alteration as a new hallmark of cancer is a logical and necessary step that will further encourage the development of novel epigenetic biomarkers and therapeutics.

  1. MicroRNA and cancer--a brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acunzo, Mario; Romano, Giulia; Wernicke, Dorothee; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs with a length of ∼22 nucleotides, involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Until now, over 2588 miRNAs have been identified in humans and the list is growing. MicroRNAs have an important role in all biological processes and aberrant miRNA expression is associated with many diseases including cancer. In the year 2002 the first connection between cancer and miRNA deregulation was discovered. Since then, a lot of information about the key role which miRNAs play in cancer development and drug resistance has been gained. However, there is still a long way to go to fully understand the miRNA world. In this review, we briefly describe miRNA biogenesis and discuss the role of miRNAs in cancer development and drug resistance. Finally we explain how miRNAs can be used as biomarkers and as a novel therapeutic approach in cancer.

  2. Progress in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anampa, Jesus; Makower, Della; Sparano, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer and cancer death worldwide. Although most patients present with localized breast cancer and may be rendered disease-free with local therapy, distant recurrence is common and is the primary cause of death from the disease. Adjuvant systemic therapies are effective in reducing the risk of distant and local recurrence, including endocrine therapy, anti-HER2 therapy, and chemotherapy, even in patients at low risk of recurrence. The widespread use of adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to reduced breast cancer mortality rates. Adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens have evolved from single alkylating agents to polychemotherapy regimens incorporating anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This review summarizes key milestones in the evolution of adjuvant systemic therapy in general, and adjuvant chemotherapy in particular. Although adjuvant treatments are routinely guided by predictive factors for endocrine therapy (hormone receptor expression) and anti-HER2 therapy (HER2 overexpression), predicting benefit from chemotherapy has been more challenging. Randomized studies are now in progress utilizing multiparameter gene expression assays that may more accurately select patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent C H; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Ho, Robin S T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients' quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited.

  4. Mutagen sensitivity: a genetic predisposition factor for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian; Spitz, Margaret R

    2007-04-15

    Mutagen sensitivity, measured by quantifying the chromatid breaks induced by mutagens in short-term cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes, has been used as an indirect measure of DNA repair capacity. Numerous epidemiologic studies have suggested that mutagen sensitivity is a cancer susceptibility factor for a variety of epithelial cancers. A recent classic twin study examined systematically the role of genetic and environmental factors on the mutagen sensitivity phenotype and provided compelling evidence that mutagen sensitivity is highly heritable. A new prospective analysis provides further support to the notion that mutagen sensitivity increases the risk of cancer. In this review, we briefly summarize nearly two decades of epidemiologic and genetic studies linking mutagen sensitivity and cancer risk. The evidence is becoming increasingly convincing that mutagen sensitivity is a risk factor for cancer development.

  5. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  6. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  7. Breast cancer: An overview of published Indian data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Bharath; Shet, Tanuja; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Nair, Nita S; Sairam, R Madhu; Hingmire, Sachin S; Bajpai, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    The Incidence of breast cancer has been steadily increasing in the last two decades, more so in urban areas of the sub-continent. Cancer ceters across the country have large numbers of patients being treated with multiple publications in this field. Inspite of paucity of prospective data and randomised clinical trials from India, there are large number of retrospective publications on various aspects of the disease including pathology, radiology, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, palliative care and alternatitive treatment modalities. These published data provide an insight into the trends of breast cancer in the country and this comprehensive data review of Indian data will provide a basis for designing trials relevant to our population and planning health care.

  8. Management of fatigue in patients with cancer -- a practical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koornstra, Rutger H T; Peters, Marlies; Donofrio, Stacey; van den Borne, Ben; de Jong, Floris A

    2014-07-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a serious clinical problem and is one of the most common symptoms experienced by cancer patients. CRF has deleterious effects on many aspects of patient quality of life including their physical, psychological and social well-being. It can also limit their ability to function, socialise and participate in previously enjoyable activities. The aetiology of CRF is complex and multidimensional, involving many potentially contributing elements. These include tumour-related factors and comorbid medical/psychological conditions and also side effects associated with anti-cancer therapies or other medications. Barriers to the effective management of CRF exist both on the side of physicians and patients, and as a result CRF often remains unrecognised and undiscussed in clinical practice. A change of approach is required, where fatigue is treated as central to patient management during and after systemic anti-cancer treatment. In this review we summarise factors involved in the aetiology of CRF and the barriers to its effective management, as well as factors involved in the screening, diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients experiencing fatigue. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches to its management are also reviewed. We suggest an algorithm for the process of managing CRF, guided by our experiences in The Netherlands, which we hope may provide a useful tool to healthcare professionals dealing with cancer patients in their daily practice. Although CRF is a serious and complex clinical problem, if it is worked through in a structured and comprehensive way, effective management has the potential to much improve patient quality of life.

  9. [Overview of current modalities of colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajzrlíková, Ivana Mikoviny; Vítek, Petr

    2016-04-01

    There are one-step and two-steps programs for colorectal cancer screening. The aim of all screening examinations is to detect early stage of the disease in asymptomatic patient. The aim of this article is actual review of current screening modalities such as fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoideoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, blood-based tests and stool DNA tests. Colonoscopy still remains the gold standard for detection of colorectal neoplasias. In majority of countries worldwide programs for colorectal cancer screening are based on immunochemical fecal occult blood test followed by colonoscopy when positive.

  10. Genome-wide Association Studies from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGEMS identifies common inherited genetic variations associated with a number of cancers, including breast and prostate. Data from these genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are available through the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics website.

  11. Indian studies on genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic influences on cancer development have been extensively investigated during the last decade following publication of human genome sequence. The present review summarizes case-control studies on genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk in Indians. It is observed that the most commonly studied genes in the Indian population included members of phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes. Other than these genes, genetic polymorphisms for cell cycle and apoptosis-related factors, DNA repair enzymes, immune response elements, growth factors, folate metabolizing enzymes, vitamin/hormone receptors, etc., were investigated. Several studies also evidenced a stronger risk for combined genotypes rather than a single polymorphism. Gene-environment interaction was also found to be a determining factor for cancer development in some experiments. Data for single polymorphism and single cancer type, however, was insufficient to validate an association. It appears that much more experiments involving larger sample size, cross-tabulating genetic polymorphisms and environmental factors are required in order to identify genetic markers for different cancers in Indian populations.

  12. General overview of genetic research and experimentation on coconut varieties tolerant/resistant to Lethal Yellowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudouin Luc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lethal Yellowing (LY disease is one of the main threats to coconut industry in many parts of Africa and the Caribbean. Planting resistant varieties has long been recognized as one of the most promising ways of controlling the disease. Considerable efforts have been devoted throughout the world to screening suitable varieties and have often involved international cooperation. It has proven to be a lengthy and difficult task. We present an overview of these efforts with special mention to Ghana, Jamaica and Mexico. Although no variety so far has been proven fully and permanently resistant, treating resistance level as a threshold trait makes it possible to demonstrate significant differences among varieties, which can be exploited effectively to make genetic improvement a component of an integrated control strategy. Based on past experience, we make a few suggestions to increase the diversity of resistance sources and increase the level and the sustainability of resistance to LY in coconut.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening - An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThere are several modalities available for a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program. When determining which CRC screening program to implement, the costs of such programs should be considered in comparison to the health benefits they are expected to provide. Cost-effectiveness analysi

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes the tissue to light up under a microscope. This type of test may be used to tell the difference between different types of cancer. Light and electron ... and high-powered microscopes to look for certain changes in the cells. ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. Laryngoscopy : A procedure to look at the larynx (voice box) for abnormal areas. A mirror or ... is inserted through the mouth to see the larynx. A special tool on the laryngoscope may ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and ...

  16. An overview of pregnancy and fertility issues in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrosin, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies of women in the reproductive years. In the Western world there is a trend towards delaying pregnancy to later in life, and in combination with an increased incidence of breast cancer an increased number of women are diagnosed with breast cancer before they have completed their reproductive plans. In addition, breast cancer during pregnancy may affect an increased number of women as the childbearing years are delayed. The survival rate after breast cancer has improved during the last decades, and many young breast cancer survivors will consider a pregnancy subsequent to the completion of adjuvant breast cancer therapy. Traditionally, many women are advised against a pregnancy due to a fear of increased risk of recurrence, especially women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Due to feasibility issues, evidence from large prospective randomized trials is missing regarding the safety of pregnancy after breast cancer. Today guidelines are based on cohort studies and population-based registry evidence with its limitations. Overall, data suggest that pregnancy after breast cancer therapy is safe, and the current evidence is summarized in this overview.

  17. Thyroid cancer mortality and incidence: a global overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Malvezzi, Matteo; Bosetti, Cristina; Garavello, Werner; Bertuccio, Paola; Levi, Fabio; Negri, Eva

    2015-05-01

    In most areas of the world, thyroid cancer incidence has been appreciably increasing over the last few decades, whereas mortality has steadily declined. We updated global trends in thyroid cancer mortality and incidence using official mortality data from the World Health Organization (1970-2012) and incidence data from the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (1960-2007). Male mortality declined in all the major countries considered, with annual percent changes around -2/-3% over the last decades. Only in the United States mortality declined up to the mid 1980s and increased thereafter. Similarly, in women mortality declined in most countries considered, with APCs around -2/-5% over the last decades, with the exception of the UK, the United States and Australia, where mortality has been declining up to the late 1980s/late 1990s to level off (or increase) thereafter. In 2008-2012, most countries had mortality rates (age-standardized, world population) between 0.20 and 0.40/100,000 men and 0.20 and 0.60/100,000 women, the highest rates being in Latvia, Hungary, the Republic of Moldova and Israel (over 0.40/100,000) for men and in Ecuador, Colombia and Israel (over 0.60/100,000) for women. In most countries, a steady increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer (mainly papillary carcinomas) was observed in both sexes. The declines in thyroid cancer mortality reflect both variations in risk factor exposure and changes in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, while the increases in the incidence are likely due to the increase in the detection of this neoplasm over the last few decades.

  18. Progress in systemic chemotherapy of primary breast cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobagyi, G N

    2001-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the multidisciplinary management of primary breast cancer during the last 30 years. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to significantly reduce the annual risk of cancer recurrence and mortality, and these effects persist even 15 years after diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy is superior to single-agent therapy and anthracycline-containing regimens. Those that combine an anthracycline with 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide are more effective than regimens without an anthracycline. Six cycles of a single regimen appear to provide optimal benefit. Dose reductions below the standard range are associated with inferior results. Dose increases that require growth factor or hematopoietic stem cell support are under investigation; at this time, the existing results provide no compelling reason to use this strategy outside a clinical trial. Regimens using fixed crossover designs with two non-cross-resistant regimens are being evaluated. The addition of a taxane to anthracycline-containing regimens is currently under intense scrutiny, and preliminary analysis of the first three clinical trials has shown encouraging, albeit not compelling, results. For patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, the sequential administration of chemotherapy and 5 years of tamoxifen therapy provides additive benefits. No compelling evidence exists to combine ovarian ablation with chemotherapy. Most side effects and toxic effects are self-limited, although premature menopause requires monitoring and preventive interventions to preserve bone mineral density. The small risk of acute leukemia is of concern, and additional research to develop safer regimens is clearly indicated. The overall effect of optimal local/regional treatment combined with an anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy and a taxane (and, for patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 5 years of tamoxifen therapy) is a greater than 50% reduction in annual risks of

  19. Breast cancer and pregnancy; overview of international bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogerakos, K; Sofoudis, C; Tzonis, P; Koutsouradis, P; Katsoulis, G

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer constitutes the first gynaecological malignancy in pregnancy with a frequency of 1 : 3,000 - 10,000 pregnancies. Pregnancy itself does not seem to affect the odds of developing breast cancer or its prognosis. Breast ultrasonography constitutes the diagnostic method of choice, whereas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as adjunct. As main staging tests, thoracic X-ray and abdominal ultrasonography are recommended. The therapy of choice is modified radical mastectomy for the first two trimesters and lumpectomy or partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy after childbirth for patients diagnosed in the 3(rd) trimester of pregnancy. The administration of chemotherapy is deemed acceptable in the 2(nd) and 3(rd) trimester, whereas hormonal therapy should be avoided for reasons of safety of the foetus.

  20. The cancer genetics and pathology of male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Siddhartha; Lakhani, Sunil R; Ottini, Laura; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon and poorly understood disease. Recent molecular studies have shown important differences from female breast cancer which are likely to influence treatment strategies from the current female-based management towards a more tailored approach. Significantly more MBCs than female breast cancers arise with an underlying germline cancer predisposition, and display a vastly different penetrance compared with females. Furthermore, the genophenotypical association of basal-like cancer with BRCA1 present in female breast cancer is not observed in male breast cancer. Differences in somatic changes between male and female breast cancer have also been reported, with particular enrichment of PIK3CA mutations and a paucity of TP53 mutations. In general, chromosomal-based changes, in particular regions of gains, are seen more frequently in male than female breast cancer and methylation is seen less frequently. Clinically, several molecular subtypes with prognostic relevance have been described, including chromosomal complex high and methylation high groups, and subgroups with profiling signatures pertaining to epithelial mesenchymal transition and hormonal therapy insensitivity. As with female breast cancer, attention to male specific multicentre trials based on the individual characteristics are needed, together with establishment of reliable preclinical models to understand more clearly the pathogenesis of male breast cancer and improve the general poor outcome of this disease.

  1. Clinical overview of metronomic chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzone, Elisabetta; Colleoni, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Over 15 years ago, low-dose metronomic chemotherapy was shown to induce disease control in patients with advanced-stage breast cancer with a lower incidence of adverse events compared with conventional maximum tolerated dose chemotherapy. Good response rates have been seen in heavily pre-treated patients for whom limited treatment options are available. Most patients prefer oral therapy and metronomic chemotherapy is a convenient alternative in patients with advanced-stage disease in which minimal toxicity and good tumour control are the overall aims of treatment. The addition of metronomic protocols to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens has produced promising pathological complete response rates. Ongoing trials including the SYSUCC-001 trial in patients with triple-negative breast cancer and the IBCSG 22-00 trial that is assessing a cyclophosphamide-methotrexate maintenance regimen after standard adjuvant therapy in hormone receptor-negative disease, will clarify the value of adding this approach to conventional therapies. The low cost associated with metronomic chemotherapy represents an opportunity for the utilization of this treatment option, especially in developing countries, and poses a challenge for the launch of large trials sponsored by industry. Using breast cancer as the principal example, we discuss the key clinical advances in this area, including new trial design, appropriate patient and end point selection, as well as the evolving rationale for metronomic chemotherapy combinations.

  2. Genetics and epidemiology, congenital anomalies and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, J.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-03-01

    Many of the basic statistical methods used in epidemiology - regression, analysis of variance, and estimation of relative risk, for example - originally were developed for the genetic analysis of biometric data. The familiarity that many geneticists have with this methodology has helped geneticists to understand and accept genetic epidemiology as a scientific discipline. It worth noting, however, that most of the work in genetic epidemiology during the past decade has been devoted to linkage and other family studies, rather than to population-based investigations of the type that characterize much of mainstream epidemiology. 30 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. The genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeles, Rosalind; Goh, Chee; Castro, Elena; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Guy, Michelle; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Easton, Douglas; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, familial and epidemiological studies have generated considerable evidence of an inherited component to prostate cancer. Indeed, rare highly penetrant genetic mutations have been implicated. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have also identified 76 susceptibility loci associated with prostate cancer risk, which occur commonly but are of low penetrance. However, these mutations interact multiplicatively, which can result in substantially increased risk. Currently, approximately 30% of the familial risk is due to such variants. Evaluating the functional aspects of these variants would contribute to our understanding of prostate cancer aetiology and would enable population risk stratification for screening. Furthermore, understanding the genetic risks of prostate cancer might inform predictions of treatment responses and toxicities, with the goal of personalized therapy. However, risk modelling and clinical translational research are needed before we can translate risk profiles generated from these variants into use in the clinical setting for targeted screening and treatment.

  4. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N;

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address...... this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested...... that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We...

  5. The genetics of nicotine dependence: Relationship to pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stewart L MacLeod; Parimal Chowdhury

    2006-01-01

    Smoking of tobacco products continues to be a major cause of worldwide health problems. Epidemiological studies have shown that tobacco smoking is the greatest risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer.Smokers who are able to quit smoking can reduce their risk of pancreatic cancer by nearly 50% within two years, however, their risk of developing pancreatic cancer remains higher than that of non-smokers for 10 years. Nicotine is the major psychoactive substance in tobacco, and is responsible for tobacco dependence and addiction. Recent evidence suggests that individuals have genetically based differences in their ability to metabolize nicotine, as well as genetic differences in the psychological reward pathways that may influence individual response to smoking initiation, dependence,addiction and cessation. Numerous associations have been reported between smoking behavior and genetic polymorphisms in genes that are responsible for nicotine metabolism. Tn addition, polymorphisms in genes that encode neurotransmitters and transporters that function in psychological reward pathways have been implicated in differences in smoking behavior. However,there is a large degree of between-study variability that demonstrates the need for larger, well-controlled casecontrol studies to identify target genes and deduce mechanisms that account for the genetic basis of interindividual differences in smoking behavior. Understanding the genetic factors that increase susceptibility to tobacco addiction may result in more effective tobacco cessation programs which will, in turn, reduce the incidence of tobacco related disease, including pancreatic cancer.

  6. Genetic surgery - a right strategy to attack cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2011-12-01

    The approaches now united under the term "gene therapy" can be divided into two broad strategies: (1) strategy using the ideology of molecular targeted therapy, but with genes in the role of agents targeted at certain molecular component(s) or pathways presumably crucial for cancer maintenance; (ii) strategy aimed at the destruction of tumors as a whole exploiting the features shared by all cancers, for example relatively fast mitotic cell division. While the first strategy is "true" gene therapy, the second one, as e.g. suicide gene therapy, is more like genetic surgery, when a surgeon just cuts off a tumor being not interested in subtle genetic mechanisms of cancer emergence and progression. This approach inherits the ideology of chemotherapy but escapes its severe toxic effects due to intracellular formation of toxic agents. Genetic surgery seems to be the most appropriate approach to combat cancer, and its simplicity is paradoxically adequate to the super-complexity of tumors. The review consists of three parts: (i) analysis of the reasons of tumor supercomplexity and fatally inevitable failure of molecular targeted therapy, (ii) general principles of the genetic surgery strategy, and (iii) examples of genetic surgery approaches with analysis of their drawbacks and the ways for their improvement.

  7. Courting the future: cancer and genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Describing this double issue of MEDICC Review could be an exercise for a first-year philosophy course in logic. It's not about "cancer and genetics" in Cuba. It's about cancer in Cuba and about genetics in Cuba, not about exploring relationships between them. Nevertheless, while the marriage of the two themes was fortuitous, in that the two had long been scheduled for the journal in 2014, there is a certain felicity to their sharing an issue. To date, the outstanding accomplishments of genetics have been most helpful for conditions occurring at the beginning of life and cancer is largely (though not exclusively) a disease related to aging. But the two are intrinsically connected: Although only a few of the more than 100 different diseases grouped under the term cancer are known to be hereditary, every cancer begins with a mutation in one or more genes, whether the mutation is inherited, due to an exposure, or is simply a random error in the millions of cell divisions that are part and parcel of cellular reproduction. Our cover image, a stained-glass window by Cuban artist Rosa María de la Terga at Cuba's National Medical Genetics Center, illustrates the elegance of the DNA molecule, the intricate key to life.

  8. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complaints about false or misleading health claims in advertisements. The American Society of Human Genetics, a membership ... at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT ...

  9. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  10. COX2 genetic variation, NSAIDs, and advanced prostate cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, I.; Liu, X.; Plummer, S J; Krumroy, L M; Casey, G; Witte, J S

    2007-01-01

    Collective evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) plays a role in prostate cancer risk. Cyclooxygenase 2 is the major enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, which are potent mediators of inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the enzymatic activity of COX2 and long-term use of NSAIDs appears to modestly lower the risk of prostate cancer. We investigated whether common genetic variation in COX2 influences the risk of advanced prostate canc...

  11. Mobile genetic elements and cancer. From mutations to gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeretska, I A; Demydov, S V; Ostapchenko, L I

    2011-12-01

    In the present review, an association between cancer and the activity of the non-LTR retroelements L1, Alu, and SVA, as well as endogenous retroviruses, in the human genome, is analyzed. Data suggesting that transposons have been involved in embryogenesis and malignization processes, are presented. Events that lead to the activation of mobile elements in mammalian somatic cells, as well as the use of mobile elements in genetic screening and cancer gene therapy, are reviewed.

  12. Genetic aspects of etiology and development of thyroid gland cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko Yu.V.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on thyroid gland cancer development and progression have identified new classes of tumor markers, proto-oncogenes, tumor-suppressing genes, cell receptor genes, identified genetic tumor-predisposing polymorphism and some other significantly important segments of genome. The identification has been based mainly on revealing of DNA abnormal consequences, specific for occurrence of thyroid gland cancer and its progression.

  13. Molecular and genetic bases of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Gelibter, Alain; Bria, Emilio; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Cappello, Paola; Di Modugno, Francesca; Pino, Maria Simona; Nuzzo, Carmen; Cognetti, Francesco; Novelli, Francesco; Nistico, Paola; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a formidable challenge for oncologists and patients alike. Despite intensive efforts, attempts at improving survival in the past 15 years, particularly in advanced disease, have failed. This is true even with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their action on pathways that were supposedly important in pancreatic cancer development and progression: indeed, with the notable exception of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib, that has provided a minimal survival improvement when added to gemcitabine, other agents targeting EGFR, matrix metallo-proteases, farnesyl transferase, or vascular endothelial growth factor have not succeeded in improving outcomes over standard gemcitabine monotherapy for a variety of different reasons. However, recent developments in the molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and an ever evolving understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer initiation and progression raise renewed hope to find novel, relevant therapeutic targets that could be pursued in the clinical setting. In this review we focus on molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its influence on sensitivity to EGFR-targeted approaches, apoptotic pathways, hypoxia-related pathways, developmental pathways (such as the hedgehog and Notch pathways), and proteomic analysis as keys to a better understanding of pancreatic cancer biology and, most importantly, as a source of novel molecular targets to be exploited therapeutically.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Yanju Bao; Xiangying Kong; Liping Yang; Rui Liu; Zhan Shi; Weidong Li; Baojin Hua; Wei Hou

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of...

  15. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  16. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  17. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  18. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  19. Does and should breast cancer genetic counselling include lifestyle advice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Vernooij, M.; Osch, L. van; Pijpe, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    To optimally inform counselees about their and their relatives' risks, information about lifestyle risk factors, e.g. physical activity and alcohol consumption, might be discussed in breast cancer genetic counselling. This study explored whether lifestyle was discussed, on whose initiative, whether

  20. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2015-01-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors tha

  1. [The microencapsulated genetic engineering cells: a new platform on treatment of cancer instead of genetic engineering drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuelong; Zheng, Shu

    2003-06-01

    The microencapsulated genetic cells may be a new platform instead of genetic engineering drugs, as they can overcome the genetic engineering drugs' shortages such as short half-life in vivo, low activity, and incomplete elimination of organic solvent. This article reviews and summarizes the advantages, possible problems and solution and the feasibility of using microencapsulated genetic engineering cells in the treatment of cancer.

  2. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    family of each index case, as ongoing research at Creighton has shown that virtually all forms of hereditary cancer involve multiple anatomic sites...HOME NEWS SPORTS BUSINESS ENTERTAINMENT LIFE TRAVEL BLOGS OPINION JOBS HOMES CARS CLASSIFIEDS COUPONS INDEX Houston & Texas Houston weather Houston...with any of the following conditions? (Please select all that apply) anemia (chronic) Crohn’s disease diabetes ulcerative

  3. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanju Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel, and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture, and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS, and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain.

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine for cancer pain: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanju; Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Liping; Liu, Rui; Shi, Zhan; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Hou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel), and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture), and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain.

  6. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  7. Genetic testing by cancer site: endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarski, Robert; Nagy, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Numerous hereditary syndromes, caused by mutations in multiple tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, can cause tumors in organs of the endocrine system. The primary syndromes (and genes) addressed here include multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2 (MEN1 and RET genes), Cowden syndrome (PTEN), hereditary pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma syndromes (multiple genes), and von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL). Clinical genetic testing is available for each of these syndromes and is generally directed to individuals with endocrine or other tumors and additional features suggestive of a hereditary syndrome. However, for some endocrine tumors, the proportion because of heredity is so high that genetic testing may be appropriate for all affected individuals. Management for hereditary cases typically involves aggressive screening and/or surgical protocols, starting at young ages to minimize morbidity and mortality. Endocrine tumors can be less commonly seen in a number of other hereditary syndromes (eg, neurofibromatosis), which are not reviewed in this section.

  8. Translating Population Difference: The Use and Re-Use of Genetic Ancestry in Brazilian Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    In the past ten years, there has been an expansion of scientific interest in population genetics linked to both understanding histories of human migration and the way that population difference and diversity may account for and/or be implicated in health and disease. In this article, I examine how particular aspects of a globalizing research agenda related to population differences and genetic ancestry are taken up in locally variant ways in the nascent field of Brazilian cancer genetics. Drawing on a broad range of ethnographic data from clinical and nonclinical contexts in the south of Brazil, I examine the ambiguities that attention to genetic ancestry generates, so revealing the disjunctured and diverse ways a global research agenda increasingly orientated to questions of population difference and genetic ancestry is being used and reused.

  9. COSMIC: somatic cancer genetics at high-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Simon A.; Beare, David; Boutselakis, Harry; Bamford, Sally; Bindal, Nidhi; Tate, John; Cole, Charlotte G.; Ward, Sari; Dawson, Elisabeth; Ponting, Laura; Stefancsik, Raymund; Harsha, Bhavana; Kok, Chai Yin; Jia, Mingming; Jubb, Harry; Sondka, Zbyslaw; Thompson, Sam; De, Tisham; Campbell, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    COSMIC, the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (http://cancer.sanger.ac.uk) is a high-resolution resource for exploring targets and trends in the genetics of human cancer. Currently the broadest database of mutations in cancer, the information in COSMIC is curated by expert scientists, primarily by scrutinizing large numbers of scientific publications. Over 4 million coding mutations are described in v78 (September 2016), combining genome-wide sequencing results from 28 366 tumours with complete manual curation of 23 489 individual publications focused on 186 key genes and 286 key fusion pairs across all cancers. Molecular profiling of large tumour numbers has also allowed the annotation of more than 13 million non-coding mutations, 18 029 gene fusions, 187 429 genome rearrangements, 1 271 436 abnormal copy number segments, 9 175 462 abnormal expression variants and 7 879 142 differentially methylated CpG dinucleotides. COSMIC now details the genetics of drug resistance, novel somatic gene mutations which allow a tumour to evade therapeutic cancer drugs. Focusing initially on highly characterized drugs and genes, COSMIC v78 contains wide resistance mutation profiles across 20 drugs, detailing the recurrence of 301 unique resistance alleles across 1934 drug-resistant tumours. All information from the COSMIC database is available freely on the COSMIC website. PMID:27899578

  10. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurisicchio, Luigi, E-mail: aurisicchio@takis-it.it [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); BIOGEM scarl, via Camporeale, 83031 Ariano Irpino (AV) (Italy); Ciliberto, Gennaro [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università degli studi di Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy)

    2011-09-22

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  11. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Ciliberto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  12. The molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration: an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saritha Katta; Inderjeet Kaur; Subhabrata Chakrabarti

    2009-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder of the eye and the third leading cause of blindness worldwide. With a multifactorial etiology, AMD results in progressive loss of central vision affecting the macular region of the eye in elderly. While the prevalence is relatively higher in the Caucasian populations, it has gradually become a major public health issue among the non-Caucasian populations (including Indians) as well due to senescence, rapidly changing demographics and life-style factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on large case–control cohorts have helped in mapping genes in the complement cascade that are involved in the regulation of innate immunity with AMD susceptibility. Genes involved with mitochondrial oxidative stress and extracellular matrix regulation also play a role in AMD pathogenesis. Majority of the associations observed in complement (CFH, CFB, C2 and C3) and other (ARMS2 and HTRA1) genes have been replicated in diverse populations worldwide. Gene–gene (CFH with ARMS2 and HTRA1) interactions and correlations with environmental traits (smoking and body mass index) have been established as significant covariates in AMD pathology. In this review, we have provided an overview on the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms in AMD worldwide and highlight the AMD-associated-candidate genes and their potential role in disease pathogenesis.

  13. Predicting human genetic interactions from cancer genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lu

    Full Text Available Synthetic Lethal (SL genetic interactions play a key role in various types of biological research, ranging from understanding genotype-phenotype relationships to identifying drug-targets against cancer. Despite recent advances in empirical measuring SL interactions in human cells, the human genetic interaction map is far from complete. Here, we present a novel approach to predict this map by exploiting patterns in cancer genome evolution. First, we show that empirically determined SL interactions are reflected in various gene presence, absence, and duplication patterns in hundreds of cancer genomes. The most evident pattern that we discovered is that when one member of an SL interaction gene pair is lost, the other gene tends not to be lost, i.e. the absence of co-loss. This observation is in line with expectation, because the loss of an SL interacting pair will be lethal to the cancer cell. SL interactions are also reflected in gene expression profiles, such as an under representation of cases where the genes in an SL pair are both under expressed, and an over representation of cases where one gene of an SL pair is under expressed, while the other one is over expressed. We integrated the various previously unknown cancer genome patterns and the gene expression patterns into a computational model to identify SL pairs. This simple, genome-wide model achieves a high prediction power (AUC = 0.75 for known genetic interactions. It allows us to present for the first time a comprehensive genome-wide list of SL interactions with a high estimated prediction precision, covering up to 591,000 gene pairs. This unique list can potentially be used in various application areas ranging from biotechnology to medical genetics.

  14. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J;

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had...... been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P... and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted....

  15. Genetic susceptibility loci, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Koutros

    Full Text Available Uncovering SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms-environment interactions can generate new hypotheses about the function of poorly characterized genetic variants and environmental factors, like pesticides. We evaluated SNP-environment interactions between 30 confirmed prostate cancer susceptibility loci and 45 pesticides and prostate cancer risk in 776 cases and 1,444 controls in the Agricultural Health Study. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multiplicative SNP-pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. After correction for multiple tests using the False Discovery Rate method, two interactions remained noteworthy. Among men carrying two T alleles at rs2710647 in EH domain binding protein 1 (EHBP1 SNP, the risk of prostate cancer in those with high malathion use was 3.43 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.44-8.15 (P-interaction= 0.003. Among men carrying two A alleles at rs7679673 in TET2, the risk of prostate cancer associated with high aldrin use was 3.67 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.43, 9.41 (P-interaction= 0.006. In contrast, associations were null for other genotypes. Although additional studies are needed and the exact mechanisms are unknown, this study suggests known genetic susceptibility loci may modify the risk between pesticide use and prostate cancer.

  16. Mass spectrometry cancer data classification using wavelets and genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Nahavandi, Saeid; Creighton, Douglas; Khosravi, Abbas

    2015-12-21

    This paper introduces a hybrid feature extraction method applied to mass spectrometry (MS) data for cancer classification. Haar wavelets are employed to transform MS data into orthogonal wavelet coefficients. The most prominent discriminant wavelets are then selected by genetic algorithm (GA) to form feature sets. The combination of wavelets and GA yields highly distinct feature sets that serve as inputs to classification algorithms. Experimental results show the robustness and significant dominance of the wavelet-GA against competitive methods. The proposed method therefore can be applied to cancer classification models that are useful as real clinical decision support systems for medical practitioners.

  17. Strategies for integrated analysis of genetic, epigenetic and gene expression variation in cancer: addressing the challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Bruun Thingholm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis. However, integration of heterogeneous measurements of biological variation is a non-trivial exercise due to the diversity of the human genome and the variety of output data formats and genome coverage obtained from the commonly used molecular platforms. This review article will provide an introduction to integration strategies used for analyzing genetic risk factors for cancer. We critically examine the ability of these strategies to handle the complexity of the human genome and also accommodate information about the biological and functional interactions between the elements that have been measured – making the assessment of disease risk against a composite genomic factor possible. The focus of this review is to provide an overview and introduction to the main strategies and to discuss where there is a need for further development.

  18. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued.

  19. Integrated patient and tumor genetic testing for individualized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, D L; McLeod, H L

    2016-02-01

    Tumor genome analysis is transforming cancer treatment by enabling identification of specific oncogenic drivers and selection of effective targeted agents. Meanwhile, patient genome analysis is being employed across therapeutic areas to inform selection of appropriate drugs and doses for treatment safety. Integration of patient genome analysis concurrent with preemptive tumor genetic testing will enable oncologists to make informed treatment decisions to select the right dose of the right drug for each patient and their tumor.

  20. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Archive Regulation of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Overview Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act Genetic Discrimination and ... gov/employees/process.cfm Top of page Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws Bill Clinton's Executive Order Prohibiting ...

  1. Genetics and genomics of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Dean; Hong Lou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies in the world with over 890 000 cases and over 258 000 deaths worldwide each year.Nearly all mortalities from PCa are due to metastatic disease,typically through tumors that evolve to be hormone-refractory or castrate-resistant.Despite intensive epidemiological study,there are few known environmental risk factors,and age and family history are the major determinants.However,there is extreme heterogeneity in PCa incidence worldwide,suggesting that major determining factors have not been described.Genome-wide association studies have been performed and a considerable number of significant,but low-risk loci have been identified.In addition,several groups have analyzed PCa by determination of genomic copy number,fusion gene generation and targeted resequencing of candidate genes,as well as exome and whole genome sequencing.These initial studies have examined both primary and metastatic tumors as well as murine xenografts and identified somatic alterations in TP53 and other potential driver genes,and the disturbance of androgen response and cell cycle pathways.It is hoped that continued characterization of risk factors as well as gene mutation and misregulation in tumors will aid in understanding,diagnosing and better treating PCa.

  2. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature.

  3. COX2 genetic variation, NSAIDs, and advanced prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, I; Liu, X; Plummer, S J; Krumroy, L M; Casey, G; Witte, J S

    2007-08-20

    Collective evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) plays a role in prostate cancer risk. Cyclooxygenase 2 is the major enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, which are potent mediators of inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit the enzymatic activity of COX2 and long-term use of NSAIDs appears to modestly lower the risk of prostate cancer. We investigated whether common genetic variation in COX2 influences the risk of advanced prostate cancer. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in COX2 were genotyped among 1012 men in our case-control study of advanced prostate cancer. Gene-environment interactions between COX2 polymorphisms and NSAID use were also evaluated. Information on NSAID use was obtained by questionnaire. Three SNPs demonstrated nominally statistically significant associations with prostate cancer risk, with the most compelling polymorphism (rs2745557) associated with a lower risk of disease (odds ratio (OR) GC vs GG=0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49-0.84; P=0.002). We estimated through permutation analysis that a similarly strong result would occur by chance 2.7% of the time. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use was associated with a lower risk of disease in comparison to no use (OR=0.67; 95% CI: 0.52-0.87). No significant statistical interaction between NSAID use and rs2745557 was observed (P=0.12). Our findings suggest that variation in COX2 is associated with prostate cancer risk.

  4. Cancer genetics and the cardiotoxicity of the therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Hind; Kolaja, Kyle L; Force, Thomas

    2013-01-22

    Cancer genomics has focused on the discovery of mutations and chromosomal structural rearrangements that either increase susceptibility to cancer or support the cancer phenotype. Protein kinases are the most frequently mutated genes in the cancer genome, making them attractive therapeutic targets for drug design. However, the use of some of the kinase inhibitors (KIs) has been associated with toxicities to the heart and vasculature, including acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Herein we discuss the genetic basis of cancer, focusing on mutations in the kinase genome (kinome) that lead to tumorigenesis. This will allow an understanding of the real and potential power of modern cancer therapeutics. The underlying mechanisms that drive the cardiotoxicity of the KIs are also examined. The preclinical models for predicting cardiotoxicity, including induced pluripotent stem cells and zebrafish, are reviewed, with the hope of eventually being able to identify problematic agents before their use in patients. Finally, the use of biomarkers in the clinic is discussed, and newer strategies (i.e., metabolomics and enhanced imaging strategies) that may allow earlier and more accurate detection of cardiotoxicity are reviewed.

  5. Molecular genetics and genomics progress in urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, George J

    2013-11-01

    The clinical management of solid tumor patients has recently undergone a paradigm shift as the result of the accelerated advances in cancer genetics and genomics. Molecular diagnostics is now an integral part of routine clinical management in lung, colon, and breast cancer patients. In a disappointing contrast, molecular biomarkers remain largely excluded from current management algorithms of urologic malignancies. The need for new treatment alternatives and validated prognostic molecular biomarkers that can help clinicians identify patients in need of early aggressive management is pressing. Identifying robust predictive biomarkers that can stratify response to newly introduced targeted therapeutics is another crucially needed development. The following is a brief discussion of some promising candidate biomarkers that may soon become a part of clinical management of bladder cancers.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms and metabolism of endocrine disruptors in cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatagima Ana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have estimated that approximately 80% of all cancers are related to environmental factors. Individual cancer susceptibility can be the result of several host factors, including differences in metabolism, DNA repair, altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, and nutritional status. Xenobiotic metabolism is the principal mechanism for maintaining homeostasis during the body's exposure to xenobiotics. The balance of xenobiotic absorption and elimination rates in metabolism can be important in the prevention of DNA damage by chemical carcinogens. Thus the ability to metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics can be considered one of the body's first protective mechanisms. Variability in individual metabolism has been related to the enzymatic polymorphisms involved in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. This paper is a contemporary literature review on genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of endocrine disruptors potentially related to cancer development.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms and metabolism of endocrine disruptors in cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Hatagima

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have estimated that approximately 80% of all cancers are related to environmental factors. Individual cancer susceptibility can be the result of several host factors, including differences in metabolism, DNA repair, altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, and nutritional status. Xenobiotic metabolism is the principal mechanism for maintaining homeostasis during the body's exposure to xenobiotics. The balance of xenobiotic absorption and elimination rates in metabolism can be important in the prevention of DNA damage by chemical carcinogens. Thus the ability to metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics can be considered one of the body's first protective mechanisms. Variability in individual metabolism has been related to the enzymatic polymorphisms involved in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. This paper is a contemporary literature review on genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of endocrine disruptors potentially related to cancer development.

  8. Resistance to cancer treatment: the role of somatic genetic events and the challenges for targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald eBatist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic resistance remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths. Resistance can occur from the outset of treatment or as an acquired phenomenon after an initial clinical response. Therapeutic resistance is an almost universal phenomenon in the treatment of metastatic cancers. The advent of molecularly targeted treatments brought greater efficacy in patients whose tumors express a particular target or molecular signature. However, resistance remains a predictable challenge. This article provides an overview of somatic genomic events that confer resistance to cancer therapies. Some examples, including BCR-ABL, EML4-ALK, and the androgen receptor, contain mutations in the target itself, which hamper binding and inhibitory functions of therapeutic agents. There are also examples of somatic genetic changes in other genes or pathways that result in resistance by circumventing the inhibitor, as in resistance to trastuzumab and BRAF inhibitors. Yet other examples results in activation of cytoprotective genes. The fact that all of these mechanisms of resistance are due to somatic changes in the tumor’s genome makes targeting them selectively a feasible goal. To identify and validate these changes, it is important to obtain biopsies o

  9. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  10. Role of Withania somnifera in Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Singh

    2011-10-01

    , environmental chemical toxins, allopathic drugs, pesticide infected food with heavy metals and some not properly developed metallic preparation of Ayurvedic or other Folk Medicine can be a causative factor, leave aside genetic processes of the Individual for the development of the risk of cancer. If we look in the properties of WS like adaptogen/ anti-stress agent, immunomodulator, antioxidant (reducing free radical damage, anabolic effect, improving resistance of body, reducing fatigue and detoxificant effects, we are inclined to suggests that WS works through all above mechanisms in controlling the dreaded cancer, rather than its effect on stopping the cell division. As during radio and chemotherapy body’s natural normal cells are also killed and low immunity develops, WS helps prevent these adverse effects of both and helps patients better recovery and life styles. However, multicentric long term clinical studies by oncologists, although deviated from their routine, must be carried out on WS to prove our contentions.

  11. Comparative evaluation of genetic assays to identify oral pre-cancerous fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, J.F.; Braakhuis, B.J.; Brink, A.; Broeckaert, M.A.; Beliën, J.A.M.; Meijer, G.A.; Kuik, D.J.; Leemans, C.R.; Bloemena, E.; van der Waal, I.; Brakenhoff, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinomas often develop in a pre-cancerous field, defined as mucosal epithelium with cancer-related genetic alterations, and which may appear as a clinically visible lesion. The test characteristics of three genetic assays that were developed to detect pre-cancerous f

  12. 76 FR 14034 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: In compliance with the requirement... included in the NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory on NCI's Cancer.gov Web site. The...

  13. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI, an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002. For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%. However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78. Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06, and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58. In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10-5. Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk.

  14. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  15. A systematic overview of radiation therapy effects in cervical cancer (cervix uteri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhorn, Nina; Tropé, Claes; Ridderheim, Mona; Boman, Karin; Sorbe, Bengt; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately (Acta Oncol 2003; 42: 357-365). This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for cervical cancer is based on data from 1 meta-analysis and 34 randomized trials. In total, 35 scientific articles are included, involving 7 952 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 34 024 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized in these points: There are limited scientific data supporting that postoperative pelvic radiotherapy improves disease-free survival in early cervical cancer. No firm conclusion can be drawn. There is moderate scientific evidence that external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy gives a similar disease-free and overall survival rate as radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer. There is strong scientific evidence that concomitant radiochemotherapy improves disease-free and overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone in early cervical cancer. The NCI has recently published an announcement stating that cisplatin-based chemotherapy should be used concomitantly with radiotherapy in cervical cancer. No solid documentation for this statement can be found concerning locally advanced stages ( >IIB). There is a strong scientific evidence that cisplatin-based chemotherapy given concomitantly with radiotherapy is superior to concomitant chemotherapy with hydroxyurea. There is no scientific evidence to show that neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy improves disease-free or overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone in patients with localized cervical cancer. There is moderate scientific evidence that high-dose-rate brachytherapy gives the same local control rate as low-dose-rate brachytherapy but with fewer rectal complications.

  16. Engagement with Genetic Information and Uptake of Genetic Testing: the Role of Trust and Personal Cancer History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Megan C; Taber, Jennifer M; Klein, William M

    2017-01-20

    We used national survey data to (1) determine the extent to which individuals trust the sources from which they are most likely to receive information about cancer-related genetic tests (BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome), (2) examine how level of trust for sources of genetic information might be related to cancer-related genetic testing uptake, and (3) determine whether key factors, such as cancer history and numeracy, moderate the latter association. We used cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey. Our study sample included individuals who responded that they had heard or read about genetic tests (n = 1117). All analyses accounted for complex survey design. Although respondents trusted information from health professionals the most, they were significantly less likely to report hearing about genetic testing from such professionals than via television (p information source from which participants heard about genetic tests were associated with increased odds of genetic testing uptake, particularly among those with a personal cancer history. Numeracy was not associated with genetic testing uptake. Because health professionals were among the most trusted health information sources, they may serve as important brokers of genetic testing information for those with a personal cancer history.

  17. Beliefs about Cancer and Diet among Those Considering Genetic Testing for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Upton, Rachel; Lee, Seungjin; Panter, Abby T.; Hadley, Don W.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome. Design: Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study. Setting: Clinical research setting. Participants: Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons…

  18. Mechanisms of endocrine resistance in breast cancer: an overview of the proposed roles of noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Erin L; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine therapies such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are the standard treatment options for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients. However, resistance to these agents has become a major clinical obstacle. Potential mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapies have been identified, often involving enhanced growth factor signaling and changes in the expression or action of the estrogen receptor, but few studies have addressed the role of noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Two important types of ncRNA include microRNA (miRNA) and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). miRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression via translational inhibition or degradation of mRNA transcripts, while lncRNAs are larger RNA molecules that have been shown to play a role in multiple cellular maintenance functions such as protein scaffolding, chromatin looping, and regulation of mRNA stability. Both miRNA and lncRNA have recently impacted the field of breast cancer research as important pieces in the mechanistic puzzle of the genes and pathways involved in breast cancer development and progression. This review serves as an overview of the roles of miRNA and lncRNA in breast cancer progression and the development of endocrine resistance. Ideally, future experiments in the field should include identification of ncRNAs that could be potential therapeutic targets in endocrine-resistant tumors, as well as ncRNA biomarkers that facilitate more tumor-specific treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer patients.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms and non-small-cell lung cancer: future paradigms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Ramon Andrade Bezerra de [Serviço de Oncologia Médica, Instituto Português de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina, Universidade do Algarve, Faro (Portugal)

    2014-07-01

    This article addresses some current issues about genetic polymorphisms studied in the non-small-cell lung cancer translational field. Furthermore, it discusses about new potential biomarkers regarding lung cancer risk and prognosis.

  20. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary in which cancer risk perception, risk communication, and risk counseling are discussed. The summary also contains information about recording and analyzing a family history of cancer and factors to consider when offering genetic testing.

  1. Overview on Topical 5-ALA Photodynamic Therapy Use for Non Melanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cantisani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UV contributes to a variety of skin diseases including inflammation, degenerative aging, and cancer. Historically, humans have been exposed to UV radiation mainly through occupational exposure; recreational UV exposure, however, has increased dramatically in recent years, because of outdoor leisure activities and to purposely tan for cosmetic purposes. Both UVB and UVA radiation have been shown to cause DNA damage and immunosuppression, the important forms of biological damage that lead to NMSC. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common malignancy, whose public health significance is often unrecognized which continues to grow at an alarming rate, becoming an occupational disease. Available treatments alternative to surgery include photodynamic therapy, electrochemotherapy, cryotherapy, ablative lasers, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, ingenol mebutate, and diclofenac. Among these, photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive technique with excellent cosmetic outcome and good curative results, when used in initial stages of skin cancers for superficial lesions. It is administered under numerous and significantly varied regimens and there are a wide range of cure rates reported, permitting treatment of large and multiple lesions with excellent cosmetic results. This is an overview of photodynamic applications especially for the treatment of NMSC, with a short focus on daylight modality.

  2. Cancer Regression in Patients After Transfer of Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Royal, Richard E.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Kammula, Udai S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Zheng, Zhili; Nahvi, Azam; de Vries, Christiaan R.; Rogers-Freezer, Linda J.; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-10-01

    Through the adoptive transfer of lymphocytes after host immunodepletion, it is possible to mediate objective cancer regression in human patients with metastatic melanoma. However, the generation of tumor-specific T cells in this mode of immunotherapy is often limiting. Here we report the ability to specifically confer tumor recognition by autologous lymphocytes from peripheral blood by using a retrovirus that encodes a T cell receptor. Adoptive transfer of these transduced cells in 15 patients resulted in durable engraftment at levels exceeding 10% of peripheral blood lymphocytes for at least 2 months after the infusion. We observed high sustained levels of circulating, engineered cells at 1 year after infusion in two patients who both demonstrated objective regression of metastatic melanoma lesions. This study suggests the therapeutic potential of genetically engineered cells for the biologic therapy of cancer.

  3. Developing culturally sensitive cancer genetics communication aids for African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Bonnie Jeanne; Kinney, Anita Yeomans; Ellis, Sara Marie

    2003-04-15

    The goal of this project was to develop educational materials to communicate genetic health information in a culturally sensitive manner. These materials were designed to communicate information about cancer risk, genetic testing options, and health management options in an African American kindred with a known BRCA1 mutation. Educational materials were pilot-tested in four African American focus groups varying in socioeconomic status and gender. The audiotaped focus groups consisted of presentation of the educational materials, followed by a feedback session led by an African American facilitator. Qualitative analysis of the focus group transcripts identified important themes and the educational materials were revised in response to the participants' suggestions. The products included a booklet and a flip chart for use in educational sessions. Focus group participants recommended a substantial reduction in technical detail, and recommended that information be personalized and made relevant to the lives of the target population. Other critical themes included the importance of building trust in the medical system and avoiding words and images that have strong negative associations in the African American community. Strategies that were successful included nontechnical images to explain genetic concepts, clip art images to energize and personalize word slides, vibrant color, identifiably African American figures, and the development of themes relevant to many African Americans. The use of these materials in an ongoing study offering BRCA1 counseling and testing to a large, rural Louisiana-based kindred will provide additional feedback about the effectiveness of the culturally tailored genetic education and counseling materials.

  4. Identification of new genetic risk factors for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michelle Guy; Helen I.Field; Melissa C.Southey; Gianluca Severi; Jenny L.Donovan; Freddie C.Hamdy; David P.Dearnaley; Kenneth R.Muir; Charmaine Smith; Melisa Bagnato; Audrey T.Ardern-Jones; Zsofia Kote-Jarai; Amanda L.Hall; Lynne T.O'Brien; Beatrice N.Gehr-Swain; Rosemary A.Wilkinson; Angela Cox; Sarah Lewis; Paul M.Brown; Sameer G.Jhavar; Malgorzata Tymrakiewicz; Artitaya Lophatananon; Graham G.Giles; Sarah L.Bryant; The UK Genetic Prostate Cancer Study Collaborators; British Association of Urological Surgeons' Sectio; Alan Horwich; Robert A.Huddart; Vincent S.Khoo; Christopher C.Parker; Christopher J.Woodhouse; Alan Thompson; Tim Christmas; Ali Amin Al Olama; Chris Ogden; Cyril Fisher; Charles Jameson; Colin S.Cooper; Dallas R.English; John L.Hopper; David E.Neal; Douglas E Easton; Rosalind A.Eeles; Sarah K.Jugurnauth; Shani Mulholland; Daniel A.Leongamomlert; Stephen M.Edwards; Jonathan Morrison

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that a substantial part of genetic predisposition to prostate cancer (PCa) may be due to lower penetrance genes which are found by genome-wide association studies.We have recently conducted such a study and seven new regions of the genome linked to PCa risk have been identified.Three of these loci contain candidate susceptibility genes:MSMB,LMTK2 and KLK2/3.The MSMB and KLK2/3 genes may he useful for PCa screening,and the LMTK2 gene might provide a potential therapeutic target.Together with results from other groups,there are now 23 germline genetic variants which have been reported.These results have the potential to be developed into a genetic test.However,we consider that marketing of tests to the public is premature,as PCa risk can not be evaluated fully at this stage and the appropriate screening protocols need to be developed.Follow-up validation studies,as well as studies to explore the psychological implications of genetic profile testing,will be vital prior to roll out into healthcare.

  5. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0113 TITLE: Genetic and epigenetic biomarkers for recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Beadchip microarray, high density beadchip, for this study. This array includes 485,577 CpG sites and covers CpGs in 99% of genes and 96% of CpG ...differentially methylated CpG sites in 17 genes between recurrent and non-recurrent tumor tissues, with a false discovery rate (FDR) [12] q-value less than

  6. Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer: Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    predispose to breast cancer . These mutations are always in the context of Cowden’s Syndrome, and do not appear in families with brest cancer in the...AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-94-J-4307 TITLE: Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCA1 PRINCIPAL...Aug97-) Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other than BRCA1 6. AUTHOR{S) Mary-Clair King, Ph.D. 7

  7. Genetic susceptibility for specific cancers. Medical liability of the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, M J

    1999-12-01

    The use of genetic profiling techniques to detect individuals with an increased susceptibility to heritable cancers has provoked recent legal interest in the duties of the attending physician and in the rights of patients and their families. In the current study specific prima facie and recently litigated cases are presented and explored to delineate the issues facing physicians and to illustrate the prerogatives of patients who are caught up in a heritable cancer enigma. Various courts have attempted to answer questions involving lawsuits in which incidents of breast/ovarian carcinoma and colon carcinoma have provoked claims of negligence against health care providers. Health care workers involved in the care of these patients have specific duties to these individuals. It would appear that physicians are being forced to assume the additional duty of delving into a patient's family history of cancer through multiple generations. This duty is followed by a responsibility to provide detailed counseling to those patients in whom such activity impacts the diagnosis and management of familial cancer.

  8. Unclassified sequence variants (UVS and genetic predisposition to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves-Jean Bignon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are mainly attributable to predisposition genes whose germinal mutations are responsible for the disease. The most common genes associated with breast/ovarian cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2 but at least 20 other genes of medium of high penetrance have been associated with these types of cancer. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for BRCA mutations carriers approaches 90%. Appropriate medical follow-up is therefore essential for women carrying mutations in these genes. BRCA mutational spectrum has not been entirely characterized but not all sequence variants are pathogenic. These are classified as benign polymorphisms or unclassified variants (UV with unknown pathological potential. To date, 43,5% of over 3500 genetic variants BRCA1 and BRCA2 are reported as having uncertain clinical significance. Whether one sequence variant has or not a pathogenicity implication is often a hard decision to take, involving important consequences for diagnosis and medical follow-up. Here we present several cases of unclassified sequence variants detection and interpretation by in-silico analysis.

  9. Lymphohematopoietic Cancers Induced by Chemicals and Other Agents: Overview and Implications for Risk Assessment (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft report provides an overview of the types of mechanisms underlying the lymphohematopoietic cancers induced by chemical agents and radiation in humans, with a primary emphasis on leukemia and leukemia-inducing agents. It focuses on how mechanistic information on human l...

  10. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma as a paradigm of cancer genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm J. Simons

    2011-01-01

    The unusual incidence patterns for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in China, Northeast India, Arctic Inuit, Peninsular and island Southeast Asia, Polynesian Islanders, and North Africans indicate a role for NPC risk genes in Chinese, Chinese-related, and not-obviously Chinese-related populations. Renewed interest in NPC genetic risk has been stimulated by a hypothesis that NPC population patterns originated in Bai-Yue / pre-Austronesian-speaking aborigines and were dispersed during the last glacial maximum by Sundaland submersion. Five articles in this issue of the Chinese Journal of Cancer, first presented at a meeting on genetic aspects of NPC [National Cancer Center of Singapore (NCCS), February 20-21, 2010], are directed towards incidence patterns, to early detection of affected individuals within risk populations, and to the application of genetic technology advances to understanding the nature of high risk. Turnbull presents a general framework for understanding population migrations that underlie NPC and similar complex diseases, including other viral cancers. Trejaut et al. apply genetic markers to detail migration from East Asia through Taiwan to the populating of Island Polynesia. Migration dispersal in a westward direction took mongoloid peoples to modem day Northeast India adjacent to Western China (Xinjiang). NPC incidence in mongoloid Nagas ranks amongst the highest in the world, whereas elsewhere in India NPC is uncommon. Cao et al. detail incidence patterns in Southeast China that have occurred over recent decades. Finally, Ji et al. describe the utility of Epstein-Barr virus serostatus in early NPC detection. While genetic risk factors still remain largely unknown, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been a focus of attention since the discovery of an HLA association with NPC in 1973 and, two years later, that NPC susceptibility in highest-risk Cantonese involved the co-occurrence of multi-HLA locus combinations of HLA genes as chromosome

  11. Certified Genetic Counselors: A Crucial Clinical Resource in the Management of Patients with Suspected Hereditary Cancer Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catts, Zohra Ali-Khan; Hampel, Heather

    2015-10-01

    The role of the cancer genetic counselor in the management of patients with cancer is discussed in this article. This includes explaining what a genetic counselor is trained to do and how they are credentialed and licensed. In addition, the article explains who to refer for cancer genetic counseling. Once referred, the article describes what actually happens in a pretest and posttest cancer genetic counseling session. Use of a cancer genetic registry and how it can help in practice is discussed. Finally, several mechanisms for identifying a cancer genetic counselor at one's institution or nearby are outlined.

  12. An overview of molecular epidemiologic studies in biliary tract cancer%肝外胆道癌分子流行病学研究的新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟令勤; 刘金钢

    2012-01-01

    胆道癌是一种生存率极低的高致死性疾病,在世界范围内,胆道癌的发病率呈上升趋势.胆道癌不良的预后源于缺乏早期诊断和有效治疗的手段,因此,明确胆道癌的发病机制显得至关重要.基因多态性的关联分析将有助于阐明胆道癌的发生机制,有望发现有价值的肿瘤标记物以确定胆道癌高危人群并进行早期诊断和预后评估,进而成为基因治疗的新靶点.本文从分子流行病学角度对胆道癌基因多态性方面的最新研究进展进行综述.%Biliary tract cancer is a rare but highly fatal malignancy,with world -wide increasing incidence in recent years. The prognosis of biliary tract cancer is grim due to lack of early diagnostic modalities and effective treatments. It is important to explore the pathogenesis of biliary tract cancer. Molecular epidemiologic studies examining the associations between polymorphisms in several gene pathways and biliary tract cancer risk may provide insight into the etiology of this kind of cancer, and be helpful to discover validated biomarkers for early detection in asymptomatic individuals and present new targets of gene therepy in biliary tract cancer in the future. We present a broad overview of molecular epidemiologic studies that have addressed the relationship between biliary tract cancer risk and genetic polymorphisms in several candidate genes and suggest avenues for future research.

  13. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F;

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain patients need variable opioid doses. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that opioid efficacy is related to genetic variability. However, the studies have small samples, findings are not replicated, and several candidate genes have not been studied. Therefore, a study of genetic...... mechanisms. The patients' mean age was 62.5 years, and the average pain intensity was 3.5. The patients' primary opioids were morphine (n=830), oxycodone (n=446), fentanyl (n=699), or other opioids (n=234). Pain intensity, time on opioids, age, gender, performance status, and bone or CNS metastases predicted......C, HTR3D, HTR3E, HTR1, or CNR1 showed significant associations with opioid dose in both the development and the validation analyzes. These findings do not support the use of pharmacogenetic analyses for the assessed SNPs to guide opioid treatment. The study also demonstrates the importance...

  14. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F;

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain patients need variable opioid doses. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that opioid efficacy is related to genetic variability. However, the studies have small samples, findings are not replicated, and several candidate genes have not been studied. Therefore, a study of genetic...... variability with opioid doses in a large population using a confirmatory validation population was warranted. We recruited 2294 adult European patients using a World Health Organization (WHO) step III opioid and analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes with a putative influence on opioid...... mechanisms. The patients' mean age was 62.5 years, and the average pain intensity was 3.5. The patients' primary opioids were morphine (n=830), oxycodone (n=446), fentanyl (n=699), or other opioids (n=234). Pain intensity, time on opioids, age, gender, performance status, and bone or CNS metastases predicted...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis ... Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Diagnosis & Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types ...

  16. Clinical characterization and risk profile of individuals seeking genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Edenir Inez; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; da Rocha, José Cláudio C; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Kalakun, Luciane; Blom, Melissa Brauner; Azevedo, Sérgio J; Caleffi, Maira; Giugliani, Roberto; Schüler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary breast cancer (HBC) accounts for 5-10% of breast cancer cases and it significantly increases the lifetime risk of cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the sociodemographic variables, family history of cancer, breast cancer (BC) screening practices and the risk profile of cancer affected or asymptomatic at-risk women that undergo genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer in public Brazilian cancer genetics services. Estimated lifetime risk of BC was calculated for asymptomatic women using the Gail and Claus models. The majority of women showed a moderate lifetime risk of developing BC, with an average risk of 19.7% and 19.9% by the Gail and Claus models, respectively. The average prior probability of carrying a BRCA1/2 gene mutation was 16.7% and overall only 32% fulfilled criteria for a hereditary breast cancer syndrome as assessed by family history. We conclude that a significant number of individuals at high-risk for HBC syndromes may not have access to the benefits of cancer genetic counseling in these centers. Contributing factors may include insufficient training of healthcare professionals, disinformation of cancer patients; difficult access to genetic testing and/or resistance in seeking such services. The identification and understanding of these barriers is essential to develop specific strategies to effectively achieve cancer risk reduction in this and other countries were clinical cancer genetics is not yet fully established.

  17. Genetics of breast cancer: Applications to the Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer research has yielded several important results including the strong susceptibility genes,BRCA1 and BRCA2 and more recently 19 genes and genetic loci that confer a more moderate risk.The pace of discovery is accelerating as genetic technology and computational methods improve. These discoveries will change the way that breast cancer risk is understood in Mexico over the next few decades.La investigación en cáncer de mama ha dado varios resultados importantes incluyendo los genes fuertemente susceptibles, BRCA1 y BRCA2, y más recientemente 19 genes y loci genéticos que confieren un riesgo moderado. El ritmo de los descubrimientos se acelera conforme mejora la tecnología y métodos computacionales.Estosdescubrimientoscambiarán la forma en que la investigación del cáncer es comprendida en México en las próximas décadas.

  18. Genetic Polymorphism and Expression of CXCR4 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Okuyama Kishima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CXCR4 genetic polymorphisms, as well as their expression level, have been associated with cancer development and prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of CXCR4 rs2228014 polymorphism on its mRNA and protein expression in breast cancer samples. It was observed that patients presented higher CXCR4 mRNA relative expression (5.7-fold than normal mammary gland, but this expression was not correlated with patients clinicopathological features (nuclear grade, nodal status, ER status, PR status, p53 staining, Ki67 index, and HER-2 status. Moreover, CXCR4 mRNA relative expression also did not differ regarding the presence or absence of T allele (p=0.301. In the immunohistochemical assay, no difference was observed for CXCR4 cytoplasmic protein staining in relation to different genotypes (p=0.757; however, high cytoplasmic CXCR4 staining was verified in invasive breast carcinoma (p<0.01. All in all, the results from present study indicated that rs2228014 genetic variant does not alter CXCR4 mRNA or protein expression. However, this receptor was more expressed in tumor compared to normal tissue, in both RNA and protein levels, suggesting its promising applicability in the general context of mammary carcinogenesis.

  19. Genetic Polymorphism and Expression of CXCR4 in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama Kishima, Marina; Brajão de Oliveira, Karen; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; de Almeida, Felipe Campos; Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton Freire; Trugilo, Kleber Paiva; Guembarovski, Alda Fiorina Maria Losi; Jorge Sobrinho, Walter; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 genetic polymorphisms, as well as their expression level, have been associated with cancer development and prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of CXCR4 rs2228014 polymorphism on its mRNA and protein expression in breast cancer samples. It was observed that patients presented higher CXCR4 mRNA relative expression (5.7-fold) than normal mammary gland, but this expression was not correlated with patients clinicopathological features (nuclear grade, nodal status, ER status, PR status, p53 staining, Ki67 index, and HER-2 status). Moreover, CXCR4 mRNA relative expression also did not differ regarding the presence or absence of T allele (p = 0.301). In the immunohistochemical assay, no difference was observed for CXCR4 cytoplasmic protein staining in relation to different genotypes (p = 0.757); however, high cytoplasmic CXCR4 staining was verified in invasive breast carcinoma (p < 0.01). All in all, the results from present study indicated that rs2228014 genetic variant does not alter CXCR4 mRNA or protein expression. However, this receptor was more expressed in tumor compared to normal tissue, in both RNA and protein levels, suggesting its promising applicability in the general context of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26576337

  20. Overview of gene therapy clinical progress including cancer treatment with gene-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Malcolm K; Okur, Fatma V

    2009-01-01

    It is now twenty years since the first legal gene transfer studies were approved, and there has been considerable disappointment in the slow rate of progress that followed the initial studies. Gradually, however, as the limitations of available vectors are acknowledged and overcome, and with advances in our understanding of the molecular and cell biology of genetic diseases and of cancer, unequivocal successes are now being reported. In this paper we describe the remaining major roadblocks to successful gene therapy and outline approaches to overcome them. We also illustrate how genetically modified immune system cells are already being used for the effective treatment of hematological and other malignancies, and how these approaches are being modified so that they can be effective in treating a broader range of malignancies.

  1. An overview of the effective combination therapies for the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Cristina; Capelo, José Luis; Igrejas, Gilberto; Alfonso, Amparo; Botana, Luis M; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is generally classified based on the receptors overexpressed on the cell nucleus, which include hormone receptors such as progesterone (PR) and estrogen (ER), and HER2. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a type of cancer that lacks any of these three types of receptor proteins (ER/PR/HER2). Tumor cells exhibit drug resistant phenotypes that decrease the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatments. Generally, drug resistance has a genetic basis that is caused by an abnormal gene expression, nevertheless, there are several types of drug resistance: efflux pumps reducing the cellular concentration of the drug, alterations in membrane lipids that reduce cellular uptake, increased or altered drug targets, metabolic alteration of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis, repair of the damaged DNA, and alteration of the cell cycle checkpoints. The use of "combination therapy" is recognized as an efficient solution to treat human diseases, in particular, breast cancer. In this review, we give examples of different nanocarriers used to co-deliver multiple therapeutics (chemotherapeutic agent and nucleic acid) to drug-resistant tumor cells, and lastly, we give our recommendations for the future directions for the co-delivery treatments.

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the FTO gene and cancer risk: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Caballero, Marta Elena; Sierra-Ramírez, José Alfredo

    2015-03-01

    The FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated) gene has a strong linkage disequilibrium block, within which SNPs have been identified that are involved in the development of obesity. Recently some of these variants have also been associated with cancer. However, identification of the possible mechanisms that could explain these associations has proven to be elusive. It has been found that FTO polymorphisms can regulate the expression of genes at large kilobases of distance as well as the expression of the FTO gene itself, and regions for transcription factor binding. To date it has been observed that variants rs9939609, rs17817449, rs8050136, rs1477196, rs6499640, rs16953002, rs11075995 and rs1121980 are associated with the risk of developing cancer. Some studies have produced negative results when comparing the same polymorphisms, but make a simple association between polymorphic variants and cancer, have proved difficult because this relation is by nature multifactorial. A certain degree of variation resulting from the improper design of studies or processing of data can lead to erroneous conclusions. However, it is now unquestionable that certain FTO polymorphisms regulate genetic expression related to cancer susceptibility, although this field is just beginning to be understood.

  3. Genetic susceptibility variants associated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulí, Anna; Lozano, Juan José; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo; Bessa, Xavier; Muñoz, Jenifer; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Clofent, Juan; Morillas, Juan Diego; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in Western countries. Once a tumour develops, a differentiated prognosis could be determined by lifestyle habits or inherited and somatic genetic factors. Finding such prognostic factors will be helpful in order to identify cases with a shorter survival or at a higher risk of recurrence that may benefit from more intensive treatment and follow-up surveillance. Sixteen CRC genetic susceptibility variants were directly genotyped in a cohort of 1235 CRC patients recruited by the EPICOLON Spanish consortium. Univariate Cox and multivariate regression analyses were performed taking as primary outcomes overall survival (OS), disease-free survival and recurrence-free interval. Genetic variants rs9929218 at 16q22.1 and rs10795668 at 10p14 may have an effect on OS. The G allele of rs9929218 was linked with a better OS [GG genotype, genotypic model: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.93, P = 0.0179; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.94, P = 0.0202]. Likewise, the G allele of rs10795668 was associated with better clinical outcome (GG genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-1.01, P = 0.0570; GA genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.92, P = 0.0137; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.94, P = 0.0194). In conclusion, CRC susceptibility variants rs9929218 and rs10795668 may exert some influence in modulating patient's survival and they deserve to be further tested in additional CRC cohorts in order to confirm their potential as prognosis or predictive biomarkers.

  4. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  5. Effectiveness of psychological interventions intended to promote adjustment of children with cancer and their parents: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Muglia-Wechsler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at providing a general overview of psychological interventions intended to promote psychological adjustment of children with cancer and their parents. To achieve this goal, we reviewed published articles between 1998-2010, using a combination of the following key words: psychosocial intervention, psychotherapy, trial, treatment, adjustment, wellbeing, adaptation, cancer, childhood cancer, pediatric cancer, anxiety and depression in the electronic databases: Psycinfo, Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, Psicodoc and Psyarticles. Fourteen articles were found and analyses show that most interventions had some efficacy in the psychological adjustment of children and their parents; nevertheless, there is a limited number of treatments that can in fact be considered effective. The convenience of psychological interventions is discussed and how they must comprehend strengths and the promotion of psychological health and should not be based solely on deficits and psychopathological models. Possibly, this reorientation will help fostering significant clinic changes regarding the stress associated to cancer and its treatment.

  6. Lung cancer, genetic predisposition and smoking: the Nordic Twin Study of Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.; Korhonen, Tellervo; Holst, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to disentangle genetic and environmental causes in lung cancer while considering smoking status. Methods: Four Nordic twin cohorts (43 512 monozygotic (MZ) and 71 895 same sex dizygotic (DZ) twin individuals) had smoking data before cancer diagnosis. We used time...... for lung cancer, nearly all were current smokers at baseline and only one concordant pair was seen among never smokers. Among ever smokers, the case-wise concordance of lung cancer, that is the risk before a certain age conditional on lung cancer in the co-twin before that age, was significantly increased...... pairs. Among smoking discordant pairs, the pairwise HR for lung cancer of the ever smoker twin compared to the never smoker co-twin was 5.4 (95% CI 2.1 to 14.0) in MZ pairs and 5.0 (95% CI 3.2 to 7.9) in DZ pairs. Conclusions: The contribution of familial effects appears to decrease by age...

  7. Towards a genetic definition of cancer-associated inflammation: role of the IDO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, George C; Metz, Richard; Muller, Alexander J

    2010-05-01

    Chronic inflammation drives the development of many cancers, but a genetic definition of what constitutes 'cancer-associated' inflammation has not been determined. Recently, a mouse genetic study revealed a critical role for the immune escape mediator indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in supporting inflammatory skin carcinogenesis. IDO is generally regarded as being immunosuppressive; however, there was no discernable difference in generalized inflammatory processes in IDO-null mice under conditions where tumor development was significantly suppressed, implicating IDO as key to establishing the pathogenic state of 'cancer-associated' inflammation. Here we review recent findings and their potential implications to understanding the relationship between immune escape and inflammation in cancer. Briefly, we propose that genetic pathways of immune escape in cancer are synonymous with pathways that define 'cancer-associated' inflammation and that these processes may be identical rather than distinct, as generally presumed, in terms of their genetic definition.

  8. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  9. Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    and to determine the association of genetic variants with prostate cancer aggressiveness. Tasks were also proposed in the reporting period (Year 1) to...data and to determine the association of genetic variants with prostate cancer aggressiveness, and summarize data and develop a manuscript. We also...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0453 TITLE: Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of

  10. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic.

  11. MOLECULAR GENETIC MARKERS AS PREDICTORS OF SUPERFICIAL BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Babayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A system of clinical and morphological criteria is currently used to determine the pattern of superficial bladder cancer (SBC. However, this system does not completely reflect the clinical potential of SBC and needs additional markers. The purpose of this study was to search for and evaluate molecular genetic disorders as additional markers of the course of SBC. The diagnostic panel included the deletion of the loci 3р14, 9р21, 9q34, 17р13 (ТР53, mutations of exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene, and hypermethylation of the promoter regions of the RASSF1, RARB, p16, p14, CDH1 genes. The study was made on 108 matched samples (tumor/peripheral blood obtained from patients with SBC. The deletions of the loci 3р14, 9р21 and anomalous methylation of the RARb and p16 genes are markers of the worse course of SBC while FGFR3 gene mutation is a marker of better prognosis. In the context of estimation of the relapsing potential of a primary tumor, the 9p21 locus deletion is a marker associated with recurrence within the first year after malignancy resection. The group of molecular genetic markers determined by the authors for poor prognosis in combination with classical clinical and morphological criteria will specify the pattern of the course of the disease and its prognosis.

  12. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. Objective We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. Methods We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. Results We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. Conclusions More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations. PMID:26938633

  13. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Légaré

    Full Text Available Knowledge translation (KT interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties.We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing.We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153 published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC and Consumers and Communication.We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%. Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1 and educational outreach (n = 1. Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15, communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7, personalized risk communication (n = 3 and mobile phone messaging (n = 1. Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective.More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations.

  14. National Swine Genetic Improvement: An overview of essential program components and organizational structure needed for success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; MABRY

    2005-01-01

    The swine industry in China is a thrivingand evolving industry that has shown phenome-nal growth over the past10years.Newand mod-ern swine farms have been started in locationsacross the country.Genetics has been importedfrom many different countries in an effort to up-grade the quality and efficiency of the traditionalbreeds of swine.But to insure long term successand viability in a worldwide competitive industrysuch as pork,there is need for a National SwineGenetic Improvement Program.This programneeds to ...

  15. Snake venom derived molecules in tumor angiogenesis and its application in cancer therapy; an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhananjaya, B L; Sivashankari, P R

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a complex mixture of biologically and pharmacologically active components, comprising hydrolytic enzymes, non-enzymatic proteins/peptides, and small amounts of organic and inorganic molecules. The venom components are known to vary with geographic location, season, species and age of the snakes. The role of the venom in the snake is not primarily for self-defense, but in prey immobilization and its subsequent digestion. Hence, several digestive enzymes in venoms, in addition to their hydrolytic activity have evolved to interfere in diverse physiological processes that help in the immobilization of prey/victim. As snake components are capable of modulating the physiological response of envenomated prey/victim, they show promise as potential pharmacological tools, as drug leads and in diagnostic applications. This, in a practical sense to be a reality has to be linked to the advances in toxinology that provide investigators with an understanding of the pharmacodynamics of toxins together with improved understanding of the etiology of many human diseases and identification of potential sites for therapeutic intervention. This review aims at providing an overview on snake venom toxins and their derivatives that have potential anti-angiogenic effects for cancer treatment. Some of the anti-angiogenic components of snake venom like Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs), Disintegrins, Phospholipases A2 (PLA2), CType Lectins (CLP), Vascular Apoptosis inducing Proteins (VAP) and L-Amino Acid Oxidases (LAAO) are discussed. This review aims at giving an overall view of these molecules and their mechanism of action as an effective antiangiogenic agent towards the treatment of cancer.

  16. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  17. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary.

  18. Workshop overview : Approaches to the assessment of the allergenic potential of food from genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladics, G.S.; Holsapple, M.P.; Astwood, J.D.; Kimber, I.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Helm, R.M.; Dong, W.

    2003-01-01

    There is a need to assess the safety of foods deriving from genetically modified (GM) crops, including the allergenic potential of novel gene products. Presently, there is no single in vitro or in vivo model that has been validated for the identification or characterization of potential food allerge

  19. Naturally occurring cancers in dogs: insights for translational genetics and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we briefly review the state of knowledge of human cancer genetics to elaborate on the need for different types of mammalian models, highlighting the strengths of the dog. Mouse models are unparalleled for their experimental tractability and rapid genetic manipulation but have some key limitations in the area of human relevance. Companion dog models are attractive, because they are genetically more similar to humans, share environmental exposures with their owners, suffer from the same diseases as humans, and receive a high level of health care. They are ideal for the study of chronic diseases, because they age five to eight times faster than humans and generally live to old age. In addition, each dog breed is on the order of 100-fold genetically simpler than the whole human or dog population. These traits make the dog ideal for the study of complex genetics of naturally occurring cancers. Here, we contrast the relative strengths of cancer genetics in humans and dogs. We propose that humans are most ideal for the study of somatic cancer genetics, whereas dogs are most ideal for germline genetics. That proposition is supported by comparison of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in human and canine cancer. One of the advantages of dog cancer GWASs is the ability to rapidly map complex traits, conduct fine mapping and identification of causative variation, and thus be in a position to move on to functional studies. We mention how these strengths of dog models will lead to rapid advances in translational medicine.

  20. Socioeconomic Status and Lung Cancer: Unraveling the Contribution of Genetic Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Steve; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Sison, Jennette D.; Hansen, Helen M.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Seldin, Michael F.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Wiencke, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the relationship between genetic ancestry, socioeconomic status (SES), and lung cancer among African Americans and Latinos. Methods. We evaluated SES and genetic ancestry in a Northern California lung cancer case–control study (1998–2003) of African Americans and Latinos. Lung cancer case and control participants were frequency matched on age, gender, and race/ethnicity. We assessed case–control differences in individual admixture proportions using the 2-sample t test and analysis of covariance. Logistic regression models examined associations among genetic ancestry, socioeconomic characteristics, and lung cancer. Results. Decreased Amerindian ancestry was associated with higher education among Latino control participants and greater African ancestry was associated with decreased education among African lung cancer case participants. Education was associated with lung cancer among both Latinos and African Americans, independent of smoking, ancestry, age, and gender. Genetic ancestry was not associated with lung cancer among African Americans. Conclusions. Findings suggest that socioeconomic factors may have a greater impact than genetic ancestry on lung cancer among African Americans. The genetic heterogeneity and recent dynamic migration and acculturation of Latinos complicate recruitment; thus, epidemiological analyses and findings should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:23948011

  1. Comparative genetics of longevity and cancer: insights from long-lived rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mammals have evolved a dramatic diversity of aging rates. Within the single order of Rodentia maximum lifespans differ from four years in mice to 32 years in naked mole rats. Cancer rates also differ significantly, from cancer-prone mice to virtually cancer-proof naked and blind mole rats. Recent progress in rodent comparative biology, in combination with the emergence of whole genome sequence information, has opened opportunities for the discovery of genetic factors controlling longevity and cancer susceptibility. PMID:24981598

  2. Genetic and Non-Genetic Cystic Kidney: An Overview, Morphological Classification and Diagnostic Value of Imaging Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mearadji

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital renal cystic disease comprises a mixed group of developmental anomalies with different etiology, histology and clinical presentation. Progress in molecular genetics as well as use of prenatal and postnatal ultrasound contributed in early diagnosis and differentiation of congenital cystic diseases of the kidney. "nIn a retrospective study clinical and imaging findings of 131 infants and children with cystic diseases of kidney were collected with reviewing of clinical and imaging findings."nThis patient material is categorized in two groups: inherited renal cystic diseases and non-inherited cystic kidney diseases."nThe group of inherited renal diseases includes 28 patients with an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Eleven infants and children suffered from an autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD. The remaining 6 of the 45 inherited cystic kidney diseases were 4 children with nephronophtisis and 2 with syndromal related cysts in kidney."nWithin the large group of patients with a non-inherited cystic kidney disease 79 infants and chil-dren were with one-sided non-functioning multicystic dysplastic kidney disease (MCKD. An ectopic ureter was found in 11 patients in this group and in 2 cases the ureter of the affected kidney was atretic. Lung hypoplasia was found in 2 cases with double-sided multicystic dysplastic kid-ney."nCystic nephroma (2 cases, renal cysts in malforma-tion syndromes (2 cases and the medullary sponge kidney (one case are the diagnosis of the remaining patients with a non-inherited renal cystic disease. "nSpecial attention should be payed to hepatic in-volvement in cases with ADPKD (hepatic cysts and ARPKD (liver fibrosis."nWithin the scope of this meeting the importance of early diagnostic and the incredible value of ultra-sound in prenatal and postnatal life will be empha-sized. The mode of inheritance in different genetic renal cystic diseases, complications and other addi

  3. Interactions Between Genetic Variants and Breast Cancer Risk Factors in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Travis, Ruth C.; Berg, Christine D.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dostal, Lucie; Fournier, Agnes; Hankinson, Susan E.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; McCarty, Catherine A.; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Riboli, Elio; Jose Sanchez, Maria; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Skeie, Guri; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstroem, Sara; Canzian, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, several genome-wide association studies have identified various genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Relatively little is known about the possible interactions between these loci and the established risk factors for breast cancer. Methods To assess interactions between

  4. Molecular genetic, diagnosis, prevention and gene therapy in prostatic cancer: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori Daloii MR

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nThe prostate is a small gland located below the bladder and upper part of the urethra. In developed countries prostate cancer is the second common cancer (after skin cancer, and also the second leading cause of cancer death (after lung cancer among men. The several studies have been shown prostate cancer familial aggregation. The main reason for this aggregation is inheritance included genes. The family history is an important risk factor for developing the disease. The genes AR, CYP17, SRD5A2, HSD3B1 and HSD3B2 are all intimately involved in androgen metabolism and cell proliferation in the prostate. Each shows intraspecific polymorphism and variation among racial-ethnic groups that is associated with the risk of prostate cancer. Some of genes expressed in the prostate are in association with the production of seminal fluid and also with prostate cancer. Epigenetic modifications, specifically DNA hypermethylation, are believed to play an important role in the down-regulation of genes important for protection against prostate cancer. In prostate cancer numerous molecular and genetic aberrations have been described. It is now well established that cancer cells exhibit a number of genetic defects in apoptotic pathways. In this review article, the most recent data in molecular genetic, prevention and especially gene therapy in prostate cancer are introduced.

  5. Editorial overview: Molecular and genetic bases of disease: the double life of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Cynthia T; Vijg, Jan

    2014-06-01

    This issue of Current Opinions focuses on the dual role of DNA in life and death. In ancient Roman religion and myth, Janus is the god who looks both to the past and to the future. He guides the beginnings of life, its progression from one condition to another, and he foresees distant events. The analogy to DNA could not be stronger. Closely interacting with the environment, our basic genetics provides the origin of life, guides the quality of health with age, predicts disease, and ultimately foresees our end. A shared and deep interest with the origin of life has long prompted our desire to define aging, and, ultimately, to understand whether it can be reversed. In this special issue, the authors collectively review concepts of normative aging, DNA instability, DNA repair, the genetic contribution of age and diet to disease, and how the basic molecular transactions of DNA guide both the transitions to life as well as the transitions to death.

  6. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  7. Cultivation, Genetic, Ethnopharmacology, Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Moringa oleifera Leaves: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Alessandro; Spada, Alberto; Battezzati, Alberto; Schiraldi, Alberto; Aristil, Junior; Bertoli, Simona

    2015-06-05

    Moringa oleifera is an interesting plant for its use in bioactive compounds. In this manuscript, we review studies concerning the cultivation and production of moringa along with genetic diversity among different accessions and populations. Different methods of propagation, establishment and cultivation are discussed. Moringa oleifera shows diversity in many characters and extensive morphological variability, which may provide a resource for its improvement. Great genetic variability is present in the natural and cultivated accessions, but no collection of cultivated and wild accessions currently exists. A germplasm bank encompassing the genetic variability present in Moringa is needed to perform breeding programmes and develop elite varieties adapted to local conditions. Alimentary and medicinal uses of moringa are reviewed, alongside the production of biodiesel. Finally, being that the leaves are the most used part of the plant, their contents in terms of bioactive compounds and their pharmacological properties are discussed. Many studies conducted on cell lines and animals seem concordant in their support for these properties. However, there are still too few studies on humans to recommend Moringa leaves as medication in the prevention or treatment of diseases. Therefore, further studies on humans are recommended.

  8. Genetic variants in telomere-maintenance genes and bladder cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyuan Gu; Yao Zhu; Dingwei Ye

    2013-01-01

    Telomere maintenance genes play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the telomere structure that protects chromosome ends, and telomere dysfunction may lead to tumorigenesis. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes has been confirmed. Cumulative evidence shows that the dif erence of telomere length and stability among the indi-vidual depends on the genetic variants of telomere maintenance genes. Genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes may af ect telomere length and stability, thus the increased cancer risk. This review intends to summarize the association of genetic variants in telomere maintenance genes with bladder cancer risk.

  9. An Overview: Treatment of Lung Cancer on Researcher Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javeria Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers is defined as the uncontrolled cell divisions. Cell does not grow maturely and destined to uncontrolled cell growth. When these cells of lungs grow uncontrolled it is called lung cancer. Nowadays mortality rate due to lung cancer is increasing day by day. Many treatment and diagnoses are now a day’s available to deal with lung cancer. Here we disused different method for diagnosis the common types of lung cancer Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer Limited Stage, Small Cell Lung Cancer - Extensive Stage, Lung Adenocarcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma,Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC, Metastatic lung cancer.

  10. Cost sharing and hereditary cancer risk: predictors of willingness-to-pay for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matro, Jennifer M; Ruth, Karen J; Wong, Yu-Ning; McCully, Katen C; Rybak, Christina M; Meropol, Neal J; Hall, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Increasing use of predictive genetic testing to gauge hereditary cancer risk has been paralleled by rising cost-sharing practices. Little is known about how demographic and psychosocial factors may influence individuals' willingness-to-pay for genetic testing. The Gastrointestinal Tumor Risk Assessment Program Registry includes individuals presenting for genetic risk assessment based on personal/family cancer history. Participants complete a baseline survey assessing cancer history and psychosocial items. Willingness-to-pay items include intention for: genetic testing only if paid by insurance; testing with self-pay; and amount willing-to-pay ($25-$2,000). Multivariable models examined predictors of willingness-to-pay out-of-pocket (versus only if paid by insurance) and willingness-to-pay a smaller versus larger sum (≤$200 vs. ≥$500). All statistical tests are two-sided (α = 0.05). Of 385 evaluable participants, a minority (42%) had a personal cancer history, while 56% had ≥1 first-degree relative with colorectal cancer. Overall, 21.3% were willing to have testing only if paid by insurance, and 78.7% were willing-to-pay. Predictors of willingness-to-pay were: 1) concern for positive result; 2) confidence to control cancer risk; 3) fewer perceived barriers to colorectal cancer screening; 4) benefit of testing to guide screening (all p willingness-to-pay for genetic services is increasingly important as testing is integrated into routine cancer care.

  11. A genomic overview of short genetic variations in a basal chordate, Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satou Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Ciona intestinalis genome contains many allelic polymorphisms, there is only limited data analyzed systematically. Establishing a dense map of genetic variations in C. intestinalis is necessary not only for linkage analysis, but also for other experimental biology including molecular developmental and evolutionary studies, because animals from natural populations are typically used for experiments. Results Here, we identified over three million candidate short genomic variations within a 110 Mb euchromatin region among five C. intestinalis individuals. The average nucleotide diversity was approximately 1.1%. Genetic variations were found at a similar density in intergenic and gene regions. Non-synonymous and nonsense nucleotide substitutions were found in 12,493 and 1,214 genes accounting for 81.9% and 8.0% of the entire gene set, respectively, and over 60% of genes in the single animal encode non-identical proteins between maternal and paternal alleles. Conclusions Our results provide a framework for studying evolution of the animal genome, as well as a useful resource for a wide range of C. intestinalis researchers.

  12. Genetic characteristics of the non-clear cell renal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Mikhaylenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cancer (RC is one of the most frequent diseases in oncological urology; the most common form of RC is the clear cell carcinoma. However, percentage of less-studied non-clear cell RC (nccRC reaches up to 25 % of cases suggesting further studying, improvement of diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. The key events of carcinogenesis are genetic alterations including chromosomal aberrations and point mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This review describes cytogenetic aberrations in the context of nccRC diversity according to the current ISUP classification. Translocation variants of nccRC (MiT-RC were characterized separately as particular cases of the chromosome rearrangements involving MiT gene family (TFE3, TFEB, MITF. In addition, the main nccRC hereditary forms caused by germinal mutations in the genes FLCN, FH, and MET, as well as recent studies of sporadic tumors with using the next generation sequencing techniques were reviewed. These experiments were designed to search for somatic mutations throughout the tumor genome or exom and revealed the different mutational profiles of I/II papillary RC subtypes, chromophobe carcinoma versus oncocytoma. The review may be informative for oncologists, urologists, geneticists and specialists in related sciences. 

  13. GENETIC RISK MARKERS FOR SUPERFICIAL AND INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Pavlov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal possible associations of the polymorphic variants of the cytochrome P450 and enzymes glutathione-S-transferase genes with the risk for bladder cancer (BC, the authors analyzed the frequency of genotypes and alleles at the polymorphic loci of the CYP1A1 (A2454G, GSTM1 (del, and GSTP1 (A313G genes in 208 patients diagnosed as having BC (104 patients with invasive BC and 104 with superficial BC and in 367 patients without identified oncopathology. The *1A*2C (OR = 3.42 and *2C*2С (OR = 6.98 genotypes, *2C (OR = 3.73 allele of the CYP1A1 gene and the GG (OR = 2.53 genotype of the GSTP1 gene were ascertained to be genetic markers for a risk for BC. The presence of the *2C (OR = 1.69 allele of the CYP1A1 gene, the G (OR = 2.40 allele and the AG genotype (OR = 2.40 of the GSTP1 gene was associated with the invasive forms of BC. There were no substantial differences in the distribution of the frequency of genotypes of the GSTM1 gene between the samples of patients and healthy individuals.

  14. Unraveling of the major genetic defects in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G.L. Hermans (Karin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn developed countries, prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and a major cause of cancer-related death (1). In The Netherlands 93 new cases per 100,000 men were detected in 2003 (The Netherlands Cancer Registry). Prostate cancer incidence varies between different ethnic g

  15. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0223 TITLE: Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion...COVERED 1Aug2014 - 31Jul2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0223...same patient will provide substantial insight into the determinants of subtype specificity. Preliminary data on one such case demonstrates a

  16. Genetic Variations in Mitochondria and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness and Progression in Caucasian and African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration : common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics...PubMed PMID: 22138376. 3. Khandrika L, Kumar B, Koul S, Maroni P, Koul HK. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer. Cancer letters. 2009;282(2):125- 36 . doi...PMID: 23851045. 34. Melkonian SC, Wang X, Gu J, Matin SF , Tannir NM, Wood CG, et al. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood leukocytes and

  17. Effects of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy for early breast cancer on recurrence and 15-year survival : an overview of the randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abe, O; Abe, R; Enomoto, K; Kikuchi, K; Koyama, H; Masuda, H; Nomura, Y; Sakai, K; Sugimachi, K; Tominaga, T; Uchino, J; Yoshida, M; Haybittle, JL; Davies, C; Harvey, VJ; Holdaway, TM; Kay, RG; Mason, BH; Forbes, JF; Wilcken, N; Gnant, M; Jakesz, R; Ploner, M; Yosef, HMA; Focan, C; Lobelle, JP; Peek, U; Oates, GD; Powell, J; Durand, M; Mauriac, L; Di Leo, A; Dolci, S; Piccart, MJ; Masood, MB; Parker, D; Price, JJ; Hupperets, PSGJ; Jackson, S; Ragaz, J; Berry, D; Broadwater, G; Cirrincione, C; Muss, H; Norton, L; Weiss, RB; Abu-Zahra, HT; Portnoj, SM; Baum, M; Cuzick, J; Houghton, J; Riley, D; Gordon, NH; Davis, HL; Beatrice, A; Mihura, J; Naja, A; Lehingue, Y; Romestaing, P; Dubois, JB; Delozier, T; Mace-Lesec'h, J; Rambert, P; Andrysek, O; Barkmanova, J; Owen, [No Value; Meier, P; Howell, A; Ribeiro, GC; Swindell, R; Alison, R; Boreham, J; Clarke, M; Collins, R; Darby, S; Davies, C; Elphinstone, P; Evans, [No Value; Godwin, J; Gray, R; Harwood, C; Hicks, C; James, S; MacKinnon, E; McGale, P; McHugh, T; Mead, G; Peto, R; Wang, Y; Albano, J; de Oliveira, CF; Gervasio, H; Gordilho, J; Johansen, H; Mouridsen, HT; Gelman, RS; Harris, [No Value; Henderson, IC; Shapiro, CL; Andersen, KW; Axelsson, CK; Blichert-Toft, M; Moller, S; Mouridsen, HT; Overgaard, J; Overgaard, M; Rose, C; Cartensen, B; Palshof, T; Trampisch, HJ; Dalesio, O; de Vries, EGE; Rodenhuis, S; van Tinteren, H; Comis, RL; Davidson, NE; Gray, R; Robert, N; Sledge, G; Tormey, DC; Wood, W; Cameron, D; Chetty, U; Forrest, P; Jack, W; Rossbach, J; Klijn, JGM; Treurniet-Donker, AD; van Putten, WLJ; Costa, A; Veronesi, U; Bartelink, H; Duchateau, L; Legrand, C; Sylvester, R; van der Hage, JA; van de Velde, CJH; Cunningham, MP; Catalano, R; Creech, RH; Bonneterre, J; Fargeot, P; Fumoleau, P; Kerbrat, P; Namer, M; Jonat, W; Kaufmann, M; Schumacher, M; von Minckwitz, G; Bastert, G; Rauschecker, H; Sauer, R; Sauerbrei, W; Schauer, A; Schumacher, M; de Schryver, A; Vakaet, L; Belfiglio, M; Nicolucci, A; Pellegrini, F; Sacco, M; Valentini, M; McArdle, CS; Smith, DC; Galligioni, E; Boccardo, F; Rubagotti, A; Dent, DM; Gudgeon, CA; Hacking, A; Erazo, A; Medina, JY; Izuo, M; Morishita, Y; Takei, H; Fentiman, IS; Hayward, JL; Rubens, RD; Skilton, D; Graeff, H; Janicke, F; Meisner, C; Scheurlen, H; Kaufmann, M; von Fournier, D; Dafni, U; Fountzilas, G; Klefstrom, P; Blomqvist, C; Saarto, T; Margreiter, R; Asselain, B; Salmon, RJ; Vilcoq, [No Value; Arriagada, R; Hill, C; Laplanche, A; Le, MG; Spielmann, M; Bruzzi, P; Montanaro, E; Rosso, R; Sertoli, MR; Venturini, M; Amadori, D; Benraadt, J; Kooi, M; van de Velde, AO; van Dongen, JA; Vermorken, JB; Castiglione, M; Cavalli, F; Coates, A; Collins, J; Forbes, J; Gelber, RD; Goldhirsch, A; Lindtner, J; Price, KN; Rudenstam, CM; Senn, HJ; Bliss, JM; Chilvers, CED; Coombes, RC; Hall, E; Marty, M; Borovik, R; Brufman, G; Hayat, H; Robinson, E; Wigler, N; Bonadonna, G; Camerini, T; De Palo, G; Del Vecchio, M; Formelli, F; Valagussa, P; Martoni, A; Pannuti, F; Cocconi, G; Colozza, A; Camisa, R; Aogi, K; Takashima, S; Abe, O; Ikeda, T; Inokuchi, K; Kikuchi, K; Sawa, K; Sonoo, H; Korzeniowski, S; Skolyszewski, J; Ogawa, M; Yamashita, J; Bonte, J; Christiaens, R; Paridaens, R; Van den Boegart, W; Martin, P; Romain, S; Hakes, T; Hudis, CA; Norton, L; Wittes, R; Giokas, G; Kondylis, D; Lissaios, B; de la Huerta, R; Sainz, MG; Altemus, R; Cowan, K; Danforth, D; Lichter, A; Lippman, M; O'Shaughnessy, J; Pierce, LJ; Steinberg, S; Venzon, D; Zujewski, J; Paradiso, A; De Lena, M; Schittulli, F; Myles, JD; Pater, JL; Pritchard, KI; Nomura, Y; Anderson, S; Bass, G; Brown, A; Bryant, J; Costantino, J; Dignam, J; Fisher, B; Redmond, C; Wieand, S; Wolmark, N; Baum, M; Jackson, IM; Palmer, MK; Ingle, JN; Suman, VJ; Bengtsson, NO; Jonsson, H; Larsson, LG; Lythgoe, JP; Swindell, R; Kissin, M; Erikstein, B; Hannisdal, E; Jacobsen, AB; Varhaug, JE; Erikstein, B; Gundersen, S; Hauer-Jensen, M; Host, H; Jacobsen, AB; Nissen-Meyer, R; Blamey, RW; Mitchell, AK; Morgan, DAL; Robertson, JFR; Di Palma, M; Mathe, G; Misset, JL; Clark, RM; Levine, M; Morimoto, K; Sawa, K; Takatsuka, Y; Crossley, E; Harris, A; Talbot, D; Taylor, M; Cocconi, G; di Blasio, B; Ivanov, [No Value; Semiglazov, [No Value; Brockschmidt, J; Cooper, MR; Ueo, H; Falkson, CI; A'Hern, R; Ashley, S; Powles, TJ; Smith, IE; Yarnold, [No Value; Gazet, JC; Cocoran, N; Deshpande, N; di Martino, L; Douglas, P; Hacking, A; Host, H; Lindtner, A; Notter, G; Bryant, AJS; Ewing, GH; Firth, LA; Krushen-Kosloski, JL; Nissen-Meyer, R; Foster, L; George, WD; Stewart, HJ; Stroner, P; Malmstrom, P; Moller, TR; Ryden, S; Tengrup, [No Value; Tennvall-Nittby, L; Carstenssen, J; Dufmats, M; Hatschek, T; Nordenskjold, B; Soderberg, M; Carpenter, JT; Albain, K; Crowley, J; Green, S; Martino, S; Osborne, CK; Ravdin, PM; Glas, U; Johansson, U; Rutqvist, LE; Singnomklao, T; Wallgren, A; Castiglione, M; Goldhirsch, A; Maibach, R; Senn, HJ; Thurlimann, B; Brenner, H; Hercbergs, A; Yoshimoto, M; DeBoer, G; Paterson, AHG; Pritchard, KI; Meakin, JW; Panzarella, T; Pritchard, KI; Shan, Y; Shao, YF; Wang, [No Value; Zhao, DB; Boreham, J; Chen, ZM; Pan, HC; Peto, R; Bahi, J; Reid, M; Spittle, M; Deutsch, GP; Senanayake, F; Kwong, DLW; Bianco, AR; Carlomagno, C; De Laurentiis, M; De Placido, S; Buzdar, AU; Smith, T; Bergh, J; Holmberg, L; Liljegren, G; Nilsson, J; Seifert, M; Sevelda, P; Zielinsky, CC; Buchanan, RB; Cross, M; Royle, GT; Dunn, JA; Hills, RK; Lee, M; Morrison, JM; Spooner, D; Litton, A; Chlebowski, RT; Caffier, H

    2005-01-01

    Background Quinquennial overviews (1985-2000) of the randomised trials in early breast cancer have assessed the 5-year and 10-year effects of various systemic adjuvant therapies on breast cancer recurrence and survival. Here, we report the 10-year and 15-year effects. Methods Collaborative meta-anal

  18. Men's values-based factors on prostate cancer risk genetic testing: A telephone survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuelin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a definitive genetic test for Hereditary Prostate Cancer (HPC is not yet available, future HPC risk testing may become available. Past survey data have shown high interest in HPC testing, but without an in-depth analysis of its underlying rationale to those considering it. Methods Telephone computer-assisted interviews of 400 men were conducted in a large metropolitan East-coast city, with subsequent development of psychometric scales and their correlation with intention to receive testing. Results Approximately 82% of men interviewed expressed that they "probably" or "definitely" would get genetic testing for prostate cancer risk if offered now. Factor analysis revealed four distinct, meaningful factors for intention to receive genetic testing for prostate cancer risk. These factors reflected attitudes toward testing and were labeled "motivation to get testing," "consequences and actions after knowing the test result," "psychological distress," and "beliefs of favorable outcomes if tested" (α = 0.89, 0.73, 0.73, and 0.60, respectively. These factors accounted for 70% of the total variability. The domains of motivation (directly, consequences (inversely, distress (inversely, and positive expectations (directly all correlated with intention to receive genetic testing (p Conclusions Men have strong attitudes favoring genetic testing for prostate cancer risk. The factors most associated with testing intention include those noted in past cancer genetics studies, and also highlights the relevance in considering one's motivation and perception of positive outcomes in genetic decision-making.

  19. Effectiveness of Chinese herbal medicine for cancer palliative care: overview of systematic reviews with meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Vincent C H; Wu, Xinyin; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Ho, Robin S T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2015-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) are often used in managing cancer related symptoms but their effectiveness and safety is controversial. We conducted this overview of meta-analyses to summarize evidence on CHM for cancer palliative care. We included systematic reviews (SRs) with meta-analyses of CHM clinical trials on patients diagnosed with any type of cancer. Methodological quality of included meta-analyses was assessed with the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) Instrument. Fifty-one SRs with meta-analyses were included. They covered patients with lung (20 SRs), gastric (8 SRs), colorectal (6 SRs), liver (6 SRs), breast (2 SRs), cervical (1 SR), esophageal (1 SR), and nasopharyngeal (1 SR) cancers. Six SRs summarized evidence on various types of cancer. Methodological quality of included meta-analyses was not satisfactory. Overall, favorable therapeutic effects in improving quality of life among cancer patients have been reported. Conflicting evidence exists for the effectiveness of CHM in prolonging survival and in reducing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy related toxicities. No serious adverse effects were reported in all included studies. Evidence indicated that CHM could be considered as an option for improving quality of life among patients receiving palliative care. It is unclear if CHM may increase survival, or reduce therapy related toxicities.

  20. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  1. Identification of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,47...

  2. Prediction of individual genetic risk to prostate cancer using a polygenic score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szulkin, Robert; Whitington, Thomas; Eklund, Martin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polygenic risk scores comprising established susceptibility variants have shown to be informative classifiers for several complex diseases including prostate cancer. For prostate cancer it is unknown if inclusion of genetic markers that have so far not been associated with prostate ca...

  3. Potential role of genetic markers in the management of kidney cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junker, K.; Ficarra, V.; Kwon, E.D.; Leibovich, B.C.; Thompson, R.H.; Oosterwijk, E.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Kidney cancer is not a single entity but comprises a number of different types of cancer that occur in the kidney including renal cell tumours as the most common type. Four major renal cell tumour subtypes can be distinguished based on morphologic and genetic characteristics. To individuali

  4. Using functional genetics to identify components of cancer relevant signaling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heynen, G.J.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical introduction of the so-called ‘targeted therapies’ some 15 years ago has started a new era in the treatment of cancer patients. These drugs hugely increase the possibilities to treat patients based on the genetic mutations of their cancer and therefore hold the promise of ‘personalized

  5. Big screens with small RNAs : loss of function genetic screens to identify novel cancer genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullenders, J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis described the construction and screening of one of the first large scale RNAi libraries for use in human cells. Functional genetic screens with this library have led to the identification of novel cancer genes. These cancer genes function in several pathways including the p53 tumor suppr

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  7. Genetically lowered microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity and tobacco-related cancer in 47,000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Julie; Dahl, Morten; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    Two functional polymorphisms of the microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) gene (EPHX1), Tyr113His (rs1051740) and His139Arg (rs2234922), have variably been found to influence susceptibility to various cancer forms. We tested whether genetically lowered mEH activity affects risk of developing cancer...

  8. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  9. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Linetta); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is l

  10. Cytogenetics and genetics of human cancer: methods and accomplishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Avery A; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia M

    2010-12-01

    Cytogenetic and related changes in human cancer constitute part of a constantly developing and enlarging continuum of known genetic alterations associated with cancer development and biology. The cytogenetic component of this continuum has fulfilled much of its pioneering role and now constitutes a small but dynamic segment of the vast literature on cancer genetics, in which it has played an important if not initiating role. The goals of this article are (a) to address historical and methodological aspects of cancer cytogenetics; (b) to present information on diagnostic translocations in leukemias, lymphomas, bone and soft tissue tumors, and carcinomas; (c) to connect some of these chromosomal aberrations with their molecular equivalents; and (d) to describe anomalies in some solid tumors indicative of the complexity of the genomic alterations in cancer. We also look at a few of the more recent genomic developments in cancer and offer an opinion as to what all these findings add up to.

  11. Interplay between viral infections and genetic alterations in liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hainaut

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    With over 500 000 annual deaths, Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and a leading cause of death in developing countries where about 80% of the cases arise. Risk factors include chronic hepatitis infections (hepatitis B, (HBV and hepatitis C (HCV viruses, alcohol, dietary contaminants such as falatoxins The incidence shows important geographic variations, accor In southern Asia, HCC development is mainly related to the endemic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV infection, cases with hot spot mutation in codon 249 (249ser of TP53 tumor suppressor gene were also described and associated to a low-intermediate exposure rate to Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. Presence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection was also detected in 12 - 17% of HCC cases. Despite the increasing number of studies identifying viral/host interactions in viro-induced HCC or describing potential pathways for hepatocarcinogenesis, precise mechanism has not been identified so far. HBV was demonstrated to enhance hepatocarcinogenesis by different manners; HBV chronic infection is associated to active hepatitis (CAH and cirrhosis which are hepatic complications considered as early stage for HCC development. These complications mobilise the host immune response, the resulting inflammation initiates and selects the first genetic alteration at the origin of loss of cell control. Moreover, HBV can also promote carcinogenesis through genetic instability generated by its common integration in host DNA. HBV proteins, as HBx, was proven to interact with a variety of targets in the host cell including protein or host transcription factor such as, in particular, the p53 protein or the transcription factor E4F, which is implicated in growth, differenciation and senescence. Specific HBV mutations or distinct HBV genotypes are associated to higher risks factors for HCC or hepatic complications leading

  12. Susceptibility genetic variants associated with early-onset colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, María Dolores; López-Dóriga, Adriana; Bujanda, Luis; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Muñoz, Jenifer; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Jover, Rodrigo; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cosme, Angel; Enríquez-Navascués, José María; Moreno, Victor; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Western countries. Hereditary forms only correspond to 5% of CRC burden. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified common low-penetrant CRC genetic susceptibility loci. Early-onset CRC (CRC65 years old) (n = 1264). CRC susceptibility variants at 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 18q21 (rs4939827), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253) were genotyped in all DNA samples. A genotype-phenotype correlation with clinical and pathological characteristics in both groups was performed. Risk allele carriers for rs3802842 [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.05, P = 0.0096, dominant model) and rs4779584 (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.02-1.9, P = 0.0396, dominant model) were more frequent in the CRC<50 group, whereas homozygotes for rs10795668 risk allele were also more frequent in the early-onset CRC (P = 0.02, codominant model). Regarding early-onset cases, 14q22 (rs4444235), 11q23 (rs3802842) and 20p12 (rs961253) variants were more associated with family history of CRC or tumors of the Lynch syndrome spectrum excluding CRC. In our entire cohort, sum of risk alleles was significantly higher in patients with a CRC family history (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.06-1.85, P = 0.01). In conclusion, variants at 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842) and 15q13.3 (rs4779584) may have a predominant role in predisposition to early-onset CRC. Association of CRC susceptibility variants with some patient's familiar and personal features could be relevant for screening and surveillance strategies in this high-risk group and it should be explored in further studies.

  13. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  14. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  15. Common genetic variability in ESR1 and EGF in relation to endometrial cancer risk and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Einarsdóttir, K; Darabi, H; Czene, K.; Li, Y; Low, Y.L.; Y. Q. Li; Bonnard, C.; Wedrén, S.; Liu, E. T.; Hall, P; Liu, J; Humphreys, K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated common genetic variation in the entire ESR1 and EGF genes in relation to endometrial cancer risk, myometrial invasion and endometrial cancer survival. We genotyped a dense set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both genes and selected haplotype tagging SNPs (tagSNPs). The tagSNPs were genotyped in 713 Swedish endometrial cancer cases and 1567 population controls and the results incorporated into logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. We found five a...

  16. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  17. An Overview: Treatment of Lung Cancer on Researcher Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Javeria Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cancers is defined as the uncontrolled cell divisions. Cell does not grow maturely and destined to uncontrolled cell growth. When these cells of lungs grow uncontrolled it is called lung cancer. Nowadays mortality rate due to lung cancer is increasing day by day. Many treatment and diagnoses are now a day’s available to deal with lung cancer. Here we disused different method for diagnosis the common types of lung cancer Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cance...

  18. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Julian Bujarski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings along with nonreplicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (i How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (ii What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (iii Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (iv Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (v What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  19. Implementing rapid, robust, cost-effective, patient-centred, routine genetic testing in ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Angela; Riddell, Daniel; Seal, Sheila; Talukdar, Sabrina; Mahamdallie, Shazia; Ruark, Elise; Cloke, Victoria; Slade, Ingrid; Kemp, Zoe; Gore, Martin; Strydom, Ann; Banerjee, Susana; Hanson, Helen; Rahman, Nazneen

    2016-07-13

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made genetic testing fast and affordable, but limitations of testing processes are impeding realisation of patient benefits. Ovarian cancer exemplifies the potential value of genetic testing and the shortcomings of current pathways to access testing. Approximately 15% of ovarian cancer patients have a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation which has substantial implications for their personal management and that of their relatives. Unfortunately, in most countries, routine implementation of BRCA testing for ovarian cancer patients has been inconsistent and largely unsuccessful. We developed a rapid, robust, mainstream genetic testing pathway in which testing is undertaken by the trained cancer team with cascade testing to relatives performed by the genetics team. 207 women with ovarian cancer were offered testing through the mainstream pathway. All accepted. 33 (16%) had a BRCA mutation. The result informed management of 79% (121/154) women with active disease. Patient and clinician feedback was very positive. The pathway offers a 4-fold reduction in time and 13-fold reduction in resource requirement compared to the conventional testing pathway. The mainstream genetic testing pathway we present is effective, efficient and patient-centred. It can deliver rapid, robust, large-scale, cost-effective genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 and may serve as an exemplar for other genes and other diseases.

  20. Genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: responsibility and choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agincourt-Canning, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer has become an important part of clinical genetics practice. Although considerable work has focused on the psychological impact of this technology, there has been little research into the moral implications of genetic information on hereditary cancer families. In this article, the author examines moral issues related to individuals' decisions to seek or decline testing. In-depth interviews with 53 participants make up the core of the research. Analysis of participants' accounts illustrates how the decision to be tested (or not) interconnects with moral agency and aspects of self (embodied, familial-relational, and civic self). The findings form the foundation for inquiry into conceptualization of moral responsibility, autonomy, and choice. They also provide insight that might assist clinicians to understand more fully the needs and responses of those who seek genetic testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

  1. Genetic basis of kidney cancer: role of genomics for the development of disease-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W Marston

    2012-11-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease; it is made up of a number of different types of cancer, including clear cell, type 1 papillary, type 2 papillary, chromophobe, TFE3, TFEB, and oncocytoma. Sporadic, nonfamilial kidney cancer includes clear cell kidney cancer (75%), type 1 papillary kidney cancer (10%), papillary type 2 kidney cancer (including collecting duct and medullary RCC) (5%), the microphalmia-associated transcription (MiT) family translocation kidney cancers (TFE3, TFEB, and MITF), chromophobe kidney cancer (5%), and oncocytoma (5%). Each has a distinct histology, a different clinical course, responds differently to therapy, and is caused by mutation in a different gene. Genomic studies identifying the genes for kidney cancer, including the VHL, MET, FLCN, fumarate hydratase, succinate dehydrogenase, TSC1, TSC2, and TFE3 genes, have significantly altered the ways in which patients with kidney cancer are managed. While seven FDA-approved agents that target the VHL pathway have been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced kidney cancer, further genomic studies, such as whole genome sequencing, gene expression patterns, and gene copy number, will be required to gain a complete understanding of the genetic basis of kidney cancer and of the kidney cancer gene pathways and, most importantly, to provide the foundation for the development of effective forms of therapy for patients with this disease.

  2. A genetic study and meta-analysis of the genetic predisposition of prostate cancer in a Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan-Chao; Ren, Guoping; Yu, Yongwei; Wu, Yudong; Wu, Ji; Xue, Yao; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yanling; Xu, Xingxing; Li, Jie; He, Weiyang; Benlloch, Sara; Ross-Adams, Helen; Chen, Li; Li, Jucong; Hong, Yingqia; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Cui, Xingang; Hou, Jianguo; Guo, Jianming; Xu, Lei; Yin, Changjun; Zhou, Yuanping; Neal, David E.; Oliver, Tim; Cao, Guangwen; Zhang, Zhengdong; Easton, Douglas F.; Chelala, Claude; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Zhang, Hongwei; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer predisposition has been extensively investigated in European populations, but there have been few studies of other ethnic groups. To investigate prostate cancer susceptibility in the under-investigated Chinese population, we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis on a cohort of Chinese cases and controls and then meta-analysis with data from the existing Chinese prostate cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genotyping 211,155 SNPs in 495 cases and 640 controls of Chinese ancestry identified several new suggestive Chinese prostate cancer predisposition loci. However, none of them reached genome-wide significance level either by meta-analysis or replication study. The meta-analysis with the Chinese GWAS data revealed that four 8q24 loci are the main contributors to Chinese prostate cancer risk and the risk alleles from three of them exist at much higher frequencies in Chinese than European populations. We also found that several predisposition loci reported in Western populations have different effect on Chinese men. Therefore, this first extensive single-nucleotide polymorphism study of Chinese prostate cancer in comparison with European population indicates that four loci on 8q24 contribute to a great risk of prostate cancer in a considerable large proportion of Chinese men. Based on those four loci, the top 10% of the population have six- or two-fold prostate cancer risk compared with men of the bottom 10% or median risk respectively, which may facilitate the design of prostate cancer genetic risk screening and prevention in Chinese men. These findings also provide additional insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer. PMID:26881390

  3. Interest and attitudes of patients, cancer physicians, medical students and cancer researchers towards a spectrum of genetic tests relevant to breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoi, Natalie; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Khin, Lay-Wai; Wong, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals towards breast cancer genetic tests that are becoming increasingly available is unexplored in Asians. We surveyed the interest and attitudes of 200 breast cancer patients, 67 cancer physicians, 485 medical students and cancer researchers towards three genetic tests, BRCA1/2 mutation, CYP2D6 genotype and Oncotype DX testing, using hypothetical scenarios. Approximately 60% of patients expressed initial interest in each genetic test, although the majority reversed their decisions once test limitations were conveyed, with <15% maintaining interest in each test. Cancer physicians were most likely to recommend BRCA1/2 mutation testing (73%) and least likely to recommend CYP2D6 genotyping (12%), while patients were more likely to choose Oncotype DX testing (28%) over CYP2D6 (21%) and BRCA1/2 testing (15%). Cost concerns, low educational level and lack of prior awareness of genetic testing were the main barriers against breast cancer genetic testing among Asian patients.

  4. The importance of p53 pathway genetics in inherited and somatic cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Wang, Xuting; Wallace, Marsha D; Grawenda, Anna M; Zhang, Ping; Hewitt, Juliet; Zeron-Medina, Jorge; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Tomlinson, Ian P; Goding, Colin R; Cygan, Kamil J; Fairbrother, William G; Thomas, Laurent F; Sætrom, Pål; Gemignani, Federica; Landi, Stefano; Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Bell, Douglas A; Bond, Gareth L

    2016-04-01

    Decades of research have shown that mutations in the p53 stress response pathway affect the incidence of diverse cancers more than mutations in other pathways. However, most evidence is limited to somatic mutations and rare inherited mutations. Using newly abundant genomic data, we demonstrate that commonly inherited genetic variants in the p53 pathway also affect the incidence of a broad range of cancers more than variants in other pathways. The cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the p53 pathway have strikingly similar genetic characteristics to well-studied p53 pathway cancer-causing somatic mutations. Our results enable insights into p53-mediated tumour suppression in humans and into p53 pathway-based cancer surveillance and treatment strategies.

  5. Telomere length, genetic variants and gastric cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangbo; Zhu, Xun; Xie, Cuiwei; Dai, Ningbin; Gu, Yayun; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Yong; Pan, Feng; Ren, Chuanli; Ji, Yong; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Jiaping; Yi, Honggang; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Jin, Guangfu

    2015-09-01

    Telomeres maintain chromosomal stability and integrity and are crucial in carcinogenesis. Telomere length is implicated in multiple cancer risk, but the results are conflicting. Genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci associated with telomere length in Caucasians. However, the roles of telomere length and related variants on gastric cancer development are largely unknown. We conducted a case-control study including 1136 gastric cancer cases and 1012 controls to evaluate the associations between telomere length, eight telomere length-related variants identified in Caucasians and gastric cancer risk in Chinese population. We observed an obvious U-shaped association between telomere length and gastric cancer risk (P telomere length (P telomeres (P = 0.047). However, we did not observe significant associations between these genetic variants and gastric cancer risk for both single-variant and WGS analyses. These findings suggest that either short or extreme long telomeres may be risk factor for gastric cancer. Genetic variants identified in Caucasians may also contribute to the variation of telomere length in Chinese but seems not to gastric cancer susceptibility.

  6. Combined androgen blockade in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer--an overview. The Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1997-01-01

    The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed.......The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed....

  7. Synchronous Onset of Breast and Pancreatic Cancers: Results of Germline and Somatic Genetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synchronous cancers have occasionally been detected at initial diagnosis among patients with breast and ovarian cancer. However, simultaneous coexistence and diagnosis of breast and pancreas cancer has not previously been reported. Case Report: Paternal transmission of a germline BRCA2 mutation to a patient who was diagnosed at age 40 with locally advanced breast and pancreas cancer is presented. Somatic genomic analysis of both cancers with next-generation DNA sequencing confirmed the germline result and reported a variety of variants of unknown significance alterations, of which two were present in both the breast and pancreas cancers. Discussion: The possibility that genomic alterations could have been responsible for modulating the phenotypic or clinical expression of this rare presentation is considered. The authors call attention to the practice of privatizing the clinicogenetic information gained from genetic testing and call for health policy that will facilitate sharing in order to advance the outcomes of patients diagnosed with hereditary cancers.

  8. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage...... candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and....../or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating...

  9. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  10. Translating genomics: cancer genetics, public health and the making of the (de)molecularised body in Cuba and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how cancer genetics has emerged as a focus for research and healthcare in Cuba and Brazil. Drawing on ethnographic research undertaken in community genetics clinics and cancer genetics services, the article examines how the knowledge and technologies associated with this novel area of healthcare are translated and put to work by researchers, health professionals, patients and their families in these two contexts. It illuminates the comparative similarities and differences in how cancer genetics is emerging in relation to transnational research priorities, the history and contemporary politics of public health and embodied vulnerability to cancer that reconfigures the scope and meaning of genomics as "personalised" medicine.

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer include pain or swelling in the abdomen. Ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer may not ... swelling, or a feeling of pressure in the abdomen or pelvis. Vaginal bleeding that is heavy or ...

  12. Overview of the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (Past Initiative)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project is a multistudy effort to investigate whether environmental factors are responsible for breast cancer in Suffolk and Nassau counties, NY, as well as in Schoharie County, NY, and Tolland County, CT.

  13. Dietary Screener Questionnaire in the National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement 2010: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement (CCS) is administered every five years and focuses on knowledge, attitudes, and practices in cancer-related health behaviors, screening, and risk assessment.

  14. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    eg, internal medicine, obstetric / gynecology practices), or community oncology re- sources based on the setting from which they were referred...numerous arenas of genetic counseling, ranging from male infertility [13] to pregnant women’s satisfaction with prenatal genetic counseling [14]. Recent...Brannigan RE. Male infertility : perceptions, utility, and satisfaction with genetic counseling services. Fertil Steril 2003;80:52. [14] Tercyak KP, Johnson

  15. The genetics and biology of KRAS in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M.K.Westcott; Minh D.To

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of KRAS is a common oncogenic event in lung cancer and other epithelial cancer types.Efforts to develop therapies that counteract the oncogenic effects of mutant KRAS have been largely unsuccessful,and cancers driven by mutant KRAS remain among the most refractory to available treatments.Studies undertaken over the past decades have produced a wealth of information regarding the clinical relevance of KRAS mutations in lung cancer.Mutant Kras-driven mouse models of cancer,together with cellular and molecular studies,have provided a deeper appreciation for the complex functions of KRAS in tumorigenesis.However,a much more thorough understanding of these complexities is needed before clinically effective therapies targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers can be achieved.

  16. Novel genetic loci associated with prostate cancer in the Japanese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Sun; Jiaoti Huang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Takata et al.1 recently reported in Nature Genetics that they have identified five nove associated with prostate cancer in the Japanese population.Using most updated Illumina Quad BeadChip to genotype 3001 prostate cancer patients and 5415 control subjects,they identified263 single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)showing significant association with prostate cancer in Japan.Further analysis indicated that 80 SNPs reside in the previously known regions,and five of them are novel susceptibility loci associated with the prostate cancer.

  17. Genetically altered fields in head and neck cancer and second field tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Sabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of field cancerization has been ever changing since its first description by Slaughter et al in 1953.Field cancerization explains the mechanisms by which second primary tumors (SPTs develop. SPTs are the tumors, which develop in the oral cavity in succession to the primary malignant tumors, which might vary in duration ranging from few months to years. Conceivably, a population of daughter cells with early genetic changes (without histopathology remains in the organ, demonstrating the concept of field cancerization. This review explains the concept of field cancerization and various field theories along with molecular basis of field formation.

  18. Genetically altered fields in head and neck cancer and second field tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Robin; Mahendra, Ashish; Moon, Ninad J; Gupta, Parul; Jain, Ashish; Gupta, Shivangi

    2014-07-01

    The concept of field cancerization has been ever changing since its first description by Slaughter et al in 1953. Field cancerization explains the mechanisms by which second primary tumors (SPTs) develop. SPTs are the tumors, which develop in the oral cavity in succession to the primary malignant tumors, which might vary in duration ranging from few months to years. Conceivably, a population of daughter cells with early genetic changes (without histopathology) remains in the organ, demonstrating the concept of field cancerization. This review explains the concept of field cancerization and various field theories along with molecular basis of field formation.

  19. Illuminating cancer systems with genetically engineered mouse models and coupled luciferase reporters in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Brandon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2013-06-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a powerful noninvasive tool that has dramatically accelerated the in vivo interrogation of cancer systems and longitudinal analysis of mouse models of cancer over the past decade. Various luciferase enzymes have been genetically engineered into mouse models (GEMM) of cancer, which permit investigation of cellular and molecular events associated with oncogenic transcription, posttranslational processing, protein-protein interactions, transformation, and oncogene addiction in live cells and animals. Luciferase-coupled GEMMs ultimately serve as a noninvasive, repetitive, longitudinal, and physiologic means by which cancer systems and therapeutic responses can be investigated accurately within the autochthonous context of a living animal.

  20. An overview of tobacco related cancers in Patan district, Gujarat state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jivarajani Parimal J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Tobacco is the single most important cause of avoidable morbidity and early mortality in many countries. In India approximately 700,000-900,000 new cancers are diagnosed every year. Nearly half of all cancers in men and one fifth of cancers in women are tobacco related cancers. The present study was conducted to examine the proportion of tobacco related cancers, their age distribution and geographical variations in Patan district, Gujarat. All new cases of tobacco related cancers diagnosed during the year 2011 were included in the study. Apart from Gujarat Cancer & Research Institute, cancer data were also obtained from government hospitals, private hospitals& consultants, pathology laboratories and death registration units of Patan district and other districts. During the year 2011, a total of 472 new cases (Males: 310; Females: 162 were registered. Among them 214 cases were tobacco related cancers with a male preponderance (189 cases. Majority of the cases were in the age group of 35-64 years. Tongue Cancer was the commonest site in both sexes. Patan taluka had highest tobacco related cancers. This study implies an urgent need for tobacco control among the population of Patan district as tobacco is the most common risk factor of cancer occurrence.

  1. DNA Damage and Genetic Instability as Harbingers of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    trial (NBT) and the its primary aim was determine if selenium supplementation can reduce incidence of prostate cancer as compared to placebo. Primary...analysis of this trial indicated no statistically significant effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer incidence. As a result, all the...chemoprevention trial carried out to determine the effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer progression. Patient clinical data and

  2. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  3. Specific psychosocial issues of individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer - a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijzenga, Willem; Hahn, Daniela E E; Aaronson, Neil K; Kluijt, Irma; Bleiker, Eveline M A

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 25% of individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer experiences clinically relevant levels of distress, anxiety and/or depression. However, these general psychological outcomes that are used in many studies do not provide detailed information on the specific psychosocial problems experienced by counselees. The aim of this review was to investigate the specific psychosocial issues encountered by individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer, and to identify overarching themes across these issues. A literature search was performed, using four electronic databases (PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL and Embase). Papers published between January 2000 and January 2013 were selected using combinations, and related indexing terms of the keywords: 'genetic counseling', 'psychology' and 'cancer'. In total, 25 articles met our inclusion criteria. We identified the specific issues addressed by these papers, and used meta-ethnography to identify the following six overarching themes: coping with cancer risk, practical issues, family issues, children-related issues, living with cancer, and emotions. A large overlap in the specific issues and themes was found between these studies, suggesting that research on specific psychosocial problems within genetic counseling has reached a point of saturation. As a next step, efforts should be made to detect and monitor these problems of counselees at an early stage within the genetic counseling process.

  4. ACG clinical guideline: Genetic testing and management of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngal, Sapna; Brand, Randall E; Church, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Hampel, Heather L; Burt, Randall W

    2015-02-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the management of patients with hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes. The initial assessment is the collection of a family history of cancers and premalignant gastrointestinal conditions and should provide enough information to develop a preliminary determination of the risk of a familial predisposition to cancer. Age at diagnosis and lineage (maternal and/or paternal) should be documented for all diagnoses, especially in first- and second-degree relatives. When indicated, genetic testing for a germline mutation should be done on the most informative candidate(s) identified through the family history evaluation and/or tumor analysis to confirm a diagnosis and allow for predictive testing of at-risk relatives. Genetic testing should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling to ensure the patient's informed decision making. Patients who meet clinical criteria for a syndrome as well as those with identified pathogenic germline mutations should receive appropriate surveillance measures in order to minimize their overall risk of developing syndrome-specific cancers. This guideline specifically discusses genetic testing and management of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Cowden syndrome, serrated (hyperplastic) polyposis syndrome, hereditary pancreatic cancer, and hereditary gastric cancer.

  5. Use of Whole Genome Sequencing for Diagnosis and Discovery in the Cancer Genetics Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B. Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential of whole-genome sequencing (WGS to improve patient diagnosis and care, the empirical value of WGS in the cancer genetics clinic is unknown. We performed WGS on members of two cohorts of cancer genetics patients: those with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 176 and those without (n = 82. Initial analysis of potentially pathogenic variants (PPVs, defined as nonsynonymous variants with allele frequency < 1% in ESP6500 in 163 clinically-relevant genes suggested that WGS will provide useful clinical results. This is despite the fact that a majority of PPVs were novel missense variants likely to be classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS. Furthermore, previously reported pathogenic missense variants did not always associate with their predicted diseases in our patients. This suggests that the clinical use of WGS will require large-scale efforts to consolidate WGS and patient data to improve accuracy of interpretation of rare variants. While loss-of-function (LoF variants represented only a small fraction of PPVs, WGS identified additional cancer risk LoF PPVs in patients with known BRCA1/2 mutations and led to cancer risk diagnoses in 21% of non-BRCA cancer genetics patients after expanding our analysis to 3209 ClinVar genes. These data illustrate how WGS can be used to improve our ability to discover patients' cancer genetic risks.

  6. [Epidemiology of prostate cancer in China: an overview and clinical implication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dingwei; Zhu, Yao

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is a currently common disease in Chinese male. The incidence is increasing rapidly in urban area and the mortality is high in rural area. According to characteristics of disease stage, advancement in early diagnosis of prostate cancer is the key to improve prostate cancer survival in China. Because of the remarkable disparity in economic and health care across mainland China, a selective prostate cancer screen approach may be a better alternative to spread. Therefore, indepth researches in optimization of prostate specific antigen screen and validation biomarkers of aggressive prostate cancer should be advocated. Furthermore, physicians should take a more active role in population education.

  7. Acetate/acetyl-CoA metabolism associated with cancer fatty acid synthesis: overview and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-28

    Understanding cancer-specific metabolism is important for identifying novel targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Induced acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism is a notable feature that is related to fatty acid synthesis supporting tumor growth. In this review, we focused on the recent findings related to cancer acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism. We also introduce [1-¹¹C]acetate positron emission tomography (PET), which is a useful tool to visualize up-regulation of acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism in cancer, and discuss the utility of [1-¹¹C]acetate PET in cancer diagnosis and its application to personalized medicine.

  8. Non-genetic health professionals' attitude towards, knowledge of and skills in discussing and ordering genetic testing for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, Kirsten F L; Smets, Ellen M A; Allain, Dawn C

    2016-04-01

    Non-genetic health professionals (NGHPs) have insufficient knowledge of cancer genetics, express educational needs and are unprepared to counsel their patients regarding their genetic test results. So far, it is unclear how NGHPs perceive their own communication skills. This study was undertaken to gain insight in their perceptions, attitudes and knowledge. Two publically accessible databases were used to invite NGHPs providing cancer genetic services to complete a questionnaire. The survey assessed: sociodemographic attributes, experience in ordering hereditary cancer genetic testing, attitude, knowledge, perception of communication skills (e.g. information giving, decision-making) and educational needs. Of all respondents (N = 49, response rate 11%), most have a positive view of their own information giving (mean = 53.91, range 13-65) and decision making skills (64-77% depending on topic). NGHPs feel responsible for enabling disease and treatment related behavior (89-91%). However, 20-30% reported difficulties managing patients' emotions and did not see management of long-term emotions as their responsibility. Correct answers on knowledge questions ranged between 41 and 96%. Higher knowledge was associated with more confidence in NGHPs' own communication skills (r(s) = .33, p = 0.03). Although NGHPs have a positive view of their communication skills, they perceive more difficulties managing emotions. The association between less confidence in communication skills and lower knowledge level suggests awareness of knowledge gaps affects confidence. NGHPs might benefit from education about managing client emotions. Further research using observation of actual counselling consultations is needed to investigate the skills of this specific group of providers.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms in DPF3 associated with risk of breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyal Carolyn R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified rare genetic variations responsible for many cases of familial breast cancer but their contribution to total breast cancer incidence is relatively small. More common genetic variations with low penetrance have been postulated to account for a higher proportion of the population risk of breast cancer. Methods and Results In an effort to identify genes that influence non-familial breast cancer risk, we tested over 25,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located within approximately 14,000 genes in a large-scale case-control study in 254 German women with breast cancer and 268 age-matched women without malignant disease. We identified a marker on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.1 that was marginally associated with breast cancer status (OR = 1.5, P = 0.07. Genotypes for this SNP were also significantly associated with indicators of breast cancer severity, including presence of lymph node metastases (P = 0.006 and earlier age of onset (P = 0.01. The association with breast cancer status was replicated in two independent samples (OR = 1.35, P = 0.05. High-density association fine mapping showed that the association spanned about 80 kb of the zinc-finger gene DPF3 (also known as CERD4. One SNP in intron 1 was found to be more strongly associated with breast cancer status in all three sample collections (OR = 1.6, P = 0.003 as well as with increased lymph node metastases (P = 0.01 and tumor size (P = 0.01. Conclusion Polymorphisms in the 5' region of DPF3 were associated with increased risk of breast cancer development, lymph node metastases, age of onset, and tumor size in women of European ancestry. This large-scale association study suggests that genetic variation in DPF3 contributes to breast cancer susceptibility and severity.

  10. An Overview of Current Screening and Management Approaches for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Omar N; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fourth leading cause of mortality in Australian men. The prevalence and incidence is increasing in both developed and developing nations, thus there is a need for better screening and management of this disorder. While there is no direct known cause of prostate cancer, management is largely focused on early detection and treatment strategies. Of particular concern is advanced prostate cancer which can manifest as castrate resistant prostate cancer characterized by therapy resistance. This short review outlines the global epidemiology of prostate cancer, clinical manifestations, risk factors, current screening strategies including first line clinical screening as well as the use of circulating biomarkers, and treatment of prostate cancer through mainstream therapeutics as well as the cutting edge peptide and nano-technology based therapeutics that are being implemented or in the process of development to overcome therapeutic obstacles in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  11. Causative relationship between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer in various regions of Saudi Arabia: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Jamal M; Al-Saif, Ahmad M; Al-Karrawi, Mohammed A; Al-Sagair, Othman A

    2011-01-01

    The unwarranted connection between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer has gained new ground in recent years. Breast cancer in Saudi females accounts for approximately 21% of all cancers and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Saudi females is also 21.5%. DM is diagnosed in the age group of 30+ years with possible exposure to predisposing factors like hyperinsulinemia and obesity at younger age. Further, 12% of the breast cancer cases are diagnosed in the young females aged 20-34 years. Despite the readily available access to healthcare facilities in the Kingdom, a large number of diabetics, approximately 27.9%, were unaware of having diabetes mellitus. This subpopulation is quite susceptible of developing breast cancer at later age. This review discusses common etiological and predisposing factors for breast cancer and diabetes, regional distribution and possible correlation of diabetes and cancer in Saudi Arabia.

  12. Cancer Prevention Interdisciplinary Education Program at Purdue University: Overview and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, Dorothy; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Adedokun, Omolola; Childress, Amy; Parker, Loran Carleton; Burgess, Wilella; Nagel, Julie; Knapp, Deborah W.; Lelievre, Sophie; Agnew, Christopher R.; Shields, Cleveland; Leary, James; Adams, Robin; Jensen, Jakob D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a broad field that crosses many disciplines; therefore, educational efforts to enhance cancer prevention research focused on interdisciplinary approaches to the field are greatly needed. In order to hasten progress in cancer prevention research, the Cancer Prevention Internship Program (CPIP) at Purdue University was designed to develop and test an interdisciplinary curriculum for undergraduate and graduate students. The hypothesis was that course curriculum specific to introducing interdisciplinary concepts in cancer prevention would increase student interest in and ability to pursue advanced educational opportunities (e.g., graduate school, medical school). Preliminary results from the evaluation of the first year which included 10 undergraduate and 5 graduate students suggested that participation in CPIP is a positive professional development experience, leading to a significant increase in understanding of interdisciplinary research in cancer prevention. In its first year, the CPIP project has created a successful model for interdisciplinary education in cancer prevention research. PMID:21533583

  13. Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire: development and testing of a screening questionnaire for use in clinical cancer genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijzenga, W.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Hahn, D.E.E.; Kluijt, I.; Sidharta, G.N.; Gundy, C.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Up to three-quarters of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling and testing report psychosocial problems specifically related to that setting. The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate the screening properties of a questionnaire designed to assess specific psych

  14. Genetic features of metachronous esophageal cancer developed in Hodgkin's lymphoma or breast cancer long-term survivors: an exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Boldrin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of novel therapeutic drugs and regimens for cancer treatment has led to improvements in patient long-term survival. This success has, however, been accompanied by the increased occurrence of second primary cancers. Indeed, patients who received regional radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL or breast cancer may develop, many years later, a solid metachronous tumor in the irradiated field. Despite extensive epidemiological studies, little information is available on the genetic changes involved in the pathogenesis of these solid therapy-related neoplasms. METHODS: Using microsatellite markers located in 7 chromosomal regions frequently deleted in sporadic esophageal cancer, we investigated loss of heterozygosity (LOH and microsatellite instability (MSI in 46 paired (normal and tumor samples. Twenty samples were of esophageal carcinoma developed in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors: 14 squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC and 6 adenocarcinomas (EADC, while 26 samples, used as control, were of sporadic esophageal cancer (15 ESCC and 11 EADC. RESULTS: We found that, though the overall LOH frequency at the studied chromosomal regions was similar among metachronous and sporadic tumors, the latter exhibited a statistically different higher LOH frequency at 17q21.31 (p = 0.018. By stratifying for tumor histotype we observed that LOH at 3p24.1, 5q11.2 and 9p21.3 were more frequent in ESCC than in EADC suggesting a different role of the genetic determinants located nearby these regions in the development of the two esophageal cancer histotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results strengthen the genetic diversity among ESCC and EADC whether they occurred spontaneously or after therapeutic treatments. The presence of histotype-specific alterations in esophageal carcinoma arisen in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors suggests that their transformation process, though the putative different etiological origin, may retrace

  15. Genetic and epigenetic characteristics of gastric cancers with JC virus T-antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi Yamaoka; Hiroyuki Yamamoto; Katsuhiko Nosho; Hiroaki Taniguchi; Yasushi Adachi; Shigeru Sasaki; Yoshiaki Arimura; Kohzoh Imai; Yasuhisa Shinomura

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the significance of JC virus (JCV) T-antigen (T-Ag) expression in human gastric cancer.METHODS: We investigated the relationship between T-Ag detected by immunohistochemistry and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, microsatellite instability (MSI), and genetic and epigenetic alterations in gastric cancers. Mutations in the p53, β-catenin, KRAS, BRAF,PIK3CA genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Allelic losses were determined by PCR at 7 microsatellite loci. Aberrant DNA methylation was analyzed by MethyLight assay.RESULTS: JCV T-Ag protein expression was found in 49% of 90 gastric cancer tissues. T-Ag positivity was not correlated with clinicopathological characteristics.T-Ag expression was detected in a similar percentage of EBV positive cancers (4 of 9, 44%) and EBV negative cancers (35 of 73, 48%). T-Ag expression was detected in a significantly lower percentage of MSI-H cancers (14%) than in non MSI-H cancers (55%, P = 0.005).T-Ag expression was detected in a significantly higher percentage of cancers with nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin (15 of 21, 71%) than in cancers without (42%, P = 0.018). p53 mutations were detected in a significantly lower percentage of T-Ag positive cancers (32%) than in T-Ag negative cancers (57%, P = 0.018). T-Ag positive gastric cancers showed a significant increase in the allelic losses and aberrant methylation compared with T-Ag negative gastric cancers ( P = 0.008 and P = 0.003).CONCLUSION: The results suggest that JCV T-Ag is involved in gastric carcinogenesis through multiple mechanisms of genetic and epigenetic alterations.

  16. Assessing the genetic architecture of epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Dixon, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the deadliest common cancers. The five most common types of disease are high-grade and low-grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell carcinoma. Each of these subtypes present distinct molecular pathogeneses and sensitivities to treatments. Recen...

  17. Personalizing Anti-Cancer Treatment from Genetic and Pharmacokinetic Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bins (Sander)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractOnly recently, systemic anti-cancer treatment consisted of little more than chemotherapy, targeting mitosis in rapidly dividing cells such as cancer cells. Increasing biological insight has led to the development of more biology driven treatments, e.g. tyrosine kinase inhibitors and

  18. Human breast cancer: its genetics, biology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCancer is a major public health problem, being the second leading cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases1. Among women, breast cancer is the first neoplasm for incidence and the second for mortality all over the world. World-wide, an incidence of 1.4 million new cases and a mortal

  19. Molecular epidemiology of and genetic susceptibility to esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Manisha; Das, Kiron M; Lefferts, Joel; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Phillips, Wayne A; Srivastava, Amitabh; To, Henry

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on clonal evolution in Barrett's carcinogenesis; biomarkers for early detection of esophageal cancer; the role of the methylguanine methyl transferase biomarker in the management of adenocarcinoma; and the discovery of high-risk genes in families.

  20. The Genetics and Molecular Alterations of Pancreatic Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, R.F. de

    2015-01-01

    The prospect that pancreatic cancer will be the second most common cause of cancer death by 2030 is worrisome. Considering that the approximate 6% overall 5-year survival has not merely changed in the past decades illustrates the need to revert the bleak prognosis. Centralization of surgery (pancr

  1. Genetic alterations in Krebs cycle and its impact on cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajnani, Karishma; Islam, Farhadul; Smith, Robert Anthony; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells exhibit alterations in many cellular processes, including oxygen sensing and energy metabolism. Glycolysis in non-oxygen condition is the main energy production process in cancer rather than mitochondrial respiration as in benign cells. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of Krebs cycle enzymes favour the shift of cancer cells from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis. Mutations in genes encoding aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and citrate synthase are noted in many cancers. Abnormalities of Krebs cycle enzymes cause ectopic production of Krebs cycle intermediates (oncometabolites) such as 2-hydroxyglutarate, and citrate. These oncometabolites stabilize hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1), nuclear factor like 2 (Nrf2), inhibit p53 and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PDH3) activities as well as regulate DNA/histone methylation, which in turn activate cell growth signalling. They also stimulate increased glutaminolysis, glycolysis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, genetic alterations in Krebs cycle enzymes are involved with increased fatty acid β-oxidations and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction. These altered phenomena in cancer could in turn promote carcinogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and survival. Overall, epigenetic and genetic changes of Krebs cycle enzymes lead to the production of oncometabolite intermediates, which are important driving forces of cancer pathogenesis and progression. Understanding and applying the knowledge of these mechanisms opens new therapeutic options for patients with cancer.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Events of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Related to Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mckenna Longacre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer persists as the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer is also a significant source of morbidity and mortality, as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. This reflects the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. Though breast and ovarian cancer usually present as distinct clinical entities, the recent explosion of large-scale -omics research has uncovered many overlaps, particularly with respect to genetic and epigenetic alterations. We compared genetic, microenvironmental, stromal, and epigenetic changes common between breast and ovarian cancer cells, as well as the clinical relevance of these changes. Some of the most striking commonalities include genetic alterations of BRCA1 and 2, TP53, RB1, NF1, FAT3, MYC, PTEN, and PIK3CA; down regulation of miRNAs 9, 100, 125a, 125b, and 214; and epigenetic alterations such as H3K27me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, and H3K4me. These parallels suggest shared features of pathogenesis. Furthermore, preliminary evidence suggests a shared epigenetic mechanism of oncogenesis. These similarities, warrant further investigation in order to ultimately inform development of more effective chemotherapeutics, as well as strategies to circumvent drug resistance.

  3. Ethnic background and genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Jing

    Full Text Available The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort's ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be

  4. Genetic counseling for breast cancer risk: how did we get here and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Katherine Af

    2013-07-01

    Genetic counselors have been helping patients navigate hereditary cancer risk for decades. The rapidly changing landscape of genetic testing options means the field is again at a unique time in its history. Fears that arose when BRCA testing first became available are again being voiced in light of next-generation sequencing. The origins of genetic counseling, best practices, and recommendations that have come about since those early days need to be well understood before these new challenges can be met. The role of a proper risk assessment in preventing adverse outcomes is vital as options for testing change. In addition, an understanding of how various countries have incorporated genetic testing and genetic counseling into their healthcare systems can provide lessons in moving forward and capitalizing on the new technology that is again creating a genetics revolution.

  5. Prostate Cancer Risk in Relation to IGF-1 and its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study Within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    I and its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rudolf J...Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS) 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0374 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  6. Enzymes for N-Glycan Branching and Their Genetic and Nongenetic Regulation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Kizuka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available N-glycan, a fundamental and versatile protein modification in mammals, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cancer progression. The formation of N-glycan branches catalyzed by specific N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases [GnT-III, GnT-IVs, GnT-V, GnT-IX (Vb] and a fucosyltransferase, Fut8, provides functionally diverse N-glycosylated proteins. Aberrations of these branches are often found in cancer cells and are profoundly involved in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we focus on the GlcNAc and fucose branches of N-glycans and describe how their expression is dysregulated in cancer by genetic and nongenetic mechanisms including epigenetics and nucleotide sugar metabolisms. We also survey the roles that these N-glycans play in cancer progression and therapeutics. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our knowledge on basic glycobiology to the development of medicine and biomarkers for cancer therapy.

  7. An Overview of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Status in Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal chromosome number, or aneuploidy, is a common feature of human solid tumors, including oral cancer. Deregulated spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC is thought as one of the mechanisms that drive aneuploidy. In normal cells, SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes are correctly aligned at the metaphase plate thereby ensuring genomic stability. Significantly, the activity of this checkpoint is compromised in many cancers. While mutations are rather rare, many tumors show altered expression levels of SAC components. Genomic alterations such as aneuploidy indicate a high risk of oral cancer and cancer-related mortality, and the molecular basis of these alterations is largely unknown. Yet, our knowledge on the status of SAC components in oral cancer remains sparse. In this review, we address the state of our knowledge regarding the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in oral cancer, and discuss their therapeutic relevance, focusing our analysis on the core components of SAC and its target Cdc20.

  8. Nanomedicine in Action: An Overview of Cancer Nanomedicine on the Market and in Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruibing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine, defined as the application of nanotechnology in the medical field, has the potential to significantly change the course of diagnostics and treatment of life-threatening diseases, such as cancer. In comparison with traditional cancer diagnostics and therapy, cancer nanomedicine provides sensitive cancer detection and/or enhances treatment efficacy with significantly minimized adverse effects associated with standard therapeutics. Cancer nanomedicine has been increasingly applied in areas including nanodrug delivery systems, nanopharmaceuticals, and nanoanalytical contrast reagents in laboratory and animal model research. In recent years, the successful introduction of several novel nanomedicine products into clinical trials and even onto the commercial market has shown successful outcomes of fundamental research into clinics. This paper is intended to examine several nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics and/or diagnostics-related applications, to analyze the trend of nanomedicine development, future opportunities, and challenges of this fast-growing area.

  9. Managing Intraoral Lesions in Oral Cancer Patients in a General Dental Practice: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Reuben Han-Kyu; Yang, Paul; Sung, Eric C

    2016-02-01

    As medical technology advances in the area of cancer therapeutics, dental practitioners will encounter patients with active cancer or a history of cancer. Typically, these patients may have had or are undergoing therapies such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of therapies. These patients may present with multiple side effects that dental practitioners can manage or prevent. We discuss some of these concerns and provide management strategies.

  10. Genetic variation in genes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campa, Daniele; McKay, James; Sinilnikova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    -binding protein), which is induced by glucose, and SREBP-1 (sterol response element-binding protein-1), which is stimulated by insulin through the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway. We investigated whether the genetic variability of the genes encoding for ChREBP, SREBP and FAS (respectively, MLXIPL, SREBF1...... and FASN) is related to breast cancer risk and body-mass index (BMI) by studying 1,294 breast cancer cases and 2,452 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). We resequenced the FAS gene and combined information of SNPs found by resequencing and SNPs from public databases....... Using a tagging approach and selecting 20 SNPs, we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between the SNPs in the FAS, ChREBP and SREPB-1 genes and an increased risk of breast cancer overall...

  11. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes in relation to ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Vivo, Immaculata De; Titus, Linda J; Vitonis, Allison F; Wong, Jason Y Y; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive non-coding DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes that provide protection against chromosomal instability. Telomere length and stability are influenced by proteins, including telomerase which is partially encoded by the TERT gene. Genetic variation in the TERT gene is associated with ovarian cancer risk, and predicts survival in lung cancer and glioma. We investigated whether genetic variation in five telomere maintenance genes was associated with survival among 1480 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in the population-based New England Case-Control Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall we observed no significant associations between SNPs in telomere maintenance genes and mortality using a significance threshold of p=0.001. However, we observed some suggestive associations in subgroup analyses. Future studies with larger populations may further our understanding of what role telomeres play in ovarian cancer survival.

  12. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  13. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris;

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu...... of discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype....

  14. Skeletal Health Part 1: Overview Of Bone Health and Management In the Cancer Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Drudge-Coates, Lawrence; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone disease and cancer therapy-induced bone loss are significant skeletal problems related to the treatment for urological and other cancers. Our team of specialists and nurse practitioners developed a nurse practitioner-led Bone Support Clinic for urologic cancer patients at a university hospital in London, England, United Kingdom, to address this issue. The clinic has been well-accepted, has made a positive impact on the patient journey, helps to ensure continuity of care, and highlights patients who require assessment or treatment for impending skeletal-related events in a timely fashion. This article has been divided into two parts for improved readability.

  15. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of microRNAs and implications for human cancers and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Musaffe; Machado, Andreia S; Calin, George A

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a well-studied group of noncoding RNAs that control gene expression by interacting mainly with messenger RNA. It is known that miRNAs and their biogenesis regulatory machineries have crucial roles in multiple cell processes; thus, alterations in these genes often lead to disease, such as cancer. Disruption of these genes can occur through epigenetic and genetic alterations, resulting in aberrant expression of miRNAs and subsequently of their target genes. This review focuses on the disruption of miRNAs and their key regulatory machineries by genetic alterations, with emphasis on mutations and epigenetic changes in cancer and other diseases.

  16. Alternate service delivery models in cancer genetic counseling: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hudson Buchanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models such as telephone counseling, telegenetics and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology.

  17. Update on Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Morphological, Molecular, and Genetic Features of the Most Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Ragazzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is the most aggressive form of thyroid cancer. It shows a wide spectrum of morphological presentations and the diagnosis could be challenging due to its high degree of dedifferentiation. Molecular and genetic features of ATC are widely heterogeneous as well and many efforts have been made to find a common profile in order to clarify its cancerogenetic process. A comprehensive review of the current literature is here performed, focusing on histopathological and genetic features.

  18. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes, telomere length, and lung cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgood, H Dean; Cawthon, Richard; He, Xingzhou; Chanock, Stephen; Lan, Qing

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres are responsible for the protection of the chromosome ends and shortened telomere length has been associated with risk of multiple cancers. Genetic variation in telomere-related genes may alter cancer risk associated with telomere length. Using lung cancer cases (n=120) and population-based controls (n=110) from Xuanwei, China, we analyzed telomere length separately and in conjunction with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the telomere maintenance genes POT1, TERT, and TERF2, which we have previously reported were associated with risk of lung cancer in this study. POT1 rs10244817, TERT rs2075786, and TERF2 rs251796 were significantly associated with lung cancer (p(trend)telomere length was not significantly associated with risk of lung cancer (OR=1.58; 95% CI=0.79-3.18) when compared to the longest tertile of telomere length. When stratified by genotype, there was a suggestion of a dose-response relationship between tertiles of telomere length and risk of lung cancer among the POT1 rs10244817 common variant carriers (OR (95% CI)=1.33 (0.47-3.75), 3.30 (1.14-9.56), respectively) but not among variant genotype carriers (p(interaction)=0.05). Our findings provide evidence that telomere length and genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes may be associated with risk of lung cancer susceptibility and warrant replication in larger studies.

  19. Genetic variants associated with breast size also influence breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While some factors of breast morphology, such as density, are directly implicated in breast cancer, the relationship between breast size and cancer is less clear. Breast size is moderately heritable, yet the genetic variants leading to differences in breast size have not been identified. Methods To investigate the genetic factors underlying breast size, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of self-reported bra cup size, controlling for age, genetic ancestry, breast surgeries, pregnancy history and bra band size, in a cohort of 16,175 women of European ancestry. Results We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs significantly associated with breast size (p−8: rs7816345 near ZNF703, rs4849887 and (independently rs17625845 flanking INHBB, rs12173570 near ESR1, rs7089814 in ZNF365, rs12371778 near PTHLH, and rs62314947 near AREG. Two of these seven SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD with SNPs associated with breast cancer (those near ESR1 and PTHLH, and a third (ZNF365 is near, but not in LD with, a breast cancer SNP. The other three loci (ZNF703, INHBB, and AREG have strong links to breast cancer, estrogen regulation, and breast development. Conclusions These results provide insight into the genetic factors underlying normal breast development and show that some of these factors are shared with breast cancer. While these results do not directly support any possible epidemiological relationships between breast size and cancer, this study may contribute to a better understanding of the subtle interactions between breast morphology and breast cancer risk.

  20. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  1. What's New in Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Griffin, Molly; Thakuria, Joseph; Hughes, Kevin S

    2016-09-15

    The advent of next-generation sequencing, and its transition further into the clinic with the US Food and Drug Administration approval of a cystic fibrosis assay in 2013, have increased the speed and reduced the cost of DNA sequencing. Coupled with a historic ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States that human genes are not patentable, these events have caused a seismic shift in genetic testing in clinical medicine. More labs are offering genetic testing services; more multigene panels are available for gene testing; more genes and gene mutations are being identified; and more variants of uncertain significance, which may or may not be clinically actionable, have been found. All these factors, taken together, are increasing the complexity of clinical management. While these developments have led to a greater interest in genetic testing, risk assessment, and large-scale population screening, they also present unique challenges. The dilemma for clinicians is how best to understand and manage this rapidly growing body of information to improve patient care. With millions of genetic variants of potential clinical significance and thousands of genes associated with rare but well-established genetic conditions, the complexities of genetic data management clearly will require improved computerized clinical decision support tools, as opposed to continued reliance on traditional rote, memory-based medicine.

  2. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process.

  3. Ethnicity and Prostate Cancer: Vitamin D Genetic and Sociodemographic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Buring JE, Levine RS, Gaziano JM. History of diabetes mellitus and risk of prostate cancer in physicians. Am J Epidemiol 2004;159:978-982. 13. Sakr...the US, found population substructure in both groups.(47) However, in their study of asthma , they found this substructure only confounded their...aggressive disease is associated with being overweight.9,10. Interestingly, obesity itself is inversely related to risk for prostate cancer in middle

  4. Sources of uncertainty about daughters' breast cancer risk that emerge during genetic counseling consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Fisher, Carla L; Brashers, Dale; Edgerson, Shawna; Glogowski, Emily A; Boyar, Sherry R; Kemel, Yelena; Spencer, Sara; Kissane, David

    2012-04-01

    Uncertainty is central to the experience of genetic decision making and counseling about cancer risk. Women seeking genetic counseling about their breast cancer risk may experience a great deal of uncertainty about issues related to their daughters. We used a theory of Communication and Uncertainty Management to guide analysis of sources of uncertainty about daughters that emerged during 16 video-recorded and transcribed conversations between mothers at risk for a BRCA 1/2 mutation and their genetic healthcare practitioners. An interpretive design and constant comparative method revealed three dominant patterns or themes representing sources of uncertainty mothers have relating to their daughters: disease risk, future cancer screening, and communication of related information to daughters. Both practitioners and mothers discussed these aspects of uncertainty. The findings identify the significant role uncertainty and familial concerns play in mothers' genetic testing decision making process. To assist genetic practitioners, we highlight daughter-related concerns that mothers are uncertain about and which are vital to their genetic counseling needs.

  5. Association between pepsinogen C gene polymorphism and genetic predisposition to gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Jie Liu; Xiao-Lin Guo; Ming Dong; Lan Wang; Yuan Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify a molecular marker for gastric cancer, andto investigate the relationship between the polymorphismof pepsinogen C (PGC) gene and the genetic predispositionto gastric cancer.METHODS: A total of 289 cases were involved in this study.115 cases came from Shenyang area, a low risk area ofgastric cancer, including 42 unrelated controls and 73 patientswith gastric cancer. 174 cases came from Zhuanghe area, ahigh-risk area of gastric cancer, including 113 unrelatedcontrols, and 61 cases from gastric cancer kindred families.The polymorphism of PGC gene was detected by polymerasechain reaction (PCR) and the relation between the geneticpolymorphism of PGC and gastric cancer was examined.RESULTS: Four alleles, 310bp (allele 1), 400bp (allele 2),450bp (allele 3), and 480bp (allele 4) were detected byPCR. The frequency of allele 1 was higher in patients withgastric cancer than that in controls. Genotypes containinghomogenous allele 1 were significantly more frequent inpatients with gastric cancerthan that in controls (0.33, 0.14,x2=3.86, P<0.05). There was no significant differencebetween the control group of Zhuanghe and the group ofgastric cancer kindred. But the frequency of allele 1 washigher in control group of Zhuanghe area than that in controlgroup of Shenyang area and genotypes containinghomogenous allele 1 were significantly more frequent inthe control group of Zhuanghe area than those in controlgroup of Shenyang area (0.33, 0.14, x2=4.32, P<0.05). Inthe group of gastric cancer kindred the frequency of allele 1was significantly higher than that in control group ofShenyang area (0.5164, 0.3571, x2=4.47, P<0.05).Genotypes containing homogenous allele 1 were significantlymore frequent in the group of gastric cancer kindred thanthose in control group of Shenyang area (0.36, 0.14, x2=4.91,P<0.05).CONCLUSION: These results suggest that there is somerelation between pepsinogen C gene polymorphism andgastric cancer, and the person with

  6. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  7. Acceptance of genetic counseling and testing in a hospital-based series of patients with gynecological cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, N.; Dorst, E.B. van; Luijt, R.B. van der; Gijn, M.E. van; Tuil, M. van; Offerhaus, J.A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Referral of patients with endometrial (EC) and/or ovarian cancer (OC) for genetic counseling is based on age at diagnosis and family history. Many patients with hereditary cancers are missed by following this strategy. We determined acceptance and mutation detection rate of offering genetic counseli

  8. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: Under the provisions of... Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer....

  9. Combined effect of genetic polymorphisms in phase I and II biotransformation enzymes on head and neck cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacko, M.; Voogd, A.C.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Ophuis, M.B.; Peters, W.H.M.; Manni, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combinations of genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes might modify the individual risk for head and neck cancer. METHODS: Blood from 432 patients with head and neck cancer and 437 controls was investigated for genetic polymorphisms in 9 different phase I and II biotransforma

  10. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  11. Enhancing cancer registry data for comparative effectiveness research (CER) project: overview and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Eheman, Christie R; Johnson, Christopher J; Hernandez, Monique N; Rousseau, David; Styles, Timothy S; West, Dee W; Hsieh, Meichin; Hakenewerth, Anne M; Celaya, Maria O; Rycroft, Randi K; Wike, Jennifer M; Pearson, Melissa; Brockhouse, Judy; Mulvihill, Linda G; Zhang, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Following the Institute of Medicine's 2009 report on the national priorities for comparative effectiveness research (CER), funding for support of CER became available in 2009 through the American Recovery and Re-investment Act. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received funding to enhance the infrastructure of population-based cancer registries and to expand registry data collection to support CER. The CDC established 10 specialized registries within the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) to enhance data collection for all cancers and to address targeted CER questions, including the clinical use and prognostic value of specific biomarkers. The project also included a special focus on detailed first course of treatment for cancers of the breast, colon, and rectum, as well as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) diagnosed in 2011. This paper describes the methodology and the work conducted by the CDC and the NPCR specialized registries in collecting data for the 4 special focused cancers, including the selection of additional data variables, development of data collection tools and software modifications, institutional review board approvals, training, collection of detailed first course of treatment, and quality assurance. It also presents the characteristics of the study population and discusses the strengths and limitations of using population-based cancer registries to support CER as well as the potential future role of population-based cancer registries in assessing the quality of patient care and cancer control.

  12. Choosing relevant endpoints for older breast cancer patients in clinical trials: an overview of all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glas, N A; Hamaker, M E; Kiderlen, M; de Craen, A J M; Mooijaart, S P; van de Velde, C J H; van Munster, B C; Portielje, J E A; Liefers, G J; Bastiaannet, E

    2014-08-01

    With the ongoing ageing of western societies, the proportion of older breast cancer patients will increase. For several years, clinicians and researchers in geriatric oncology have urged for new clinical trials that address patient-related endpoints such as functional decline after treatment of older patients. The aim of this study was to present an overview of trial characteristics and endpoints of all currently running clinical trials in breast cancer, particularly in older patients. The clinical trial register of the United States National Institutes of Health Differences was searched for all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment. Trial characteristics and endpoints were retrieved from the register and differences in characteristics between studies in older patients specifically (defined as a lower age-limit of 60 years or older) and trials in all patients were assessed using χ(2) tests. We included 463 clinical trials. Nine trials (2 %) specifically investigated breast cancer treatment in older patients. Ninety-one breast cancer trials included any patient-related endpoint (20 %), while five trials specifically addressing older patients included any patient-related endpoint (56 %, P = 0.02). Five of the trials in older patients incorporated a geriatric assessment (56 %). Clinical trials still rarely incorporate patient-related endpoints, even in trials that specifically address older patients. Trials that are specifically designed for older patients do not often incorporate a geriatric assessment in their design. This implicates that current clinical studies are not expected to fill the gap in knowledge concerning treatment of older breast cancer patients in the next decade.

  13. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance.

  14. Prostate cancer risk-associated genetic markers and their potential clinical utility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Xu; Jielin Sun; S Lilly Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers among men in Western developed countries and its incidence has increased considerably in many other parts of the world,including China.The etiology of PCa is largely unknown but is thought to be multifactorial,where inherited genetics plays an important role.In this article,we first briefly review results from studies of familial aggregation and genetic susceptibility to PCa.We then recap key findings of rare and high-penetrance PCa susceptibility genes from linkage studies in PCa families.We devote a significant portion of this article to summarizing discoveries of common and low-penetrance PCa risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genetic association studies in PCa cases and controls,especially those from genome-wide association studies (GWASs).A strong focus of this article is to review the literature on the potential clinical utility of these implicated genetic markers.Most of these published studies described PCa risk estimation using a genetic score derived from multiple risk-associated SNPs and its utility in determining the need for prostate biopsy.Finally,we comment on the newly proposed concept of genetic score; the notion is to treat it as a marker for genetic predisposition,similar to family history,rather than a diagnostic marker to discriminate PCa patients from non-cancer patients.Available evidence to date suggests that genetic score is an objective and better measurement of inherited risk of PCa than family history.Another unique feature of this article is the inclusion of genetic association studies of PCa in Chinese and Japanese populations.

  15. Seventeen-years overview of breast cancer inside and outside screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo, Laia; Jacobsen, Katja Kemp; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Long-term data on breast cancer detection in mammography screening programs are warranted to better understand the mechanisms by which screening changes the breast cancer pattern in the population. We aimed to analyze 17 years of breast cancer detection rates inside and outside...... screening in two Danish regions, emphasizing the influence of organizational differences of screening programs on the outcomes. Material and methods. We used data from two long-standing population-based mammography screening programs, Copenhagen and Fyn, in Denmark. Both programs offered biennial screening....... In Fyn, non-screened women even had a higher rate than screening participants during the first three invitation rounds. The interval cancer rate was lower in Copenhagen than in Fyn, with an increase over time in Copenhagen, but not in Fyn. Screen-detected cancers showed tumor features related...

  16. Genetic variants in the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and risk of different types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juan; Yu, Chen-Yang; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Hao-Yan; Guan, Jian; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-02-16

    Members of the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway regulate cell proliferation, migration and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, and are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Whether germline genetic variants in inositol phosphate metabolism pathway are associated with cancer risk remains to be clarified. We examined the association between inositol phosphate metabolism pathway genes and risk of eight types of cancer using data from genome-wide association studies. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate SNP-level associations. Gene- and pathway-based associations were tested using the permutation-based adaptive rank-truncated product method. The overall inositol phosphate metabolism pathway was significantly associated with risk of lung cancer (P = 2.00 × 10(-4)), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (P = 5.70 × 10(-3)), gastric cancer (P = 3.03 × 10(-2)) and renal cell carcinoma (P = 1.26 × 10(-2)), but not with pancreatic cancer (P = 1.40 × 10(-1)), breast cancer (P = 3.03 × 10(-1)), prostate cancer (P = 4.51 × 10(-1)), and bladder cancer (P = 6.30 × 10(-1)). Our results provide a link between inherited variation in the overall inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and several individual genes and cancer. Further studies will be needed to validate these positive findings, and to explore its mechanisms.

  17. Overview of breast cancer in Malaysian women: a problem with late diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Abdullah N; Yip, Cheng-Har

    2004-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. There is a marked geographical difference in the worldwide incidence of breast cancer, with a higher incidence in developed countries compared to developing countries. From 1998 to 2001, new cases of breast cancer presenting to the breast clinics at Hospital Kuala Lumpur and University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, were reviewed; the race, age and stage at presentation were analysed. Of 774 cases seen in Hospital Kuala Lumpur, only 5.2% (40/774) were impalpable breast cancers diagnosed on mammography. The prevalent age group was 40 to 49 years, and the median age was 50 years. The average size of the tumour was 5.4 cm in diameter. Malay women appear to have larger tumours and a later stage at presentation than other ethnic groups; 50% to 60% were in late stages (Stages 3 and 4). During the same period, 752 new cases of breast cancer were seen in the University Malaya Medical Centre. The average tumour size was 4.2 cm, and 30% to 40% were in late stages. The age incidence was similar. The delay in presentation of breast cancer was attributed to a strong belief in traditional medicine, the negative perception of the disease, poverty and poor education, coupled with fear and denial. A prospective, population-based study is required to determine the demographic pattern of breast cancer and the factors delaying presentation. These findings will have important implications in future programmes to promote the early detection of breast cancer, as well as in understanding geographical as well as racial variations in the incidence of breast cancer.

  18. Life insurance and breast cancer risk assessment: adverse selection, genetic testing decisions, and discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Weber, Barbara; FitzGerald, Genevieve; Hershey, John C; Pauly, Mark V; Lemaire, Jean; Subramanian, Krupa; Asch, David A

    2003-07-30

    Life insurance industry access to genetic information is controversial. Consumer groups argue that access will increase discrimination in life insurance premiums and discourage individuals from undergoing genetic testing that may provide health benefits. Conversely, life insurers argue that without access to risk information available to individuals, they face substantial financial risk from adverse selection. Given this controversy, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of breast cancer risk information on life insurance purchasing, the impact of concerns about life insurance discrimination on use of BRCA1/2 testing, and the incidence of life insurance discrimination following participation in breast cancer risk assessment and BRCA1/2 testing. Study participants were 636 women who participated in genetic counseling and/or genetic testing at a University based clinic offering breast cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, and BRCA1/2 testing between January 1995 and May 2000. Twenty-seven women (4%) had increased and six (1%) had decreased their life insurance since participation in breast cancer risk assessment. The decision to increase life insurance coverage was associated with predicted breast cancer risk (adjusted OR 1.03 for each 1% absolute increase in risk, 95% CI 1.01-1.10) and being found to carry a mutation in BRCA1/2 (OR 5.10, 95% CI 1.90-13.66). Concern about life insurance discrimination was inversely associated with the decision to undergo BRCA1/2 testing (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.85). No respondent reported having life insurance denied or canceled. In this cohort of women, these results indicate that information about increased breast cancer risk is associated with increase in life insurance purchasing, raising the possibility of adverse selection. Although fear of insurance discrimination is associated with the decision not to undergo BRCA1/2 testing, there was no evidence of actual insurance discrimination from BRCA1

  19. Genetic variability of the mTOR pathway and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    Full Text Available The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway integrates various signals, regulating ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis as a function of available energy and amino acids, and assuring an appropriate coupling of cellular proliferation with increases in cell size. In addition, recent evidence has pointed to an interplay between the mTOR and p53 pathways. We investigated the genetic variability of 67 key genes in the mTOR pathway and in genes of the p53 pathway which interact with mTOR. We tested the association of 1,084 tagging SNPs with prostate cancer risk in a study of 815 prostate cancer cases and 1,266 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC. We chose the SNPs (n = 11 with the strongest association with risk (p<0.01 and sought to replicate their association in an additional series of 838 prostate cancer cases and 943 controls from EPIC. In the joint analysis of first and second phase two SNPs of the PRKCI gene showed an association with risk of prostate cancer (OR(allele = 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94, p = 1.3 x 10⁻³ for rs546950 and OR(allele = 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93, p = 5.6 x 10⁻⁴ for rs4955720. We confirmed this in a meta-analysis using as replication set the data from the second phase of our study jointly with the first phase of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS project. In conclusion, we found an association with prostate cancer risk for two SNPs belonging to PRKCI, a gene which is frequently overexpressed in various neoplasms, including prostate cancer.

  20. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer and the clinical implications for molecular targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Keng

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynaecological malignancy, and tumoural heterogeneity (TH) has been blamed for treatment failure. The genomic and epigenomic atlas of EOC varies significantly with tumour histotype, grade, stage, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. Rapidly accumulating knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic events that control TH in EOC has facilitated the development of molecular-targeted therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, designed to target homologous recombination, are poised to change how breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-related ovarian cancer is treated. Epigenetic treatment regimens being tested in clinical or preclinical studies could provide promising novel treatment approaches and hope for improving patient survival.

  1. The critical role of bisphosphonates to target bone cancer metastasis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder; Kaur, Veerpal; Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Prabhjot; Murthy, R S R; Rawal, Ravindra K

    2015-01-01

    Cancer becomes the leading cause of deaths worldwide, including breast cancer, prostate cancer and lung cancer that preferentially metastasize to bone and bone marrow. Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been used successfully for many years to reduce the skeletal complications related with the benign and malignant bone diseases that are characterized by enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) have also been demonstrated to exhibit direct anti-tumour effects. BPs binds avidly to the bone matrix, and released from matrix during bone resorption process, BPs are internalized by the osteoclasts where they interfere with biochemical pathways and induce osteoclast apoptosis. BPs also antagonizes the production of osteoclast and promotes the osteoblasts proliferation. Currently, Zoledronic acid is widely used as one of the BP having high bone specificity and potential to inhibit the osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In addition to inhibition of cell multiplication and initiation of apoptosis in cultured cancer cells, they also interfere with adhesion of cancer cells to the bone matrix and inhibit cell migration and invasion. Pathophysiology and current target therapies like conjugate of BPs with liposomes, nanoparticle used for the treatment of bone cancer is reviewed in this article along with the use of different BPs.

  2. Dietary factors and cancer chemoprevention: An overview of obesity-related malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a growing health problem in developed nations and in countries that are in the process of westernization like India. Obesity is linked with several health disorders such as hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and certain cancers. Currently, obesity-related malignancies, e.g., cancers of the breast, prostate and colon are the leading cancers in the industrialized societies. An increased amount of fat or adipose tissue in an overweight or obese person probably influences the development of cancer by releasing several hormone-like factors or adipokines. The majority of adipokines are pro-inflammatory, which promote pathological conditions like insulin resistance and cancer. On the other hand, many recent studies have shown that adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory adipokine, has anti-cancer and insulin-sensitizing effects. Adiponectin exerts its physiological functions chiefly by activation of AMP kinase via adiponectin receptors. Interestingly, several fruits and vegetables may contain adiponectin-like molecules or may increase the biosynthesis of adiponectin in our body. Studies on adiponectin analogues or adiponectin receptor agonists are a promising area of cancer chemoprevention research. In general, fruits and vegetables contain various dietary substances such as vitamins, minerals (like calcium and selenium, fiber and phytochemicals or phenolic compounds (like flavonoids and vanilloids, which may act as anti-cancer agents. Similarly, several dietary constituents including phytochemicals may have anti-obesity effects. Consumption of such dietary compounds along with caloric restriction and physical activity may be helpful in preventing obesity-related cancers. For this review article, we searched PubMed primarily to get the relevant literature.

  3. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Chattopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ′HPV′, ′cervical′, ′CIN′, ′polymorphism(s′, ′cervical′ + FNx01the name of the geneFNx01 and ′HPV′ + FNx01the name of the geneFNx01. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals.

  4. Interaction of environmental factors and genetic polymorphism in the etiology of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Zaridze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Еnvironmental and lifestyle factors play a dominant role in etiology of cancer. In addition, genetic factors significantly influence interindividual variation in cancer incidence. The epidemiological studies in which effects of genetic polymorphism on the risk of cancer have been elucidated are somewhat disappointing. An important problem of these studies is their size. Moreover some of them do not have information on life-style and environmental exposures. The epidemiological method used to investigate the effect of genetic polymorphism on cancer risk is a retrospective case-control study. The chance of discovery of the specific «frequent» allelic variant which is associated with small increase in the risk is higher in studies including large numbers of cases and controls. This paper reviews the epidemiologic studies conducted in Department of epidemiology (Institute of carcinogenesis, Russian N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre in cooperation with countries of Central and Eastern Europe (Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC. We will cover the studies, in which an attempt has been made to investigate the interaction between polymorphisms of phase 2 xenobiotic metabolism genes (GST, alcohol and aldehyde-metabolizing genes (ADH, ALDH, folate metabolism genes (MTHFR, TYMS and CHECK2 with environmental and life-style factors in etiology of cancers of the lung, kidney and upper aerodigestive tract. The analyses of these studies suggest that genetic polymorphism modifies the effect of environmental exposures (including occupational carcinogens and life-style factors (including tobacco, alcohol and diet on the risk of cancer. The risk of cancer associated with known carcinogenic exposure may increase or decrease depending on the genotype. Interaction between exposure to carcinogenic factor and genotype is a major and significant determinant of cancer risk

  5. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases.......5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry....... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...

  6. Preventing cervical cancer : overviews of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and 2 US immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kris; Curtis, C Robinette; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Stokley, Shannon; Walker, Chastity; Roland, Katherine; Benard, Vicki; Saraiya, Mona

    2008-11-15

    Three federal programs with the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, especially among underserved populations, are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, and the Section 317 immunization grant program. The NBCCEDP provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to uninsured and underinsured women. The VFC program and the Section 317 immunization grant program provide vaccines, including human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, to targeted populations at no cost for these vaccines. This article describes the programs, their histories, populations served, services offered, and roles in preventing cervical cancer through HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Potential long-term reduction in healthcare costs resulting from HPV vaccination is also discussed. As an example of an initiative to vaccinate uninsured women aged 19-26 years through a cancer services program, a state-based effort that was recently launched in New York, is highlighted.

  7. Use of fluorescent proteins and color-coded imaging to visualize cancer cells with different genetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are very bright and available in spectrally-distinct colors, enable the imaging of color-coded cancer cells growing in vivo and therefore the distinction of cancer cells with different genetic properties. Non-invasive and intravital imaging of cancer cells with fluorescent proteins allows the visualization of distinct genetic variants of cancer cells down to the cellular level in vivo. Cancer cells with increased or decreased ability to metastasize can be distinguished in vivo. Gene exchange in vivo which enables low metastatic cancer cells to convert to high metastatic can be color-coded imaged in vivo. Cancer stem-like and non-stem cells can be distinguished in vivo by color-coded imaging. These properties also demonstrate the vast superiority of imaging cancer cells in vivo with fluorescent proteins over photon counting of luciferase-labeled cancer cells.

  8. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC-associated breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations that confers a two- to threefold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion...

  9. Developing national guidance on genetic testing for breast cancer predisposition: the role of economic evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, W.; Evans, D.G.; Newman, W.G.; Ramsden, S.C.; Scheffer, H.; Payne, K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in genetic testing to identify predisposition for hereditary breast cancer (HBC) mean that it is important to understand the incremental costs and benefits of the new technologies compared with current testing strategies. This study aimed to (1) identify and critically appraise existing

  10. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    address at the International Conference on Hormonal Steroids and Hormones & Cancer, Edinburgh, Scotland , 09/22/2010; Genetic Variation of the Androgen...Ferrell, R.E., Roth , S.M., 2005. Androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism is associated with fat-free mass in men. J. Appl. Physiol. 98, 132–137. Wu, C.T

  11. Genetic variation and cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Ekholm, Ola; Kaasa, Stein

    2016-01-01

    of candidate genes, high opioid dose, and cognitive dysfunction. METHODS: Cross-sectional multicenter study (European Pharmacogenetic Opioid Study, 2005-2008); 1586 patients; 113 SNPs from 41 genes. Inclusion criteria: cancer, age ≥18 year, opioid treatment, and available genetic data. Cognitive assessment...

  12. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudet, Mia M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M.; Guiducci, Candace; Segre, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. Overeem; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers

  13. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutat

  14. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs ca

  15. Specific psychosocial issues of individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer - a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijzenga, W.; Hahn, D.E.E.; Aaronson, N.K.; Kluijt, I.; Bleiker, E.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 25 % of individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer experiences clinically relevant levels of distress, anxiety and/or depression. However, these general psychological outcomes that are used in many studies do not provide detailed information on the specific psychosocial probl

  16. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Ben Kinnersley, [Unknown; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Foersti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,0

  17. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovari...

  18. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case-control...

  19. Who is being referred to cancer genetic counseling? Characteristics of counselees and their referral.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, E. van; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2012-01-01

    Both physician and patient play a role in the referral process for cancer genetic counseling. Access to such counseling is not optimal because some eligible patients are not being reached by current referral practice. We aimed to identify factors associated with the initiator of referral. During a 7

  20. Who is being referred to cancer genetic counseling? Characteristics of counselees and their referral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, E. van; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Both physician and patient play a role in the referral process for cancer genetic counseling. Access to such counseling is not optimal because some eligible patients are not being reached by current referral practice. We aimed to identify factors associated with the initiator of referral. During a 7

  1. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise B; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis. H...

  2. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  3. Risk perceptions, worry, and attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Linda D; Reeve, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the unique associations of risk perceptions and worry with attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. Women (general practitioner clinic attenders, university students, and first-degree relatives of breast cancer survivors; N = 303) read information about genetic testing and completed measures assessing perceived cancer risk, cancer worry, and genetic testing attitudes and beliefs. Worry was associated with greater interest in genetic testing, stronger beliefs that testing has detrimental emotional consequences, and positive beliefs about benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. Perceived risk was unrelated to interest and associated with more skeptical beliefs about emotional consequences and benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. At low worry levels, testing interest increased with more positive beliefs about testing benefits; at high worry levels, interest was high regardless of benefits beliefs. The findings support Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of self-regulation delineating interactive influences of risk-related cognitions and emotions on information processing and behavior.

  4. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Ting

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC/β-catenin (CTNNB1 genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001. After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer.

  5. International Cancer of the Head and Neck, Genetics and Environment (InterCHANGE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Evaluate the Association Between Certain Environmental Exposures (e.g. Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Betel Nut Chewing…) and Head and Neck Cancers; Assess the Effect of Genetic Factors, Including Both SNP and Copy Number Variation (CNV) Through Analysis of Both Main Effect and Gene-gene Interaction

  6. Genetics as a diagnostic tool in sarcomatoid renal-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, T; VandenBerg, E; van den Berg, A.; VandeVeen, A; Faber, H; Buys, CHCM; Storkel, S; DeJong, B; Dam, A.

    1997-01-01

    Renal-cell cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors, which currently can be sub-divided into morphologically distinct entities, each characterized by a specific combination of genetic changes. Sarcomatoid transformation might occur in any of the sub-types, resulting in tumors consisting of b

  7. Specific psychosocial issues of individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer - a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Eijzenga; D.E.E. Hahn; N.K. Aaronson; I. Kluijt; E.M.A. Bleiker

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 25 % of individuals undergoing genetic counseling for cancer experiences clinically relevant levels of distress, anxiety and/or depression. However, these general psychological outcomes that are used in many studies do not provide detailed information on the specific psychosocial probl

  8. Colorectal cancer and detoxification enzymes : with emphasis on enzyme modulation and genetic polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logt, E.M.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex and involves genetic and lifestyle factors. To deal with the daily load of carcinogens, present in food, tobacco smoke etc., humans possess an efficient system of defence against such compounds and an important role is reserved for the det

  9. Focusing on patient needs and preferences may improve genetic counseling for colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, S.; Dekker, N.; Kets, C.M.; Looij, E. van der; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2013-01-01

    During cancer genetic counseling, different items which counselors consider important are discussed. However, relatively little empirical evidence exists regarding the needs and preferences of counselees. In this study needs and preferences were assessed from counselees with a personal and/or family

  10. The genetic heterogeneity of colorectal cancer predisposition - guidelines for gene discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, M.M.; Voer, R.M. de; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kuiper, R.P.; Kessel, A.G. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cumulative term applied to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neoplasms that occur in the bowel. Based on twin studies, up to 45 % of the CRC cases may involve a heritable component. Yet, only in 5-10 % of these cases high-penetrant germline

  11. Current perspectives on recommendations for BRCA genetic testing in ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, Ignace; Banerjee, Susana; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; van Asperen, Christi; Marth, Christian; Vaz, Fatima; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gonzalez-Martin, Antonio; Sehouli, Jalid; Colombo, Nicoletta

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally, BRCA genetic testing has been undertaken to identify patients and family members at future risk of developing cancer and patients have been referred for testing based on family history. However, the now recognised risk of ovarian cancer (OC) patients, even those with no known family history, harbouring a mutation in BRCA1/2, together with the first poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase inhibitor (PARPi; olaparib [Lynparza]) being licenced for the treatment of BRCA-mutated OC, has led to reconsideration of referral criteria for OC patients. Provided here is a review of the existing data and guidelines in the European Union, relating to recommendations, as well as considerations, for the referral of OC patients for BRCA genetic testing. Based on this review of newly updated guidance and up-to-date evidence, the following is recommended: all patients with invasive epithelial OC (excluding borderline or mucinous), including those with fallopian tube and peritoneal cancers, should be considered as candidates for referral for BRCA genetic testing, irrespective of age; genetic testing should ideally be offered at diagnosis, although patients can be referred at any stage; retrospective testing should be offered to patients in long-term follow-up because of the implications for family members and individual future breast cancer risk; and germline BRCA testing of a blood/saliva sample should initially be conducted and, if negative, tumour tissue should be tested (to identify non-germline [somatic] BRCA PARPi therapy candidates).

  12. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd;

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  13. Genetic predisposition, parity, age at first childbirth and risk for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Salma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with the risk of breast cancer and parity and age at first childbirth are well established and important risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between these environmental factors and genetic variants on breast cancer risk. Methods The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS included 17 035 female participants, from which 728 incident breast cancer cases were matched to 1448 controls. The associations between 14 SNPs and breast cancer risk were investigated in different strata of parity and age at first childbirth. A logistic regression analysis for the per allele risk, adjusted for potential confounders yielded odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Six of the previously identified SNPs showed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk: rs2981582 (FGFR2, rs3803662 (TNRC9, rs12443621 (TNRC9, rs889312 (MAP3K1, rs3817198 (LSP1 and rs2107425 (H19. We could not find any statistically significant interaction between the effects of tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth on breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions The results of this study are in agreement with previous studies of null interactions between tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth with regard to breast cancer risk.

  14. Identification of Novel Prognostic Genetic Marker in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Carlsbad, CA, USA) were denatured for 7 minutes Bank , Tokyo) containing sequences encoding the simian at 75°C, reannealed at 37°C for 1 hour, then...Hum. Mol. Genet. 10, 271-282. 21. Daigo, Y., Chin, S. F., Gorringe , K. L., Bobrow, L. G., Ponder, B. A., Pharoah, P. D., Caldas, C. (2001

  15. Association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer in ethnically diverse women from Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaima Al-Alem

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Non-Hispanic (nH Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. METHODS: We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the "Breast Cancer Care in Chicago" study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. RESULTS: As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54-0.92 among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.95 among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02 and higher grade (p = 0.012 in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03 in nH Blacks. CONCLUSION: Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial

  16. 59. Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology: Molecular genetics of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Investigation of the mechanistic aspects of cancer has its roots in the studies on tumor viruses and their effects on cell proliferation, function, and growth. This outstanding progress was well documented in previous Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. In the early to mid 1980s, progress on the development of chromosome mapping strategies and the accumulation of DNA probes that identified polymorphisms, encouraged by the international Human Genome Project, enabled the identification of other genes that contributed to familial inheritance of high susceptibility to specific cancers. This approach was very successful and led to a degree of optimism that one aspect of cancer, the multistep genetic process from early neoplasia to metastatic tumors, was beginning to be understood. It therefore seemed appropriate that the 59th Symposium on Quantitative Biology focus attention on the Molecular Genetics of Cancer. The concept was to combine the exciting progress on the identification of new genetic alterations in human tumor cells with studies on the function of the cancer gene products and how they go awry in tumor cells.

  17. Patterns of Cancer Genetic Testing: A Randomized Survey of Oregon Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L. Cox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Appropriate use of genetic tests for population-based cancer screening, diagnosis of inherited cancers, and guidance of cancer treatment can improve health outcomes. We investigated clinicians’ use and knowledge of eight breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer genetic tests. Methods. We conducted a randomized survey of 2,191 Oregon providers, asking about their experience with fecal DNA, OncoVue, BRCA, MMR, CYP2D6, tumor gene expression profiling, UGT1A1, and KRAS. Results. Clinicians reported low confidence in their knowledge of medical genetics; most confident were OB-GYNs and specialists. Clinicians were more likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA and MMR than the other tests, and OB-GYNs were twice as likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA testing than primary care providers. Less than 10% of providers ordered/recommended OncoVue, fecal DNA, CYP2D6, or UGT1A1; less than 30% ordered/recommended tumor gene expression profiles or KRAS. The most common reason for not ordering/recommending these tests was lack of familiarity. Conclusions. Use of appropriate, evidence-based testing can help reduce incidence and mortality of certain cancers, but these tests need to be better integrated into clinical practice. Continued evaluation of emerging technologies, dissemination of findings, and an increase in provider confidence and knowledge are necessary to achieve this end.

  18. Prognostic Implications of Important Genetic Alterations in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Boormans (Joost)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe prostate is a walnut-sized gland that is located caudally from the urinary bladder. It excretes fluid as a part of the semen of men. Prostatic neoplasia is common; in Western developed countries prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in men and it is the second l

  19. Genetic determinants of psychic resilience after a diagnosis of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette; Drago, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Comorbidity between cancer and psychiatric disorders including adjustment disorder, depressive disorders or angst can seriously influence the prognosis and the quality of life of patients. The identification of the psychological and biological profile of patients at risk for such comorbidity is n...

  20. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Cancer Institute of New Jersey); Erin Moshier, Elizabeth Zaita, Katie Dorn, Anneisha Camp- bell, Ana Estevez, Joan Bratton, Melissa Solis, Sherly Jacob...18) Costa -Pinto FA, Palermo-Neto J: Neuroimmune interactions in stress, Neuroimmunomodulation 2010; 17(3):196-9. 19) Smith AJP, Humphries SE

  1. Genetic and cell biological aspects of PTEN in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W. van Duijn (Petra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe dual specific phosphatase PTEN (Phosphatase and TENsin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) is one of the most extensively studied proteins of the last decade. It was the first phosphatase identified as a tumor suppressor and in sporadic cancers PTEN is one of the most frequently altere

  2. Delivery of Internet-based cancer genetic counselling services to patients' homes: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Daly, Mary B; Vig, Hetal S; Manion, Frank J; Manne, Sharon L; Mazar, Carla; Murphy, Camara; Solarino, Nicholas; Zubarev, Vadim

    2011-01-01

    We examined the feasibility of home videoconferencing for providing cancer genetic education and risk information to people at risk. Adults with possible hereditary colon or breast and ovarian cancer syndromes were offered Internet-based counselling. Participants were sent web cameras and software to install on their home PCs. They watched a prerecorded educational video and then took part in a live counselling session with a genetic counsellor. A total of 31 participants took part in Internet counselling sessions. Satisfaction with counselling was high in all domains studied, including technical (mean 4.3 on a 1-5 scale), education (mean 4.7), communication (mean 4.8), psychosocial (mean 4.1) and overall (mean 4.2). Qualitative data identified technical aspects that could be improved. All participants reported that they would recommend Internet-based counselling to others. Internet-based genetic counselling is feasible and associated with a high level of satisfaction among participants.

  3. Genetic background may contribute to PAM50 gene expression breast cancer subtype assignments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome wide transcriptional analysis have provided greater insights into the etiology and heterogeneity of breast cancer. Molecular signatures have been developed that stratify the conventional estrogen receptor positive or negative categories into subtypes that are associated with differing clinical outcomes. It is thought that the expression patterns of the molecular subtypes primarily reflect cell-of-origin or tumor driver mutations. In this study however, using a genetically engineered mouse mammary tumor model we demonstrate that the PAM50 subtype signature of tumors driven by a common oncogenic event can be significantly influenced by the genetic background on which the tumor arises. These results have important implications for interpretation of "snapshot" expression profiles, as well as suggesting that incorporation of genetic background effects may allow investigation into phenotypes not initially anticipated in individual mouse models of cancer.

  4. Emerging technologies to create inducible and genetically defined porcine cancer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B Schook

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging need for new animal models that address unmet translational cancer research requirements. Transgenic porcine models provide an exceptional opportunity due to their genetic, anatomic and physiological similarities with humans. Due to recent advances in the sequencing of domestic animal genomes and the development of new organism cloning technologies, it is now very feasible to utilize pigs as a malleable species, with similar anatomic and physiological features with humans, in which to develop cancer models. In this review, we discuss genetic modification technologies successfully used to produce porcine biomedical models, in particular the Cre-loxP System as well as major advances and perspectives the CRISPR/Cas9 System. Recent advancements in porcine tumor modeling and genome editing will bring porcine models to the forefront of translational cancer research.

  5. A cost analysis of a cancer genetic service model in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Ingrid; Hanson, Helen; George, Angela; Kohut, Kelly; Strydom, Ann; Wordsworth, Sarah; Rahman, Nazneen

    2016-07-01

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing have made gene testing fast and more affordable. Evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of genetic service models is essential for the successful translation of sequencing improvements for patient benefit, but remain sparse in the genetics literature. In particular, there is a lack of detailed cost data related to genetic services. A detailed micro-costing of 28 possible pathways relating to breast and/or ovarian cancer and BRCA testing was carried out by defining service activities and establishing associated costs. These data were combined with patient-level data from a Royal Marsden Cancer Genetics Service audit over a 6-month period during which BRCA testing was offered to individuals at ≥10 % risk of having a mutation, in line with current NICE guidance. The average cost across all patient pathways was £2227.39 (range £376.51 to £13,553.10). The average cost per pathway for an affected person was £1897.75 compared to £2410.53 for an unaffected person. Of the women seen in the Cancer Genetics Service during the audit, 38 % were affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer, and 62 % were unaffected but concerned about their family history. The most efficient service strategy is to identify unaffected relatives from an affected individual with an identified BRCA mutation. Implementation of this strategy would require more comprehensive testing of all eligible cancer patients, which could be achieved by integrating BRCA testing into oncology services. Such integration would be also more time-efficient and deliver greater equity of access to BRCA testing than the standard service model.

  6. Evaluation of breast cancer susceptibility using improved genetic algorithms to generate genotype SNP barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association is a challenging task for the identification and characterization of genes that increase the susceptibility to common complex multifactorial diseases. To fully execute genetic studies of complex diseases, modern geneticists face the challenge of detecting interactions between loci. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to detect the association of genotype frequencies of cancer cases and noncancer cases based on statistical analysis. An improved genetic algorithm (IGA) is proposed to improve the reliability of the GA method for high-dimensional SNP-SNP interactions. The strategy offers the top five results to the random population process, in which they guide the GA toward a significant search course. The IGA increases the likelihood of quickly detecting the maximum ratio difference between cancer cases and noncancer cases. The study systematically evaluates the joint effect of 23 SNP combinations of six steroid hormone metabolisms, and signaling-related genes involved in breast carcinogenesis pathways were systematically evaluated, with IGA successfully detecting significant ratio differences between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases. The possible breast cancer risks were subsequently analyzed by odds-ratio (OR) and risk-ratio analysis. The estimated OR of the best SNP barcode is significantly higher than 1 (between 1.15 and 7.01) for specific combinations of two to 13 SNPs. Analysis results support that the IGA provides higher ratio difference values than the GA between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases over 3-SNP to 13-SNP interactions. A more specific SNP-SNP interaction profile for the risk of breast cancer is also provided.

  7. Why pesticides could be a common cause of prostate and breast cancers in the French Caribbean Island, Martinique. An overview on key mechanisms of pesticide-induced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau-Ossondo, M; Rabia, N; Jos-Pelage, J; Marquet, L M; Isidore, Y; Saint-Aimé, C; Martin, M; Irigaray, P; Belpomme, D

    2009-07-01

    Prostate and breast cancers have become very frequent in Martinique. We previously conducted a multifactorial analysis in the French Caribbean Island, Martinique, in order to elucidate the aetiology of prostate cancer. Using a linear regression analysis, we found that the growth curves of incidence rates for Martinique and metropolitan France have been significantly diverging since 1983. Although a Caribbean genetic susceptibility factor may be involved in prostate carcinogenesis: this factor, because it could not have changed during the observation period, cannot per se account for the growing incidence of this cancer in the island. We therefore suggested that among possible environmental factors, the intensive and prolonged exposure to Carcinogenic, Mutagenic and/or Reprotoxic (CMR) or presumed CMR pesticides may account for the observed growing incidence of prostate cancer and thus may be involved in prostate carcinogenesis. In this study, we further attempt to show that due to their carcinogenic properties, pesticides and especially organochlorine pesticides may in fact be causally implicated in the growing incidence of prostate cancer in Martinique. Also, we suggest that CMR or presumed CMR pesticides may be causally involved in the growing incidence of breast cancer through a common endocrine disruption mechanism. We therefore propose that protective medical recommendations should be immediately set up and carried out by general practitioners, paediatricians, obstetricians, gynaecologists and urologists; and that public health measures of primary precaution and prevention should be urgently taken in close collaboration with health professionals in order to protect population, more especially pregnant women and children, with the final objective perhaps that these medical recommendations and public health measures will stop Martinique's cancer epidemic.

  8. Adjuvant Cancer Biotherapy by Viscum Album Extract Isorel: Overview of Evidence Based Medicine Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunjic, Suzana Borovic; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Vukovic, Tea; Weiss, Thomas; Weiss, Elisabeth Sussman; Soldo, Ivo; Djakovic, Nikola; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-09-01

    Within the integrative medicine one of the most frequently used adjuvant cancer biotherapies is based on aqueous mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts. Tumor growth inhibition, stimulation of host immune response and improvement of the quality of life are the positive effects of mistletoe therapy described in several preclinical and clinical studies. However, cumulative results of the evidence based medicine findings on such treatments are rarely given. Therefore, this paper evaluates the evidence based findings describing effects of the Viscum album extract Isorel in cancer therapy with respect to the type of therapy, stage and type of illness. This study presents cumulated data for 74 patients with different types and stages of cancer treated by Viscum album extract as adjuvant treatment to different conventional therapies, mostly combined surgery and radiotherapy. The biotherapy effectiveness was evaluated according to the outcome as (1) no major therapeutic improvement (15% of patients), (2) prevention of tumor recurrence (47% of patients) and (3) regression of cancer (38% of patients). Notably, there was no obvious health worsening during the follow up period at all. Thus, the results obtained for conventional anticancer therapies combined with adjuvant biotherapy based on Viscum album extract seem to be beneficial for the majority of cancer patients (85%) without serious side effects.

  9. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs.

  10. Chemical genetics and drug screening in Drosophila cancer models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara Gladstone; Tin Tin Su

    2011-01-01

    Drug candidates often fail in preclinical and clinical testing because of reasons of efficacy and/or safety.It would be time- and cost-efficient to have screening models that reduce the rate of such false positive candidates that appear promising at first but fail later.In this regard,it would be particularly useful to have a rapid and inexpensive whole animal model that can pre-select hits from high-throughput screens but before testing in costly rodent assays.Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a potential whole animal model for drug screening.Of particular interest have been drugs that must act in the context of multi-cellularity such as those for neurological disorders and cancer.A recent review provides a comprehensive summary of drug screening in Drosophila,but with an emphasis on neurodegenerative disorders.Here,we review Drosophila screens in the literature aimed at cancer therapeutics.

  11. Stress and Coping in Genetic Testing for Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    depression." Institut Gregory Bateson , Paris "Intervening with individuals, couples, and families: I’ecole de Palo Alto." Institut Gregory Bateson ...potential determinants. Journal of Family Practice 47:312-5. Wooster R, Bignell G, Lancaster J, Swift S, Seal S, Mangion J, Collins N, Gregory S, Gumbs...Richards, M. A., Gregory , W. M., & Rubens, R. D. (1993). Psychiatric disorder in patients with advanced breast cancer: Prevalence and associated

  12. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  13. Recent advances in ginseng as cancer therapeutics: a functional and mechanistic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alice S T; Che, Chi-Ming; Leung, Kar-Wah

    2015-02-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Ginseng, a key ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine, shows great promise as a new treatment option. As listed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health as a complementary and alternative medicine, its anti-cancer functions are being increasingly recognized. This review covers the mechanisms of action of ginsenosides and their metabolites, which can modulate signaling pathways associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, angiogenesis, metastasis, and stem/progenitor-like properties of cancer cells. The emerging use of structurally modified ginsenosides and recent clinical studies on the use of ginseng either alone or in combination with other herbs or Western medicines which are exploited as novel therapeutic strategies will also be explored.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of p53 Deregulation in Cancer: An Overview in Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Ana B; Rojas, Elizabeta A; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Krzeminski, Patryk; Gutiérrez, Norma C

    2016-11-30

    The p53 pathway is inactivated in the majority of human cancers. Although this perturbation frequently occurs through the mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are other mechanisms that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, overexpression of important p53 negative regulators, such as murine double minute 2 (MDM2) or murine double minute 4 (MDM4), epigenetic deregulation, or even alterations in TP53 mRNA splicing. In this work, we will review the different mechanisms of p53 pathway inhibition in cancer with special focus on multiple myeloma (MM), the second most common hematological malignancy, with low incidence of p53 mutations/deletions but growing evidence of indirect p53 pathway deregulation. Translational implications for MM and cancer prognosis and treatment are also reviewed.

  15. An overview of sipuleucel-T: autologous cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Johnna D; Whitmore, James; Trager, James; Sheikh, Nadeem

    2012-04-01

    Sipuleucel-T, the first autologous active cellular immunotherapy approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, is designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer. Sipuleucel-T is manufactured by culturing a patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (including antigen presenting cells) with a recombinant protein comprising a tumor-associated antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Treatment consists of 3 infusions at approximately 2-week intervals, resulting in a prime-boost pattern of immune activation, a robust antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune response, and, consequently, a survival benefit in subjects with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and resolve within 2 d. Serious adverse events occur at a low rate. As the first autologous cellular immunotherapy to demonstrate a survival benefit, sipuleucel-T is a novel oncologic therapeutic that warrants the reassessment of the current prostate cancer treatment paradigm.

  16. [History, overview and challenges of the breast cancer movement in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza-Fernández, María Elena; Vecchi-Martini, Elda

    2009-01-01

    This essay describes the history of the civil society breast cancer movement in Mexico, the role played by breast cancer NGOs and the changes they must undergo for their activities to impact the quality of life of men and women dealing with this disease. The concept of civil society today has been transformed, regaining a degree of autonomy and being at the center of a participatory democracy. Civil society takes a lead role in key issues such as health, civil rights, and public welfare. Breast cancer organizations have the liberty to organize and promote initiatives that will help others' welfare and develop their full potential for the benefit of themselves and their community. These organizations must focus on promoting changes in the system that will result in better services and better quality of life for their constituents.

  17. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis and prognostics of bladder cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; He, Xiang-Lei; Teng, Xiao-Dong

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of cellular mechanisms in malignances of the bladder has grown exponentially. Molecular technologies have led to the discovery of the molecular pathways distinguishing low-and high-grade urothelial neoplasms. This trend portends the future in which the classification and diagnosis of the bladder tumors through morphologic analysis will be supported by molecular information correlating with prognosis and targeted therapy. This article outlines tumor molecular pathology of bladder cancer with an emphasis on several promising candidate biomarkers that may soon make their transition to the realm of clinical management of bladder cancer.

  18. GENETIC ALTERRATIONS OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AT CHROMOSOME 17 IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Xue-jun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Froudarakis ME, Bouros D, Spandidos DA, et al. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 17 in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Chest 1998; 113:1091.[2]Fong KM, Zimmerman PV, Smith PJ. Microsatellite instability and other molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2098.[3]Mountain CF. A new international staging system for lung cancer [J]. Chest 1986; 89(suppl):225.[4]Shridhar V, Siegfried J, Hunt J, et al. Genetic instability of microsatellite sequences in many non-small cell lung carcinomas [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2084.[5]Loeb LA. Microsatellite instability: Marker of a mutator phenotype in cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:5059.[6]Sanchez CM, Monzo M, Rosell R, et al. Detection of chromosome 3p alterations in serum DNA of non-small cell lung cancer patients [J]. Ann Oncol 1989; 113.

  19. "Be ready against cancer, now": direct-to-consumer advertising for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William-Jones, Bryn

    2006-04-01

    A recent addition to the debate about the benefits and harms of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of medicines and pharmaceuticals is a growing critique of DTC marketing and sale of genetic tests. Academic and policy literatures exploring this issue have, however, tended to focus on the sale of genetic tests, paying rather less attention to the particular implications of advertising. The globalization of broadcast media and ever increasing access to the Internet mean that public exposure to advertising for medical technologies is a reality that national regulatory bodies will be hard pressed to constrain. Working through a case study detailing Myriad Genetics' 2002 pilot advertising campaign for their BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, this paper highlights some of the diverse and often overlooked and unregulated approaches to DTC advertising, and the associated social, ethical and policy implications.

  20. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  1. Patient education about treatment in cancer care: an overview of the literature on older patients' needs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of older people are treated for cancer. Several factors, such as comorbidity and sensory deficits, occur more frequently in older patients than in younger patients. In addition, their life circumstances, values, and preferences may differ. These factors ask for tailored nurse-ol

  2. An overview of prognostic factors for long-term survivors of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); M.W.J. Louwman (Marieke); J.G. Ribot (Jacques); J.A. Roukema; J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Numerous studies have examined prognostic factors for survival of breast cancer patients, but relatively few have dealt specifically with 10+-year survivors. Methods: A review of the PubMed database from 1995 to 2006 was undertaken with the following inclusion criteria: media

  3. Involvement of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkawy, Ahmed H; Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Morris, David L

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there are several studies supporting the role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system in cancer. The association of uPA to its receptor triggers the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. This process is regulated by the uPA inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2). Plasmin promotes degradation of basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM) components as well as activation of ECM latent matrix metalloproteases. Degradation and remodeling of the surrounding tissues is crucial in the early steps of tumor progression by facilitating expansion of the tumor mass, release of tumor growth factors, activation of cytokines as well as induction of tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Hence, many tumors showed a correlation between uPA system component levels and tumor aggressiveness and survival. Therefore, this review summarizes the structure of the uPA system, its contribution to cancer progression, and the clinical relevance of uPA family members in cancer diagnosis. In addition, the review evaluates the significance of uPA system in the development of cancer-targeted therapies.

  4. Targeted therapies in bladder cancer: an overview of in vivo research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Kim E M; Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Alberts, Arnout R; Boormans, Joost L; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2015-12-01

    Survival of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer is poor and new therapies are needed. Currently, none of the targeted agents that are approved for cancer therapy have been approved for the treatment of bladder cancer and the few clinical trials that have been performed had limited success, often owing to a lack of efficacy and toxic effects. However, many other novel targeted agents have been investigated in animal models of bladder cancer. EGFR, FGFR-3, VEGF, mTOR, STAT3, the androgen receptor and CD24 are molecular targets that could be efficiently inhibited, resulting in reduced tumour growth, and that have been investigated in multiple independent studies. Several other targets, for example COX-2, IL-12, Bcl-xL, livin and choline kinase α, have also been observed to inhibit tumour growth, but these findings have not been replicated to date. Limitations of several studies include the use of cell lines with mutations downstream of the target, providing resistance to the tested therapy. Furthermore, certain technologies, such as interfering RNAs, although effective in vitro, are not yet ready for clinical applications. Further preclinical research is needed to discover and evaluate other possible targets, but several validated targets are now available to be studied in clinical trials.

  5. A comprehensive overview of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles - endogenous nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Skov, Martin Najbjerg; Pilgaard, Linda; Moos, Torben; Duroux, Meg

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes denote a class of secreted nanoparticles defined by size, surface protein and lipid composition, and the ability to carry RNA and proteins. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest them to be important both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, prompting the idea of using exosomes as drug delivery vehicles, especially for gene therapy. This review covers the current status of evidence presented in the field of exosome-based drug delivery systems. Components for successful exosome-based drug delivery, such as choice of donor cell, therapeutic cargo, use of targeting peptide, loading method and administration route are highlighted and discussed with a general focus pertaining to the results obtained in models of different cancer types. In addition, completed and on-going clinical trials are described, evaluating exosome-based therapies for the treatment of different cancer types. Due to their endogenous origin, exosome-based drug delivery systems may have advantages in the treatment of cancer, but their design needs further refinement to justify their usage on the clinical scale.

  6. Common Beans and Their Non-Digestible Fraction: Cancer Inhibitory Activity—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Campos-Vega

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The US Department of Agriculture’s MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables including dry beans—an important food staple in many traditional diets that can improve public health and nutrition. Populations with high legume (peas, beans, lentils consumption have a low risk of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases. Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. are known as a rich, reliable source of non-digested compounds like fiber, phenolics, peptides and phytochemicals that are associated with health benefits. Emerging evidence indicates that common bean consumption is associated with reduced cancer risk in human populations, inhibiting carcinogenesis in animal models and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cell cultures. Fiber may reduce the risk of premature death from all causes, whereas the whole non-digestible fraction from common beans exhibits anti-proliferative activity and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo colon cancer. The mechanisms responsible for this apparently protective role may include gene-nutrient interactions and modulation of proteins’ expression. This review investigates the potential health benefits and bioactivity of beans on tumor inhibition, highlighting studies involving functional compounds, mainly non-digestible fractions that modulate genes and proteins, thereby, unraveling their preventive role against the development of cancer.

  7. Selenium Compounds, Apoptosis and Other Types of Cell Death: An Overview for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Palop

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential trace element involved in different physiological functions of the human body and plays a role in cancer prevention and treatment. Induction of apoptosis is considered an important cellular event that can account for the cancer preventive effects of Se. The mechanisms of Se-induced apoptosis are associated with the chemical forms of Se and their metabolism as well as the type of cancer studied. So, some selenocompounds, such as SeO2 involve the activation of caspase-3 while sodium selenite induces apoptosis in the absence of the activation of caspases. Modulation of mitochondrial functions has been reported to play a key role in the regulation of apoptosis and also to be one of the targets of Se compounds. Other mechanisms for apoptosis induction are the modulation of glutathione and reactive oxygen species levels, which may function as intracellular messengers to regulate signaling pathways, or the regulation of kinase, among others. Emerging evidence indicates the overlaps between the apoptosis and other types of cell death such as autophagy. In this review we report different processes of cell death induced by Se compounds in cancer treatment and prevention.

  8. Data quality at the Bulgarian National Cancer Registry: An overview of comparability, completeness, validity and timeliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Nadya; Parkin, Donald Maxwell

    2015-06-01

    Reporting of neoplasms in Bulgaria has been compulsory since a directive from the Ministry of Health in 1951. The quality of cancer registry data has been estimated rather infrequently in past years. We aimed to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the quality of the data at the Bulgarian National Cancer Registry (BNCR). Quantitative and semi-quantitative methods were applied for cancers diagnosed during the whole period 1993-2010, and also for cases diagnosed in 2006-2010. The methods used include historic data methods, mortality-to-incidence ratios (M:I), capture-recapture and death-certificate methods, proportions of morphologically verified cases (MV%), death-certificate-only cases (DCO%), and cases with missing information (primary site unknown, PSU%; stage unknown, SU%). The BNCR coding and classification systems follow international standards. The overall completeness was estimated at 92.6-94.7% for the period 2006-2010, with variations between cancer sites (86.7-98.5%). During the period 1993-2010, M:I decreased to 0.5 for males and 0.4 for females, MV increased to 87.4%, DCO and SU decreased to 4.8% and 18.8%, respectively, and PSU remained at the same level of about 4% for both sexes together. Sub-analysis revealed differences by site, sex and age groups. The comparison with other registries from the region showed similar incidence rates and directions of trends: M:I, MV% and DCO% that were not significantly different. The underreporting in 2008 and 2009 due to timely publication was estimated at an overall 0.8% and 0.5%, respectively. The present review showed that the BNCR yields internationally comparable data that are reasonably accurate, timely, and close to complete, especially in recent years. This is a prerequisite for the BNCR to expand its role to more areas of cancer control.

  9. Relative susceptibilities of male germ cells to genetic defects induced by cancer chemotherapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A J; Schmid, T E; Marchetti, F

    2004-06-15

    Some chemotherapy regimens include agents that are mutagenic or clastogenic in model systems. This raises concerns that cancer survivors, who were treated before or during their reproductive years, may be at increased risks for abnormal reproductive outcomes. However, the available data from offspring of cancer survivors are limited, representing diverse cancers, therapies, time-to-pregnancies, and reproductive outcomes. Rodent breeding data after paternal exposures to individual chemotherapeutic agents illustrate the complexity of factors that influence the risk for transmitted genetic damage including agent, dose, endpoint, and the germ-cell susceptibility profiles that vary across agents. Direct measurements of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of mice and humans by sperm FISH have corroborated the differences in germ-cell susceptibilities. The available evidence suggests that the risk of producing chromosomally defective sperm is highest during the first few weeks after the end of chemotherapy, and decays with time. Thus, sperm samples provided immediately after the initiation of cancer therapies may contain treatment-induced genetic defects that will jeopardize the genetic health of offspring.

  10. Ethnicity and Prostate Cancer: Vitamin D Genetic and Sociodemographic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    3 Ivana Balic,4 Tim E. Byers,2 John E. Hokanson,2 Jill M. Norris,2 Anna E. Baro¤ n,2 M. Scott Lucia,1 IanM.Thompson,5 and RobinJ. Leach3,5,6 Abstract...and CYP3A4. Hum Hered 2002;54:13^21. 33. John EM, Schwartz GG, Koo J, van den Berg D, Ingles SA. Sun exposure, vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms...Bock CH, Monaghan K, et al. SRD5A2 andHSD3B2 polymorphisms are associated withprostate cancer risk and aggressiveness. Prostate 2007;67:1654^63. 38

  11. Communication and technology in genetic counseling for familial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, H T; Snyder, C; Stacey, M; Olson, B; Peterson, S K; Buxbaum, S; Shaw, T; Lynch, P M

    2014-03-01

    When a cancer predisposing germline mutation is detected in an index case, the presence of the underlying syndrome is confirmed and the potential for predictive testing of at-risk relatives is established. However, the reporting of a positive family history does not routinely lead to communication of information about risk to close, much less distant relatives. This review summarizes information technology utilized to address penetration or 'reach' of knowledge of risk within extended families, including the use of telephone and video counseling to reach distant patients, and anticipate novel internet-based processes for communication between investigators and relatives.

  12. Telemedicine vs in-person cancer genetic counseling: measuring satisfaction and conducting economic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta SK

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Santanu K Datta1,2, Adam H Buchanan3, Gail P Hollowell4, Henry F Beresford5, Paul K Marcom1,3, Martha B Adams1,61Department of Medicine, Duke University; 2Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center; 3Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University; 4Department of Biology, North Carolina Central University; 5School of Nursing, Duke University; 6Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cancer genetic counseling (CGC provides benefits and is the standard of care for individuals at increased risk of having a hereditary cancer syndrome. CGC services are typically centered in urban medical centers, leading to limited access to counseling in rural communities. Telemedicine has the potential to improve access to CGC, increase efficient use of genetic counselors, and improve patient care in rural communities. For telemedicine CGC to gain wide acceptance and implementation it needs to be shown that individuals who receive telemedicine CGC have high satisfaction levels and that CGC is cost-effective; however little research has been conducted to measure the impact of telemedicine CGC. This paper describes the design and methodology of a randomized controlled trial comparing telemedicine with in-person CGC. Measurement of patient satisfaction and effectiveness outcomes are described, as is measurement of costs that are included in an economic analysis. Study design and methodologies used are presented as a contribution to future comparative effectiveness investigations in the telemedicine genetic counseling field.Keywords: cancer genetics, genetic counseling, rural health services, telemedicine, satisfaction, cost

  13. Cost-effectiveness of a genetic test for breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folse, Henry J; Green, Linda E; Kress, Andrea; Allman, Richard; Dinh, Tuan A

    2013-12-01

    Genetic testing of seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (7SNP) can improve estimates of risk of breast cancer relative to the Gail risk test alone, for the purpose of recommending MRI screening for women at high risk. A simulation of breast cancer and health care processes was used to conduct a virtual trial comparing the use of the 7SNP test with the Gail risk test to categorize patients by risk. Average-risk patients received annual mammogram, whereas high-risk patients received annual MRI. Cancer incidence was based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data and validated to Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort data. Risk factor values were drawn from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-4) and Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial data. Mammogram characteristics were derived from Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data. The test was most cost-effective when given to patients at an intermediate lifetime risk of breast cancer. For patients with a risk of 16% to 28%, it resulted in a 1.91% reduction in cancer deaths, saving 0.005 quality-adjusted life years per person at a cost of $163,264 per QALY. These results were sensitive to the age at which the test is given, the discount rate, and the costs of the genetic test and MRI. The cost effectiveness of using the 7SNP test for patients with intermediate Gail risk is similar to that of other recommended strategies, including annual MRI for patients with a lifetime risk greater than 20% or BRCA1/2 mutations.

  14. Genetic-epidemiological evidence for the role of acetaldehyde in cancers related to alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, C J Peter

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol drinking increases the risk for a number of cancers. Currently, the highest risk (Group 1) concerns oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colorectum, and female breast, as assessed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Alcohol and other beverage constituents, their metabolic effects, and alcohol-related unhealthy lifestyles have been suggested as etiological factors. The aim of the present survey is to evaluate the carcinogenic role of acetaldehyde in alcohol-related cancers, with special emphasis on the genetic-epidemiological evidence. Acetaldehyde, as a constituent of alcoholic beverages, and microbial and endogenous alcohol oxidation well explain why alcohol-related cancers primarily occur in the digestive tracts and other tissues with active alcohol and acetaldehyde metabolism. Genetic-epidemiological research has brought compelling evidence for the causality of acetaldehyde in alcohol-related cancers. Thus, IARC recently categorized alcohol-drinking-related acetaldehyde to Group 1 for head and neck and esophageal cancers. This is probably just the tip of the iceberg, since more recent epidemiological studies have also shown significant positive associations between the aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2 (rs671)*2 allele (encoding inactive enzyme causing high acetaldehyde elevations) and gastric, colorectal, lung, and hepatocellular cancers. However, a number of the current studies lack the appropriate matching or stratification of alcohol drinking in the case-control comparisons, which has led to erroneous interpretations of the data. Future studies should consider these aspects more thoroughly. The polymorphism phenotypes (flushing and nausea) may provide valuable tools for future successful health education in the prevention of alcohol-drinking-related cancers.

  15. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  16. Genetically engineered mucin mouse models for inflammation and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Bafna, Sangeeta; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer. PMID:25634251

  17. Cancer genetics education in a low- to middle-income country: evaluation of an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hill

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic testing is becoming an integral part of medical care for inherited disorders. While genetic testing and counseling are readily available in high-income countries, in low- and middle-income countries like Kenya genetic testing is limited and genetic counseling is virtually non-existent. Genetic testing is likely to become widespread in Kenya within the next decade, yet there has not been a concomitant increase in genetic counseling resources. To address this gap, we designed an interactive workshop for clinicians in Kenya focused on the genetics of the childhood eye cancer retinoblastoma. The objectives were to increase retinoblastoma genetics knowledge, build genetic counseling skills and increase confidence in those skills.The workshop was conducted at the 2013 Kenyan National Retinoblastoma Strategy meeting. It included a retinoblastoma genetics presentation, small group discussion of case studies and genetic counseling role-play. Knowledge was assessed by standardized test, and genetic counseling skills and confidence by questionnaire.Knowledge increased significantly post-workshop, driven by increased knowledge of retinoblastoma causative genetics. One-year post-workshop, participant knowledge had returned to baseline, indicating that knowledge retention requires more frequent reinforcement. Participants reported feeling more confident discussing genetics with patients, and had integrated more genetic counseling into patient interactions.A comprehensive retinoblastoma genetics workshop can increase the knowledge and skills necessary for effective retinoblastoma genetic counseling.

  18. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-06-09

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention.

  19. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chowdhury

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention.

  20. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  1. Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of common cancers: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenan; Doherty, Jennifer A; Burgess, Stephen; Hung, Rayjean J; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Gong, Jian; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James D; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Timofeeva, Maria N; Wang, Yufei; Heinrich, Joachim; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Muir, Ken; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Berndt, Sonja I; Chanock, Stephen J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Andrulis, Irene L; Hopper, John L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Ursin, Giske; Whittemore, Alice S; Hunter, David J; Gruber, Stephen B; Knight, Julia A; Hou, Lifang; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Hudson, Thomas J; Chan, Andrew T; Li, Li; Woods, Michael O; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2015-09-15

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51 725 cases and 62 035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P = 6.3 × 10(-15)), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P = 6.6 × 10(-6)). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate [odds ratio (OR) = 2.78] is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 bp increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk.

  2. Genetically Programmed Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles for Cancer Cell-Targeted Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mi Hwa; Yu, Jeong Heon; Kim, Insu; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-10-14

    Interpretations of the interactions of nanocarriers with biological cells are often complicated by complex synthesis of materials, broad size distribution, and heterogeneous surface chemistry. Herein, the major capsid proteins of an icosahedral T7 phage (55 nm in diameter) are genetically engineered to display a gold-binding peptide and a prostate cancer cell-binding peptide in a tandem sequence. The genetically modified phage attracts gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a cluster of gold nanoparticles (about 70 nanoparticles per phage). The cluster of AuNPs maintains cell-targeting functionality and exhibits excellent dispersion stability in serum. Under a very low light irradiation (60 mW cm(-2)), only targeted AuNP clusters kill the prostate cancer cells in minutes (not in other cell types), whereas neither nontargeted AuNP clusters nor citrate-stabilized AuNPs cause any significant cell death. The result suggests that the prostate cancer cell-targeted clusters of AuNPs are targeted to only prostate cancer cells and, when illuminated, generate local heating to more efficiently and selectively kill the targeted cancer cells. Our strategy can be generalized to target other types of cells and assemble other kinds of nanoparticles for a broad range of applications.

  3. AGO Austria recommendations for genetic testing of patients with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marth, Christian; Hubalek, Michael; Petru, Edgar; Polterauer, Stephan; Reinthaller, Alexander; Schauer, Christian; Scholl-Firon, Tonja; Singer, Christian F; Zschocke, Johannes; Zeimet, Alain G

    2015-08-01

    In Austria, 700 women are diagnosed every year with ovarian carcinoma. Approximately 15% of the patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The increased incidence of breast and/or ovarian cancer in genetically related family members has given rise to the term "hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome" (HBOC). Some 25-55% of these in-family diseases are attributed to germline mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2, and approximately 5-10% to other known tumor predisposition syndromes. The remaining persons may carry mutations in as yet unidentified genes. HBOC caused by BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is an autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance. BRCA1 and BRCA2 encode for so-called tumor suppressor proteins. Inherited functional mutations of these genes cause loss of function of the respective allele. Loss of function of the second allele causes complete loss of the corresponding protein and facilitates the development of a malignancy.The Association of Gynecologic Oncology recommends that testing for a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 should be offered to all patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. When mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, or other cancer-susceptibility genes have been identified, patients with ovarian carcinoma can be treated with new, innovative therapies. This recommendation is intended as a standard guideline for genetic testing of patients with an ovarian carcinoma.

  4. Venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer: an overview for pharmacists using a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangilinan, Joanna Maudlin

    2010-08-01

    Clinicians must always maintain a heightened suspicion for the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the cancer patient population. VTE is common in this population and often results in morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology is complex and likely multifactorial. Risk factors for VTE include patient-associated, cancer-associated, and treatment-associated factors as well as biomarkers. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is a cornerstone for VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Studies have shown that LMWH may decrease VTE recurrence and impart a survival benefit. Organizational guidelines are available to assist the clinician in choosing appropriate anticoagulant agents, dosing, and duration of prophylaxis and treatment. Pharmacists serve an important role for the safe and effective management of anticoagulation in this complex patient population. In addition, pharmacists can be important providers of patient education about VTE and anticoagulation.

  5. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoufeh Aalaei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC, Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC, and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC. Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets.

  6. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN) and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier) on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC), Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC), and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC). Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. PMID:27403253

  7. The determination of genetic markers of age-related cancer pathologies in populations from Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Bulatovna Djansugurova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging associates with a variety of pathological conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, autoimmune diseases, and metabolic disorders. The oncogenic alterations overlap frequently with the genes linked to aging. Here, we show that several aging related genes may serve as the genetic risk factors for cervical and esophagus cancers. In our study, we analyzed samples obtained from 115 patients with esophageal and 207 patients with cervical cancer. The control groups were selected to match the ethnicity and age of cancer patients. We examined the genes involved in the processes of xenobiotics detoxification (GSTM1 and GSTT1, DNA repair (XRCC1 and XRCC3, and cell cycle regulation and apoptosis (CCND1 and TP53. Our study revealed that deletions of GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes or the distinct point mutations of XRCC1 gene are associated with cervical and esophageal cancers. These results will lead to development of screening for detection of individuals susceptible to esophageal and cervical cancers. Introduction of the screening programs will allow the early and effective preventive measures that will reduce cancer incidence and mortality in Kazakhstan.

  8. HSP-molecular chaperones in cancer biogenesis and tumor therapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Francesca; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; David, Sabrina; Campanella, Claudia; Carini, Francesco; Tomasello, Giovanni; Damiani, Provvidenza; Cappello, Francesco; DE Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J L

    2012-12-01

    Molecular chaperones, many of which are heat-shock proteins (HSPs), are an important class of molecules with various functions. Pathological conditions in which chaperones become etiological and/or pathogenic factors are called chaperonopathies, and are classified into by defect, by excess, and by 'mistake'. In the latter case, the chaperone is structurally and functionally normal but participates in pathways that favor disease, although in some cases the chaperone may have post-translational modifications that may lead it to change its location and function and, thus, to become pathogenic. For example, HSP-chaperones are involved in carcinogenesis in various ways, so that some forms of cancer may be considered 'chaperonopathies by mistake'. This concept suggests new strategies for anticancer therapy (chaperonotherapy), in which the primary targets or therapeutic agents are chaperones. Chaperonotherapy consists of the utilization of HSP-chaperones for treating chaperonopathies, including cancer. Negative chaperonotherapy is aimed at eliminating or blocking the action of chaperones that favor carcinogenesis or other diseases, whereas positive chaperonotherapy uses chaperones, genes or proteins, to fight against diseases, such as cancer, by stimulating the immune system or the cellular defenses against stress.

  9. Chemotherapeutic strategies in metastatic colorectal cancer: an overview of current clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhne-Wömpner, C H; Schmoll, H J; Harstrick, A; Rustum, Y M

    1992-04-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is still the mainstay of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A prolonged infusion of 5-FU is more active than any other schedule of 5-FU used to date. Cisplatin does not improve treatment results compared with 5-FU alone and is not recommended outside clinical trials. Biomodulation of 5-FU is a major step forward in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients and as the standard chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. Two schedules of folinic acid daily for 5-day (low and high doses) and weekly high dose in combination with daily or weekly 5-FU are the most widely used schedules. Although the response rates to either schedule are comparable, the profile of toxicity is different, being stomatitis for the daily schedule and diarrhea for the weekly schedule as the dose-limiting toxicity. Modulation of 5-FU by methotrexate is time dependent. An interval of 24 hours between methotrexate and 5-FU is necessary for effective modulation. Other modulators, like interferon and N-phosphonoactyl-L-aspartate (PALA), are promising treatment options currently under investigation in randomized trials. The data from phase II and III trials using modulation of 5-FU by folinic acid, PALA, or methotrexate, or using continuous infusion 5-FU indicate that all of these strategies are active. Randomized trials are currently underway to further investigate these therapeutic approaches and whether a specific modulation offers more therapeutic advantages.

  10. The Role of Natural Polyphenols in the Prevention and Treatment of Cervical Cancer-An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Dimienescu, Oana Gabriela; Arvatescu, Cristian Andrei; Mironescu, Aurel; Dracea, Laura; Ples, Liana

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer represents the second leading cause of death for women worldwide. The importance of the diet and its impact on specific types of neoplasia has been highlighted, focusing again interest in the analysis of dietary phytochemicals. Polyphenols have shown a wide range of cellular effects: they may prevent carcinogens from reaching the targeted sites, support detoxification of reactive molecules, improve the elimination of transformed cells, increase the immune surveillance and the most important factor is that they can influence tumor suppressors and inhibit cellular proliferation, interfering in this way with the steps of carcinogenesis. From the studies reviewed in this paper, it is clear that certain dietary polyphenols hold great potential in the prevention and therapy of cervical cancer, because they interfere in carcinogenesis (in the initiation, development and progression) by modulating the critical processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. Specifically, polyphenols inhibit the proliferation of HPV cells, through induction of apoptosis, growth arrest, inhibition of DNA synthesis and modulation of signal transduction pathways. The effects of combinations of polyphenols with chemotherapy and radiotherapy used in the treatment of cervical cancer showed results in the resistance of cervical tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, one of the main problems in the treatment of cervical neoplasia that can lead to failure of the treatment because of the decreased efficiency of the therapy.

  11. Illuminating p53 function in cancer with genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The key role of the p53 protein in tumor suppression is highlighted by its frequent mutation in human cancers and by the completely penetrant cancer predisposition of p53 null mice. Beyond providing definitive evidence for the critical function of p53 in tumor suppression, genetically engineered mouse models have offered numerous additional insights into p53 function. p53 knock-in mice expressing tumor-derived p53 mutants have revealed that these mutants display gain-of-function activities th...

  12. Current perspectives on recommendations for BRCA genetic testing in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergote, Ignace; Banerjee, Susana; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, BRCA genetic testing has been undertaken to identify patients and family members at future risk of developing cancer and patients have been referred for testing based on family history. However, the now recognised risk of ovarian cancer (OC) patients, even those with no known family...... history, harbouring a mutation in BRCA1/2, together with the first poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase inhibitor (PARPi; olaparib [Lynparza]) being licenced for the treatment of BRCA-mutated OC, has led to reconsideration of referral criteria for OC patients. Provided here is a review...

  13. Survey on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Training Needs of Italian Residents on Genetic Tests for Hereditary Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Panic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess knowledge and attitudes of medical residents working in Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, on genetic tests for breast and colorectal cancer. Methods. We distributed self-administered questionnaire to the residents. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the determinants of knowledge and attitudes towards the tests. Results. Of 754 residents, 364 filled in questionnaire. Around 70% and 20% answered correctly >80% of questions on breast and colorectal cancer tests, respectively. Knowledge on tests for breast cancer was higher among residents who attended course on cancer genetic testing during graduate training (odds ratio (OR: 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.05–2.82 and inversely associated with male gender (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.35–0.87. As for colorectal cancer, residents were more knowledgeable if they attended courses on cancer genetic testing (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.07–4.03 or postgraduate training courses in epidemiology and evidence-based medicine (OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.03–3.69. More than 70% asked for the additional training on the genetic tests for cancer during the specialization school. Conclusion. The knowledge of Italian residents on genetic tests for colorectal cancer appears to be insufficient. There is a need for additional training in this field.

  14. The knowledge value-chain of genetic counseling for breast cancer: an empirical assessment of prediction and communication processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Nabil; Blouin-Bougie, Jolyane; Jbilou, Jalila; Halilem, Norrin; Simard, Jacques; Landry, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze the genetic counseling process for breast cancer with a theoretical knowledge transfer lens and to compare generalists, medical specialists, and genetic counselors with regards to their genetic counseling practices. This paper presents the genetic counseling process occurring within a chain of value-adding activities of four main stages describing health professionals' clinical practices: (1) evaluation, (2) investigation, (3) information, and (4) decision. It also presents the results of a cross-sectional study based on a Canadian medical doctors and genetic counselors survey (n = 176) realized between July 2012 and March 2013. The statistical exercise included descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results indicate that even though all types of health professionals are involved in the entire process of genetic counseling for breast cancer, genetic counselors are more involved in the evaluation of breast cancer risk, while medical doctors are more active in the decision toward breast cancer risk management strategies. The results secondly demonstrate the relevance and the key role of genetic counselors in the care provided to women at-risk of familial breast cancer. This paper presents an integrative framework to understand the current process of genetic counseling for breast cancer in Canada, and to shed light on how and where health professionals contribute to the process. It also offers a starting point for assessing clinical practices in genetic counseling in order to establish more clearly where and to what extent efforts should be undertaken to implement future genetic services.

  15. African-Caribbean cancer consortium for the study of viral, genetic and environmental cancer risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odedina Folakemi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a short summary of a meeting of the "African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium", jointly organized by the University of Pittsburgh, Department of Epidemiology and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica as a satellite meeting at the Caribbean Health Research Council, 52nd Annual Council and Scientific meeting on May 4, 2007.

  16. Aspects of genetic and clinical heterogeneity in breast cancer in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Bootsma (Aart)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer affects approximately 1 in every 12 women in Western countries. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women in these countries. Investigation of the mechanism of breast carcinogenesis is hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease that can be observed at the clinical,

  17. Genetic association of the KLK4 locus with risk of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Lose

    Full Text Available The Kallikrein-related peptidase, KLK4, has been shown to be significantly overexpressed in prostate tumours in numerous studies and is suggested to be a potential biomarker for prostate cancer. KLK4 may also play a role in prostate cancer progression through its involvement in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a more aggressive phenotype, and metastases to bone. It is well known that genetic variation has the potential to affect gene expression and/or various protein characteristics and hence we sought to investigate the possible role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the KLK4 gene in prostate cancer. Assessment of 61 SNPs in the KLK4 locus (± 10 kb in approximately 1300 prostate cancer cases and 1300 male controls for associations with prostate cancer risk and/or prostate tumour aggressiveness (Gleason score <7 versus ≥ 7 revealed 7 SNPs to be associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer at the P(trend<0.05 significance level. Three of these SNPs, rs268923, rs56112930 and the HapMap tagSNP rs7248321, are located several kb upstream of KLK4; rs1654551 encodes a non-synonymous serine to alanine substitution at position 22 of the long isoform of the KLK4 protein, and the remaining 3 risk-associated SNPs, rs1701927, rs1090649 and rs806019, are located downstream of KLK4 and are in high linkage disequilibrium with each other (r(2 ≥ 0.98. Our findings provide suggestive evidence of a role for genetic variation in the KLK4 locus in prostate cancer predisposition.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in obesity-related genes and endometrial cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Long, Ji-Rong; Cai, Hui; Cai, Qiuyin; Cheng, Jiarong; Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with circulating levels of adiponectin and leptin and endometrial cancer risk. Little is known about whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes that encode adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1), adiponectin receptor 2 (ADIPOR2), and leptin receptor (LEPR) are associated with endometrial cancer. Methods We selected 87 tagging SNPs to capture common genetic variants in these five genes. These SNPs were evaluated in 1,028 endometrial cancer cases and 1,932 community controls recruited from Chinese women. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results Three of the 10 SNPs evaluated in the ADIPOQ gene were significantly associated with reduced cancer risk. The OR for women homozygous for the minor allele (A/A) for rs3774262 was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.48-0.97) compared with women homozygous for the major allele (G/G). Similar results were found for SNPs rs1063539 and rs12629945 in ADIPOQ, which were in linkage disequilibrium with rs3774262. These associations became non-significant after Bonferroni correction was applied. Controls with the minor allele A at rs3774262 had lower weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, and BMI than controls with the major allele G (all P<0.05). Women homozygous for the minor allele (T/T) of rs2071045 in the LEP gene also had significantly lower risk (OR=0.70 (0.54-0.90)) than women homozygous for the major allele (C/C). No other SNPs in the LEP, ADIPOR1, ADIPOR2, or LEPR genes were found to be associated with cancer risk. Conclusions Although a chance finding cannot be ruled out, the consistency of findings for gene-endometrial cancer risk and gene-obesity measurements suggests that genetic polymorphisms in the ADIPOQ genes may play a role in endometrial cancer development. PMID:22038736

  19. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer: Addressing the Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise Bruun; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis....... However, integration of heterogeneous measurements of biological variation is a non-trivial exercise due to the diversity of the human genome and the variety of output data formats and genome coverage obtained from the commonly used molecular platforms. This review article will provide an introduction...... to integration strategies used for analyzing genetic risk factors for cancer. We critically examine the ability of these strategies to handle the complexity of the human genome and also accommodate information about the biological and functional interactions between the elements that have been measured...

  20. Genetic counselling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: the gent(le) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, M; Poppe, B; Delvaux, I; Mortier, G; Claes, K; Messiaen, L; De Paepe, A

    1999-10-01

    The counselling experience with 50 Flemish families in whom mutation analysis of the total coding region of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene has been initiated, is presented. Genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility is offered by a multidisciplinary team. During the counselling sessions, special attention is given to comprehensible and emotionally acceptable communication of genetic information and to the psychosocial evaluation of the counselee. The limitations of molecular testing and the controversy surrounding cancer prevention strategies are also discussed. The overall acceptance of mutation testing is high. Some of the problems encountered are inaccuracy of the reported family history, poor retrieval of the medical records of affected family members and the reluctance of many patients to inform their relatives about the possibility of being tested.